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Encyclopedia > Tintern Abbey
Tintern Abbey, 1993
Tintern Abbey, 1993
Enlarge
Tintern Abbey, interior, 2004

Tintern Abbey was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on May 9, 1131. Situated on the River Wye in Monmouthshire, it was only the second Cistercian foundation in Britain, and the first in Wales. It is one of the most spectacular ruins in the country and inspired the William Wordsworth poem "Tintern Abbey" and more than one painting by J. M. W. Turner. Download high resolution version (813x520, 50 KB)Tintern Abbey, 1993, large version Taken by Hotlorp 03:19, 13 Jan 2004 (UTC). ... Download high resolution version (813x520, 50 KB)Tintern Abbey, 1993, large version Taken by Hotlorp 03:19, 13 Jan 2004 (UTC). ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 732 KB)Taken by User:MartinBiely 5th August 2004. ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 732 KB)Taken by User:MartinBiely 5th August 2004. ... Chepstow (Welsh language: Cas-gwent) is a border town straddling the Monmouthshire—Gloucestershire border, situated at the confluence of the River Wye and River Severn on the Severns west bank. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... Events May 9 - Tintern Abbey is founded. ... River Wye and Lancat and Ban y Gore Nature Reserve The Wye at Hay-on-Wye The Wye at Tintern This article is about the river that flows along the Anglo-Welsh border. ... Monmouthshire (Welsh: Sir Fynwy) is both a principal area and a traditional county in south-east Wales. ... The Order of Cistercians (OCist) (Latin Cistercenses), otherwise Gimey or White Monks (from the colour of the habit, over which is worn a black scapular or apron) are a Catholic order of monks. ... Motto: (Welsh for Wales forever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff Official language(s) English, Welsh Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total 20,779 km² (3rd in... Rocky landscape with ruins, by Nicolaes Berchem, ca. ... William Wordsworth, English poet William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. ... Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, often abbreviated to Tintern Abbey, is a poem written by William Wordsworth. ... Self portrait, oil on canvas, circa 1799 Joseph Mallord William Turner (born in Covent Garden, London on April 23, 1775 (exact date disputed), died December 19, 1851) was an English Romantic landscape artist, whose style can be said to have laid the foundation for Impressionism. ...


Walter, of the powerful family of Clare, was also related by marriage to Bishop William of Winchester, who had introduced the first colony of Cistercians, to Waverley in 1128. The monks for Tintern came from a daughter house of Cîteaux, L'Aumone, in the diocese of Blois in France. 16th century Citeaux, perspective view (engraving) Cîteaux Abbey (French: abbaye de Cîteaux) is a Catholic abbey located in Saint-Nicolas-lès-Cîteaux, south of Dijon, France. ...


In time Tintern established two daughter houses, Kingswood in Gloucester (1139) and Tintern Parva, west of Wexford in South East Ireland (1203). The Cistercian monks (or White Monks) who lived at Tintern followed the Rule of St Benedict. The Carta Caritatis (Charter of Love) laid out their basic principles, namely: Events July 26, Independence of Portugal from the Kingdom of León and Castile declared after the Battle of Ourique against the Almoravides lead by Ali ibn Yusuf: Prince Afonso Henriques becomes Afonso I, King of Portugal, after assembling the first assembly of the estates-general of Portugal at Lamego... Events April 16 - Philip II of France enters Rouen, leading to the eventual unification of Normandy and France. ...

  • Obedience
  • Poverty
  • Chastity
  • Silence
  • Prayer
  • Work

Despite this austere way of life the Cistercians were one of the most successful orders in the 12th and 13th centuries. The present-day remains of Tintern are a mixture of building works covering a 400-year period between 1136 and 1536. Very little remains of the first buildings, a few sections of walling are incorporated into later buildings and the two recessed cupboards for books on the east of the cloisters are from this period. The church of that time was smaller than the present building and was slightly to the north. (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Events Completion of the Saint Denis Basilica in Paris Peter Abelard writes the Historia Calamitatum, detailing his relationship with Heloise People of Novgorod rebel against the hereditary prince Vsevolod and depose him Births Amalric I of Jerusalem William of Newburgh, English historian (died 1198) Deaths November 15 - Margrave Leopold III... Events February 2 - Spaniard Pedro de Mendoza founds Buenos Aires, Argentina. ...


The lands of the Abbey were divided into agricultural units or granges, local people worked on these granges and provided services such as smithies to the Abbey. Many endowments of land on both sides of the Wye were made to the Abbey. During the 13th century, the Abbey was virtually rebuilt, first the cloisters and the domestic ranges then finally the great church between 1269 and 1301. Roger Bigod III, the then lord of Chepstow was a generous benefactor; his monumental undertaking was the rebuilding of the church. The Abbey put his coat of arms in the glass of its east window in gratitude to him. It is this great church that we see today. It has a cruciform plan with an aisled nave; two chapels in each transept and a square ended aisled chancel. The Gothic church represents the architectural developments of its day in the contemporary Decorated Style. Events Births Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Categories: 1269 ... Events February 7 - Edward of Caernarvon (later King Edward II of England) becomes the first Prince of Wales End of the reign of Emperor Go-Fushimi, emperor of Japan Emperor Go-Nijō ascends to the throne of Japan Dante was sent into Exile in Florence. ...


In 1326 King Edward II visited Tintern and spent two nights there. The Black Death swept the country in 1349 and it became impossible to attract new recruits for the lay brotherhood. Changes to the way the granges were tenanted out rather than worked by lay brothers show the difficulty Tintern was experiencing with labour shortages. In the early 1400s Tintern was experiencing financial difficulties due in part to the effects of the Welsh uprising under Owain Glyndŵr against the English kings and Abbey properties were destroyed by the Welsh rebels. Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Osman I (1299-1326) to Orhan I (1326-1359) Aradia de Toscano, is initiated into a Dianic cult of Italian Witchcraft (Stregheria), and discovers through a vision that she is the human incarnation of the goddess Aradia. ... Edward II, (April 25, 1284 – September 21, 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... // Events January 9 - The Jewish population of Basel, Switzerland is rounded up and incinerated, believed by the residents to be the cause of the ongoing bubonic plague. ... Events and Trends Categories: 1400s ... Seal of Owain Glyndŵr The Banner of the Arms of Owain Glyndŵr showing his parentage Owain Glyndŵr [], sometimes anglicised as Owen Glendower (1359–c. ...

Tintern Abbey viewed from the far (English) bank of the River Wye in 2004
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Tintern Abbey viewed from the far (English) bank of the River Wye in 2004

The closest battle to the Abbey was at Craig y Dorth near Monmouth, between Trellech and Mitchel Troy. In the reign of King Henry VIII traditional monastic life in England and Wales was brought to an abrupt end by his policy of establishing total control over the church, partly to take advantage of the considerable wealth of the monasteries. On September 3, 1536 Abbot Wyche surrendered Tintern Abbey to the King's visitors and ended a way of life which had lasted 400 years. The valuable articles from the Abbey were sent to the King's treasury and Abbot Wyche was pensioned off. The building was granted to the Earl of Worcester, lead from the roof was sold and the decay of the shell of the buildings began. In the next two centuries little or no interest was shown in the history of the site. However in the Eighteenth century it became fashionable to visit wilder parts of the country, the Wye Valley in particular was well known for its romantic and picturesque qualities and the ivy clad Abbey was frequented by 'romantic' tourists. After the publication of the book Observations on the River Wye by the Reverend William Gilpin in 1782 tourists visited the site in droves. In the nineteenth century ruined abbeys became the focus for scholars and architectural and archaeological investigations were carried out. In 1901 the Abbey was bought by the crown for £15,000 and recognised as a monument of national importance and repair and maintenance works were carried out. In 1914 the Office of Works were passed responsibility for Tintern and major structural repairs were undertaken — the ivy considered so romantic by the early tourists was removed. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 205 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Tintern Abbey ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 205 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Tintern Abbey ... River Wye and Lancat and Ban y Gore Nature Reserve The Wye at Hay-on-Wye The Wye at Tintern This article is about the river that flows along the Anglo-Welsh border. ... Trellech is a village in Monmouthshire, Wales at grid reference SO500054, and the location of an archaeological site. ... For the play, see Henry VIII (play). ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 2 - Spaniard Pedro de Mendoza founds Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... The Reverend William Gilpin (1724-1804) was an English clergyman, schoolmaster and author, best known as one of the originators of the idea of the picturesque. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Species See text Hedera (English name ivy, plural ivies) is a genus of about ten species of climbing or ground-creeping evergreen woody plants in the family Araliaceae, native to the Atlantic Islands, western, central and southern Europe, northwestern Africa and across central-southern Asia east to Japan. ...


In 1984 Cadw took over responsibility for the site. 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cadw is a semi-autonomous publicly-funded body which with the mission to protect, conserve, and to promote the built heritage of Wales — the Welsh equivalent of English Heritage and Historic Scotland. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Tintern Abbey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (837 words)
The monks for Tintern came from a daughter house of Cîteaux, L'Aumone, in the diocese of Blois in France.
In the early 1400s Tintern was experiencing financial difficulties due in part to the effects of the Welsh uprising under Owain Glyndŵr against the English kings and Abbey properties were destroyed by the Welsh rebels.
The closest battle to the Abbey was at Craig y Dorth near Monmouth, between Trellech and Mitchel Troy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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