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Encyclopedia > Titus Oates
Titus Oates.
Titus Oates.

Titus Oates (September 15, 1649July 12/13, 1705) was a 17th century perjurer who fabricated a fraudulent Catholic plot to kill King Charles II of England. Download high resolution version (800x1001, 106 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (800x1001, 106 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Captain Lawrence Edward Grace Oates (March 17, 1880 – March 17, 1912) was a British Antarctic explorer. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 30 - King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland is beheaded. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Perjury is the act of lying or making verifiably false statements on a material matter under oath or affirmation in a court of law or in any of various sworn statements in writing. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ...

Contents

Early life

Titus Oates was born in Oakham into a family of Baptist clergymen. He was educated at Merchant Taylors' School, Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, and St John's College, Cambridge (he was kicked out of Cambridge before taking his degree)[1], and became an Anglican priest but was dismissed due to "drunken blasphemy" and allegations of sodomy. Arms of Rutland County Council Oakham is the county town of Rutland, England. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... For MTS Crosby, see Merchant Taylors School, Crosby. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348, refounded 1557 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Sir Christopher Hum Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge is a... College name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto Souvent me Souvient (Latin: I often remember) Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist Established 1511 Location St. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... For the black metal band, see Blasphemy (band). ... François Elluin, Sodomites provoking the wrath of God, from Le pot pourri de Loth (1781). ...


A few months later, he became a curate and Vicar of the parish of Bobbing in Kent. From here he was dismissed for theft, drunkenness, and alleged sodomy. From the Latin curatus (compare Curator), a curate is a person who is invested with the care, or cure (cura), of souls of a parish. ... In the broadest sense, a vicar (from the Latin vicarius) is anyone acting as a substitute or agent for a superior (compare vicarious). In this sense, the title is comparable to lieutenant. ... Bobbing is a village and civil parish in the Swale district of Kent, England, about a mile north-west of Sittingbourne, and forming part of its urban area. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... A young waif steals a pair of boots “Stealing” redirects here. ... The Drunkenness of Noah by Giovanni Bellini Drunkenness is the state of being intoxicated by consumption of alcohol to a degree that mental and physical facilities are noticeably impaired. ...


Royal Navy

In 1677 he got himself appointed as a chaplain of the ship Adventurer in the English navy. He was soon accused of buggery (i.e., sodomy, which was a capital offence in England at the time) and spared only because of his clergyman's status. Oates fled and temporarily joined the Jesuits. 1677 (MDCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... A chaplain in the 45th Infantry Division leads a religious service in an unknown location during World War II. US Navy Chaplain Kenneth Medve conducts Catholic Mass onboard the Ronald Reagan (2006) A chaplain is typically a priest, ordained deacon or other member of the clergy serving a group of... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... // The Buggery Act of 1534 (25 Hen. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ...


Jesuits

Oates was involved with the Jesuit houses of St. Omer (in France) and the Royal English College at Valladolid, Spain (like many diocesan seminaries of the day, this was a Jesuit-run institution). Later he claimed that he had pretended to become a Catholic to learn about the secrets of the Jesuits and that, before leaving, he had heard about a planned Jesuit meeting in London. He later also claimed he had become a Catholic doctor of Divinity. When he returned to London he befriended the rabid anti-Catholic clergyman Israel Tonge. The College of St. ... For the city in Mexico, see Valladolid, Yucatán. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Israel Tonge (also referred to as Ezerel or Ezreel Tongue) (11 November 1621 – 1680) was an English divine and an ally of Titus Oates in the Popish plot. ...


The Popish Plot

In August, 1678 King Charles was warned of plots against his life, first by Christopher Kirkby, and later by Tonge, whose complex claims included the Jesuits, the English Catholics and King Louis XIV of France. The king was unimpressed but made the mistake of handing the matter over to the anti-Catholic Earl of Danby, who was more willing to listen and who was introduced by Tonge to Oates. Louis XIV redirects here. ... Thomas Osborne, 1st Duke of Leeds (February 20, 1631 - July 26, 1712), English statesman, commonly known also by his earlier title of Earl of Danby, served in a variety of offices under Kings Charles II and William III of England. ...


On September 6, 1678 Oates and Tonge approached Sir Edmund Berry Godfrey, an Anglican magistrate. Oates claimed he had a proof of a Catholic plot to assassinate the King and replace him with his Catholic brother, James, the Duke of York (future James II). Then all the leading Protestants would be killed. is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events August 10 - Treaty of Nijmegen ends the Dutch War. ... Sir Edmund Berry Godfrey (23 December 1621 - 12 October 1678) was an English magistrate whose mysterious death caused anti-Catholic uproar in England. ... James II (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[1] became King of England, King of Scots,[2] and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685. ...


The King's Council interrogated Oates. On September 28 he made 43 allegations against various members of Catholic religious orders — including 541 Jesuits — and numerous Catholic nobles. He accused Sir George Wakeman, the queen's physician, and Edward Coleman, the secretary to the Duchess of York (Mary of Modena), of planning to assassinate the king. Although Oates probably selected the names randomly or with the help of the Earl of Danby, Coleman was found to have corresponded with a French Jesuit, which condemned him. Wakeman was later acquitted. is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A Taoist monk playing an instrument. ... Sir George Wakeman was a physician to Catherine of Braganza, Consort of King Charles II of England. ... Sarah, Duchess of York (born 15 October 1959) is the former wife of Prince Andrew, Duke of York. ... Mary of Modena (October 5, 1658 – May 7, 1718) was the queen consort of King James II of England. ...


Others Oates accused included Dr William Fogarty, Archbishop Peter Talbot of Dublin, Samuel Pepys, and Lord Belasyse. With the help of the Earl of Danby the list grew to 81 accusations. Oates was given a squad of soldiers and he began to round up Jesuits, including those who had helped him in the past. Peter Talbot, (1620-1680), was the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Dublin from 1669 to his death. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... Samuel Pepys, FRS (23 February 1633 – 26 May 1703) was an English naval administrator and Member of Parliament, who is now most famous for his diary. ... John Belasyse, 1st Baron Belasyse (24 June 1614- 10 September 1689) was an English nobleman, soldier and MP, notable for his role during and after the English Civil War. ...


The Lord Chief Justice, Sir William Scroggs, began a trial against the "Popish Plot". Edward Coleman was sentenced to death on December 3, 1678 for treason and was hanged, drawn and quartered. The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales is the second-highest judge of the Courts of England and Wales, after the Lord Chancellor, and the presiding judge of Criminal Division of the Court of Appeal, and of the Queens Bench Division of the High Court. ... Sir William Scroggs (c. ... The Popish Plot was an alleged Catholic conspiracy. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events August 10 - Treaty of Nijmegen ends the Dutch War. ...


On October 12, Sir Edmund Berry Godfrey, the Anglican magistrate, disappeared for five days and then was found dead in Primrose Hill. He had been strangled and run through with his own sword. Oates exploited this incident to launch a public campaign against the "Papists" and spread a rumor that the murder had been the work of the Jesuits. King Charles heard about the unrest, returned to London and summoned Parliament. is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... , Primrose Hill is a hill located on the north side of Regents Park in north London, and also the name for the surrounding district. ... Papist is a term, usually disparaging, referring to a member of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


King Charles still did not believe in Titus's accusations. However, Parliament and public opinion forced him to order an investigation. The king's opponents, however, who disliked his "Catholic" court and his Catholic wife Catherine of Braganza, exploited the situation. One of the most prominent such opponents was Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury. Catherine of Braganza (November 25, 1638 – November 30, 1705) (Catherine Henrietta, Portuguese: Catarina Henriqueta de Bragança), was the queen consort of King Charles II of England. ... Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury ( July 22, 1621– January 21, 1683) was a prominent English politician of the Interregnum and during the reign of King Charles II. Cooper, born in Dorset County, suffered the death of both his parents at a young age and was raised by...


Hysteria continued. Noblewomen carried firearms if they had to venture outdoors at night. Houses were searched for hidden guns, mostly without any significant result. Some Catholic widows tried to ensure their safety by marrying Anglican widowers. The House of Commons was searched — without result — in the expectation of a second Gunpowder Plot being perpetrated. The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... A contemporary sketch of the conspirators. ...


Oates became more daring and accused five Catholic lords (including Arundel and Bellasyse) for involvement of the plot. The King reputedly laughed at the accusations but the Earl of Shaftesbury had the lords arrested and sent to the Tower. Then Shaftesbury publicly demanded that the King's brother, James, should be excluded from the royal succession. On November 5, 1678, people burned effigies of the Pope instead of those of Guy Fawkes. At the end of the year, the parliament passed a bill, a second Test Act, excluding Catholics from membership of both Houses (a law not repealed until 1829). This article is about the town in England. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... A hereditary monarchy is the most common style of monarchy and is the form that is used by almost all of the worlds existing monarchies. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events August 10 - Treaty of Nijmegen ends the Dutch War. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... Guy Fawkes (13 April 1570 – 31 January 1606), was a member of a group of English Roman Catholics who attempted to carry out the Gunpowder Plot, an attempt to blow up the Houses of Parliament and kill King James I of England, to destroy Protestant rule by killing the Protestant... The several Test Acts were a series of English penal laws that imposed various civil disabilities on Roman Catholics and Nonconformists. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


On November 24, Oates claimed the Queen was working with the King's physician to poison him and enlisted the aid of "Captain" William Bedloe, who was ready to say anything for money. The King personally interrogated Oates, caught him out in a number of inaccuracies and lies, and ordered his arrest. However, a couple days later, Parliament forced Oates's release with the threat of constitutional crisis. is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Bedloe (April 20, 1650 - August 20, 1680), English informer, was born at Chepstow. ...


Anyone even suspected of being Catholic was driven out of London and forbidden to return within ten miles of the city. Silk armour was produced for fashionable ladies and gentlemen. There was also a playing card set with key figures of the scandal as face cards. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Oates, in turn, received a state apartment in Whitehall and an annual allowance of £1,200. He was not ready to stop, however, and soon presented new allegations. He claimed assassins intended to shoot the king with silver bullets so the wound would not heal. The public invented their own stories, including a tale that the sound of digging had been heard near the House of Commons and rumours of a French invasion in the Isle of Purbeck. The "purge" spread to the countryside. Whitehall, London, looking south towards the Houses of Parliament. ... Corfe Castle The Isle of Purbeck, not a true island but a peninsula, is in the county of Dorset, England. ...


Oates was heaped with praise. He asked the College of Arms to check his lineage and produce a coat of arms for him. They gave him the arms of a family that had died out. There were even rumours that Oates was to be married to one of the Earl of Shaftesbury's daughters. The entrance of the College of Arms. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


However, public opinion began to turn against Oates. Having had at least 15 probably-innocent men executed, the last Oliver Plunkett, Archbishop of Armagh, executed on July 1, 1681, Judge Scroggs began to declare people innocent. The King began to devise countermeasures. St. ... Primate of All Ireland is the title held by the Archbishop of Armagh. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ...


On August 31, 1681, Oates was told to leave his apartments in Whitehall, but remained undeterred and denounced the King, the Duke of York, and just about anyone he regarded as an opponent. He was arrested for sedition, sentenced to a fine of £100,000 and thrown into prison. is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... Sedition is a term of law which refers to covert conduct, such as speech and organization, that is deemed by the legal authority as tending toward insurrection against the established order. ...

Engraving of a pilloried Titus Oates
Engraving of a pilloried Titus Oates

When James II acceded to the throne, he had a score to settle. He had Oates retried and sentenced for perjury to annual pillory, loss of clerical dress, and imprisonment for life. Oates was taken out of his cell wearing a hat with the text "Titus Oates, convicted upon full evidence of two horrid perjuries" and put into the pillory at the gate of Westminster Hall where passers-by pelted him with eggs. The next day he was pilloried in London and a third day was stripped, tied to a cart, and whipped from Aldgate to Newgate. The next day, the whipping resumed. The judge was Judge Jeffreys who stated that Oates was a "Shame to mankind". Image File history File links Download high resolution version (889x1310, 974 KB) Image scanned from Robert Chambers Book of Days, 1st edition. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (889x1310, 974 KB) Image scanned from Robert Chambers Book of Days, 1st edition. ... Gothic pillory (early 16th century) in Schwäbisch Hall, Germany The pillory was a device used in punishment by public humiliation and often additional, sometimes lethal, physical abuse. ... Clock Tower and New Palace Yard from the west The Palace of Westminster, on the banks of the River Thames in Westminster, London, is the home of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, which form the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Aldgate was a gateway through London Wall to the City of London, located by the East End. ... Newgate was a gate in the west of London Wall round the City of London. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... George Jeffreys, 1st Baron Jeffreys (1648-1689), Baron Wem, better known as Hanging Judge Jeffreys, became notorious during the reign of King James II, rising to the position of Lord Chancellor. ...


Oates spent the next three years in prison. At the accession of William of Orange and Mary in 1688, he was pardoned and granted a pension of £5 a week but his reputation did not significantly recover. The pension was later suspended, but in 1698 was restored and increased to £300 a year. Titus Oates died on July 12 or July 13, 1705. William III of England, II of Scotland and III of Orange (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Kensington Palace, 8 March 1702) was a Dutch aristocrat, the Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28 June 1672, King of England and King... Mary II (30 April 1662–28 December 1694) reigned as Queen of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and as Queen of Scots (as Mary II of Scotland) from 11 April 1689 until her death. ... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ...


Trivia

  • The Titus Oates Society was formed at Gonville & Caius College in the 1960s with Peter Tranchell as its patron. Oates was commemorated at the society's dinners (known as exceedings) which were notorious for their debauched campery. In the mid-1990s, the society was disbanded by order of the college council and banned from Caius in perpetuity.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC History is a magazine devoted to history enthusiasts of all levels of knowledge and interest. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... A list of the worst Britons in history, according to ten English historians, was compiled by the BBC History Magazine in late 2005. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto - Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348 Sister College Brasenose College Master Neil McKendrick (Lent 2006: Sir Christopher Hum) Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Graduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, generally... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Peter Andrew Tranchell (14 July 1922–14 September 1993) was a British composer. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...

References

  1. ^ "Are these the 10 worst Britons?", The Independent, September 14, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-09-14. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Titus Oates - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1394 words)
Titus Oates was born in Oakham into a family of Baptist clergymen.
Oates was involved with the Jesuit houses of St.
Oates was taken out of his cell wearing a hat with the text "Titus Oates, convicted upon full evidence of two horrid perjuries" and put into the pillory at the gate of Westminster Hall where passers-by pelted him with eggs.
Titus Oates - definition of Titus Oates in Encyclopedia (1296 words)
Titus Oates (September 15, 1649 - July 12/13, 1705) was a 17th century perjurer who fabricated a fraudulent Catholic plot to kill King Charles II of England.
Titus Oates was born in Oakham into a family of Baptist clergyman.
Oates was involved with the Jesuit houses of Valladolid and St.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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