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Encyclopedia > Titanic (TV miniseries)
Titanic
Directed by Robert Lieberman
Produced by Rocky Lang
Written by Ross LaManna
Joyce Eliason
Starring George C. Scott
Marilu Henner
Peter Gallagher
Catherine Zeta-Jones
Tim Curry
Music by Lennie Niehaus
Cinematography David Hennings
Editing by Tod Feuerman
Distributed by RHI Entertainment
Release date(s) November 17, 1996
Running time 173 min.
Country Canada/United States
Language English
Budget $13,000,000 (estimated)
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Titanic was a made-for-TV movie that premiered in 1996. Titanic follows several characters on board the RMS Titanic when she sinks on her maiden voyage in 1912. The miniseries was directed by Robert Lieberman. The original music score was composed by Lennie Niehaus. Robert Lieberman is a director of movies and television series. ... George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ... Marilu Henner (born April 6, 1952) is an American actress and producer. ... Peter Killian Gallagher (born August 19, 1955) is a Golden Globe-winning American actor. ... Catherine Zeta-Jones (born 25 September 1969) is an Academy Award-winning Welsh actress based in the United States. ... Timothy James Curry (born April 19, 1946) is an Emmy Award-winning English actor, singer, and composer, perhaps best known for his role as mad scientist Dr. Frank-N-Furter in The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). ... Lennie Niehaus is an American alto saxophonist, arranger, and composer. ... RHI Entertainment is an American producer of television movies and miniseries, founded in the 1980s by Robert Halmi Jr. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ... Robert Lieberman is a director of movies and television series. ... Lennie Niehaus is an American alto saxophonist, arranger, and composer. ...


Taglines:

  • They all said she was unsinkable. When she sank, it was unthinkable.
  • The story so few lived to tell.

Contents

Plot summary

Titanic has three different storylines. Mrs. Isabella Paradine is traveling on the Titanic to see her husband. On the Titanic, she meets Wynn Park, her ex-husband. She falls in love with him again, sending her husband a telegram saying that they can't be together anymore. When the ship starts sinking Isabella has to leave Wynn reluctantly.


Also in first class are the Allison family, a real family who traveled on the actual ship, returning home to Montreal with their two small children and new nurse, Alice Cleaver. They notice something wrong with her, and a maid asks her if she had been in Cairo last month, but soon realizes that she remembers her from the highly publicized trial where Alice was accused of throwing her baby off a train. When the Titanic starts sinking Alice Cleaver panics and leaves with the Allisons' baby, Trevor, and gets into a lifeboat. The family doesn't know, and they refuse to leave the ship without their baby, which in the end, costs them their lives. Hudson Joshua Creighton Allison (b. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ...


In third class, Jamie Pierce steals a ticket to get on board. He manages to become friends with the ship's purser Simon Doonan, who is a robber. Jamie falls in love with Osa Ludvigson and they spend time on board together. However, she is raped by Doonan, and she doesn't trust anybody anymore. When the ship hits the iceberg, Jamie can't convince Osa to go into a lifeboat, but in the end she does.


Historical inaccuracy

Produced in advance of the imminent James Cameron film on the same topic, this TV version was rushed into production and very hastily completed in order to cash in on the latter's pre-release hype. It premiered over two nights in late November 1996. The first part received high Nielsen ratings, but experienced a huge drop during the second part, because most viewers got turned off by the lackluster production. Since the film was so rushed, it included mistakes and historical inaccuracies which Titanic enthusiasts found inexcusable given the wealth of knowledge about the liner and its occupants available by the mid 1990s. Titanic is a 1997 American romantic drama film directed, written, produced and edited by James Cameron about the sinking of the RMS Titanic. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ...


Some of the mistakes and historical inaccuracies include:

  • Unlike the steerage bathroom seen during the rape scene, Titanic's 3rd class had only two bathtubs. There were no shower stalls as seen in the film. Shower stalls were almost unknown in the UK at the time.
  • Alice Cleaver was not a psychotically insane child murderess as portrayed. She was confused with another woman of the same name, a common mistake when it comes discussing the Titanic survivors. The real Alice Cleaver went on to be a recluse rarely talking about the Titanic until she died in the 1970s. Miss Cleaver either had a roommate in the form of another servant and did not sleep with the Allison children, or only slept with Trevor in a separate stateroom. The film shows her in the same cabin as Lorraine.
  • Alice Cleaver and baby Trevor Allison boarded lifeboat number 11, quite late into the sinking; not lifeboat 7, the first one launched.
  • The real Lorraine Allison was barely two at the time of the sinking.
  • The Allisons were portrayed in the film as Americans. They were Canadians.
  • It is not known whether First Officer William Murdoch actually committed suicide, though this can hardly be considered a historical inaccuracy due to the fact that there were no survival accounts which spoke of Murdoch's fate.
  • Thomas Andrews, a person of major historical importance, was deleted altogether, with parts of his involvement during the night fused onto Captain Smith's and J. Bruce Ismay's characters.
  • Ismay did not participate in the final outfitting of the ship and was not in the boiler room (a location forbidden to passengers) at any time during the voyage.
  • Like most films on the subject, Ismay's role in the tragedy is greatly exaggerated for melodramatic purposes. In specific, he did not force the ship's crew to run the liner at breakneck speed. He testified at the Senate hearings on the sinking that had the ship been travelling at its maximum speed, it would have arrived in New York in the middle of the night and would have had to wait up to eight hours for both a pilot and customs clearance. Ismay may have wished to increase the ship's speed temporarily during the day on Monday in order to carry out a short series of sea trials, but he did not mention this in his testimony.
  • Fourth Officer Joseph Boxhall did not go down with the ship. In fact, he went on to have a successful career in the Royal Navy and the Cunard Line, White Star Line's rival company. He then went onto be a technical advisor on A Night to Remember and to be one of the foremost authorities of the disaster.
  • At one point Captain Smith complains that the rockets are white, when in fact they should be red for distress. White is the correct color for distress and Captain Smith, of all people, would have known that.
  • The Morse code lamp was located on top of the bridge, but in the film its location is bizarrely shifted onto the front of the first class promenade deck.
  • The crew aboard the SS Californian are shown giving up trying to achieve contact with the Titanic after a short while and the ship's Captain, Stanley Lord, calmly going to sleep. The actions of those aboard the Californian that night are a subject of great controversy in the Titanic community; most are agreed, however, that the Californian's wireless officer went to bed shortly before Titanic broadcast its distress call and did not power up his set until early the next morning.
  • The real Captain Lord and wireless operator Cyril Evans (both of the Californian) were much younger than the actors chosen to portray them. Captain Lord was in his mid-thirties, while Evans was twenty.
  • Margaret Tobin Brown was not referred to as "Molly" until the writers Gene Fowler and Carolyn Bancroft used her (beginning in the year after her death) as the subject of a number of highly imaginative fictional folk tales. Far from the raving, oversexed hillbilly portrayed by Marilu Henner, Margaret Brown was an intelligent, well-mannered social and political activist who spoke several foreign languages and contributed heavily to cultural and human rights causes. She was also much older and less attractive than portrayed in the film and she did not board the Titanic until Cherbourg.
  • Margaret Brown did not spend any time gambling and drinking at the smoking room. The smoking room was a male-only preserve, and women would not have been allowed inside. At the time of the collision, she was most likely sound asleep in her cabin.
  • The Titanic was not booked solid as indicated in the film. In fact, the majority of her first and second class cabins were empty during the voyage, and just under half of her steerage berths were empty.
  • There was no gate between the steerage to first class on A deck. The entrance out of steerage around that area led to B deck.
  • The hallways leading to the first class staterooms were not wood paneled. Their walls were actually painted white, with an array of paneling from ornate to simple.
  • The first class grand staircase is shown without the glass dome, but with two unhistoric light fixtures on either side of the central clock and with much more darker, heavier oak paneling.
  • The first class smoking room did not have a bar. The stewards served drinks and other beverages in a classic waiting fashion.
  • Even though Titanic had a Ritz-inspired restaurant with an adjoining promenade cafe patterned after Parisian sidewalk establishments and two Palm Court Verandahs, there was no gigantic two story tea room with revolving doors and huge windows as depicted at one point in the film. In fact, one look at the superstructure at any point in the film would show that it was physically impossible for the ship to have room for such an establishment. This space could be a substitution for the first class lounge, which was not shown in the film.
  • John Jacob Astor IV did not say, "I asked for ice, but this is ridiculous!" It is an urban legend.
  • During a sweeping crane shot of the port side of the ship, several mistakes in the design of the set are apparent, including but not limited to, an extra deck house on the poop and forecastle decks, the main mast facing the wrong direction, and the absence of 'B' Deck.
  • The first class dining saloon is shown in different scenes as being on 'A' Deck and the Boat Deck. In reality, it was located on 'D' Deck.
  • Access to the dining saloon was gained through two sets of double doors leading from the reception room located at the bottom of the Grand Staircase. In the film, three large arched openings are shown.
  • The actual first class dining room was painted white, not peaches-and-cream as shown in the film.
  • There are several errors during the Southampton scenes, such as having Titanic docked by her starboard side. The deck houses on the docks also appear to be from New York City.
  • The Titanic was built and fitted out in Belfast, not Southampton as shown in the film.
  • There were no press conferences held aboard the ship on the day before her maiden voyage and the speech Captain Smith gives the reporters about the art of ship building was in reality delivered by him five years earlier on another White Star liner, the Adriatic.
  • Chief Officer Henry Wilde, Third Officer Herbert Pitman and Sixth Officer James Moody are omitted.
  • Titanic's first class dining room was not fitted with a dance floor as shown in the film. However, Titanic's sister ship, Olympic, was fitted with a dance floor much later in her career.
  • Contrary to the popular belief, there was no organized dancing in first class. In fact, it would have been considered bordering on the obscene to dance during dinner within the upper class.
  • Moreover, the tango (which the characters are portrayed dancing) originated in the bordellos of Argentina and would have been completely beneath the notice of the upper classes. It was almost unknown as a ballroom dance until after World War I.
  • The ship's lookouts did indeed have to work without the binoculars, but not because they had been taken to the bridge for use there. They had been misplaced back in Southampton.
  • By 1912, the concept of "moving pictures" was nothing new, so it's hardly plausible that some of the characters would be astonished when told of the concept. Morever, Mary Pickford did not become a full fledged movie star and a household name until 1917, so it was nearly impossible for Jamie Perse to have any idea who Miss Pickford was, let alone knowing her name.
  • Shortly after the ship collides with the iceberg, first class passengers Molly Brown, John Jacob Astor and the fictional character of "Mr. Foley" (loosely based on Sir Cosmo Duff Gordon, a real passenger) are shown emerging from the second class entrance at the aft port side of the boat deck. To top off such a gratutious mistake, the trio is then shown admiring the passengers tossing around the pieces of ice that fell onto the deck after the collision, even though the ship hit the berg with her starboard side at the bow and the iceberg never even fully reached A-deck, which was a level below the boat deck.
  • The characters played by Catherine Zeta-Jones and Peter Gallagher both visit a service window to receive and send out wireless telegrams. Such a window did not exist on the Titanic; first class passengers sent and received telegrams via steward, rather than first-hand with the Marconi operators.
  • The Carpathia's deck was not littered with corpses as the film shows. In fact, only one body was found by the rescue ship and buried at sea shortly afterwards. Some references state that one passenger also died after being rescued. The majority of the bodies recovered were found by the cable ship Mackay-Bennett which was chartered by the White Star Line for the recovery of the bodies.
  • The davits seen on the film's RMS Carpathia were actually first developed in 1926.
  • At the very end of the film, a caption reads that "all the attempts to raise the Titanic had failed." No such attempt has ever been made. The wreckage is so fragile that experts believe it would be impossible to raise even a small section.

For the 1944 movie, see Lifeboat (film). ... Lieutenant William McMaster Murdoch RNR (February 28, 1873 - April 15, 1912) was the First Officer aboard the RMS Titanic, and was one of 1,496 people who died when the luxury liner sank in the Atlantic in 1912. ... Thomas Andrews, Jr. ... J. Bruce Ismay Joseph Bruce Ismay (December 12, 1862 - October 15, 1937) was a British businessman who served as Managing Director of the White Star Line of steamships. ... Commander Joseph Groves Boxhall (23 March 1884 – 25 April 1967) was the Fourth Officer on the Titanic, and later served as a naval officer in World War I. // Early life Boxhall was born in Hull in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England, the second child of Capt. ... “RNR” redirects here. ... The Cunard Line, formerly Cunard White Star Line, is a British cruise line, operator of ocean liners RMS Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2) and RMS Queen Mary 2 (QM2). ... A Night to Remember is a 1958 film adaptation of Walter Lords book of the same name, recounting the final night of the RMS Titanic. ... 1922 Chart of the Morse Code Letters and Numerals Morse code is a method for transmitting telegraphic information, using standardized sequences of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a message. ... Signal lamp training during World War II. Signal lamp, also called Aldis lamp, is a visual signaling device for optical communication (typically using Morse code) – essentially a focused lamp which can produce a pulse of light. ... SS Californian The SS Californian was a Leyland Line steamship that was in the vicinity of the RMS Titanic when it sank on April 15, 1912. ... For the New York criminal, see Margaret Brown. ... Hillbilly is a term, often considered pejorative but sometimes endearing, referring to people who dwell in remote, rural, mountainous areas. ... Marilu Henner (born April 6, 1952) is an American actress and producer. ... Cherbourg is a city of Normandy, in northwestern France, in the Manche département, of which it is a sous_préfecture. ... John Jacob Astor IV (July 13, 1864 – April 15, 1912) was an American millionaire businessman, inventor, writer, a member of the prominent Astor family, and a lieutenant colonel in the Spanish-American War. ... An urban legend or urban myth is similar to a modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ... Captain Edward John Smith, RD , RNR (January 27, 1850 – April 15, 1912) was the captain of the RMS Titanic when it sank in 1912. ... For other uses, see White star. ... Henry Tingle Wilde (September 21, 1872 – April 15, 1912) was the Chief Officer of the RMS Titanic. ... Pitman, left, with Second Officer Charles Lightoller. ... 6th officer James Paul Moody (born August 21, 1887 - died April 15, 1912) was the youngest officer on the RMS Titanic and the only junior officer of the ship to perish in the disaster. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... Cinema can refer to: Film, motion pictures or movies. ... Mary Pickford (April 8, 1892 – May 29, 1979) was an Oscar-winning Canadian motion picture star and co-founder of United Artists in 1919. ... A movie star or film star is a celebrity who is a person known for his or her roles in motion pictures. ... Catherine Zeta-Jones (born 25 September 1969) is an Academy Award-winning Welsh actress based in the United States. ... Peter Killian Gallagher (born August 19, 1955) is a Golden Globe-winning American actor. ... The CS Mackay-Bennett was a cable-laying ship based in Halifax, Nova Scotia. ... RMS Carpathia The RMS Carpathia was a Cunard Line transatlantic passenger steamship built by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson. ...

Trivia

  • Originally intended as a remake of the 1979 television film S.O.S. Titanic.
  • The original screenplay contains many historical characters and elements associated with S.O.S. Titanic, but the main storyline was heavily influenced by James Cameron's fictional love story that appears in his blockbuster.
  • Contains many elements shown in James Cameron's epic blockbuster (which, in turn, liberally borrows from the 1943 version.) The rumor in Hollywood was that someone at CBS got ahold of Cameron's original script from 20th Century Fox and altered it into their own miniseries in order to cash in on the impending blockbuster's pre-release hype. The first draft of the teleplay for the mini-series contains several fictional scenes and subplots that were clearly lifted from Cameron's vision. It is alleged that the script was re-written at the last second in order to avoid lawsuits from 20th Century Fox and Paramount. Such a hasty re-write can explain numerous plot holes, mistakes and awkwardly written-in subplots.
  • The film was released to home video soon after the release of James Cameron's blockbuster film.
  • Billy Zane played Caledon Hockley in James Cameron's version of Titanic. Zane and Catherine Zeta-Jones starred in The Phantom; Zane as the legendary superhero and Zeta-Jones as an evil aviatrix.
  • Steven Spielberg was inspired to hire Catherine Zeta-Jones after seeing her in this mini-series.
  • Visual effects company Vision Crew Unlimited contributed miniatures to James Cameron's version of Titanic as well as the miniseries.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... S.O.S. Titanic (1979) is a television movie that covers the doomed 1912 voyage as it is experienced by two second-class passengers, one played by David Warner, who would go on to play a personal security person to a first-class passenger in the 1997 film Titanic. ... S.O.S. Titanic (1979) is a television movie that covers the doomed 1912 voyage as it is experienced by two second-class passengers, one played by David Warner, who would go on to play a personal security person to a first-class passenger in the 1997 film Titanic. ... For other persons named James Cameron, see James Cameron (disambiguation). ... Titanic is a 1997 American romantic drama film directed, written, produced and edited by James Cameron about the sinking of the RMS Titanic. ... Titanic was a 1943 Nazi propaganda film made during World War II in Berlin by Tobis Productions for Ufa Films. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Titanic is a 1997 American romantic drama film directed, written, produced and edited by James Cameron about the sinking of the RMS Titanic. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... The home video business rents and sells videocassettes and DVDs to the public. ... William George Billy Zane, Jr. ... For other persons named James Cameron, see James Cameron (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Phantom. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Catherine Zeta-Jones (born 25 September 1969) is an Academy Award-winning Welsh actress based in the United States. ... Vision Crew Unlimited was founded in 1994 by visual effects artists Evan Jacobs, Jon Warren and Douglas Miller with the goal of providing high quality visual effects for feature films, commercials, and television. ... For other persons named James Cameron, see James Cameron (disambiguation). ...

Main cast

Actor Role
George C. Scott Captain Edward J. Smith
Marilu Henner Mrs. Margaret "Molly" Brown
Peter Gallagher Wynn Park
Catherine Zeta-Jones Mrs. Isabella Paradine
Tim Curry Simon Doonan
Eva Marie Saint Hazel Foley
Roger Rees J. Bruce Ismay
Harley Jane Kozak Bess Allison
Kavan Smith Fifth Officer Harold Lowe

George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ... Captain Edward John Smith, RD , RNR (January 27, 1850 – April 15, 1912) was the captain of the RMS Titanic when it sank in 1912. ... Marilu Henner (born April 6, 1952) is an American actress and producer. ... For the New York criminal, see Margaret Brown. ... Peter Killian Gallagher (born August 19, 1955) is a Golden Globe-winning American actor. ... Catherine Zeta-Jones (born 25 September 1969) is an Academy Award-winning Welsh actress based in the United States. ... Timothy James Curry (born April 19, 1946) is an Emmy Award-winning English actor, singer, and composer, perhaps best known for his role as mad scientist Dr. Frank-N-Furter in The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). ... Eva Marie Saint (born July 4, 1924) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Roger Rees Roger Rees (born on May 4, 1944) is a British-American actor. ... J. Bruce Ismay Joseph Bruce Ismay (December 12, 1862 - October 15, 1937) was a British businessman who served as Managing Director of the White Star Line of steamships. ... Harley Jane Kozak (January 28, 1957) is an American actress and author. ... Kavan Smith as Major Lorne in Stargate Atlantis Kavan Smith (born 1970) is a Canadian actor best known for playing Major Lorne in Stargate SG-1 and Stargate Atlantis and for his recurring role as Agent Garrity in The 4400. ... Harold Lowe Harold Godfrey Lowe (born November 21, 1882 - died May 12, 1944) is best known as one of the RMS Titanics surviving officers. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia Titanica Message Board: Archive through 11 October, 2003 (4193 words)
That miniseries was more effective as a look into the workings of a transatlantic liner in the early 20th century than about the Titanic specifically.
Granted, the sets for SOS Titanic could use a little work and I was never once convinced that for the large scale shots I wasn't looking at the Queen Mary, but overall I thought it a standup piece of work.
The worst Titanic movie, sorry to say for those who feel otherwise, is Cameron's by a mile with me. No amount of accurate sets and impressive SFX can ever compensate for the worst written script ever, not to mention insufferably annoying characters and performances from all the leads.
Titanic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (158 words)
The RMS Titanic, a famous ocean liner that sank on its maiden voyage in 1912.
Titanic (1997 film), the most popular version of the Titanic disaster.
Salman Raduyev, a Chechen warlord whose nickname was "Titanic"
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