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Encyclopedia > Titanomachy
Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Olympians
Aquatic deities
Chthonic deities
Personified concepts
Other deities
Titans
The Twelve Titans:
Oceanus and Tethys,
Hyperion and Theia,
Coeus and Phoebe,
Cronus and Rhea,
Mnemosyne, Themis,
Crius, Iapetus
Sons of Iapetus:
Atlas, Prometheus,
Epimetheus, Menoetius

In Greek mythology, the Titanomachy, or War of the Titans (Greek: Τιτανομαχία), was the eleven-year series of battles fought between the two races of deities long before the existence of mankind: the Titans, fighting from Mount Othrys, and the Olympians, who would come to reign on Mount Olympus. This Titanomachia is also known as the Battle of the Titans, Battle of Gods, or just the Titan War The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the telling of stories created by the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think, from which mind and mental are also derived[1]) are 50 goddesses or spiritual guides who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek , plural ) were greater even than the gods. ... In the Greek and Roman world-view, Oceanus (Greek , Okeanos), was the world-ocean, which they believed to be an enormous river encircling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... In the Homers Iliad and Odyssey the sun god is called Helios Hyperion, Sun High-one. But in the Odyssey, Hesiods Theogony and the Homeric Hymn to Demeter the sun is once in each work called Hyperonides son of Hyperion and Hesiod certainly imagines Hyperion as a separate... In Greek mythology, Theia (also written Thea or Thia), also called Euryphaessa (wide-shining), was a Titan. ... In Greek mythology, Coeus (also Koios) was the Titan of intelligence. ... Phoebe (pronunced fee-bee) was one of the original Titans, one set of sons and daughters of Uranus and Gaia. ... Cronus (Ancient Greek Κρόνος, Krónos), also called Cronos or Kronos, was the leader and the youngest of the first generation of Titans, divine descendants of Gaia, the earth, and Uranus, the sky. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... Mnemosyne (Greek , IPA in RP and in General American) (sometimes shortened to Mneme) was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... In Greek mythology, Crius was one of the Titans, a son of Uranus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology Iapetus, or Iapetos, was a Titan, the son of Uranus and Gaia, and father (by an Oceanid named Clymene or Asia) of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Menoetius and through Prometheus and Epimetheus and Atlas an ancestor of the human race. ... In Greek mythology, Atlas was one of the primordial Titans. ... Prométhée enchaîné (Prometheus Bound) by Nicolas-Sébastien Adam (1762) For other uses, see Prometheus (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Epimetheus (hindsight, literally hind-thought) was the brother of Prometheus (foresight, literally fore-thought), a pair of Titans who acted as representatives of mankind (Kerenyi 1951, p 207). ... In Greek mythology, Menoetius referred to several different people. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the telling of stories created by the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek , plural ) were greater even than the gods. ... Mount Othrys (Greek: Όρος Όθρυς, Oros-, other transliteration: Othris) is a mountain in Central Greece in the northeastern part of Fthiotis and southern part of Magnesia. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... This article is about the mountain in Greece. ...


Greeks of the Classical age knew of several poems about the war between the gods and many of the Titans. The dominant one, and the only one that has survived, was the Theogony attributed to Hesiod. A lost epic, Titanomachia, attributed to the blind Thracian bard Thamyris, himself a legendary figure, was mentioned in passing in an essay On Music that was once attributed to Plutarch. The Titans also played a prominent role in the poems attributed to Orpheus. Although only scraps of the Orphic narratives survive, they show interesting differences from the Hesiodic tradition. Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Theogony Wikisource has original text related to this article: Theogony (in Greek) Theogony is a poem by Hesiod describing the origins of the gods of ancient Greek religion. ... Bust, traditionally thought to be Seneca, now identified by some as Hesiod. ... The Titanomachy is an epic poem, which is a part of Ancient Greek Mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Thamyris, son of Philammon, was a Thracian bard who was so vain and proud, that he boasted he could outsing the Muses themselves, according to a passage in Homer (Iliad, book ii, 594-600) that is taken up in Euripides Rhesus. ... Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ... The head of Orpheus, from an 1865 painting by Gustave Moreau. ... Orphism or Orphic cubism, is a term coined in 1912 France by the poet Guillaume Apollinaire. ...


These Greek myths of the Titanomachy fall into a class of similar myths throughout Europe and the Near East, where one generation or group of gods by and large opposes the dominant one. Sometimes the Elder Gods are supplanted. Sometimes the rebels lose, and are either cast out of power entirely or incorporated into the pantheon. Other examples might include the wars of the Æsir with the Vanir and Jotuns in Scandinavian mythology, the Babylonian epic Enuma Elish, the Hittite "Kingship in Heaven" Kumarbi narrative, the obscure generational conflict in Ugaritic fragments, and the Judeo-Christian tradition of the Fallen angel. A pantheon (Greek: παν, pan, all + θεός, theos, god), is a set of all the gods of a particular religion or mythology, such as the gods of Hinduism, Greek mythology, Norse mythology, and Egyptian mythology. ... In Old Norse, the Æsir (singular Ás, feminine Ásynja, feminine plural Ásynjur, Anglo-Saxon Ós, from Proto-Germanic *Ansuz) are the principal gods of the pantheon of Norse mythology. ... Vanir is the name of one of the two groups of gods in Norse mythology, the other and more well known being the Æsir. ... The giants Fafner and Fasolt seize Freyja in Arthur Rackhams illustration to Richard Wagners version of the Norse myths. ... Norse mythology, Viking mythology or Scandinavian mythology refer to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people. ... Babylonia was an ancient state in Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... Enûma Elish is the creation epic of Babylonian mythology. ... The Song of Kumarbi (CTH 344, also Kingship in Heaven) is the title given to a Hittite version of the Hurrian Kumarbi myth, dating to the 14th or 13th century BC. It is preserved in three tablets, but only a small fraction of the text is legible. ... Entrance to the Palace of Ugarit Ugarit (modern site Ras Shamra رأس شمرة; in Arabic) 35°35´ N; 35°45´E) was an ancient cosmopolitan port city, sited on the Mediterranean coast of northern Syria a few kilometers north of the modern city of Latakia. ... Judeo-Christian (or Judaeo-Christian) is a term used to describe the body of concepts and values which are thought to be held in common by Judaism and Christianity, and typically considered (sometimes along with classical Greco-Roman civilization) a fundamental basis for Western legal codes and moral values. ... It has been suggested that Evil Angels be merged into this article or section. ...

Contents

Prior events

The stage for this important battle was set after the youngest Titan, Cronus, overthrew his own father, Uranus (the Heaven itself and ruler of the cosmos), with the help of his mother, Gaia (the earth). Cronus (Ancient Greek Κρόνος, Krónos), also called Cronos or Kronos, was the leader and the youngest of the first generation of Titans, divine descendants of Gaia, the earth, and Uranus, the sky. ... Uranus is the Latinized form of Ouranos (), the Greek word for sky. ... Gaia (pronounced // or //) (land or earth, from the Greek ; variant spelling Gaea—see also Ge from ) is a Greek goddess personifying the Earth. ...


Uranus drew the enmity of Gaia, when he impresioned her children the Hecatonchires and Cyclopes in Tartarus. Gaia created a great sickle and gathered together Cronus and his brothers to persuade them to kill Uranus. Only Cronus was willing to do the deed, so Gaia gave him the sickle and placed him in ambush. Gaia (pronounced // or //) (land or earth, from the Greek ; variant spelling Gaea—see also Ge from ) is a Greek goddess personifying the Earth. ... The Hecatonchires, or Hekatonkheires, were three gargantuan figures of Greek mythology. ... Polyphemus the Cyclops. ... In classic Greek mythology, below heaven, earth, and hades is Tartarus, or Tartaros (Greek Τάρταρος, deep place). ... Using a sickle A Adam is a curved, hand-held agricultural tool typically used for harvesting grain crops before the advent of modern harvesting machinery. ...


When Uranus met with Gaia, Cronus attacked Uranus with the sickle by cutting off his genitals, castrating him and casting the severed member into the sea. From the blood (or, by a few accounts, semen) that spilled out from Uranus and fell upon the earth, the Gigantes, Erinyes, and Meliae were produced. This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... Horse semen being collected for breeding purposes. ... Gigantomachia: Dionysos attacking a Gigante, Attic red-figure pelike, ca. ... This article is about the characters from Greek myth. ... In Greek mythology, the Meliae were nymphs of the manna-ash tree. ...


Cronus took his father's throne after dispatching Uranus. He then secured his power by re-imprisoning his siblings the Hecatonchires and Cyclopes, and his (newly-created) siblings the Gigantes, in Tartarus. The Hecatonchires, or Hekatonkheires, were three gargantuan figures of Greek mythology. ... Polyphemus the Cyclops. ... Gigantomachia: Dionysos attacking a Gigante, Attic red-figure pelike, ca. ...


Gaia - angry at Cronus for keeping his brothers in the same pit Uranus locked them in - made a prophecy that Cronus' own children would rebel against his rule just as he had done to his own father. For fear of his unborn children rising against him, Cronus now turned into the terrible king his father Uranus had been, swallowing each of his children whole as they were born from his sister-wife Rhea. Rhea, however, managed to hide her child Zeus, by tricking Cronus into swallowing a rock wrapped in a blanket instead. Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is...


Rhea brought Zeus to a cave in Crete, where he was raised to adulthood. Later, Zeus gave Cronus a potion that caused Cronus to vomit up his swallowed children. Zeus then led his released brothers and sisters in rebellion against the Titans. For the famous World War II battle, see: Battle of Crete For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ...


War

The Fall of the Titans, by Cornelis van Haarlem
The Fall of the Titans, by Cornelis van Haarlem

Now the Olympians, led by Zeus, declared war against the previous generation of deities, the Titans. The Titans who fought were led by Cronus and included: Coeus, Crius, Hyperion, Iapetus, Atlas, Menoetius, the Gigantes,and Campe. The Olympians led by Zeus included: Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Hades, and Poseidon, assisted by the Hecatonchires (Hundred-handed ones) and Cyclopes, who had been imprisoned by Cronus. It is said the Hecatonchires helped the Olympians by hurling huge stones at the Titans—one hundred at a time. The Cyclopes helped by crafting Zeus' famous weapon, the lightning bolt. They also crafted Poseidon's trident and Hades' helmet. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x775, 265 KB) Fall of the Titans 1588 Oil on canvas, 239 cm x 307 cm Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Titanomachy ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x775, 265 KB) Fall of the Titans 1588 Oil on canvas, 239 cm x 307 cm Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Titanomachy ... Olympians can refer to any of the following: The Twelve Olympians of Ancient Greek mythology. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: it is patent nonsense. ... Cronus (Ancient Greek Κρόνος, Krónos), also called Cronos or Kronos, was the leader and the youngest of the first generation of Titans, divine descendants of Gaia, the earth, and Uranus, the sky. ... In Greek mythology, Coeus (also Koios) was the Titan of intelligence. ... In Greek mythology, Crius was one of the Titans, a son of Uranus and Gaia. ... In the Homers Iliad and Odyssey the sun god is called Helios Hyperion, Sun High-one. But in the Odyssey, Hesiods Theogony and the Homeric Hymn to Demeter the sun is once in each work called Hyperonides son of Hyperion and Hesiod certainly imagines Hyperion as a separate... In Greek mythology Iapetus, or Iapetos, was a Titan, the son of Uranus and Gaia, and father (by an Oceanid named Clymene or Asia) of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Menoetius and through Prometheus and Epimetheus and Atlas an ancestor of the human race. ... In Greek mythology, Atlas was one of the primordial Titans. ... In Greek mythology, Menoetius referred to several different people. ... Gigantomachia: Dionysos attacking a Gigante, Attic red-figure pelike, ca. ... A female monster in Greek mythology, Campe (crooked) guarded the Hecatonchires and Cyclopes in Tartarus after Cronus imprisoned them there; she was killed by Zeus when he rescued his uncles for help in the Titanomachy. ... In Greek mythology, virginal Hestia (ancient Greek ) is the goddess of the hearth, of the right ordering of domesticity and the family, who received the first offering at every sacrifice in the household. ... Ceres (Demeter), allegory of August: detail of a fresco by Cosimo Tura, Palazzo Schifanoia, Ferrara, 1469-70 Demeter was a god of the ancient greeks. ... In the Olympian pantheon of classical Greek Mythology, Hera (IPA pronunciation: ; Greek or ) was the wife and older sister of Zeus. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... The Hecatonchires, or Hekatonkheires, were three gargantuan figures of Greek mythology. ... Polyphemus the Cyclops. ... The Hecatonchires, or Hekatonkheires, were three gargantuan figures of Greek mythology. ... This page is about the mythical creatures. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ...


Having at last won victory after a full decade of war, the three Olympian brothers, according to a single passage in the Iliad drew lots to divide the spoils, granting dominion of the heavens and sky to Zeus, the sea to Poseidon, and the underworld to Hades. The Olympians then shut the defeated Titans within Tartarus, the deepest depths of the underworld. However, since during the war Oceanus and the Titanides (female Titans), Thia, Rhea, Themis, Mnemosyne, Phoebe, and Tethys, had remained neutral, they were not punished by Zeus. Some other Titans who were not imprisoned in Tartarus include: Atlas, Cronus, and Prometheus and Epimetheus. Zeus gave Atlas a different punishment. Old Uranus, the sky, nearly collapsed onto the earth after the war because so much fighting had occurred below. As a result, Zeus condemned Atlas to hold up the heavens and sky for eternity. Cronus managed to flee after the war, thereby avoiding imprisonment in Tartarus. The Hecatonchires remained to guard over the prisoners of Tartarus. It has been suggested that Deception of Zeus be merged into this article or section. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... In classic Greek mythology, below heaven, earth, and hades is Tartarus, or Tartaros (Greek Τάρταρος, deep place). ... In Greek mythology, the underworld indicates the kingdom of deaths. ... In the Greek and Roman world-view, Oceanus (Greek , Okeanos), was the world-ocean, which they believed to be an enormous river encircling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Theia (also written Thea or Thia), also called Euryphaessa (wide-shining), was a Titan. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... Mnemosyne (Greek , IPA in RP and in General American) (sometimes shortened to Mneme) was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. ... Phoebe (pronunced fee-bee) was one of the original Titans, one set of sons and daughters of Uranus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... In Greek mythology, Atlas was one of the primordial Titans. ... Cronus (Ancient Greek Κρόνος, Krónos), also called Cronos or Kronos, was the leader and the youngest of the first generation of Titans, divine descendants of Gaia, the earth, and Uranus, the sky. ... Prométhée enchaîné (Prometheus Bound) by Nicolas-Sébastien Adam (1762) For other uses, see Prometheus (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Epimetheus (hindsight, literally hind-thought) was the brother of Prometheus (foresight, literally fore-thought), a pair of Titans who acted as representatives of mankind (Kerenyi 1951, p 207). ... Uranus is the Latinized form of Ouranos (), the Greek word for sky. ... Cronus (Ancient Greek Κρόνος, Krónos), also called Cronos or Kronos, was the leader and the youngest of the first generation of Titans, divine descendants of Gaia, the earth, and Uranus, the sky. ... In classic Greek mythology, below heaven, earth, and hades is Tartarus, or Tartaros (Greek Τάρταρος, deep place). ... The Hecatonchires, or Hekatonkheires, were three gargantuan figures of Greek mythology. ... In classic Greek mythology, below heaven, earth, and hades is Tartarus, or Tartaros (Greek Τάρταρος, deep place). ...


See also

Dionysos attacking a Giant during the Gigantomachia, Attic red-figure pelike, ca. ... The front of the Pergamon Altar, as it is reconstructed in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin. ... Theomachy is a reference to battles fought between Greek Olympians themselves. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek , plural ) were greater even than the gods. ...

Notes

    External links and further reading

    Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
    Titanomachy
    • Hesiod's Theogony has a telling of the Titanomachy. (broken Link)
    • Eumelus of Corinth's fragmentary epic (broken Link) Titanomachia.

      Results from FactBites:
     
    Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Titanomachy (0 words)
    In Greek mythology, the Titanomachy, or War of the Titans (Τιτανομαχία), was the eleven-year series of battles fought between the two races of deities long before the existence of mankind: the Titans, fighting from Mount Othrys, and the Olympians, who would come to reign on Mount Olympus.
    These Greek myths of the Titanomachy fall into a class of similar myths throughout Europe and the Near East, where one generation or group of gods by and large opposes the dominant one.
    Sometimes the rebels lose, and are either cast out of power entirely or incorporated into the pantheon.
    Titan (mythology) Information (1143 words)
    Greeks of the Classical age knew of several poems about the war between the gods and many of the Titans, the Titanomachy ("War of the Titans").
    A lost epic Titanomachy attributed to the blind Thracian bard Thamyris, himself a legendary figure, was mentioned in passing in an essay On Music that was once attributed to Plutarch.
    These Greek myths of the Titanomachy fall into a class of similar myths of a War in Heaven throughout Europe and the Near East, where one generation or group of gods by and large opposes the dominant one.
      More results at FactBites »

     
     

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