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Encyclopedia > Tip O'Neill
Thomas Phillip O'Neill, Jr.

Thomas Phillip "Tip" O'Neill, Jr. (December 9, 1912January 5, 1994) was an American politician. O'Neill was an outspoken liberal Democrat and influential member of the U.S. Congress, serving in the House of Representatives for 34 years and representing two congressional districts of Massachusetts. He was the Speaker of the House from 1977 until his retirement in 1987, making him the second longest-serving Speaker in U.S. history after Sam Rayburn. Image File history File links This is the official government photo of Tip ONeill. ... December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Politics of the United States of America takes place in a framework of a federal presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of the United States is both head of state and head of government, and of a two-party legislative and electoral system. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Influence Science and Practice (ISBN 0321188950) is a Psychology book examining the key ways people can be influenced by Compliance Professionals. The books authors is Robert B. Cialdini, Professor of Psychology at Arizona State University. ... Seal of the U.S. Congress. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... U.S. Congressional districts are determined after each census. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Dennis Hastert, the current Speaker, presiding from a chair in the front of the chamber. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ... ...

Contents

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Early life and political career

O'Neill was born to Thomas Phillip O'Neill, Sr., and Rose Ann (Tolan) O'Neill in what was known as the Irish middle-class area of Cambridge, Massachusetts. During his childhood, O'Neill received the nickname "Tip" after the baseball player James "Tip" O'Neill. Educated in Roman Catholic schools, O'Neill first became active in politics at 15, campaigning for Al Smith in his 1928 presidential campaign against Republican Herbert Hoover. Four years later, he helped get out the vote for Franklin D. Roosevelt. As a senior at Boston College, Mr. O'Neill lost his first campaign which was for the Cambridge City Council, by only 150 votes. Cambridge City Hall Settled: 1630 â€“ Incorporated: 1636 Zip Code(s): 02139 â€“ Area Code(s): 617 / 857 Official website: http://www. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... James Tip ONeill (May 25, 1858-December 31, 1915) was a [baseball] player in the early 19th century. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Students in Rome, Italy. ... Al Smith waves to crowds, 1928 Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the 31st President of the United States (1929-1933), was a successful mining engineer, humanitarian, and administrator. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... This article is about Boston College; for the unaffiliated urban university see Boston University. ... Cambridge City Hall Settled: 1630 â€“ Incorporated: 1636 Zip Code(s): 02139 â€“ Area Code(s): 617 / 857 Official website: http://www. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ...


After graduating in 1936, O'Neill was elected as a Democrat to the Massachusetts House of Representatives. In 1949, he became the first Democratic Speaker of the State House in Massachusetts history. He remained in that post until 1952, when he ran for the United States House of Representatives from a district in the Boston suburbs. 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

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Congressman O'Neill

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Quick rise in the House leadership

O'Neill was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1952. The seat was being vacated by Senator-elect John F. Kennedy (who had just been elected to serve his first term). During his second term in the House, he was selected to the House Rules Committee where he proved a crucial soldier for the Democratic leadership, particularly Speaker John W. McCormack. In 1967, as the chairman of the committee, O'Neill openly criticized President Lyndon B. Johnson and the Vietnam War. In a meeting at the White House, O'Neill told the President: "In my heart and in my conscience I believe your policy is wrong." During the Vietnam era, many notable politicians that were opposed to the war were voted out of office because some viewed their stances as anti-American and labeled them as being soft on national defense. However, O'Neill became more popular in part due to his stance on the war. O'Neill won the trust and support of younger House members who also had the same stance on Vietnam, and they became important friends as O'Neill rose in power throughout the House. Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy, or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... The Committee on Rules, or (more commonly) Rules Committee, is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... John McCormack John William McCormack (December 21, 1891 – November 22, 1980) was an American politician from Boston, Massachusetts. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines Democratic Republic of Vietnam National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength ~1,200,000 (1968) ~520,000 (1968) Casualties South Vietnamese dead... North façade of the White House, seen from Pennsylvania Avenue. ...

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House Majority Whip and Majority Leader

In 1971 O'Neill was appointed Majority Whip in the House, the number three position for the Democratic Party in the House. In 1973, he was elected House Majority Leader, after Hale Boggs died in an plane crash in Alaska. As the majority leader, O'Neill was the most prominent Democrat in the House to call in 1973 for an investigation and possible impeachment of President Richard Nixon because of the Watergate scandal. In August 1974, Nixon, facing almost certain impeachment in the House and little support in the Senate, resigned. 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... The Majority Whip is an elected member of the U.S. House of Representatives who assists the Speaker of the House and the Majority Leader to coordinate ideas on and garner support for proposed legislation. ... The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (at least 218 of the 435 seats). ... Thomas Hale Boggs Sr. ... Capt. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The term Watergate refers to a series of events, spanning from 1972 to 1975, that got their name from burglaries of the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee in the Watergate Hotel complex in Washington, D.C.. Though then-President Nixon had endured two years of mounting political embarrassments, the...


Image:Http://img.timeinc.net/time/magazine/archive/covers/1974/1101740204 400.jpg

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O'Neill's association with Republican Leader Gerald Ford

O'Neill became friends with his counterpart on the Republican side, House Minority Leader Gerald Ford and had a hand in his nomination as Vice President. However, O'Neill was also a loyal Democrat determined to take back the White House in 1976, and took many opportunities to criticize Ford's administration. O'Neill said Ford was "a lovely guy but a lousy President" and "worse than Harding and Hoover put together". [1] The Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives serves as floor leader of the opposition party, and is the minority counterpart to the Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government. ... North façade of the White House, seen from Pennsylvania Avenue. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...

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Speaker of the House

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O'Neill replaces Carl Albert

As a result of the Tongsun Park scandal in 1975, House Speaker Carl Albert retired from Congress. O'Neill was elected Speaker in 1977, the same year Democrat Jimmy Carter became President. Tongsun Park was a figure in the Koreagate scandal of the 1970s with a reputation as the Asian Great Gatsby, a socialite who charmed congressmen with his Washington dinner parties and cash payments. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). ... Carl Bert Albert (May 10, 1908 – February 4, 2000) was a lawyer and a Democratic American politician from Oklahoma. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ...

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O'Neill's work with President Jimmy Carter

With substantial majorities in each house of Congress and control of the White House, O'Neill had hoped that the Democrats would be able to implement many social programs, such as universal health care and more jobs programs. Instead, the Democrats lacked party discipline on such matters. While the Carter administration and O'Neill began strong with passage of the ethics and energy packages in 1977, it had some major stumbles. Troubles began with Carter's threats to veto a water projects bill, pet projects of many members of Congress. O'Neill was also irked by some of Carter's appointments to federal offices as well as his staff. Due to a continuing weak economy and the Iran hostage crisis, prospects looked bad for Carter and the Democrats in the up-coming 1980 Congressional and Presidential election. Universal health care is a health care system in which all residents of a geographic or political entity have their health care paid for, regardless of medical condition or financial status. ... A defaced Great Seal of the United States at the former US embassy, Tehran, Iran, as it appears today The Iran hostage crisis was a 444-day (about 14 months) period during which student proxies of the new Iranian regime held hostage 52 diplomats and citizens of the United States...

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Republicans target O'Neill in 1980

Republicans made O'Neill a target of their 1980 campaign, portraying a washed-up old politician with liberal ideas. The National Republican Congressional Committee produced a television commercial that had an actor who resembled the Speaker laughing off warnings that his vehicle was low on fuel, until the vehicle finally ground to a halt. The announcer then proclaimed, "The Democrats have run out of gas." Although the Republicans made significant gains in the House in 1980, coinciding with the election of Republican Ronald Reagan, similar efforts to target O'Neill in the 1982 elections backfired and the Democrats remained firmly in control of the House for more than a decade. 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... The National Republican Congressional Committee is the Republican Hill committee for the United States House of Representatives, working to elect Republicans to that body. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

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O'Neill at odds with President Ronald Reagan

O'Neill became a leading opponent of the Reagan administration's domestic and defense policies. O'Neill believed Reagan to be appallingly ignorant of the intricacies of government; calling him the most ignorant man who had ever occupied the White House. O'Neill also said that Reagan was "Herbert Hoover with a smile" and "a cheerleader for selfishness." However, O'Neill and Reagan have been reported to have been on cordial terms privately. [1]

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Working for peace in Northern Ireland

One of O'Neill's greatest accomplishments as Speaker involved Northern Ireland. Working with fellow Irish-American politicians Governor Hugh Carey, Senator Edward M. Kennedy, and Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, they became known as the "Four Horsemen". Beginning with the "St. Patrick's Day declaration" in 1977 denouncing violence in Northern Ireland and culminating with the Irish aid package upon signing the Anglo-Irish Agreement in 1985, the "Four Horsemen" convinced Carter and Reagan to press the British government on the subject. Motto: (French for God and my right)2 Anthem: UK: God Save the Queen Regional: (De facto) Londonderry Air Capital Belfast Largest city Belfast Official language(s) English (De facto), Irish, Ulster Scots 3 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Office suspended... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Hugh Leo Carey (born April 11, 1919) was the Governor of New York between 1975 and 1983. ... Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ... Daniel Patrick Moynihan Daniel Patrick Pat Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was a United States Senator, Ambassador, and eminent sociologist. ... St. ... The Anglo-Irish Agreement was an agreement between the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland which aimed to bring an end to the Troubles in Northern Ireland. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

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After Congress

O'Neill retired from his seat in 1987. That same year O'Neill wrote (with author William Novak) about his career in the best-selling book Man of the House. During his retirement, O'Neill made commercials for a credit card company, a motel chain, and a personal computer. He also made a brief appearance in the 1993 film Dave (as himself) assessing the work of the fictional American President in the movie. 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Credit cards A credit card system is a type of retail transaction settlement and credit system, named after the small plastic card issued to users of the system. ... Holiday Inn Great Sign Exterior of a Howard Johnsons motor lodge. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as—in metonymy—the field in general. ... Dave is a 1993 comedy movie written by Gary Ross, directed by Ivan Reitman, and starring Kevin Kline (in a dual role), Sigourney Weaver, Frank Langella, Kevin Dunn, Ving Rhames, Ben Kingsley, and Laura Linney. ...


He also had a cameo role in a 1984 episode of Cheers shortly before his retirement when he ducked into the bar to escape a woman who pestered him on the street about his political ideals. She turned out to be Diane Chambers. He later said that the show was ranked 60th in the Gallup Polls at that time and that the week afterward it jumped some 20 places after that. He always believed he had something to do with it. Cheers was a long-running American situation comedy produced by Charles-Burrows-Charles Productions in association with Paramount Television for NBC. Cheers was created by the team of James Burrows, Glen Charles, and Les Charles. ... Diane Chambers was a character on the American television show Cheers, portrayed by Shelley Long (1982–1987, 1993). ...


Later on in retirement, O'Neill, who had suffered from colon cancer, made public service advertisements about cancer in which he joined athletes and movie stars in talking candidly about having the disease. Diagram of the stomach, colon, and rectum Colorectal cancer includes cancerous growths in the colon, rectum and appendix. ...


In 1994, at the age of 81, Tip O'Neill died, survived by his widow, Mildred, and their children. Upon his passing, then-President Bill Clinton said: "Tip O'Neill was the nation's most prominent, powerful and loyal champion of working people", and continued "He loved politics and government because he saw politics and government could make a difference in people's lives. And he loved people most of all." William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


The Speaker's oldest son and namesake, Thomas P. O'Neill III, a former lieutenant governor of Massachusetts, is in public relations in Boston. Another son, Christopher, is a Washington lawyer, and a third, Michael, is in business in Cambridge. One daughter, Susan, has her own business in Washington, and another, Rosemary, is a political officer for the State Department. Thomas P. ONeill III is Chief Executive Officer of a public relations and government affairs firm known as ONeill and Associates in Boston. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., with regard to the surrounding states of Maryland and Virginia. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... Cambridge City Hall Settled: 1630 â€“ Incorporated: 1636 Zip Code(s): 02139 â€“ Area Code(s): 617 / 857 Official website: http://www. ...


Mr. O'Neill's wife, Millie, died on October 6, 2003. In addition to their children, they are survived by eight grandchildren. October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Thomas P. O'Neill Jr. Tunnel, built through downtown Boston as part of the Big Dig to carry Interstate 93 under Boston, is named for him. There is also a federal office building in Boston named for him. The Thomas P. Tip ONeill Jr. ... Nickname: City on a Hill, Beantown, The Hub of the Universe (The State House, according to Oliver Wendell Holmes, is the hub of the Solar System), Athens of America Location in Massachusetts Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas Menino (D) Area    - City 232. ... Big Dig is the unofficial name of the Central Artery/Tunnel Project (CA/T), a megaproject to reroute the Central Artery (Interstate 93), the chief controlled-access highway through the heart of Boston, Massachusetts, into a 3. ... Interstate 93 is an interstate highway in the New England section of the United States. ...

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Reference

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Tip O'Neill
  • Farrell, John A. (2001). Tip O'Neill and the Democratic Century. Boston: Little, Brown & Co. ISBN 0-316-26049-5.
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Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote logo Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

Primary sources

  • Thomas P. O'Neill, Man of the House: The Life and Political Memoirs of Speaker Tip O'Neill With William Novak (1987)
  • Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., a Democratic Power in the House for Decades, Dies at 81 obituary
  • http://www.jafarrell.com
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Citations

  1. ^ qtd. in Farrell, 438.
Preceded by:
John F. Kennedy
Member of the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts's 11th congressional district
19521963
Succeeded by:
James A. Burke
Preceded by:
Torbert H. Macdonald
Member of the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts's 8th congressional district
19631987
Succeeded by:
Joseph Patrick Kennedy II
Preceded by:
Hale Boggs
House Majority Whip
19711972
Succeeded by:
John J. McFall
Preceded by:
Hale Boggs
House Majority Leader
19731977
Succeeded by:
Jim Wright
Preceded by:
Carl Albert
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
January 4, 1977January 3, 1979;
January 15, 1979January 3, 1981;
January 5, 1981January 3, 1987
Succeeded by:
Jim Wright
Speakers of the United States House of Representatives Seal of the United States House of Representatives
MuhlenbergTrumbullMuhlenbergDaytonSedgwickMaconVarnum • Clay • Cheves • Clay • TaylorBarbour • Clay • TaylorStevensonBellPolkHunterWhiteJonesDavisWinthropCobbBoydBanksOrrPenningtonGrowColfaxPomeroyBlaineKerrRandallKeiferCarlisleReedCrispReedHendersonCannonClarkGillettLongworthGarner • Rainey • ByrnsBankheadRayburnMartinRayburnMartinRayburnMcCormackAlbertO'NeillWrightFoleyGingrichHastert
Majority Leaders of the United States House of Representatives Seal of the United States House of Representatives
PayneUnderwoodKitchinMondellLongworthTilson • Rainey • ByrnsBankheadRayburnMcCormackHalleckMcCormackHalleckMcCormackAlbertBoggsO'NeillWrightFoleyGephardtArmeyDeLayBlunt (acting) • Boehner
Majority Whips of the United States House of Representatives Seal of the United States House of Representatives
TawneyWatsonDwightBellKnutsonVestalMcDuffieGreenwoodBolandRamspeckSparkmanArendsPriestArendsAlbertBoggsO'NeillMcFallBrademasFoleyCoelhoGrayBoniorDeLayBlunt

  Results from FactBites:
 
"Tip" O'Neill Exhibit - Boston College (107 words)
An exhibit honoring Thomas P. (Tip) O'Neill Jr., Speaker of the United States House of Representatives and graduate of Boston College class of 1936, is located on the second floor of the O'Neill Library.
The multi-media exhibit features displays from many facets of O'Neill's life: his North Cambridge neighborhood, his BC years, his legacy as speaker, and his political campaigns.
His voice can be heard over audio speakers, a television provides video clips of some of his speeches, and a computer station provides a way for visitors to learn more about his life and legacy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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