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Leaving some small change on a restaurant table is a common way of giving a tip to the serving staff.
Leaving some small change on a restaurant table is a common way of giving a tip to the serving staff.

A tip (or gratuity) is a payment to certain service sector workers beyond the advertised price. The amount of a tip is typically computed as a percent of the transaction minus taxes.[1] These payments and their size are a matter of social custom. Tipping varies among cultures and by service industry. Though by definition a tip is never legally required, and its amount is at the discretion of the person being served, in some circumstances failing to give an adequate tip when one is expected would be considered very miserly, a violation of etiquette, or unethical. In some other cultures or situations, giving a tip is not expected and offering one would be considered condescending or demeaning. In some circumstances (such as tipping government workers), tipping is illegal and considered a bribe. Look up tip in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 2_usd_gratuity. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 2_usd_gratuity. ... The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Office etiquette be merged into this article or section. ...

Contents

Etymology

This word originates from the 16th century verb tip, which meant "to give unexpectedly", and was derived from the German word tippen, meaning "to tap." The modern German version would instead be Trinkgeld, literally meaning "Drink Gold", or "Money to Drink"[2][3] Modern German uses the terms Hahn ("tap") and Klopfen ("to tap").[citation needed]


The notion of a stock tip is from the same slang, and the expression hot tip, as in a sure winner in a horse race, also comes from the act of tapping. In the old days, during card games, gamblers would have an accomplice in the room. This accomplice would signal the player regarding the contents of an opponent's hand by "tipping the wink" - that is, by "tapping" out a code with his eyelid.[4] The Oxford English Dictionary states that tip is derived from the English thieves (which may be taken to mean "gambler") slang word tip, meaning "to pass from one to another" (cf. "to give unexpectedly.")[5] The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... For other uses, see Slang (disambiguation). ...


The word "tip" is often inaccurately claimed to be an acronym for terms such as "to insure prompt service", "to insure proper service", "to improve performance", and "to insure promptness". However, this etymology contradicts the Oxford English Dictionary and is probably an example of a backronym.[5] A backronym (or bacronym) is a phrase that is constructed after the fact from a previously existing abbreviation, the abbreviation being an initialism or an acronym. ...


Some claim the origin for this term is a concept from Judaism, in that it was a chiyuv ("obligation") for a seller to "tip the scales" in favor of the customer. Maimonides explains the verse from Deuteronomy, "A perfect and just weight shalt thou have", that the seller should give the buyer a little more than what he paid for, "Noten lo girumin" (Gives him extra / a tip).[6] For example, if your customer has asked for three pounds of onions, you should measure out the three pounds plus one extra onion, tipping the scale in his favor.[7] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135 or 1138–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... Deuteronomy (Greek deuteronomium, second, from to deuteronomium touto, this second law, pronounced ) is the fifth book of the Torah of the Hebrew bible and the Old Testament. ...


Circumstances of tipping

In countries where tipping is the rule (for example United States), complicated social rules and etiquette have developed over the exact percentage to tip, and what should and should not be included in this calculation. In other cultures where tipping exists it is more flexible and no specific assumptions of the tip amount exist.


Some establishments pool tips and divide them to include employees who lack customer contact. At some restaurants, agreements among the staff require the servers to tip out members of the support staff (kitchen, bartender, and busser) at the end of their shift;[8]; this means that servers pay a certain fixed percentage of their sales (most often a portion less than 15 percent of total sales) to the other staff. Thus when a patron leaves a small tip, it results in the server having to receive less from the tipping pool than other staff. [9] Customers are waiting in front of a famous fashion shop for its grand opening in Hong Kong. ...


Tipping is not expected when a fee is explicitly charged for the service. For example, a service charge for all patrons that is automatically added to the tab with no tipping the rule in Brazil.[10] Bribery and corruption are sometimes disguised as tipping. In some places, police officers and other civil servants openly solicit tips, gifts and dubious fees using a variety of local euphemisms. For example, a traffic policeman in Mexico might ask a commuter to buy him a "refresco" (soft drink), while a Nigerian officer might expect "a little something for the weekend."[11]. A service charge is a fee added to a customers bill. ... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics in a variety of professions. ... For the band, see The Police. ... A civil servant or public servant is a civilian career public_sector employee working for a government department or agency. ... A euphemism is a word or phrase used in place of a term that originally could not be spoken aloud (see taboo) or, by extension, terms which they consider to be disagreeable or offensive. ... A soft drink is a drink that contains no alcohol. ...


Tax and labor-law treatment

USA

In some jurisdictions, tipped workers qualify for a lower statutory minimum wage from the employer, and therefore may supplement deficient pay with tips. For example, the United States Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requires restaurant employers to ensure that the total tip income reported to them during any pay period is at least eight percent of their total receipts for that period. If the reported total is below eight percent, employers must allocate as income the difference between the actual tip income reported and eight percent of gross receipts.[12] Therefore the IRS is implicitly assuming the average tip to be eight percent. The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... Seal of the Internal Revenue Service Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        IRS redirects here. ...


Legally, tips should be reported as income for tax purposes by the recipient,[13]


United Kingdom

In the UK all tips received by workers are treated as taxable income but the method for collecting tax will vary. A cash tip handed directly to a worker, or left on a table to be picked up by the server, is the legal property of the waiter and it will be for them to declare the tip to the tax authorities. Tax is usually collected a year in arrears using the PAYE system. PAYE (or pay-as-you-earn) is a payroll deduction system for collecting income tax in the United Kingdom. ...


In the UK, tips paid as part of card transactions belong to the business, not to the worker. "[7]." The business is therefore able to keep all, or a proportion, of the tips paid and the customer will rarely be made aware of exactly how much is actually passed to the staff. The same applies to service charges, which are amounts added to the bill when given to the customer. In the UK these vary from 5% to 15%, with 12.5% being standard. Most charges are advertised as discretionary (for tax purposes) meaning that, in theory at least, a dissatisfied customer can decline to pay the charge.


Most businesses pass the bulk of card tips and discretionary service charges to a third party to distribute. This arrangement is known as a "tronc" (from the old French word for poor box) and the person controlling the system is a troncmaster. They are usually a senior member of staff. They will decide upon what share of the tronc each member of staff gets, which is usually based upon a combination of seniority, performance and hours worked.


The tronc system has become controversial in the UK in recent years. In part this is because of a lack of transparency to the customer as to what happens to their tip, alleged abuse by a small number of businesses, and the use by some businesses of tips to pay the National Minimum Wage (which is legal). Between 2001 and 2005 the UK tax authorities launched a highly visible campaign ("Operation Gourmet") designed to clamp down on the tronc system and bring them within the scope of National Insurance Contributions, which would have potentially raised several hundred million pounds per year in extra taxes. The campaign was ultimately unsuccessful and HM Revenue & Customs was forced to back down "[8]." and reimburse businesses who had been forced to pay over money. The National Minimum Wage Act 1998 was a flagship policy of the Labour Party in the UK during its 1997 election campaign and is still pronounced today in New Labour Party circulars as an outstanding gain for ‘at least 1. ... Her Majestys Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is a new department of the British Government created by the merger of the Inland Revenue and Her Majestys Customs and Excise which came into formal effect on 18 April 2005. ...


In October 2007 the Unite trade union launched a campaign for a change in the law to stop businesses using tips as part of the National Minimum Wage. "[9]."


Sweden

In Sweden prevoiusly all tips were seen as taxable salary, although hard to check. Nowadays voluntary tips are free of tax unless one person gives one employee more than 1000 kr (about USD 150) on a year. There is general limit in Sweden, if someone pays a private person less than 1000 kr during a year for work done, it is tax free. After a decision 1996 by the European Court of Justice, all voluntary tips are free of VAT, all over the EU. This is not valid for service charges written on the bill, it is treated as normal sales income, and salary if given to the waiter. Official emblem of the ECJ The Court of Justice of the European Communities, usually called the European Court of Justice (ECJ), is the highest court in the European Union (EU). ...


Tipping by Continent

Africa

Egypt

Tipping in Egypt can be tricky. Most public bathrooms are staffed, and visitors are often asked to tip the attendant. Some locals have been known to attempt to demand baksheesh for minor services, such as assisting people out of their cars or helping people up if they trip in the street. There is no rule for what is considered tip-worthy, so it's up to one's discretion to hand out an Egyptian pound or two to use the bathroom or to get into a building. For services such as tour guides or translators, a tip of 20% or more is generally accepted, and for taxis and restaurants, 10% to 15%. However, unlike the Western world, not tipping is not considered miserly. Baksheesh is a term used to describe both charitable giving and certain forms of political corruption and bribery in the Middle East and Southwest Asia. ... ISO 4217 Code EGP User(s) Egypt Inflation 6. ...


South Africa

In South Africa, the customary tip at restaurants is 10 percent, although some restaurants charge a mandatory service fee for large parties. A small amount is occasionally given to petrol station attendants for additional services, such as cleaning one's windscreen. Toilet cleaners at service stations along major road routes are sometimes tipped when they provide good service and keep the facilities clean. "Car guards", who claim to "look after" one's parked car are often given a small tip if they are in uniform and authorized; however those without uniforms are usually regarded as a nuisance, and tipping them is not compulsory, despite the fact that they often harass motorists looking for payment. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Ethiopia

In Ethiopia tipping is common in hotels, restaurants and bars. One is also expected to tip parking lot attendants whether officially hired by institutions or self assigned. In some restaurants it is customary to tip any dancers, and this is usually done by sticking the paper money bill on the forehead of the dancer. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Asia

China

In China, traditionally there is no tipping. However, hotels that routinely serve foreign tourists may allow tipping. An example would be tour guides and associated drivers.[14][not in citation given] In Mandarin, the term used is 小費 (xiǎo fèi, lit. "small change") or 打賞 (Da shang, lit. "give awards"). In Cantonese, the term used is 貼士 (tip si), transliterated from the word 'tips'.[citation needed] Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... This article is about all of the Cantonese (Yue) dialects. ...


India

In India there has traditionally been little tipping. However, many upscale restaurants have helped establish a new trend of tipping in India. The act is known as chai-pani (for tea or water) or "bakshish" (means unofficial tips) this is made only when receiver of work is happy) A labour can ask for bakshish after doing a good job.Occasionally autorickshaw drivers ask for a tip, but this is uncommon. It has been suggested that high end be merged into this article or section. ...


However, in Nepal and northern India, the practice of tipping by giving "hilauri" is done. This entails giving workers a tip at the end of rice transplanting work each day, or during other communal work intensive farming tasks. The word originates from the word for "mud" (hilo). At the end of the work day, the workers are covered in mud, and they play and throw mud balls, and everyone enjoys themselves. The landowner receiving the work gives the workers either some extra food, alcoholic drink such as a glass of distilled rice liquor known as "raksi", or some pocket money. This tip (in kind form) is in addition to the agreed upon daily wage paid to the workers. The hilauri is a way to recognize the extra hard work that the transplanting entails.


Israel

Tipping in Israel is uncommon in hotels because a service charge, typically 10 percent of the bill, is often added to the bill automatically.[15][16][17] In restaurants it is considered customary to tip the waiter around 12 percent of the bill, regardless of the quality of the service, and most bills have לא כולל שירות ("not including the service") printed on them.[citation needed]


Japan

It is widely documented that tipping is generally not practiced in Japan except in cases of extra or special services. Hotels, ryokans, and fancy restaurants however invoice a service charge of 10-15%.[18] This article is about the Zen monk. ...


Malaysia

Tipping is not customarily done in Malaysia. However, most eateries do charge a service fee of up to 10%.


Singapore

Tipping is not required in Singapore; however it is common for restaurants to levy a 10% service charge before GST.


South Korea

Tipping is not the custom in South Korea and it is almost never expected. Many hotels and a few tourist restaurants add 10% service charge on their checks. However, it is deemed customary (although not mandatory) to tip porters and maids in international hotels, and it is always considered a generous gesture to ask taxi drivers to keep the change.[citation needed]


Taiwan

In Taiwan tipping is rare except when a customer uses a porter at an airport, which is usually 50 new Taiwan dollars per luggage, or wants to show appreciation for exceptional service. Many restaurants and hotels already add 10% service charges.[19] Taxi drivers may not wilfully refuse to make change or ask for tips. ISO 4217 Code TWD User(s) Republic of China Inflation 0. ...


Australasia

Australia

A 2005 Sydney Morning Herald article says that in Australia, "Tips are not expected but are appreciated, especially in the 10 per cent range."[15] A 2005 USA Today article advised 10%–12% tips in restaurants, rounding up taxi fares, and that tips are not expected by porters.[10] ...


Casinos in Australia generally prohibit tipping of gaming staff, as it is considered bribery. For example, in the state of Tasmania, the Gaming Control Act 1993 states in section 56 (4): "it is a condition of every special employee's licence that the special employee must not solicit or accept any gratuity, consideration or other benefit from a patron in a gaming area." [20] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Slogan or Nickname: Island of Inspiration; The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product...


Tipping for pizza delivery in Australia is rare and not customary, and hourly wages for deliverers are considered relatively high.[21] Prices for delivery orders are typically higher than for carryout orders, and "free delivery" cannot be advertised if carryout pricing is lower.[21]


New Zealand

A 2005 Sydney Morning Herald article says that in New Zealand, "Tips are not expected but are appreciated, especially in the 10 per cent range."[15] A USA Today article from the same year advises against tipping for restaurant, taxi, or porter service.[10] ...


Europe

In general, in the European Union and other parts of Europe, tipping is not essential but it is customary, although there are regional variations.


Austria

In Austria, waiters receive sufficient wages such that tips are not expected. Tipping is however common and, although legally not mandatory, often considered as socially obligatory. Giving 5% to 10% of the total amount is common; more signals exceptionally good service. Paying a multiple of a Euro is usual, for low sums the amount paid is often a multiple of 50 cents (i.e. a bill of 7.80 can be paid as 8 or 8.50). For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ...


Tipping is not practised when the goods are exchanged over the counter (i.e. in fast-food restaurants or at street stalls). Traditionally, the owner of a restaurant (known as "Wirt" in German) does not receive a tip. A tip is known in the German language as Trinkgeld, which literally translates as 'money for drink'. In similar fashion, the French expression is pourboire. It is also common practice to tip other service employees, like taxi drivers or hair dressers.


Belgium

In Belgium tipping is not needed or expected in restaurants, although appreciated.[citation needed] In a bar, when you order several drinks, you can tip the waiter or waitress by rounding up the amount on the bill. For example, you can give € 12 when the bill states € 11.75. In a restaurant, you may tip with a rate of 5%-10%. For example, a meal of € 28 may be rounded up to € 30.


Bulgaria

Tipping, called бакшиш (bakshish) in Bulgarian, is not the custom in Bulgaria, although one can leave a tip as a sign of appreciation.


Croatia

Tipping is not particularly common, although it may occur in restaurants and bars. Prices are usually already adjusted upwards, and labour laws ensure a minimum wage for all workers, therefore tipping is usually not expected.


A unique practice of tipping exists among the pensioners who receive their pension via mail in rural settlements. They may leave any coinage to the postman who delivers it as a sign of appreciation.


Czech Republic

Although it is customary to tip in the Czech Republic, it has very little to do with the size of the bill, and more to do with a sign of appreciation.


Denmark and Sweden

The service charge is included in the bill, but a small tip may be given as a sign of approval of the service.[22] In this region, tipping is referred to as driks (Norwegian), drikkepenge (Danish) or dricks (Swedish), meaning for drinks.


Finland

In Finland tipping, known as tippi ("tips") or juomaraha (literally "drink money") is entirely optional. Coat checkers generally have a compulsory service fee. Tips are preferred in cash instead of credit cards, because of avoiding sharing with the employer and with the tax office. For clerks, police, etc. tipping is not allowed, and could lead to legal problems.


France

In France, service charge is always included, and so tipping, or le pourboire (lit. "for a drink"), is not expected.


Germany

In Germany, sufficient wages are paid to most service employees. However, tips (das Trinkgeld, lit. "drink money") are expected in many situations. In bars, restaurants (except fast food places without table service), guided tours, taxicabs and sometimes barber shops, tips are expected to be about 5% of the total amount if the guest was satisfied with the service. The owner of the business was usually not tipped even if he served his customers personally, but this is changing.


Public toilet ("WC" in German) attendants are often tipped €0.30 to €0.50, usually by leaving the money on a plate by the door. See also Toilet for the lavatory Public toilet is a movie from the Hong Kong director Fruit Chan. ...


It is customary to give a relatively large tip around Christmas time to such people as house cleaners, postmen, garbage collectors, and the newspaper delivery men. For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ...


Greece

In Greece tip is known as filodorima (meaning gift for a friend). Tipping traditionally is not based on a predetermined percentage. Customers usually leave a tip to the 'maitre',waiters,valets and bell boys, varying from few coins to large amounts of money, according to how satisfied they are by the service. In some cases, waiters gain more money from tips than their wage. Tipping to taxi drivers is uncommon.


Hungary

Tips are given in Hungary for some services: in restaurants, in bars, to cab drivers, to hairdressers, and often to people that fix things around the house, like plumbers and electricians. Tips are called borravaló, "a little something for wine", in Hungarian.


Iceland

In Iceland tipping (þjórfé, lit. "drink money") is rare. Service charges are generally included in the bill.[22]


Ireland

In the Republic of Ireland, tipping has not been established as a custom, though has become much more commonplace in the period of increased wealth through the Celtic Tiger. Many people working in the service industry, particularly in restaurants, would expect a tip. It is increasingly common to tip hairdressers/barbers and for a taxi ride; the fare would normally be rounded up. It is not customary to tip bar staff, or any 'over the counter' server, though often waiters in pubs (known as lounge staff) are tipped a token amount. It is not usual to tip in a restaurant when a service charge is included (which is the norm for large groups), except in the case of exceptional service. Where no service charge is indicated, a tip of about 10% to 12% is appropriate for good service. For the Irish dance show, see Celtic Tiger Live. ...


Italy

Tips (la mancia) are customary in Italy, but not essential. The tradition of the tip remains impervious to change, even though café or restaurant prices now more and more often include both cover charge and service. On paying the bill, if it is paid in cash it is a matter of leaving a few notes from the change, or saying to the waiter "va bene così" ("it's all right"), when the difference between the amount paid and the actual bill automatically becomes the tip. Tipping in bars and discotheques is not expected and very rare.


Latvia

In Latvia many people refused to give a waiter a tip (in Latvian "Dzeramnauda"-"money for drinking") because in some restaurants and bars, there is signed on the menu "+10% for service". However, it is not a tip. Usually customers leave less than 10% of their order, but rich people usually give more than 10%.


The Netherlands

In The Netherlands, tips, or de fooi in Dutch, are common in restaurants. Tips are expected to be around 5% to 10% of the total amount (depending on the quality of service), unless the service has been poor. Tips are generally not expected in bars, but are not uncommon. In addition, in the holiday season, it is customary for the newspaper delivery person to receive a tip of around €2.50 to €5. Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain...


Norway

Tipping is strictly optional and to be considered a reward for excellent service. Until the early nineties, tipping never occurred outside the small circle of exclusive restaurants, but in the later years it has been more common due to popular culture influence. Over the counter tips would constitute a rounding up of 1-5 kroner. A good tip in a restaurant would be around 10%. Waiters typically earn a good deal more than minimum wage on Norway, and during the summer some waiter jobs even become high-income due to the tipping. The tip is not included in the bill as a separate service charge, but a part of the above minimum wage pay. ISO 4217 Code NOK User(s) Norway Inflation 2. ...


Tipping outside the restaurant business is not common, but some people give small Christmas presents to hairdressers and paper boys.


Tipping a public servant is considered bribery.


Taxis can be tipped, but beware: they will charge you extra for additional work like preparing the car for a children's seat on the bill following a pre-set rate.


Romania

The tip is usually 10% of the bill and is expected in restaurants, coffee shops, taxi, hair dresser. Many other shops not frequented by westerners refuse tips, perceiving them as a form of bribery.


Russia

Although tipping (На чай, na chai, or Чаевые, chaevie, lit. "for tea", in Russian) in Russia has largely been optional, the tradition has existed for centuries in Russian traktirs (bars) and is getting more and more common these days. Nowadays it's almost habitual to pay at least 10% tips in medium to high class restaurants, especially in large urban areas. It's almost a must in today's Moscow, Saint-Petersburg and other large cities. Lower class eateries may include service into the amount, but leaving some change (1-5%) is still a good way of showing appreciation. On the other hand, tipping is not considered customary for taxis. For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Saint Petersburg (disambiguation). ... For specific countries see Taxicabs around the world. ...


Serbia

Tipping is known as напојница/napojnica or бакшиш/bakšiš (baksheesh) in Serbian. Tips are not considered a strict social obligation, however leaving a tip (10-15%) is usually expected in restaurants if the customer is not dissatisfied with service. Baksheesh is a term used to describe both charitable giving and certain forms of political corruption and bribery in the Middle East and Southwest Asia. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ...


Kosovo (Serbia)

In Kosovo, a Serbian province currently under UN administration[23], generally tipping is not expected by anyone. Most likely locals are not expected to tip. However, foreigners and visitors are often welcome to tip. Tipping varies by the location and the type of the restaurant. Restaurants near the international institutions usually have more international visitors so tipping may be common, but not necessarily expected. For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ...


Slovenia

Tipping is not customary in Slovenia and traditionally it is almost never done. In recent times, however, high-tourist areas have begun to accept tips, which are welcomed but not obligatory. In such cases, the amount is typically 10 percent, but may range higher in exceptional circumstances.[24][25]


Spain

Tipping is not customary in Spain and it is almost never done among natives. While in bars and small restaurants, Spaniards only leave as a tip the small change they receive in a plate after paying the bill. In more sophisticated restaurants it is customary to leave between 5% and 10%. A 2005 Sydney Morning Herald article suggested to "Tip a few per cent extra in addition to the automatic tip added to the bill."[15] No tips are expected outside the restaurant business. ...


Switzerland

Swiss workers enjoy a very high per capita income and minimum wage. As a result of this and modern cultural influences, tipping is typically low (for example a maximum of CHF5 regardless of bill size), if not non-existent. Tipping is also very rare outside of restaurants and is even rare at bars. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... The culture of Switzerland is influenced by its neighbours, but over the years a distinctive culture with strong regional differences has developed. ... ISO 4217 Code CHF User(s) Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Campione dItalia Inflation 1. ...


United Kingdom

Tipping throughout the UK is optional, but typically isn't done on a regular basis. A tip may be offered for good service in a restaurant, barber's, hairdresser's or for a taxi journey but it is clearly understood that a tip will not necessarily be given. In some cases a nominal tip may be implicitly given to save the service provider giving the customer change. Tipping in a restaurant is generally only done if the meal was particularly good, or the meal was a special occasion with a large number of people attending. It is unusual to tip taxis unless they are taking passengers a long distance, or, for instance, to an airport. For other uses, see Restaurant (disambiguation). ... A boy visiting a barber A barber (from the Latin barba, beard) is someone whose occupation is to cut any type of hair, give shaves, and trim beards. ... A hairdresser is someone whose occupation is to cut or style hair, in order to change or maintain a persons image as they desire. ... For specific countries see Taxicabs around the world. ...


Tipping a policeman, fireman, nurse, doctor or other public-sector workers is prohibited and in the case of the police may be considered attempted bribery. For other public servants, however, a box of chocolates, flowers or possibly a bottle of wine may be considered appropriate as an expression of special gratitude. Some private companies may require their employees to refuse tips for various reasons. For instance, the John Lewis Partnership states to employees that customers should not be expected to pay more for good service, and that any tips that are received should be handed in. For the former (1856-1991) unrelated UK department store, see Lewiss. ...


In some table service restaurants, a 'service charge' is common (and sometimes added to the bill, in which case there is no obligation to tip further), but not compulsory and some people never tip. Unlike in many other countries, there is no percentage perceived to be 'correct' when tipping. However, 10% is a considered a good minimum within the restaurant industry and is generally considered the default. In self-service establishments, tips are not usually given, except in exceptional circumstances. Many restaurants will allow tips to be added to a credit card bill, but it is generally considered better to leave cash at the table. The reason for this is that cash is deemed to have been given to the waiting staff directly, whilst credit card payments and cheques are legally payable to the restaurant. Whilst a tip given by credit card or cheque will almost always be passed on to the waiting staff.


Tipping the delivery person upon arrival of a take-away is also quite common especially when delivery is fast. Take-out, carry-out ( in American English ) or take-away ( in British English ) is food purchased at a restaurant but eaten elsewhere. ...


It is not normal to tip for drinks in a pub, but more so in a bar. Offering to buy the barperson a drink is considered acceptable and they may then take (money) for the value of a drink (which is in effect taking a tip). In cases where the pub is also a restaurant, the serving staff may be tipped. It is less usual to tip in cafés and coffee shops than in restaurants. An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada...


In some establishments, tips are kept individually by the waiter or waitress, whereas in others they may be pooled and divided amongst all the staff. In other instances, tips may be set aside for some other purpose for the benefit of the staff, such as to fund a staff party or trip.


North America

Canada

As reported by the CBC, a "15% gratuity standard among most Canadians, but it depends on the job". 78% of Canadians regularly leave a 15% tip after dining out. However, the tips are regularly lower for other service industry jobs. [26]


The statistic that 78% of Canadians leave a 15% tip after dining out must have been gathered by asking dishonest Canadians. By asking the servers themselves, the CBC would learn that most Canadians don't leave close to that. On average, they leave approximately 10%. It costs the servers anywhere from 0% to 5% of their sales in a shift to serve customers, as this is what they tip out to the staff who don't serve. So if a table comes in and spends $100, it will cost that server around $5 to serve them. Should they leave no tip, they have to pay out of pocket just to have served that table.


Most Canadian provinces have the same minimum wage regardless of occupation,[27] but as of February 2007, Ontario allows employers to pay C$1.05 less than standard minimum wages for liquor servers,[28] and as of May 2007, Quebec allows C$0.75 less than standard for workers who would reasonably be expected to be receive tips.[29] Canada consists of ten provinces and three territories. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... C$ redirects here. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ...


Workers who receive tips are legally required to report the income to the Canada Revenue Agency and pay income tax on it. However, many workers have been known to not report any income from tips at all or, perhaps more commonly, to "lowball" the figure. In response, the CRA has vowed that it will closely check the tax returns of individuals that it would reasonably expect to be receiving tips to ensure that the tips are reported, and that the amount reported on the returns is realistic.[30] In Quebec, employers are obliged to report the sales made by waiters and bartenders, which is used to calculate the expected tips received based on a standard percentage. Because of this, not tipping is considered a graver insult in Quebec than elsewhere in Canada - the server will actually be taxed on money they have not received. Example of a cheque from the Canada Revenue Agency The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) administers: tax laws for the Government of Canada and for most provinces and territories; international trade legislation; and various social and economic benefit and incentive programs delivered through the tax system. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income...


Costa Rica

A 2005 USA Today article advises against restaurant tipping, but suggests a US$1 per bag tip for porters, and $1 for special services by taxi drivers.[10]


Mexico

According to a 2005 USA Today article, a 10%–15% tip should be left in restaurants if it does not include an automatic service charge. Porters may be tipped US$1–$2, and taxi drivers $0.50–$1.[10]


In Mexico a tip is known as una propina in Spanish, although in European Spanish (Spain) this same word connotes bribery.


Meals have a 10% to 15% tip (this includes fast food deliveries). This tip is usually paid by most people in restaurants, although it is not so common in street restaurants or stands, where the tenders usually have a can or box where people deposit coins.


In Mexican bars and night clubs it is often seen that they charge directly into the bill 15% of the total amount (taxes included) which is illegal in most cases because of the imposition of the tip and because they calculate the 15% with taxes included. Sometimes when customers refuse to pay this imposed tip partially or completely because of a bad, unkind or deficient service, waiters and owners can get aggressive to the point of retaining the custumers in the bar/club until they pay the tip, being this behavior also illegal.


In massive parties and sometimes also in night clubs the barmen expect the customers to deposit their tip in a cup they have on the table before serving the drinks, by this way, the service they give is in function with the tip they received. If someone refuses to pay this prior tip, he/she is commonly ignored by the barmen.


In some populated Mexican restaurants wandering musicians enter, play, and expect the customers to pay something, although this is totally voluntary.


It's also customary to give a tip to the person who sometimes guard the car as if they were valet parking; in Mexico these people are often called "viene viene" or franeleros and usually people give them from 3 to 20 pesos depending on the zone, although viene vienes sometimes ask for bigger sums of money when the car is left close to a night life area. When the demand for parking spaces is big, they save the spaces placing water cubes or small wooden boxes over them, and they usually ask for exaggerated tips (50 to 100 Mexican pesos depending of the area and the demand) to let the drivers park their cars. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Tipping is not commonly expected in cabs or buses, except when it is a tour.


Sometimes, in very corrupted places, some workers refuse to give a service unless the customer gives them tip for the service he has a right freely. This happens occasionally in public service, in night clubs.


Trinidad and Tobago

Tipping has not been a custom, but is become more commonplace in recent times.

  • Restaurants: Some restaurants, especially those in hotels or those that serve foreign tourists expect a tip. Most do not.
  • Taxicabs: Only airport taxis expect a tip. Local taxis do not.

United States

Tipping in the United States is widely practiced and is considered by some to be a social obligation under a variety of circumstances. Many consider the custom antiquated, adding an unnecessary level of complication and frustration for the customer. Tipping based on a percentage is customarily computed on the bill's total before tax. [31]


At a restaurant

Tipping is customary in restaurants having traditional table service. As tipped employers generally qualify for a lower statutory minimum wage from the employer, tips constitute the majority of the income for tipped workers such as wait staff. While opinions vary, Fodor's suggests that tipping wait staff 15% of the bill (before tax) is considered standard, or up to 20% at more expensive establishments.[32] Table service is a form of service in restaurants, pubs, and bars where food or drinks are served to the customers table. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... Fodors (pronounced ) is the worlds largest publisher of English language travel and tourism information, and the first relatively professional producer of travel guidebooks. ... A waitress at a restaurant in New York Waiting staff are those who work at a restaurant or a bar attending customers — supplying them with food and drink as requested. ...


Some restaurants include an automatic service charge (not to be confused with a discretionary tip or gratuity) on the bill for parties of six or more, while a rare few include an automatic charge for all bills.[10] Reputable restaurants and servers will advise customers of this mandatory charge before they order.


Tipping on wine with a meal requires some discretion/judgement. Tipping etiquette websites[33][34] suggest a tip of 15% on the meal before tax, and 5-10% on the wine (especially if the total wine bill is near or exceeds the cost of the meal).


Tipping for traditional table service restaurants offering take-out is not necessary, although a small tip (e.g., 5%-10%) is sometimes suggested for curbside service.


Tipping at buffet-style restaurants is not necessary, although some may think it is appropriate to tip a small amount (e.g., $1 per person) if a server refills their drinks or 10% if there is some table service in addition to the buffet.


Some coffee shops or establishments without table service leave a countertop tip jar (a.k.a. guilt cans) by the cash register, but tipping is not expected as it would be for table service.[31]


Servers usually "tip out" portions of their tip receipts to support staff like bussers and bartenders. Bartenders usually are also tipped by the patrons ordering drinks at the bar.[35]


At a bar

When purchasing alcoholic beverages at a bar it is customary to tip $1-2 per drink, or in the same 15% to 20% range as at a restaurant.[32] If a bartender is taking special care to take and fill your drink orders quickly at a busy bar where others may be waiting for service, a tip in the higher range is appropriate. It may also be customary to tip higher with your first drink in order to signal the bartender to take special care of you. Typical amount for this action is $5.


At a hotel

Bellmen are customarily tipped approximately one dollar per bag in five star hotels, and often tipped for deliveries (food, boxes, faxes). Room-service personnel at most American hotels expect tips, anywhere between 10% to 15% of the price (before tax) of what was ordered. It should be noted that many hotels automatically add a service fee to room service meals. The customer should verify this in order to avoid double tipping. A small tip for the housekeeping staff is discretionary. Tipping the front desk staff is almost never done unless the service is exceptional.


At a casino

In Casinos and other resort style establishments, it is customary to tip other service staff, such as a host in a showroom, or a cocktail waitress using similar scales. Doing so may guarantee better seats in a popular show, or faster refills.[citation needed] Successful gamblers at table games generally leave a tip for their dealer, or (in the case of games played against the house, particularly blackjack), designate a part of their bet or a separate hand once in a while as "for you" (the dealer), in which case the winnings, if any, go as a tip. On receiving a tip, the dealer is expected to ring a hand bell. Most casinos pool the tips and divide them among the dealers. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the gambling game. ...


For many casino dealers, tips (also called tokes) make up the majority of employees' wages. Despite the enormous success of many casinos, they may pay poker and table games dealers as little as $4.25 an hour. These casinos may claim to pay great wages when in reality, customers pay the majority of these workers' salaries.


Delivered meals

The driver is often tipped 10%-15% or $2 whichever is greater. Delivery drivers typically receive mileage reimbursement although that may not offset the high cost of fuel and cost to maintain their vehicles. This issue is complicated by establishments that charge a "delivery fee" service charge, although in most cases (e.g., pizza delivery establishments such as Domino's and Pizza Hut) the driver gets no part of the fee, and may be under-tipped as a result.[36] Greater tips are appreciated if the driver has to drive in inclement weather (e.g., snow), carry heavy loads, climb flights of stairs, drive out of area, or simply if the driver arrives promptly. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... A service charge is a fee added to a customers bill. ...


Reportedly, drivers will list amongst themselves people who routinely do not tip their driver, and when making a decision as to which delivery to make first, will deliver to the person more likely to tip a larger amount, or likely to tip at all. Some will go so far as to bring warm sodas as a passive form of retribution. It is also considered rude to be tipped in small change, i.e., being given a $20 bill for a $19.32 order and being told to "keep the change".


If an order arrives incorrect, and the restaurant sends out a free correction, some drivers consider it offensive to be the one bringing out the intended product and to not be tipped simply because they were the second person to arrive at that house (although understandably, the customer may not be inclined to tip twice for inferior service).


Getting a haircut

For a haircut or salon service, it is customary to tip the barber or stylist 15% to 20%.[citation needed]


Valet

At restaurants or hotels where the customer valets their car, it is customary to tip the valet $3-5 or occasionally more at high-class establishments.[citation needed]


Tattoos and Body Piercing

It is also customary for a customer to tip a tattoo artist or body piercer. Although tipping for these professions is customary, there is no set percentage to tip the artist.[citation needed]


Christmas season

Many service staff are tipped annually during the Christmas season, such as newspaper carriers, house cleaners, bus drivers, and pool cleaners. Some people also tip their local mail carrier in this manner, not knowing that it is illegal to do so (see government workers below). For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ...


In some large cities, the staff of apartment buildings, such as building superintendents, porters, concierges and doormen, receive similar annual tips. A red brick apartment block in central London, England, on the north bank of the Thames An apartment building, block of flats or tenement is a multi-unit dwelling made up of several (generally four or more) apartments (US) or flats (UK). ... The word super has several meanings: // Prefix First known as a prefix, meaning above, beyond, on top, besides, super- has a long history in the English language and has since evolved into a useful adjective and expletive as well. ... A porter carries objects. ... Concierge desk at the Mount Washington Hotel. ... A doorman (more commonly referred to as a bouncer) is a term for a person who deals with the general security of a bar, pub or nightclub. ...


Government workers and bank employees

Under United States federal law it is considered bribery to tip government employees. However, they are permitted to receive gifts less than or equal to $20.00. A non-monetary gift valued at $20 or less is appropriate. The most common circumstance is a holiday gift to a mail carrier. A potential tipper can donate money to a charity related to the government agency. For example, most National Parks have related "natural history associations", in which case the worker that prompted the tip may appreciate hearing that their service prompted a donation.


Other

Many reputable retailers forbid their employees to accept tips[37] (although this is illegal in some states, such as California, due to the fact that state law states "tips are the property of whom they are given, and employers are not allowed to require employees to refuse, give, or share their tips with anyone"). Tips are not generally given to parcel-delivery workers, and acceptance of tips may be forbidden by state laws and/or the employer. No tip is expected for retail clerks who bag one's groceries or carry one's purchases to the car. Some grocery stores have a jar for spare change by the cash register, which is not for tips but is used to help cash customers who are short on change (for example, a customer paying a $5.02 bill can use $0.02 from the change jar and thereby avoid paying $6.00 and getting $0.98 back in change). This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


South America

Argentina

According to a 2005 USA Today article, "tipping is officially illegal, but waiters expect a small tip" in restaurants, while porters and taxi drivers are not tipped.[10]


Bolivia

Service charges are included with the bill. Still, a small tip, around 5% or so, is sometimes given, and is considered polite.[22]


Brazil

The customary tip at restaurants is 10% for good service, although a few restaurants charge a mandatory service fee for large parties. It is usually not expected in cabs. Tipping a delivery worker is incredibly rare. In fact, most delivery companies will ask the client how he or she is going to pay for the product so that the exact change could be provided. However, it should be noted that many restaurants include a 10% delivery charge in the note. Such a charge often depends on the municipality.[citation needed]


Chile

There is no obligation to tip in Chile. This was not the case until 1981, when law number 7.388 was derogated. It stated that tipping was mandatory at places like restaurants, and the tip amount should be between 10% and 20% of the bill. Since then, it is usually assumed that customers will leave a tip of 10%, if the service is considered satisfactory.


Paraguay

Service charges are included with the bill, and tipping is uncommon.[22]


Peru

Farm workers can receive "paylla yapa" or "chakmir" (Aymara and Quechua words respectively) which are tips at the end of a work day in a field of potatoes. They are allowed to gather the extra potatoes from a field after harvesters have gone through it. These potatoes are ones that were missed or ones that are a bit rotten, broken, or too small to have picked up earlier. The extra from the field obtained through such tips is in addition to the daily wages paid to the workers by the owner of the field.


References

  1. ^ How much to tip at a restaurant
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ [2] See "Tip (version 2)" and "Tip (version 3)"
  4. ^ [3]
  5. ^ a b The Compact Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993. ISBN 0-19-861258-3.
  6. ^ Mishneh Torah.
  7. ^ "Question 85: Extra Food in a Restaurant." Honesty, torah.org.
  8. ^ Internal Revenue Service. "4.12: Tips". Frequently Asked Questions.
  9. ^ "Tipping Standards (United States)", Tip20! Service Industry Resource.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g Bly, Laura. (2005-08-25.) "The tipping point: Will service charges replace voluntary gratuities?", USA Today, via usatoday.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-19.
  11. ^ "The Ettiquette of Bribery: How to Grease a Palm". Retrieved on 2007-01-02.
  12. ^ Internal Revenue Service. "Reporting Tip Income." Restaurant Tax Tips.
  13. ^ Internal Revenue Service. Publication 1872. "Tips on Tips: A Guide to Tip Income Reporting for Employees in the Food and Beverage Industry."
  14. ^ Loose, Cindy. (April 27, 2006). "A few tips on handling gratuities worldwide" San Francisco Chronicle via sfgate.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-17.
  15. ^ a b c d MacLean, Natalie. "Gratuitous praise", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2005-02-11. Retrieved on 2007-09-17. 
  16. ^ McLaughlin, Eliott C. (September 12, 2006.) "Tips on doling out gratuities abroad." CNN.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-18.
  17. ^ Borcover, Alfred. (September 16, 2005.) "How much to tip: Pros hand out world of advice." The Seattle Times via seattletimes.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-18.
  18. ^ Google search: "Tipping in Japan"
  19. ^ Taiwan Government Information Office."Chapter 20: Tourism". Taiwan Yearbook 2006.
  20. ^ (December 2003.) Tasmanian Gaming Control Act 1993, Tasmanian Legislation (government website), retrieved on 2007-09-17.
  21. ^ a b Coomes, Steve. (2004-08-09.) "Pizza Delivery 'Down Under.'" Pizza Marketplace website. Retrieved on 2007-09-18.
  22. ^ a b c d DHL. "Cultural Tips." How to Ship Internationally.
  23. ^ See also United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK).
  24. ^ "Inside Slovenia: Tipping & Etiquette." TripAdvisor. Retrieved 2007-04-22.
  25. ^ "Slovenia Travel Information: Fact Sheet." Concierge.com. Retrieved 2007-04-22.
  26. ^ "Canadians need tips on tipping: survey"
  27. ^ "Minimum Wage Rates Across Canada: Effective June 1, 2006.". Manitoba Labour and Immigration. Retrieved on 2007-09-19.
  28. ^ (July 2006.) "Employment Standards Fact Sheet". (Government website.) Ontario Ministry of Labor. Retrieved on 2007-09-19.
  29. ^ "CNT - Wages." (Government website.) Québec Commission des Normes du Travail. Retrieved on 2007-09-19.
  30. ^ McCracken, D.L. "Revenue Canada to Tax Wait Staff's Tips." HalifaxLive.com. 2005-05-23.
  31. ^ a b Karp, Gregory. (November 19, 2006). "Spending Smart: Taking the tangle out of tipping." Chicago Tribune Web Edition. Retrieved on 2007-09-17.
  32. ^ a b "Tipping Guides: United States." Fodor's (website.) Retrieved 8 July 2007.
  33. ^ [4]
  34. ^ [5]
  35. ^ "Tip Pools." Legal Aid Society. Wayback Machine Archive, September 28, 2006.
  36. ^ [6]
  37. ^ http://www.palmbeachpost.com/accent/content/accent/browning/9.html

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External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
How to Tip Properly | eHow.com (0 words)
Be discreet when you tip, and be generous--you'll be remembered long after your departure and welcomed back enthusiastically.
Unless you are ordering from one of the national or regional chains, tips should be a minimum of 15-20% of the bill.
If you tip only $2-$3 drivers are working for $4-$6 an hour after they pay the cost of fuel.
Remember To Tip The Pizza Delivery Driver (0 words)
Papa John's online ordering snafu prevents you from tipping with your credit card at the door, even if you write it on the receipt.
We are a group of former drivers from different stores who feel short changed by the number of customers who did not tip.
Those who may currently deliver are not trying to solicit tips but are crying out against an injustice that was done to them.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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