FACTOID # 23: Wisconsin has more metal fabricators per capita than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Titus" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Titus
Titus
Emperor of the Roman Empire
Colossal head of Titus (Glyptothek)
Reign 24 June 79
13 September 81
Full name Titus Flavius
Vespasianus Augustus
Born 30 December 39(39-12-30)
Rome
Died 13 September 81 (aged 41)
Rome
Buried Rome
Predecessor Vespasian
Successor Domitian
Consort to Arrecina Tertulla (64-65)
Marcia Furnilla (65)
Issue Julia Flavia
Dynasty Flavian
Father Vespasian
Mother Domitilla

Titus Flavius Vespasianus, also known as Titus (30 December 3913 September 81), was a Roman Emperor, who ruled from the death of his father Vespasian in 79 until his own death in 81. Titus was the second emperor of the Flavian dynasty, and upon his death, he was succeeded by his younger brother Domitian. The name Titus when used alone, can refer to several different historical figures and fictional(ized) characters. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 503 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1684 × 2008 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Glyptothek is a museum in Munich, Germany, which was commissioned by the Bavarian King Ludwig I to house his collection of Greek and Roman sculptures (hence Glypto-, from the Greek root glyphein, to carve). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 79. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 0s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s Years: 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 Events Domitian succeeds his brother Titus Flavius as emperor of the Roman Empire. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Roman Empire Tigellinus, minister and favorite of the later Roman emperor Nero, is banished for adultery with Caligulas sisters. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 0s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s Years: 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 Events Domitian succeeds his brother Titus Flavius as emperor of the Roman Empire. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (born November 17, 9, died June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... Titus Flavius Domitianus (24 October 51 – 18 September 96), commonly known as Domitian, was a Roman Emperor of the gens Flavia. ... Julia Flavia (17 September 64 - 91) was the only child to the Emperor Titus from his second marriage to the well-connected Marcia Furnilla. ... The Flavian dynasty was a series of three Roman Emperors who ruled from 69, the Year of the Four Emperors, to 96, when the last member was assassinated. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (born November 17, 9, died June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... Flavia Domitilla Major (Major, Latin for the elder) Flavia Domitilla the Elder or Domitilla the Elder (died before 69) was the wife of the Roman Emperor Vespasian. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Roman Empire Tigellinus, minister and favorite of the later Roman emperor Nero, is banished for adultery with Caligulas sisters. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 0s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s Years: 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 Events Domitian succeeds his brother Titus Flavius as emperor of the Roman Empire. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (born November 17, 9, died June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... This article is about the year 79. ... The Flavian dynasty was a series of three Roman Emperors who ruled from 69, the Year of the Four Emperors, to 96, when the last member was assassinated. ... Titus Flavius Domitianus (24 October 51 – 18 September 96), commonly known as Domitian, was a Roman Emperor of the gens Flavia. ...


Prior to becoming emperor, Titus served as a general under his father during the First Jewish-Roman War from 67 until 69, and ultimately led the Roman army to victory during the Siege of Jerusalem in 70, which resulted in the complete destruction of the Second Temple and the looting of the city. For his achievement Titus was bestowed with a triumph, the Arch of Titus which commemorates this victory until this day. This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Iudaea Province Commanders Vespasian, Titus Simon Bar-Giora, Yohanan mi-Gush Halav (John of Gischala), Eleazar ben Simon Strength 70,000? 1,100,000? Casualties Unknown 1,100,000? (majority Jewish civilian casualties) Jewish-Roman wars First War – Kitos War – Bar Kokhba revolt The first... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s - 60s - 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Years: 62 63 64 65 66 - 67 - 68 69 70 71 72 Events Linus succeeds Saint Peter as pope. ... For other uses, see 69 (disambiguation). ... The Roman army was a set of land-based military forces employed by the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and later Roman Empire as part of the Roman military. ... Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Judea Commanders Titus Flavius Vespasianus Simon Bar-Giora Yohanan mi-Gush Halav (John of Gischala) Eleazar ben Simon Strength 70,000 men 13,000 men, split among three factions Casualties Unknown 60,000–1,100,000 (mass civilian casualties) The Siege of Jerusalem in the... This article is about the year 70. ... A stone (2. ... A Roman Triumph was a civil ceremony and religious rite of ancient Rome, held to publicly honour the military commander (dux) of a notably successful foreign war or campaign and to display the glories of Roman victory. ... The Arch of Titus This article deals with the main arch of Titus on the Via Sacra. ...


Upon the death of his father in 79, Titus acceded to the throne as emperor of the Roman Empire. Although his reign was brief, he was considered a good emperor by Suetonius and other contemporary historians; in this role he is best known for his public building program in Rome and for his generosity in relieving the suffering caused by two disasters, the Mount Vesuvius eruption of 79 and the fire of Rome of 80. For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... This article is about the mountain in Italy. ... The Great Fire of Rome erupted on the night of 18 July, in the year 64, among the shops clustered around the Circus Maximus. ... Events By place Roman Empire The Emperor Titus inaugurates the Flavian Amphitheatre with 100 days of games. ...

Contents

Early life

Roman imperial dynasties
Flavian dynasty
Vespasian
Children
   Titus
   Domitian
   Domitilla
Titus
Children
   Julia Flavia
Domitian
Children
   1 son, 1 daughter, both died young

Titus was born in Rome, probably on December 30 39 AD,[1] as the eldest son of Vespasian (prior to his having been acclaimed Emperor) and Domitilla the Elder. He had one older sister, Domitilla (b. 39 AD) and one younger brother Titus Flavius Domitianus (b. 51 AD). The Flavians were a family of the equestrian order who rose to prominence under the rule of Claudius.[2] What little is known of Titus' early life has been handed down to us by Suetonius, who records that he was brought up at the imperial court in the company of Britannicus,[3] the son of Claudius, who would be murdered by Nero in 55. The story was even told that Titus was reclining next to Britannicus, the night he was murdered, and sipped of the poison that was handed to him.[3] Further details on his education are scarce, but it seems he showed early promise in the military arts and was a skilled poet and orator both in Greek and Latin.[4] The Flavian dynasty was a series of three Roman Emperors who ruled from 69, the Year of the Four Emperors, to 96, when the last member was assassinated. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (born November 17, 9, died June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... Titus Flavius Domitianus (24 October 51 – 18 September 96), commonly known as Domitian, was a Roman Emperor of the gens Flavia. ... Denarius depicting Flavia Domitilla the Younger Another denarius depicting Flavia Domitilla the Younger Flavia Domitilla the Younger or Flavia Domitilla Minor (Minor, Latin for the younger) was the only daughter to future Roman Emperor Vespasian by his wife Domitilla the Elder. ... Julia Flavia (17 September 64 - 91) was the only child to the Emperor Titus from his second marriage to the well-connected Marcia Furnilla. ... Titus Flavius Domitianus (24 October 51 – 18 September 96), commonly known as Domitian, was a Roman Emperor of the gens Flavia. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Roman Empire Tigellinus, minister and favorite of the later Roman emperor Nero, is banished for adultery with Caligulas sisters. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (born November 17, 9, died June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... Flavia Domitilla Major (Major, Latin for the elder) Flavia Domitilla the Elder or Domitilla the Elder (died before 69) was the wife of the Roman Emperor Vespasian. ... Denarius depicting Flavia Domitilla the Younger Another denarius depicting Flavia Domitilla the Younger Flavia Domitilla the Younger or Flavia Domitilla Minor (Minor, Latin for the younger) was the only daughter to future Roman Emperor Vespasian by his wife Domitilla the Elder. ... Events Roman Empire Tigellinus, minister and favorite of the later Roman emperor Nero, is banished for adultery with Caligulas sisters. ... Titus Flavius Domitianus (24 October 51 – 18 September 96), commonly known as Domitian, was a Roman Emperor of the gens Flavia. ... This article is about the year 51. ... An equestrian (Latin eques, plural equites - also known as a vir egregius, lit. ... For other persons named Claudius, see Claudius (disambiguation). ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... Britannicus (41 - 55 A.D.) was the son of the Roman emperor Claudius and his third wife Messalina. ... For other persons named Claudius, see Claudius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nero (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year 55. ... The skull and crossbones symbol (Jolly Roger) traditionally used to label a poisonous substance. ... Military science concerns itself with the study of the diverse technical, psychological, and practical phenomena that encompass the events that make up warfare, especially armed combat. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


Military career

From c. 57 to 59 he was a military tribune in Germania. He also served in Britannia, perhaps arriving c. 60 with reinforcements needed after the revolt of Boudica. In c. 63 he returned to Rome and married Arrecina Tertulla, daughter of a former Prefect of the Praetorian Guard, who died c. 65.[5] Titus then took a new wife of a much more distinguished family, Marcia Furnilla. However, Marcia's family was closely linked to the opposition to Nero. Her uncle Barea Soranus and his daughter Servilia were among those who perished after the failed Pisonian conspiracy of 65.[6] Some modern historians theorize that Titus divorced his wife because of her family's connection to the conspiracy.[7] He never re-married. For other uses, see number 57. ... For other uses, see number 59. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law Tribune (from the Latin: tribunus; Greek form tribounos) was a title shared by 2-3 elected magistracies and other governmental and/or (para)military offices of the Roman Republic and Empire. ... Map of the Roman Empire and the free Germania, Magna Germania, in the early 2nd century For other uses, see Germania (disambiguation). ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Events Boudicca sacks London (approximate date). ... Boudica and Her Daughters near Westminster Pier, London, commissioned by Prince Albert and executed by Thomas Thornycroft Boudica (also spelt Boudicca, formerly better known as Boadicea) (d. ... [edit] Events [edit] By place [edit] Roman Empire Vespasian becomes governor of Africa Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo was restored to command after the Roman debacle at the Battle of Rhandeia, he invaded Armenia and defeated Tiridates II, who accepted Roman sovereignty, Parthia withdrew from the war. ... Praetorian prefect (Latin Praefectus praetorio) was the constant title of a high office in the Roman state that changed fundamentally in nature. ... Headline text Events By place Roman Empire Gaius Calpurnius Piso conspires against Roman emperor Nero. ... For other uses, see Nero (disambiguation). ... Barea Soranus, Roman senator, lived in the reign of Nero. ... Servilia, daughter of Barea Soranus. ... The conspiracy of Gaius Calpurnius Piso (65 CE) represented one of the major turning points in the reign of Nero (54-68 CE). ... Headline text Events By place Roman Empire Gaius Calpurnius Piso conspires against Roman emperor Nero. ...


Titus appears to have had multiple daughters,[8] at least one of them by Marcia Furnilla.[9] The only one known to have survived to adulthood was Julia Flavia, perhaps Titus' child by Arrecina, whose mother was also named Julia.[10] During this period Titus also practised law and attained the rank of quaestor.[9] Julia Flavia (17 September 64 - 91) was the only child to the Emperor Titus from his second marriage to the well-connected Marcia Furnilla. ... Quaestores were elected officials of the Roman Republic who supervised the treasury and financial affairs of the state, its armies and its officers. ...


Judaean campaigns

Further information: First Jewish-Roman War

In 66 the Jews of the Judaea Province revolted against the Roman Empire. Cestius Gallus, the legate of Syria, was defeated at the battle of Beth-Horon and forced to retreat from Jerusalem.[11] The pro-Roman king Agrippa II and his sister Berenice fled the city to Galilee where they later gave themselves up to the Romans. Nero appointed Vespasian to put down the rebellion, who was dispatched to the region at once with the fifth and tenth legions.[12] He was later joined by Titus at Ptolemais, bringing with him the fifteenth legion.[13] With a strength of 60,000 professional soldiers, the Romans prepared to sweep across Galilee and march on Jerusalem.[13] Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Iudaea Province Commanders Vespasian, Titus Simon Bar-Giora, Yohanan mi-Gush Halav (John of Gischala), Eleazar ben Simon Strength 70,000? 1,100,000? Casualties Unknown 1,100,000? (majority Jewish civilian casualties) Jewish-Roman wars First War – Kitos War – Bar Kokhba revolt The first... This article is about the year 66. ... Iudaea Province in the 1st century Iudaea was a Roman province that extended over Judaea (Palestine). ... Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Iudaea Province Commanders Vespasian, Titus Simon Bar-Giora, Yohanan mi-Gush Halav (John of Gischala), Eleazar ben Simon Strength 70,000? 1,100,000? Casualties Unknown 1,100,000? (majority Jewish civilian casualties) Jewish-Roman wars First War – Kitos War – Bar Kokhba revolt The first... Gaius Cestius Gallus (d. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... // Intro Beth-horon (Beth-choron (other Hebrew forms occur); Bethoron, probably the place of the hollow; compare Hauran, the hollow) The Ancient Towns The name of two towns, Beth-horon the Upper (Joshua 16:5) and Beth-horon the Lower (Joshua 16:3), said to have been built (1 Chronicles... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Agrippa II (AD 27–100), son of Agrippa I, and like him originally named Marcus Julius Agrippa. ... Berenice (b. ... Galilee (Arabic al-jaleel الجليل, Hebrew hagalil הגליל), meaning circuit, is a large area overlapping with much of the North District of Israel. ... This coin was issued by Roman emperor Gallienus to celebrate the V Macedonica, whose symbol, the eagle, is crowned of wrath by Victoria. ... Legio X Fretensis (Latin: Tenth legion of the sea strait) was a Roman legion levied by Augustus in 41/40 BC to fight during the period of civil war that started the dissolution of the Roman Republic. ... “Akko” redirects here. ... Legio XV Apollinaris (devoted to Apollo) was a Roman legion. ...

Titus' triumph after the First Jewish-Roman War was celebrated with the Arch of Titus in Rome, which shows the treasures taken from the Temple in Jerusalem, including the Menorah.
Titus' triumph after the First Jewish-Roman War was celebrated with the Arch of Titus in Rome, which shows the treasures taken from the Temple in Jerusalem, including the Menorah.

The history of the war was covered in dramatic detail by the Roman-Jewish historian Josephus in his work The Wars of the Jews. Josephus served as a commander in the city of Jotapata when the Roman army invaded Galilee in 67. After an exhausting siege which lasted 47 days, the city fell, with an estimated 40,000 killed and the remaining Jewish resistance committing suicide.[14] Josephus himself surrendered to Vespasian, became a prisoner and provided the Romans with intelligence on the ongoing revolt.[15] By 68, the entire coast and the north of Judaea were subjugated by the Roman army, with decisive victories won at Taricheae and Gamala, where Titus distinguished himself as a skilled general.[9][16] sack of jerusalem on inside wall ot arch of titus in rome, italy This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... sack of jerusalem on inside wall ot arch of titus in rome, italy This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... A Roman Triumph was a civil ceremony and religious rite of ancient Rome, held to publicly honour the military commander (dux) of a notably successful foreign war or campaign and to display the glories of Roman victory. ... Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Iudaea Province Commanders Vespasian, Titus Simon Bar-Giora, Yohanan mi-Gush Halav (John of Gischala), Eleazar ben Simon Strength 70,000? 1,100,000? Casualties Unknown 1,100,000? (majority Jewish civilian casualties) Jewish-Roman wars First War – Kitos War – Bar Kokhba revolt The first... The Arch of Titus This article deals with the main arch of Titus on the Via Sacra. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ... A coin issued by Mattathias Antigonus, c. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... Panoramic view from peak of Tel Yodfat. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s - 60s - 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Years: 62 63 64 65 66 - 67 - 68 69 70 71 72 Events Linus succeeds Saint Peter as pope. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 1st century BCE - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s - 60s - 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Years: 63 64 65 66 67 - 68 - 69 70 71 72 73 Events June 9 - Roman Emperor Nero commits suicide. ... Magdala (tower) was a small village in Galilee, which seems to have been the birthplace of Mary Magdalene, or Mary of Magdala, in the Christian New Testament. ... The remains of the city of Gamala lies on the Golan Hights. ...


Year of the Four Emperors

The last and most significant fortress of Jewish resistance was Jerusalem. However the campaign came to a sudden halt when news arrived of Nero's death.[17] Almost simultaneously, the Roman Senate had declared Galba, then governor of Hispania, as Emperor of Rome. Vespasian decided to await further orders, and sent Titus to greet the new princeps.[18] Before reaching Italy, Titus learnt that Galba had been murdered and replaced by Otho, governor of Lusitania, and that Vitellius and his armies in Germania were preparing to march on the capital, intent on overthrowing Otho. Not wanting to risk being taken hostage by one side or the other, he abandoned the journey to Rome and rejoined his father in Judaea.[19] Meanwhile, Otho was defeated in the First Battle of Bedriacum and committed suicide.[20] When the news spread across the armies in Judaea and Ægyptus, they took matters into their own hands and declared Vespasian emperor on July 1, 69.[21] Vespasian accepted, and through negotiations by Titus joined forces with Gaius Licinius Mucianus, governor of Syria.[22] A strong force drawn from the Judaean and Syrian legions marched on Rome under the command of Mucianus, while Vespasian himself travelled to Alexandria, leaving Titus in charge to end the Jewish rebellion.[23][24] By the end of 69 the forces of Vitellius had been beaten, and Vespasian was officially declared emperor by the senate on December 21, thus ending the Year of the Four Emperors.[25] “Zealot” redirects here. ... The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. ... Servius Sulpicius Galba (December 24, 3 BC – January 15, 69) was Roman Emperor from June 8, 68 until his death. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Iberian Peninsula. ... The Latin word Princeps (plural: principes) means the first. This article is devoted to a number of specific historical meanings the word took, by far the most important of which follows first. ... Emperor Otho. ... In red is the province of Lusitania within the Roman Empire, 120 AD Lusitania was an ancient Roman province approximately including current Portugal, except for the area between the rivers Douro and Minho (part of Hispania Tarraconensis), and part of modern day western Spain, the present autonomous communities of Extremadura... Vitellius, Museo Nazionale della Civiltà Romana, Rome Aulus Vitellius Germanicus (September 24, 15–December 22, 69) was Roman Emperor from April 17 69 to December 22 of the same year, one of the emperors in the Year of the four emperors. He was the son of Lucius Vitellius, who had... Map of the Roman Empire and the free Germania, Magna Germania, in the early 2nd century For other uses, see Germania (disambiguation). ... The Battle of Bedriacum refers to two battles fought during the Year of the four emperors (69) near the village of Bedriacum (now Calvatone), about twenty miles from the town of Cremona in northern Italy. ... The Roman Empire 120, with Aegyptus province highlighted See Egypt Province for the province of the Ottoman Empire. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 69 (disambiguation). ... Gaius Licinius Mucianus (fl. ... Nickname: Alexandria on the map of Egypt Map of Alexandria Coordinates: , Country Egypt Founded 334 BC Government  - Governor Adel Labib Population (2001)  - City 3,500,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Twin Cities  - Baltimore  United States  - Cleveland  United States  - ConstanÅ£a  Romania  - Durban  South Africa... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Year of the Four Emperors was a year in the history of the Roman Empire, 69, in which four emperors ruled in a remarkable succession. ...


Siege of Jerusalem

Destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem, Francesco Hayez, oil on canvas, 1867. Depicting the destruction and looting of the Second Temple by the Roman army.
Destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem, Francesco Hayez, oil on canvas, 1867. Depicting the destruction and looting of the Second Temple by the Roman army.

Meanwhile the Jews had become embroiled in a civil conflict of their own, splitting the resistance in the city among two factions; the Sicarii led by Simon Bar Giora, and the Zealots led by John of Gischala.[26] Titus seized the opportunity to begin the assault on Jerusalem. The Roman army was joined by the twelfth legion, which was previously defeated under Cestius Gallus, and from Alexandria Vespasian sent Tiberius Julius Alexander, governor of Ægyptus, to act as Titus' second in command.[27] Titus surrounded the city, with three legions (Vth, XIIth and XVth) on the western side and one (Xth) on the Mount of Olives to the east. He put pressure on the food and water supplies of the inhabitants by allowing pilgrims to enter the city to celebrate Passover, and then refusing them egress. Jewish raids continuously harassed the Roman army, one of which nearly resulted in Titus being captured by the enemy.[28] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1480, 275 KB) Description: Title: de: Die Zerstörung des Tempels von Jerusalem Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 183 × 252 cm Country of origin: de: Italien Current location (city): de: Venedig Current location (gallery): de: Galleria dArte Moderna... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1480, 275 KB) Description: Title: de: Die Zerstörung des Tempels von Jerusalem Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 183 × 252 cm Country of origin: de: Italien Current location (city): de: Venedig Current location (gallery): de: Galleria dArte Moderna... The Kiss by Francesco Hayez Francesco Hayez (1791-1882) was the leading homosexual artist of Romanticism in mid-19th-century Milan, renowned for his great historical paintings, political allegories and exceptionally fine portraits External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Francesco Hayez More information Categories: ‪Artist stubs&#x202c... A civil war is a war in which parties within the same culture, society or nationality fight against each other for the control of political power. ... Sicarii (Latin plural of Sicarius dagger- or later contract- killer) is a term applied, in the decades immediately preceding the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 CE, to the Jewish Zealots, (or insurgents) who attempted to expel the Romans and their partisans from Judea: —Josephus, Jewish Antiquities (xx. ... Simon Bar Giora (alternatively known as Simeon Bar Giora or Simon Ben Giora) was a leader of the Sicarii faction during the First Jewish-Roman War in the 1st century Judea. ... Zealotry denotes zeal in excess, referring to cases where activism and ambition in relation to an ideology have become excessive to the point of being harmful to others, oneself, and ones own cause. ... John of Giscala (aka: Johannes ben Levi; birth date unknown; death date after 70) was one of the Jewish leaders in the First Jewish-Roman War. ... Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Judea Commanders Titus Flavius Vespasianus Simon Bar-Giora Yohanan mi-Gush Halav (John of Gischala) Eleazar ben Simon Strength 70,000 men 13,000 men, split among three factions Casualties Unknown 60,000–1,100,000 (mass civilian casualties) The Siege of Jerusalem in the... Legio XII Fulminata, also known as Paterna or Antiqua, was originally levied by Julius Caesar in 58 BC and accompanied him during the Gallic wars until 49 BC. They were stationed in Pharsalus in 48 BC and probably fought in the Battle of Pharsalus. ... Gaius Cestius Gallus (d. ... Tiberius Julius Alexander ( 1st century AD) was a prominent equestrian governor and general of the Roman Empire. ... The Jewish cemetery on the Mount of Olives, overlooking the Old City The Mount of Olives (also Mount Olivet, Hebrew: ‎, Har HaZeitim; Arabic: ‎, Jebel ez-Zeitun, Jebel et-Tur, Mount of the Summit) is a mountain ridge to the east of Jerusalem. ... Monument to pilgrims in Burgos, Spain This article is on religious pilgrims. ... Pasch redirects here. ...


After attempts by Josephus to negotiate a surrender had failed, the first and second walls were quickly breached in a series of Roman attacks.[29] To intimidate the resistance, Titus ordered deserters from the Jewish side to be crucified around the city wall.[30] By this time the Jews had been thoroughly exhausted by famine, and when the weak third wall was breached bitter street fighting ensued.[31] The Romans finally captured the Antonia Fortress and began a frontal assault on the gates of the Temple.[32] According to Josephus, Titus had ordered that the Temple itself should not be destroyed,[33] but while the fighting around the gates continued a soldier hurled a torch inside one of the windows, which quickly set the entire building ablaze.[34] The later Christian chronicler Sulpicius Severus, possibly drawing on a lost portion of Tacitus' Histories, claims that Titus favoured destruction of the Temple.[35] Whatever the case, the Temple was completely demolished, after which Titus' soldiers proclaimed him imperator in honor of the victory.[36] Jerusalem was sacked and much of the population killed or dispersed. Josephus claims that 1,100,000 people were killed during the siege, of which a majority were Jewish.[37] 97,000 were captured and enslaved, including Simon Bar Giora and John of Gischala.[37] Many fled to areas around the Mediterranean. Titus reportedly refused to accept a wreath of victory, as there is "no merit in vanquishing people forsaken by their own God".[38] For other uses of Desertion, see Abandonment. ... Crucifixion is an ancient method of execution, where the condemned is tied or nailed to a large wooden cross and left to hang until dead. ... <nowiki>Insert non-formatted text hereBold text</nowiki>A famine is a social and economic crisis that is commonly accompanied by widespread malnutrition, starvation, epidemic and increased mortality. ... A model of the Antonia Frotress - currently in the Israel Museum. ... A stone (2. ... Saint Sulpicius Severus (born around 360, died between 420 and 425), wrote the earliest biography of Saint Martin of Tours. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Histories (Latin: Historiae) is a book by Tacitus, written c. ... The Latin word imperator was a title originally roughly equivalent to commander during the period of the Roman Republic. ... The Destruction of Jerusalem (specifically, the Second Destruction of Jerusalem) was the culmination of the successful campaign of Titus Flavius against Judea after an unsuccessful attack four years prior by Cestius Gallus. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... A wreath is a ring made of flowers, leaves, and sometimes fruits, used as an ornament, hanging on a wall or door, or resting on a table. ...


Heir to Vespasian

Unable to sail to Italy during the winter, Titus celebrated elaborate games at Caesarea Maritima and Berytus, then travelled to Zeugma on the Euphrates, where he was presented with a crown by Vologases I of Parthia. While visiting Antioch he confirmed the traditional rights of the Jews in that city.[39] On his way to Alexandria, he stopped in Memphis to consecrate the sacred bull Apis. According to Suetonius, this caused consternation; the ceremony required Titus to wear a diadem, which the Romans associated with kingship, and the partisanship of Titus' legions had already led to fears that he might rebel against his father. Titus returned quickly to Rome – hoping, says Suetonius, to allay any suspicions about his conduct.[40] Caesarea Palaestina, also called Caesarea Maritima, a town built by Herod the Great about 25 - 13 BC, lies on the sea-coast of Israel about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa, on the site of a place previously called Pyrgos Stratonos (Strato or Stratons Tower, in Latin Turris Stratonis). ... Central Beirut (2004) Beirut (Arabic: , BayrÅ«t) is the capital, largest city, and chief seaport of Lebanon. ... Zeugma – also Seleucia, Seleuceia, Seleukheia, Seleukeia, Seleukeia Euphrates, and Selevkaya Euphrates – is an ancient city of Commagene; currently located in the Gaziantep Province of Turkey It is a historical settlement which is considered among the four most important settlement areas under the reign of the kingdom of Commagene. ... Surfer Rosa The Euphrates (IPA: /juːˈfreɪtiːz/; Greek: EuphrátÄ“s; Akkadian: Pu-rat-tu; Hebrew: פְּרָת PÄ•rāth; Syriac: Prâth; Arabic: الفرات Al-Furāt; Turkish: Fırat; Kurdish: فرهات, Firhat, Ferhat, Azeri: FÉ™rat) is the western of the two great rivers that define Mesopotamia (the other... Vologases I of Parthia ruled the Parthian Empire (a forerunner of todays Iran) from about 51 to 78. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ... Nickname: Alexandria on the map of Egypt Map of Alexandria Coordinates: , Country Egypt Founded 334 BC Government  - Governor Adel Labib Population (2001)  - City 3,500,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Twin Cities  - Baltimore  United States  - Cleveland  United States  - ConstanÅ£a  Romania  - Durban  South Africa... For other uses, see Memphis. ... In Egyptian mythology, Apis or Hapis (alternatively spelt Hapi-ankh), was a bull-deity worshipped in the Memphis region. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... This article is about a type of crown called a diadem; for alternate meanings, see Diadem. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ...

The Arch of Titus, located on the Via Sacra, just to the south-east of the Forum Romanum in Rome.
The Arch of Titus, located on the Via Sacra, just to the south-east of the Forum Romanum in Rome.

Upon his arrival in the city in 71, Titus was awarded a triumph.[41] Accompanied by Vespasian and Domitian he rode into city, enthusiastically saluted by the Roman populace, and preceded by a lavish parade containing treasures and captives from the war. Josephus describes a procession with large amounts of gold and silver carried along the city, followed by elaborate re-enactments of the war, Jewish prisoners, and finally the treasures taken from the Temple of Jerusalem, including the Menorah and the Pentateuch.[42] Simon Bar Giora was executed in the Forum, after which the procession closed with religious sacrifices at the Temple of Jupiter.[43] The triumphal Arch of Titus, which stands at one entrance to the Forum, memorializes the victory of Titus. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 676 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (750 × 665 pixel, file size: 154 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Description: Arch of Titus, Rome, Arch, Titus, Roman Emperor Date: February 2004 Photographer: Peter Gerstbach License: GNU Descripción: Arco de Tito, Roma, Arco, Tito... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 676 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (750 × 665 pixel, file size: 154 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Description: Arch of Titus, Rome, Arch, Titus, Roman Emperor Date: February 2004 Photographer: Peter Gerstbach License: GNU Descripción: Arco de Tito, Roma, Arco, Tito... The Arch of Titus This article deals with the main arch of Titus on the Via Sacra. ... The Via Sacra (Latin: Sacred Road) is the main street of ancient Rome, leading from the top of the Capitoline Hill, through some of the most important religious sites of the Forum (where it is the widest street), to the Colosseum. ... Part of the Roman Forum. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s - 70s - 80s 90s 100s 110s 120s Years: 66 67 68 69 70 - 71 - 72 73 74 75 76 Events The Romans establish a fortress at York (Eboracum), as a base for their northern forces. ... A Roman Triumph was a civil ceremony and religious rite of ancient Rome, held to publicly honour the military commander (dux) of a notably successful foreign war or campaign and to display the glories of Roman victory. ... A coin issued by Mattathias Antigonus, c. ... Look up Pentateuch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Roman Forum (Forum Romanum) was a central area of ancient Rome in which commerce, business, trading and the administration of justice took place. ... Temple of Jupiter on Capitoline Hill, 6th–1st century BC See Temple of Jupiter for temples to him in other places. ... A triumphal arch is a structure in the shape of a monumental archway, usually built to celebrate a victory in war. ... The Arch of Titus This article deals with the main arch of Titus on the Via Sacra. ...


With Vespasian declared emperor, Titus and his brother Domitian likewise received the title of Caesar from the senate.[44] In addition to sharing tribunician power with his father, Titus held seven consulships during Vespasian's reign[45] and acted as his secretary, appearing in the senate on his behalf.[45] More crucially, he was appointed commander of the Praetorian Guard, ensuring their loyalty to the emperor and further solidifying Vespasian's position as a legitimate ruler.[45] In this capacity he achieved considerable notoriety in Rome for his violent actions, frequently ordering the execution of suspected traitors on the spot.[45] When in 79, a plot by Aulus Caecina Alienus and Eprius Marcellus to overthrow Vespasian was uncovered, Titus invited Alienus to dinner and ordered him to be stabbed before he had even left the room.[45][46] Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law Tribune (from the Latin: tribunus; Greek form tribounos) was a title shared by 2-3 elected magistracies and other governmental and/or (para)military offices of the Roman Republic and Empire. ... Consul (abbrev. ... Praetorian prefect (Latin Praefectus praetorio) was the constant title of a high office in the Roman state that changed fundamentally in nature. ... In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation. ... This article is about the year 79. ... Aulus Caecina Alienus, Roman general, was quaestor of Hispania Baetica (southern Iberia) in AD 68. ...


During the Jewish wars, Titus had begun a love affair with Queen Berenice of Cilicia, sister of Agrippa II.[19] The Herodians had collaborated with the Romans during the rebellion, and Berenice herself had supported Vespasian upon his campaign to become emperor.[47] In 75, she returned to Titus and openly lived with him in the palace as his promised wife. The Romans were wary of the Eastern Queen and disapproved of their relationship. When the pair was publicly denounced by Cynics in the theatre, Titus caved in to the pressure and sent her away,[48] but his reputation further suffered. Berenice (b. ... Agrippa II (AD 27–100), son of Agrippa I, and like him originally named Marcus Julius Agrippa. ... The Herodian Dynasty was a Jewish dynasty of Idumean descent, who ruled Iudaea Province between 37 BC - 92. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s - 70s - 80s 90s 100s 110s 120s Years: 70 71 72 73 74 - 75 - 76 77 78 79 80 Events Last known cuneiform inscription Accession of Han Zhangdi. ... This article is about the ancient Greek school of philosophy. ...


Emperor

Succession

Roman denarius depicting Titus, c. 79. The reverse commemorates his triumph in the Judaean wars, representing a Jewish captive kneeling in front of a trophy of arms.
Roman denarius depicting Titus, c. 79. The reverse commemorates his triumph in the Judaean wars, representing a Jewish captive kneeling in front of a trophy of arms.

Vespasian died of an infection on June 23 79 AD,[49] and was immediately succeeded by his son Titus.[50] Because of his many alleged vices, many Romans feared at this point that he would be another Nero.[51] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... First row : c. ... A Roman Triumph was a civil ceremony and religious rite of ancient Rome, held to publicly honour the military commander (dux) of a notably successful foreign war or campaign and to display the glories of Roman victory. ... Jewish-Roman War can refer to several revolts by the Jews of Judea against the Roman Empire: The First Jewish-Roman War (66–73 CE), sometimes called the First Jewish Revolt. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 79. ... Vice is a practice or habit that is considered immoral, depraved, and/or degrading in the associated society. ...


Against these expectations however, Titus turned out to be an effective emperor, and was well-loved by the population, who found great praise for him when they found that he possessed the greatest virtues instead of vices.[51] One of his first acts as an emperor was to publicly order a halt to trials based on treason charges,[52] which had long plagued the principate. The law of treason, or maiestas law, was originally intended to prosecute those who had corruptly 'impaired the people and majesty of Rome' by any revolutionary action.[53] Under Augustus however, this custom had been revived and applied to cover slander or libellous writings as well,[53] eventually leading to a long cycle of trials and executions under such emperors as Tiberius, Caligula and Nero, spawning entire networks of informers that terrorized Rome's political system for decades.[52] Titus put an end to this practice, against himself or anyone else, declaring: Personification of virtue (Greek ἀρετή) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Virtue (Latin virtus; Greek ) is moral excellence of a person. ... The Principate is, according to its etymological derivation from the Latin word princeps, meaning chief or first, the political regime dominated by such a political leader, whether or not he is formally head of state and/or head of government. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Law of Majestas, or lex maiestas, refers to any one of several ancient Roman laws (leges maiestatis) throughout the republican and Imperial periods dealing with crimes against the Roman people, state, or Emperor. ... For other uses, see Revolution (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... “Libel” redirects here. ... Look up trial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other persons named Tiberius, see Tiberius (disambiguation). ... Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (August 31, 12 – January 24, 41), more commonly known by his nickname Caligula, was the third Roman Emperor and a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, ruling from 37 to 41 . ... Delator, in Roman history, properly one who gave notice (deferre) to the treasury officials of moneys that had become due to the imperial fisc. ...

"It is impossible for me to be insulted or abused in any way. For I do naught that deserves censure, and I care not for what is reported falsely. As for the emperors who are dead and gone, they will avenge themselves in case anyone does them a wrong, if in very truth they are demigods and possess any power."[54]

Consequently, no senators were put to death during his reign;[54] he thus kept to his promise that he would assume the office of Pontifex Maximus "for the purpose of keeping his hands unstained".[55] The informants were publicly punished and banished from the city, and Titus further prevented abuses by introducing legislation that made it unlawful for persons to be tried under different laws for the same offense.[52] Finally, when Berenice returned to Rome, he sent her away.[51] A senate is a deliberative body, often the upper house or chamber of a legislature. ... Alternate meanings: see Pontifex (disambiguation) In Ancient Rome, the Pontifex Maximus was the high priest of the collegium of the Pontifices, the most august position in Roman religion, open only to a patrician, until 254 BC, when a plebeian first occupied this post. ... Ritual purification is a feature of many religions. ... See Exile (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... For other uses, see Double jeopardy (disambiguation). ...


As emperor he became known for his generosity, and Suetonius states that upon realising he had brought no benefit to anyone during a whole day he remarked, "Friends, I have lost a day."[52] Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ...


Challenges

The 79 eruption of Mount Vesuvius completely destroyed Pompeii and Herculaneum. Today plaster casts of actual victims found during excavations are on display in some of the ruins.
The 79 eruption of Mount Vesuvius completely destroyed Pompeii and Herculaneum. Today plaster casts of actual victims found during excavations are on display in some of the ruins.

Although his administration was marked by a relative absence of major military or political conflicts, Titus faced a number of major disasters during his brief reign. On August 24, 79, barely two months after his accession, Mount Vesuvius erupted,[56] resulting in the almost complete destruction of life and property in the cities and resort communities around the Bay of Naples. The cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum were buried under metres of stone and lava,[57] killing thousands of citizens.[58] Titus appointed two ex-consuls to organise and coordinate the relief effort, while personally donating large amounts of money from the imperial treasury to aid the victims of the volcano.[52] Additionally, he visited Pompeii once after the eruption and again the following year.[59] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (580x852, 103 KB) Garden of the Fugitives, Pompeii. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (580x852, 103 KB) Garden of the Fugitives, Pompeii. ... This article is about the mountain in Italy. ... For other uses, see Pompeii (disambiguation). ... Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) is an ancient Roman town, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 79. ... This article is about the mountain in Italy. ... Gulf of Naples is located in Southern Italy. ... For other uses, see Pompeii (disambiguation). ... Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) is an ancient Roman town, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano. ... Look up lava, Aa, pahoehoe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Humanitarian aid arriving by plane at Rinas Airport in Albania in the summer of 1999. ...


During the second visit a fire broke out in Rome which lasted for three days.[52][59] Although the extent of the damage was not as disastrous as during the Great Fire of 64 - crucially sparing the many districts of insulae - Cassius Dio records a long list of important public buildings that were destroyed, including the Pantheon, the Temple of Jupiter, the Diribitorium, parts of Pompey's Theatre and the Saepta Julia among others.[59] Once again, Titus personally compensated for the damaged regions.[59] According to Suetonius, a plague similarly struck during the fire.[52] The nature of the disease however or the death toll are unknown. According to Tacitus, the Great Fire of Rome started on the night of 18 July in the year 64, among the shops clustered around the greenhills shoping centre. ... July 18 - Great fire of Rome: A fire began to burn in the merchant area of Rome and soon burned completely out of control while Emperor Nero allegedly played his lyre and sang while watching the blaze from a safe distance, although there is no hard evidence to support this... Remains of the top floors of an insula near the Capitolium and the Aracoeli in Rome. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Pantheon may refer to: Buildings: Pantheon, Rome, a temple built in 125 AD to all Roman gods, now a Christian church. ... Temple of Jupiter on Capitoline Hill, 6th–1st century BC See Temple of Jupiter for temples to him in other places. ... The diribitorium was a public voting hall situated on the campus Martius in Ancient Rome. ... Artist rendition of the front exterior of the Theatre of Pompey The Theatre of Pompey (Latin Theatrum Pompeium, Italian: Teatro di Pompeo) is an ancient building of the Roman Republic era, built around 55 BC, once the worlds largest theater. ... The Saepta Julia was a building in Ancient Rome where citizens would gather to cast votes. ... Look up plague in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A death toll is the number of dead as a result of war, violence, accident, natural disaster, extreme weather, or disease. ...


Meanwhile war had resumed in Britannia, where Gnaeus Julius Agricola pushed further into Caledonia and managed to establish several forts there.[60] As a result of his actions, Titus received the title of Imperator for the fifteenth time.[61] Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Gnaeus Julius Agricola (July 13, 40 - August 23, 93) was a Roman general responsible for much of the Roman conquest of Britain. ... Caledonia is the Latin name given by the Roman Empire to a northern area of the island of Great Britain. ... The Latin word imperator was a title originally roughly equivalent to commander during the period of the Roman Republic. ...


His reign also saw the rebellion led by Terentius Maximus, one of several false Neros who continued to appear throughout the 70s.[62] While this may at first seem odd to modern readers—to whom Nero is primarily known as a universally hated tyrant—there is evidence that for much of his reign, he remained highly popular in the eastern provinces. Reports that Nero had in fact survived the assassination attempts were fueled by the vague circumstances surrounding his death and several prophecies foretelling his return.[63] According to Cassius Dio, Terentius Maximus resembled Nero in voice and appearance and, like him, sang to the lyre.[54] Terentius established a following in Asia minor but was soon forced to flee beyond the Euphrates, taking refuge with the Parthians.[54][62] In addition, sources state that Titus discovered that his brother Domitian was plotting against him, but refused to have him killed or banished.[55][64] Terentius Maximus was a Roman also known as the False Nero who rebelled during the reign of Titus, but was suppressed. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s - 110s - 120s 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 Note: Sometimes the 70s is used as shorthand for the 1970s, the 1870s, or other such decades in other centuries... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section seems to describe future events as if they have already occurred. ... “Lyres” redirects here. ... Anatolia (Greek: &#945;&#957;&#945;&#964;&#959;&#955;&#951; anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to... Surfer Rosa The Euphrates (IPA: /juːˈfreɪtiːz/; Greek: EuphrátÄ“s; Akkadian: Pu-rat-tu; Hebrew: פְּרָת PÄ•rāth; Syriac: Prâth; Arabic: الفرات Al-Furāt; Turkish: Fırat; Kurdish: فرهات, Firhat, Ferhat, Azeri: FÉ™rat) is the western of the two great rivers that define Mesopotamia (the other... Reproduction of a Parthian warrior as depicted on Trajans Column The Parthian Empire was the dominating force on the Iranian plateau beginning in the late 3rd century BCE, and intermittently controlled Mesopotamia between ca 190 BCE and 224 CE. Origins Bust of Parthian soldier, Esgh-abad Museum, Turkmenia. ...


Public works

The Flavian Amphitheatre, better known as the Colosseum, was completed during the reign of Titus, and inaugurated with spectacular games that lasted for 100 days.
The Flavian Amphitheatre, better known as the Colosseum, was completed during the reign of Titus, and inaugurated with spectacular games that lasted for 100 days.

Construction of the Flavian Amphitheatre, presently better known as the Colosseum, was begun in 70 under Vespasian, and finally completed in 80 under Titus.[65] In addition to providing spectacular entertainments to the Roman populace, the building was also conceived as a gigantic triumphal monument to commemorate the military achievements of the Flavians during the Jewish wars.[66] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 470 pixelsFull resolution (4827 × 2833 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 470 pixelsFull resolution (4827 × 2833 pixel, file size: 3. ... Though in ruins, the Flavian Amphitheatre, now known as the Colosseum, still stands today. ... The Colosseum by night: exterior view of the best-preserved section. ... This article is about the year 70. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (born November 17, 9, died June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... Events By place Roman Empire The Emperor Titus inaugurates the Flavian Amphitheatre with 100 days of games. ... Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Iudaea Province Commanders Vespasian, Titus Simon Bar-Giora, Yohanan mi-Gush Halav (John of Gischala), Eleazar ben Simon Strength 70,000? 1,100,000? Casualties Unknown 1,100,000? (majority Jewish civilian casualties) Jewish-Roman wars First War – Kitos War – Bar Kokhba revolt The first...


The inaugural games lasted for a hundred days and were said to be extremely elaborate, including gladiatorial combat, fights between wild animals (elephants and cranes), mock naval battles for which the theatre was flooded, horse races and chariot races.[67] During the games, wooden balls were dropped into the audience, inscribed with various prizes (clothing, gold, or even slaves), which could then be traded for the designated item.[67] Though in ruins, the Flavian Amphitheatre, now known as the Colosseum, still stands today. ... For other uses, see Gladiator (disambiguation). ... Genera and Species Loxodonta Loxodonta cyclotis Loxodonta africana Elephas Elephas maximus Elephas antiquus † Elephas beyeri † Elephas celebensis † Elephas cypriotes † Elephas ekorensis † Elephas falconeri † Elephas iolensis † Elephas planifrons † Elephas platycephalus † Elephas recki † Stegodon † Mammuthus † Elephantidae (the elephants) is a family of pachyderm, and the only remaining family in the order Proboscidea... Genera Grus Anthropoides Balearica Bugeranus Cranes are large, long-legged and long-necked birds of the order Gruiformes, and family Gruidae. ... The French battleship Orient burns, 1 August 1798, during the Battle of the Nile A naval battle is a battle fought using ships or other waterborne vessels. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... Chariot racing was one of the most popular ancient Greek and Roman sports. ... Clothing protects the vulnerable nude human body from the extremes of weather, other features of our environment, and for safety reasons. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Slavery as an institution in Mediterranean cultures of the ancient world comprised a mixture of debt-slavery, slavery as a punishment for crime, and the enslavement of prisoners of war. ...


Adjacent to the amphitheatre, within the precinct of Nero's Golden House, Titus had also ordered the construction of a new public bath-house, which was to bear his name.[67] Construction of this building was hastily finished to coincide with the completion of the Flavian Amphitheatre.[51] The Domus Aurea (Latin for Golden House) was a large landscaped portico villa, designed to take advantage of artificially created landscapes, rather than a monumental palace,[1] built in the heart of Ancient Rome by the Roman emperor Nero after Great fire of Rome, which devastated Rome in 64 AD... Roman public baths in Bath, England. ... The Baths of Titus (AD 81) were public baths (Thermae) built in Rome by Emperor Titus. ...


Practice of the imperial cult was revived by Titus, though apparently met with some difficulty as Vespasian was not deified until six months after his death.[68] To further honor and glorify the Flavian dynasty, foundations were laid for what would later become the Temple of Vespasian and Titus, which was finished by Domitian.[69][70] The Imperial cult in Ancient Rome was the worship of the Roman Emperor as a god. ... The Flavian dynasty was a series of three Roman Emperors who ruled from 69, the Year of the Four Emperors, to 96, when the last member was assassinated. ... The pediment and frieze, in the tabularium Close up The Temple of Vespasian and Titus (templum divus vespasianus)[1] is located in Rome at the western end of the Roman Forum between the Temple of Concordia and the Temple of Saturn. ...


Death

At the closing of the games, Titus officially dedicated the amphitheatre and the baths, which was to be his final recorded act as an emperor.[64] He set out for the Sabine territories but fell ill at the first posting station[71] where he died of a fever, reportedly in the same farm-house as his father.[72] Allegedly, the last words he uttered before passing away were: "I have made but one mistake".[71][64] Titus had ruled the Roman Empire for just over two years, from the death of his father in 79 to his own on September 13, 81.[64] He was succeeded by Domitian, whose first act as emperor was to deify his brother.[73] The Rape of the Sabine Women by Giambologna The tribe of the Sabines (Latin Sabini - singular Sabinus) was an Italic tribe of ancient Italy. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 0s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s Years: 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 Events Domitian succeeds his brother Titus Flavius as emperor of the Roman Empire. ... Look up Apotheosis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Historians have speculated on the exact nature of his death, and to which mistake Titus alluded to in his final words. Philostratus writes that he was poisoned by Domitian with a sea hare, and that his death had been foretold to him by Apollonius of Tyana.[74] Suetonius and Cassius Dio maintain he died of natural causes, but both accuse Domitian of having left the ailing Titus for dead.[73][64] Consequently, Dio believes Titus' mistake refers to his failure to have his brother executed when he was found to be openly plotting against him.[64] This is a list of historians. ... Philostratus, was the name of several, three (or four), Greek sophists of the Roman imperial period: Philostratus the Athenian (c. ... Families Superfamily Akeroidea Akeridae Superfamily Aplysioidea Aplysiidae Sea hares (also called sea slugs) are small marine gastropod molluscs of the suborder Anaspidea (P. Fisher, 1883) in the subclass Orthogastropoda, class Gastropoda, phylum Mollusca. ... Engraved portrait of Apollonius of Tyana. ...


According to the Babylonian Talmud (Gittin 56b), an insect flew in Titus' nose and picked at his brain. When he died, they opened his skull and found a mosquito the size of a bird. This was said to have caused his death and was interpreted as divine retribution for his wicked actions. The first page of the Talmud, in the standard Vilna edition. ... Nashim (Women) is the third order of the Mishnah (also of the Tosefta and Talmud), containing the laws related to women and family life. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (Probably paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera (angel insects) Dermaptera (earwigs) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (stick insects) Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Psocoptera...


Legacy

Historiography

Titus' record among ancient historians stands as one of the most exemplary of any emperor. All the surviving accounts from this period, many of them written by his own contemporaries, present a highly favourable view towards Titus. His character has especially prospered in comparison with that of his brother Domitian.


The Wars of the Jews offers a first-hand, eye-witness account on the Jewish rebellion and the character of Titus. The neutrality of Josephus' writings has come into question however as he was heavily indebted to the Flavians. In 71, he arrived in Rome in the entourage of Titus, became a Roman citizen and took on the Roman nomen Flavius and praenomen Titus from his patrons. He received an annual pension and lived in the palace.[75] It was while in Rome, and under Flavian patronage, that Josephus wrote all of his known works. The War of the Jews is heavily slanted against the leaders of the revolt, portraying the rebellion as weak an unorganized, and even blaming the Jews for causing the war.[76] The credibility of Josephus as a historian has subsequently come under fire.[77] The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... This article is about witnesses in law courts. ... Neutral means balanced between two or more opposites. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Flavian dynasty was a series of three Roman Emperors who ruled from 69, the Year of the Four Emperors, to 96, when the last member was assassinated. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s - 70s - 80s 90s 100s 110s 120s Years: 66 67 68 69 70 - 71 - 72 73 74 75 76 Events The Romans establish a fortress at York (Eboracum), as a base for their northern forces. ... The toga was the characteristic garment of the Roman citizen. ... In the Roman naming convention used in ancient Rome, male names typically contain three proper nouns which are classified as praenomen (or given name), nomen gentile (or Gens name) and cognomen. ... In the Roman naming convention used in ancient Rome, male names typically contain three proper nouns which are classified as praenomen (or given name), nomen gentile (or Gens name) and cognomen. ... ...


Another contemporary of Titus was Publius Cornelius Tacitus, who started his public career in 80 or 81 and credits the Flavian dynasty with his elevation.[78] The Histories—his account of this period—was published during the reign of Trajan. Unfortunately only the first five books from this work have survived until the present day, with the text on Titus' and Domitian's reign entirely lost. For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Histories (Latin: Historiae) is a book by Tacitus, written c. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ...


Suetonius Tranquilius gives a short but highly favourable account on Titus' reign in The Lives of Twelve Caesars,[79] emphasizing his military achievements, and his generosity as Emperor, in short describing him as follows: Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ...

Titus, of the same surname as his father, was the delight and darling of the human race; such surpassing ability had he, by nature, art, or good fortune, to win the affections of all men, and that, too, which is no easy task, while he was emperor.[79]

Cassius Dio finally wrote his Roman History over a hundred years after the death of Titus. He shares a similar outlook as Suetonius, possibly even using the latter as a source, but is more reserved, noting: Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ...

His satisfactory record may also have been due to the fact that he survived his accession but a very short time, for he was thus given no opportunity for wrongdoing. For he lived after this only two years, two months and twenty days — in addition to the thirty-nine years, five months and twenty-five days he had already lived at that time. In this respect, indeed, he is regarded as having equalled the long reign of Augustus, since it is maintained that Augustus would never have been loved had he lived a shorter time, nor Titus had he lived longer. For Augustus, though at the outset he showed himself rather harsh because of the wars and the factional strife, was later able, in the course of time, to achieve a brilliant reputation for his kindly deeds; Titus, on the other hand, ruled with mildness and died at the height of his glory, whereas, if he had lived a long time, it might have been shown that he owes his present fame more to good fortune than to merit.[50] For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ...

Pliny the Elder, who later died during the eruption of Mount Vesuvius,[80] dedicated his Naturalis Historia to Titus.[81] Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Naturalis Historia, 1669 edition, title page. ...


Titus in later arts

The Triumph of Titus, by Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1885). The composition suggests a love affair between Titus and Domitian's first wife Domitia Longina (see below).
The Triumph of Titus, by Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1885). The composition suggests a love affair between Titus and Domitian's first wife Domitia Longina (see below).

The war in Judaea and the life of Titus, particularly his relationship with Berenice, have inspired writers and artists through the centuries. The bas-relief in the Arch of Titus has been influential in the depiction of the destruction of Jerusalem, with the Menorah frequently being used to symbolise the looting of the Second Temple. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 403 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1531 × 2278 pixel, file size: 291 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 403 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1531 × 2278 pixel, file size: 291 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, OM, RA (January 8, 1836, Dronrijp, the Netherlands. ... Domitia Longina was a Roman matrona that lived in the 1st century. ... Bas relief is a method of sculpting which entails carving or etching away the surface of a flat piece of stone or metal. ... The Destruction of Jerusalem (specifically, the Second Destruction of Jerusalem) was the culmination of the successful campaign of Titus Flavius against Judea after an unsuccessful attack four years prior by Cestius Gallus. ... A coin issued by Mattathias Antigonus, c. ... A stone (2. ...


Literature

Bérénice is a tragedy by the French 17th-century playwright Jean Racine. ... Jean Racine. ... 1670 was a common year beginning on a Saturday in countries using the Julian calendar and a Wednesday in countries using the Gregorian calendar. ... Tite et Bérénice is a tragedy by the 17th-century French playwright Pierre Corneille. ... Pierre Corneille (June 6, 1606–October 1, 1684) was a French tragedian tragedian who was one of the three great 17th Century French dramatists, along with Molière and Racine. ... La clemenza di Tito (The Clemency of Titus), K. 621, was an opera seria written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. ... This article is about Opera, the art form. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... Vitellius, Museo Nazionale della Civiltà Romana, Rome Aulus Vitellius Germanicus (September 24, 15–December 22, 69) was Roman Emperor from April 17 69 to December 22 of the same year, one of the emperors in the Year of the four emperors. He was the son of Lucius Vitellius, who had... Lion Feuchtwanger (pseudonym: J.L. Wetcheek) (7 July 1884 - 21 December 1958) was a German-Jewish novelist who was imprisoned in a French internment camp in Les Milles and later escaped to Los Angeles with the help of his wife, Marta. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... Marcus Didius Falco is an endearing character in the novels of Lindsey Davis. ... The Roman Mysteries books are a series of historical novels for children by Caroline Lawrence. ...

Paintings

  • The Destruction of Jerusalem by Titus by Wilhelm von Kaulbach (1846). Oil on canvas, 585 x 705 cm. Neue Pinakothek, Munich. An allegorical depiction of the destruction of Jerusalem, dramatically centered around the figure of Titus.
  • The Destruction of the Temple at Jerusalem by Nicolas Poussin (1637). Oil on canvas, 147 x 198,5 cm. Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna. Depicts the destruction and looting of the Second Temple by the Roman army led by Titus.
  • The Destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem by Francesco Hayez (1867). Oil on canvas, 183 x 252 cm. Galleria d'Arte Moderna, Venice. Depicts the destruction and looting of the Second Temple by the Roman army.
  • The Triumph of Titus and Vespasian by Giulio Romano (1540). Oil on wood, 170 x 120 cm. Louvre, Paris. Depicts Titus and Vespasian as they ride into Rome on a triumphal chariot, preceded by a parade carrying spoils from the war in Judaea. The painting anachronistically features the Arch of Titus, which was not completed until the reign of Domitian.
  • The Triumph of Titus by Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1885). Oil on canvas. Private collection. This painting depicts the triumphal procession of Titus and his family. Alma-Tadema was known for his meticulous historical research on the ancient world.[82] Vespasian, dressed as Pontifex Maximus, walks at the head of his family, followed by Domitian and his first wife Domitia Longina, who he had only recently married. Behind Domitian follows Titus, dressed in religious regalia. An exchange of glances between Titus and Domitia suggests an affair which historians have speculated upon.[71][64]

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1085x900, 181 KB) Wilhelm von Kaulbach: Zerstörung Jerusalems durch Titus (Titus destroying Jerusalem) Neue Pinakothek, München, Germany File links The following pages link to this file: Jerusalem Wilhelm von Kaulbach Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... Wilhelm von Kaulbach (October 15, 1805 - April 7, 1874) was a German painter. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... , For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... The Destruction of Jerusalem (specifically, the Second Destruction of Jerusalem) was the culmination of the successful campaign of Titus Flavius against Judea after an unsuccessful attack four years prior by Cestius Gallus. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 584 pixelsFull resolution (928 × 677 pixel, file size: 115 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Les Bergers d’Arcadie, set in Ancient Greece. ... Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1480, 275 KB) Description: Title: de: Die Zerstörung des Tempels von Jerusalem Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 183 × 252 cm Country of origin: de: Italien Current location (city): de: Venedig Current location (gallery): de: Galleria dArte Moderna... The Kiss by Francesco Hayez Francesco Hayez (1791-1882) was the leading homosexual artist of Romanticism in mid-19th-century Milan, renowned for his great historical paintings, political allegories and exceptionally fine portraits External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Francesco Hayez More information Categories: &#x202a;Artist stubs&#x202c... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Fire in the Borgo, Vatican fresco Giulio Romano (ca 1499? – November 1, 1546) was an Italian painter, architect, and decorator. ... Year 1540 was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Look up Anachronism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 403 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1531 × 2278 pixel, file size: 291 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, OM, RA (January 8, 1836, Dronrijp, the Netherlands. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Alternate meanings: see Pontifex (disambiguation) In Ancient Rome, the Pontifex Maximus was the high priest of the collegium of the Pontifices, the most august position in Roman religion, open only to a patrician, until 254 BC, when a plebeian first occupied this post. ... Domitia Longina was a Roman matrona that lived in the 1st century. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Suetonius claims Titus was born in the year Caligula was assassinated, 41 AD. However, this contradicts his statement that Titus died in his 42nd year, as well as Cassius Dio who notes that Titus was 39 at the time of his accession. See Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 1, 11; Cassius Dio, Roman History LXVI.18; and Brian Jones; and Robert Milns (2002). Suetonius: The Flavian Emperors: A Historical Commentary. London: Bristol Classical Press, p. 91. ISBN 1-85399-613-0. 
  2. ^ Tacitus, Agricola 13
  3. ^ a b Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 2
  4. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 3
  5. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 4, with Jones and Milns, p. 95–96
  6. ^ Tacitus, Annals XVI.30–33
  7. ^ Gavin Townend, "Some Flavian Connections", The Journal of Roman Studies (1961), p 57. See Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 4
  8. ^ Philostratus, The Life of Apollonius of Tyana VII.7
  9. ^ a b c Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 4
  10. ^ Jones and Milns, pp. 96, 167.
  11. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews II.19.9
  12. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews III.1.2
  13. ^ a b Josephus, The War of the Jews III.4.2
  14. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews III.7.34
  15. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews III.8.8
  16. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews III.10
  17. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews IV.9.2
  18. ^ Tacitus, Histories II.1
  19. ^ a b Tacitus, Histories II.2
  20. ^ Tacitus, Histories II.41–49
  21. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews IV.10.4
  22. ^ Tacitus, Histories II.5
  23. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews IV.11.1
  24. ^ Tacitus, Histories II.82
  25. ^ Tacitus, Histories IV.3
  26. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews V.1.4
  27. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews V.1.6
  28. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews V.2.2
  29. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews V.6–V.9
  30. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews V.11.1
  31. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews VI.2–VI.3
  32. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews VI.4.1
  33. ^ Josephus, The War of the Jews VI.4.3
  34. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews VI.4.5
  35. ^ Sulpicius Severus, Chronicles II.30.6–7. For Tacitus as the source, see T. D. Barnes (July 1977). "The Fragments of Tacitus' Histories". Classical Philology 72 (3): 224–231, pp. 226–228. 
  36. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews VI.6.1
  37. ^ a b Josephus, The Wars of the Jews VI.9.3
  38. ^ Philostratus, The Life of Apollonius of Tyana 6.29
  39. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews VII.3.1, VII.5.2
  40. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 5
  41. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LXV.6
  42. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews VII.5.5
  43. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews VII.5.6
  44. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LXV.1
  45. ^ a b c d e Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 6
  46. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LXV.16
  47. ^ Tacitus, Histories II.81
  48. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LXV.15
  49. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LXVI.17
  50. ^ a b Cassius Dio, Roman History LXVI.18
  51. ^ a b c d Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 7
  52. ^ a b c d e f g Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 8
  53. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals I.72
  54. ^ a b c d Cassius Dio, Roman History LXVI.19
  55. ^ a b Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 9
  56. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LXVI.22
  57. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LXVI.23
  58. ^ The exact number of casualties is unknown, however estimates of the population of Pompeii range between 10,000 ([1]) and 25,000 ([2]), with at least a thousand bodies currently recovered in and around the city ruins.
  59. ^ a b c d Cassius Dio, Roman History LXVI.24
  60. ^ Tacitus, Agricola 22
  61. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LXVI.20
  62. ^ a b Tacitus, Histories I.2
  63. ^ Sanford, Eva Matthews (1937). "Nero and the East". Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 48: p75–103. Retrieved on 2007-09-10. 
  64. ^ a b c d e f g Cassius Dio, Roman History LXVI.26
  65. ^ Roth, Leland M. (1993). Understanding Architecture: Its Elements, History and Meaning, First, Boulder, CO: Westview Press. ISBN 0-06-430158-3. 
  66. ^ Claridge, Amanda (1998). Rome: An Oxford Archaeological Guide, First, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 1998, pp. 276–282. ISBN 0-19-288003-9. 
  67. ^ a b c Cassius Dio, Roman History LXVI.25
  68. ^ Coins bearing the inscription Divus Vespasianus were not issued until 80 or 81 by Titus.
  69. ^ Jones, Brian W. The Emperor Titus. New York: St. Martin's P, 1984. 143.
  70. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Domitian 5
  71. ^ a b c Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 10
  72. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 11
  73. ^ a b Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Domitian 2
  74. ^ Philostratus, The Life of Apollonius of Tyana 6.32
  75. ^ Josephus, The Life of Flavius Josephus 76
  76. ^ Josephus, The Wars of the Jews II.17
  77. ^ Josephus, Flavius, The Jewish War, tr. G.A. Williamson, introduction by E. Mary Smallwood. New York, Penguin, 1981, p. 24
  78. ^ Tacitus, Histories I.1
  79. ^ a b Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 1
  80. ^ The Destruction of Pompeii, 79 AD, Translation of Pliny's letters. Original.
  81. ^ Pliny the Elder, Natural Histories Preface
  82. ^ Prettejohn, Elizabeth (March 2002). "Lawrence Alma-Tadema and the Modern City of Ancient Rome". The Art Bulletin 84 (1): 115–129. Retrieved on 2007-07-31. 

Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Agricola (full Latin title: De vita et moribus Iulii Agricolae) is a book by the Roman historian Tacitus, written c. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Annals, or, in Latin, Annales, is a history book by Tacitus covering the reign of the 4 Roman Emperors succeeding to Caesar Augustus. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Philostratus, was the name of several, three (or four), Greek sophists of the Roman imperial period: Philostratus the Athenian (c. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Histories (Latin: Historiae) is a book by Tacitus, written c. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Histories (Latin: Historiae) is a book by Tacitus, written c. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Histories (Latin: Historiae) is a book by Tacitus, written c. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Histories (Latin: Historiae) is a book by Tacitus, written c. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Histories (Latin: Historiae) is a book by Tacitus, written c. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Histories (Latin: Historiae) is a book by Tacitus, written c. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... Saint Sulpicius Severus (born around 360, died between 420 and 425), wrote the earliest biography of Saint Martin of Tours. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... Philostratus, was the name of several, three (or four), Greek sophists of the Roman imperial period: Philostratus the Athenian (c. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Histories (Latin: Historiae) is a book by Tacitus, written c. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Annals, or, in Latin, Annales, is a history book by Tacitus covering the reign of the 4 Roman Emperors succeeding to Caesar Augustus. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Agricola (full Latin title: De vita et moribus Iulii Agricolae) is a book by the Roman historian Tacitus, written c. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Histories (Latin: Historiae) is a book by Tacitus, written c. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Philostratus, was the name of several, three (or four), Greek sophists of the Roman imperial period: Philostratus the Athenian (c. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Life of Flavius Josephus (phlaouiou Iosepou bios) was an autobiographical text written by Josephus in approximately 99CE. External links Vit. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Wars of the Jews (or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem) is a book written by the historian Josephus as a description of Jewish history up to the events of the Destruction of Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The Histories (Latin: Historiae) is a book by Tacitus, written c. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... On the Life of the Caesars[1], in Latin De vita Caesarum, or as it is often known in English, The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Naturalis Historia, 1669 edition, title page. ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Titus

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Primary sources

Secondary material

Preceded by
Fabius Valens and Arrius Antoninus
Consul of the Roman Empire with Vespasian
70
Succeeded by
Vespasian and Marcus Cocceius Nerva
Preceded by
Vespasian and Marcus Cocceius Nerva
Consul of the Roman Empire with Vespasian
72
Succeeded by
Domitian and Lucius Valerius Catullus Messallinus
Preceded by
Domitian and Lucius Valerius Catullus Messallinus
Consul of the Roman Empire together with Vespasian
74-77
Succeeded by
Decimus Iunius Novius Priscus Rufus and Lucius Ceionius Commodus
Preceded by
Decimus Iunius Novius Priscus Rufus and Lucius Ceionius Commodus
Consul of the Roman Empire
79-80
Succeeded by
Lucius Flavius Silva Nonius Bassus and Lucius Asinius Pollio Verrucosus
Preceded by
Vespasian
Flavian Dynasty
69–96
Succeeded by
Domitian
Preceded by
Vespasian
Roman Emperor
7981
Succeeded by
Domitian


  Results from FactBites:
 
Titus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (843 words)
Titus was born in Rome as the elder son of the emperor Vespasian and Domitilla the Elder.
Titus accompanied Vespasian to the east in 67 to put down the Jewish Rebellion, in which he served as commander of the fifteenth legion "Apollinaris".
Titus was emperor during the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 and the consequent destruction of life and property in the cities and resort communities around the Bay of Naples, such as Pompeii and Herculaneum.
Roman Emperors - DIR Titus (3007 words)
Titus was born on 30 December A.D. 39 in Rome, one of three children of Vespasian, Roman emperor (A.D. 69-79), and Domitilla I, daughter of a treasury clerk.
Titus spent the winter of A.D. 70 touring the East with a splendid retinue of legionaries and prisoners, presumably to provide a public display of Flavian military prowess and to underscore the consequences of rebellion against his father by the punishments inflicted on Jewish prisoners.
Titus was the beneficiary of considerable intelligence and talent, endowments that were carefully cultivated at every step of his career, from his early education to his role under his father's principate.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m