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Encyclopedia > Timeline of environmental events

The timeline of environmental events is a historical account of events that have shaped humanity's perspective on the environment. This timeline includes some major natural events, man-made disasters, environmentalists that have had a positive influence, and environmental legislation. See also timeline of meteorology for climatic events. // Early events 350 BC - Aristotle wrote Meteorology. ...

Contents

Earlier Events and Periods

This timeline of the evolution of life outlines the major events in the development of life on the planet Earth. ... // For other uses, see time scale. ... The Pleistocene epoch (IPA: ) is part of the geologic timescale. ... Three temperature records, the GRIP one clearly showing the Younger Dryas event at around 11 kyr BP The Younger Dryas stadial, named after the alpine / tundra wildflower Dryas octopetala, and also referred to as the Big Freeze [1], was a brief (approximately 1300 ± 70 years [1]) cold climate period following...

Holocene

The Holocene epoch is a geological period that extends from the present day back to about 10,000 radiocarbon years, approximately 11,430 ± 130 calendar years BP (between 9560 and 9300 BC). ...

10th millennium BC

Bering Sea: Land bridge from Siberia to North America sinks.
North America: Long Island becomes an island when waters break through on the western end to the interior lake
Homo floresiensis, the human's last known surviving close relative, becomes extinct.
World: Sea levels rise abruptly and massive inland flooding occurs due to glacier melt.

See 1 E11 s for more remote dates. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Species Smilodon californicus Smilodon fatalis Smilodon gracilis Smilodon populator Smilodon floridus Smilodon neogaeus Smilodon SMILE-o-don (a bahuvrihi from Greek: σμιλη knife and (Ionic) οδων tooth) is an extinct genus of large machairodontine saber-toothed cats that are understood to have lived between approximately 3 million to 10,000 years ago... Binomial name Castoroides ohioensis The Giant Beaver (Castoroides ohioensis) was a huge species of rodent, with a length up to 2. ... Families Rathymotheriidae Scelidotheriidae Mylodontidae Orophodontidae Megalonychidae Megatheriidae Ground sloths are extinct edentate (Order Xenarthra) mammals that are believed to be relatives of tree sloths and three-toed sloths. ... Species Mammuthus africanavus African mammoth Mammuthus columbi Columbian mammoth Mammuthus exilis Pygmy mammoth Mammuthus jeffersonii Jeffersonian mammoth Mammuthus trogontherii Steppe mammoth Mammuthus meridionalis Mammuthus subplanifrons South African mammoth Mammuthus primigenius Woolly mammoth Mammuthus lamarmorae Sardinian Dwarf Mammoth A mammoth is any of a number of an extinct genus of proboscidean... Trinomial name Panthera leo atrox (Leidy, 1853) The American lion, also known as the North American or American cave lion, is an extinct feline known from fossils. ... Satellite photo of the Bering Sea Bering Sea and the North Pacific Ocean Bearing Sea with Kamchatka Peninsula and Alaska The Bering (or Imarpik) Sea is a body of water north of, and separated from, the north Pacific Ocean by the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands. ... Siberian Federal District (darker red) and the broadest definition of Siberia (red) arctic northeast Siberia Udachnaya pipe Siberia (Russian: , Sibir; Tatar: ) is a vast region of Russia constituting almost all of Northern Asia and comprising a large part of the Euro-Asian Steppe. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Map showing Long Island; to the north is Connecticut and to the west are New York City and New Jersey. ... Binomial name †Homo floresiensis P. Brown , 2004 Homo floresiensis (Man of Flores) is the name for a possible species in the genus Homo, remarkable for its small body, small brain, and survival until relatively recent times. ... Trinomial name Homo sapiens sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 Humans, or human beings, are bipedal primates belonging to the mammalian species Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man or knowing man) in the family Hominidae (the great apes). ... Antarctica Oceania Africa Asia Europe North America South America Middle East Caribbean Central Asia East Asia North Asia South Asia Southeast Asia SW. Asia Australasia Melanesia Micronesia Polynesia Central America Latin America Northern America Americas C. Africa E. Africa N. Africa Southern Africa W. Africa C. Europe E. Europe N... A glacier is a large, persistent body of ice, formed largely of compacted layers of snow, that slowly deforms and flows in response to gravity. ... A map of the extent of Lake Agassiz Lake Agassiz was an immense lake—bigger than all of the present-day Great Lakes combined—in the center of North America, which was fed by glacial runoff at the end of the last ice age. ... Three temperature records, the GRIP one clearly showing the Younger Dryas event at around 11 kyr BP The Younger Dryas stadial, named after the alpine / tundra wildflower Dryas octopetala, and also referred to as the Big Freeze [1], was a brief (approximately 1300 ± 70 years [1]) cold climate period following... The Pleistocene epoch (IPA: ) is part of the geologic timescale. ... The Holocene epoch is a geological period that extends from the present day back to about 10,000 radiocarbon years, approximately 11,430 ± 130 calendar years BP (between 9560 and 9300 BC). ... This cranium, of Homo heidelbergensis, a Lower Paleolithic predecessor to Homo neanderthalensis, dates to between 400,000 BCE to 500,000 BCE The Paleolithic is a prehistoric era distinguished by the development of stone tools. ... The Mesolithic (Greek mesos=middle and lithos=stone or the Middle Stone Age[1]) was a period in the development of human technology between the Paleolithic and Neolithic periods of the Stone Age. ... See 1 E11 s for more remote dates. ... Ancylus lake is a name given by geologists to the body of fresh water that replaced the Yoldia sea after the latter had been severed from its saline intake across central Sweden by the isostatic rise of south Scandinavian landforms. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ... (10th millennium BC – 9th millennium BC – 8th millennium BC – other millennia) Beginning of the Neolithic time period of the Holocene epoch. ... Boreal may refer to these: Northern from the eponymous Boreas, god of the North Wind in Greek mythology. ...

9th millennium BC

Antarctica - long-term melting of the Antarctic ice sheets is commencing.
Asia - rising sea levels caused by postglacial warming.
World - Obliteration of more than 40 million animals about this time.
World population reaches 1 million.
North America - The glaciers were receding and by 8,000 BC the Wisconsin had withdrawn completely.
World - Inland flooding due to catastrophic glacier melt takes place in several regions.

Europe and surrounding areas in the 9th millennium BC. Blue areas are covered in ice. ... (9th millennium BC – 8th millennium BC – 7th millennium BC – other millennia) Events The south area of Çatalhöyük. ... Antarctica Oceania Africa Asia Europe North America South America Middle East Caribbean Central Asia East Asia North Asia South Asia Southeast Asia SW. Asia Australasia Melanesia Micronesia Polynesia Central America Latin America Northern America Americas C. Africa E. Africa N. Africa Southern Africa W. Africa C. Europe E. Europe N... World map showing the location of Asia. ... Antarctica Oceania Africa Asia Europe North America South America Middle East Caribbean Central Asia East Asia North Asia South Asia Southeast Asia SW. Asia Australasia Melanesia Micronesia Polynesia Central America Latin America Northern America Americas C. Africa E. Africa N. Africa Southern Africa W. Africa C. Europe E. Europe N... Map of countries by population —showing the population of the Peoples Republic of China and India, the only two countries to have a population greater than a billion. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Antarctica Oceania Africa Asia Europe North America South America Middle East Caribbean Central Asia East Asia North Asia South Asia Southeast Asia SW. Asia Australasia Melanesia Micronesia Polynesia Central America Latin America Northern America Americas C. Africa E. Africa N. Africa Southern Africa W. Africa C. Europe E. Europe N...

8th millennium BC

In the 8th millennium BC, agriculture becomes widely practiced in the Fertile Crescent and Anatolia. ... In the 8th millennium BC, agriculture becomes widely practiced in the Fertile Crescent and Anatolia. ... Alexander Tollmanns bolide, proposed by Kristen-Tollmann and Tollmann (1994), is a hypothesis presented by Austrian professor of geology Dr. Alexander Tollmann, suggesting that one or several bolides (asteroids or comets) struck the Earth at 7640 BCE (±200), with a much smaller one at 3150 BCE (±200). ... Adjectives: Terrestrial, Terran, Telluric, Tellurian, Earthly Atmosphere Surface pressure: 101. ... The cataclysm is the Greek expression for the Biblical Great Flood of Noah, from the Greek kataklysmos, to wash down. ...

7th millennium BC

— Rising sea levels form the Torres Strait, separate Australia from New Guinea.
— Increasing desiccation of the Sahara. End of the Saharan Pluvial period.
— Associated with Pollen Zone VI Atlantic, oak-elm woodlands, warmer and maritime climate. Modern wild fauna plus, increasingly, human introductions, associated with the spread of the Neolithic farming technologies.

During the 7th millennium BC, agriculture spreads from Anatolia to the Balkans. ... (8th millennium BC – 7th millennium BC – 6th millennium BC – other millennia) Events circa 7000 BC – Agriculture and settlement at Mehrgarh in South Asia circa 6500 BC – English Channel formed circa 6100 BC – The Storegga Slide, causing a megatsunami in the Norwegian Sea circa 6000... Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel (French: (IPA: ), the sleeve) is the part of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic. ... (8th millennium BC – 7th millennium BC – 6th millennium BC – other millennia) Events circa 7000 BC – Agriculture and settlement at Mehrgarh in South Asia circa 6500 BC – English Channel formed circa 6100 BC – The Storegga Slide, causing a megatsunami in the Norwegian Sea circa 6000... The three Storegga Slides count among the largest recorded landslides. ... Megatsunami (often hyphenated as mega-tsunami, also known as iminami or “wave of purification”) is an informal term used mostly by popular media and popular scientific societies to describe a very large tsunami wave beyond the typical size reached by most tsunamis (usually around 10 metres). ... The Norwegian Sea (Norwegian: Norskehavet) is part of the North Atlantic Ocean northwest of Norway, located between the North Sea (i. ... (7th millennium BC – 6th millennium BC – 5th millennium BC – other millennia) Events c. ... The Holocene Climate Optimum was a warm period during roughly the interval 7,000 to 5,000 years B.P.. This event has also been known by many other names, including: Hypisthermal, Altithermal, Climatic Optimum, Holocene Optimum, Holocene Thermal Maximum, and Holocene Megathermal. ... The Torres Strait - Cape York Peninsula is at the top; several of the Torres Strait Islands can be seen strung out towards Papua New Guinea (North is downwards in this image) The Torres Strait is a body of water which lies between Australia and the Melanesian island of New Guinea. ... A pluvial lake is a lake which experiences significant increase in depth and extent as a result of increased precipitation and reduced evaporation. ... Canopy The Atlantic in palaeoclimatology was the warmest and most moist Blytt-Sernander period, pollen zone and chronozone of Holocene north Europe. ...

6th millennium BC

  • Circa 5600 BC — According to the Black Sea deluge theory, the Black Sea floods with salt water. Some 3000 cubic miles (12,500 km³) of salt water is added, significantly expanding it and transforming it from a fresh-water landlocked lake into a salt water sea.
  • Circa 5500 BC — Beginning of the desertification of north Africa, which ultimately lead to the creation of the Sahara desert. It's possible this process pushed some natives into migrating to the region of the Nile in the east, thereby laying the groundwork for the rise of Egyptian civilization.
  • 5000 BC — Use of a sail begins. The first known picture is on an Egyptian urn found in Luxor.

During the 6th millennium BC, agriculture spreads from the Balkans to Italy and Eastern Europe and from Mesopotamia to Egypt. ... (7th millennium BC – 6th millennium BC – 5th millennium BC – other millennia) Events c. ... The Black Sea deluge is a hypothesized prehistoric flood that occurred when the Black Sea rapidly filled, possibly forming the basis for some Great Flood myths. ... NASA satellite image of the Black Sea Map of the Black Sea The Black Sea is an inland sea between southeastern Europe and Anatolia that is actually a distant arm of the Atlantic Ocean by way of the Mediterranean Sea. ... Sea water is water from a sea or ocean. ... (7th millennium BC – 6th millennium BC – 5th millennium BC – other millennia) Events c. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... The Nile (Arabic: , transliteration: , Ancient Egyptian iteru, Coptic piaro or phiaro) is a major north-flowing river in Africa, generally regarded as the longest river in the world. ... Anthem Bilady, Bilady, Bilady Capital (and largest city) Cairo Official languages Arabic1 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Hosni Mubarak  -  Prime Minister Ahmed Nazif Establishment  -  First Dynasty c. ... (6th millennium BC – 5th millennium BC – 4th millennium BC – other millennia) Events 4713 BC – The epoch (origin) of the Julian Period described by Joseph Justus Scaliger occurred on January 1, the astronomical Julian day number zero. ... A gaff-rigged cutter flying a mainsail, staysail and genoa jib For other uses, see Sail (disambiguation). ... The River Nile at Luxor Pharaonic statue in Luxor Temple Hot-air ballooning in Luxor Luxor (Arabic: الأقصر ) is a city in Upper (southern) Egypt and the capital of the Al Uqsur governorate, population approximately 200,000. ...

4th millennium BC

(5th millennium BC – 4th millennium BC – 3rd millennium BC - other millennia) // Events Sumerian city of Ur in Mesopotamia (40th century BC); Sumerian hegemony in Mesopotamia, with the invention of writing, base-60 mathematics, astronomy and astrology, civil law, complex hydrology, the sailboat, the wheel, and the potters wheel, 4000... (37th century BC - 36th century BC - 35th century BC - other centuries) (5th millennium BC - 4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC) Events Civilization of Sumeria Significant persons Inventions, discoveries, introductions Domestication of the chicken Categories: Centuries | 36th century BC | 4th millennium BC ... (Redirected from 2800 BC) (29th century BC - 28th century BC - 27th century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2775 - 2650 BC - Second Dynasty wars in Egypt 2750 BC - End of the Early Dynastic I Period, and the beginning of the Early Dynastic II... Helianthus annuus pollen Pollen zones are a system of subdividing late Pleistocene and early Holocene paleoclimate using the data from pollen cores. ... The Priora Oscillation is the name given to a sudden climatic change, which occurred approximately 3,300-3,200 BC. It is associated with a sudden surge of the Priora Glacier in Italy. ... (32nd century BC – 31st century BC – 30th century BC – other centuries) (5th millennium BC – 4th millennium BC – 3rd millennium BC) Events 3000 BC – Menes unifies Upper and Lower Egypt, and a new capital is erected at Memphis. ... Excavated ruins of Mohenjo-daro. ... Drainage is the natural or artificial removal of surface and sub-surface water from a given area. ...

3rd Millennium BC

  • 2900 BC — Floods at Shuruppak from horizon to horizon, with sediments in Southern Iraq, stretching as far north as Kish, and as far south as Uruk, associated with the return of heavy rains in Nineveh and a potential damming of the Karun River to run into the Tigris. This ends the Jemdet Nasr period and ushers in the Early Dynastic Period of Sumer cultures of the area. Possible association of this event with the Biblical deluge.
  • 2650 BCSumerian epic of Gilgamesh describes vast tracts of cedar forests in what is now southern Iraq. Gilgamesh defies the gods and cuts down the forest, and in return the gods say they will curse Sumer with fire (or possibly drought). By 2100 BC, soil erosion and salt buildup have devastated agriculture. One Sumerian wrote that the "earth turned white." Civilization moved north to Babylonia and Assyria. Again, deforestation becomes a factor in the rise and subsequent fall of these civilizations.
— Some of the first laws protecting the remaining forests decreed in Ur.
  • 2600 BC — First artificial sewage systems constructed in the cities of Harappa and Mohenjo-daro of the Indus valley. There were networks of brick-lined sewage drains and outdoor flush toilets connected.
  • 2500 BC — Sahara becomes fully desiccated. Desiccation had been proceeding from 6000 BC, as a result of the shift in the West African tropical monsoon belt southwards from the Sahel. Subsequent rates of evaporation in the region led to a drying of the Sahara, as shown by the drop in water levels in Lake Chad. Tehenu of the Sahara attempt to enter into Egypt, and there is evidence of a Nile drought in the pyramid of Unas.
  • 2200 BC — Beginning of a severe centennial-scale drought in northern Africa, southwestern Asia and midcontinental North America, which very likely caused the collapse of the Old Kingdom in Egypt as well as the Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia.

The 3rd millennium BC spans the Early to Middle Bronze Age. ... (Redirected from 2900 BC) (30th century BC - 29th century BC - 28th century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2890 BC -- Egypt: End of First Dynasty, start of Second Dynasty 2900 - 2334 BC - Mesopotamian wars of the Early Dynastic period Significant persons Inventions, discoveries... Ancient sumerian city. ... Kish [kish] (Tall al-Uhaymir) was an ancient city of Sumer, now in central Iraq. ... Uruk (Sumerian Unug, Biblical Erech, Greek Orchoë and Arabic وركاء Warka), was an ancient city of Sumer and later Babylonia, situated east of the present bed of the Euphrates, on the line of the ancient Nil canal, in a region of marshes, about 140 miles (230 km) SSE from Baghdad. ... , For other uses, see Nineveh (disambiguation). ... Jemdet Nasr is an archaeological site in modern Iraq. ... The history of Sumer, taken to include the prehistoric Ubaid and Uruk periods, spans the 5th to 3rd millennia BC, ending with the downfall of the Third Dynasty of Ur around 2004 BC, followed by a transition period of Amorite states before the rise of Babylonia in the 18th century... The Deluge by Gustave Doré. The story of a Great Flood sent by a deity or deities to destroy civilization as an act of divine retribution is a widespread theme in Greek and many other cultural myths. ... (28th century BC - 27th century BC - 26th century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2900 - 2334 BC -- Mesopotamian wars of the Early Dynastic period 2775 - 2650 BC -- Second Dynasty wars in Egypt Germination of the Bristlecone pine tree Methuselah about 2700 BC, the... Sumerian ( native tongue) was the language of ancient Sumer, spoken in Southern Mesopotamia from at least the 4th millennium BCE. It was gradually replaced by Akkadian as a spoken language in the beginning of the 2nd millenium BCE, but continued to be used as a sacred, ceremonial, literary and scientific... Gilgamesh, according to the Sumerian king list, was the fifth king of Uruk (Early Dynastic II, first dynasty of Uruk), the son of Lugalbanda, ruling circa 2650 BC. He is also the central character in the Epic of Gilgamesh, which says that his mother was Ninsun, (whom some call Rimat... Species Cedrus deodara Cedrus libani    var. ... Sumer (or Å umer) was the earliest known civilization of the ancient Near East, located in the southern part of Mesopotamia (southeastern Iran) from the time of the earliest records in the mid 4th millennium BC until the rise of Babylonia in the late 3rd millennium BC. The term Sumerian applies... A drought is a period of time when there is not enough water to support agricultural, urban, human, or environmental water needs. ... Severe soil erosion in a wheat field near Washington State University, USA. Erosion is the displacement of solids (soil, mud, rock, and so forth) by the agents of wind, water, ice, or movement in response to gravity. ... Babylonia, named for its capital city, Babylon, was an ancient state in the south part of Mesopotamia (in modern Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... An Assyrian winged bull, or lamassu. ... For other uses, see UR. Ur seen across the Royal tombs, with the Great Ziggurat in the background, January 17, 2004 Ur was an ancient city in southern Mesopotamia, located near the mouth (at the time) of the Euphrates and Tigris rivers on the Persian Gulf and close to Eridu. ... (Redirected from 2600 BC) (27th century BC - 26th century BC - 25th century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2900 - 2334 BC – Mesopotamian wars of the Early Dynastic period. ... Harappa (Urdu: ہڑپا) is a city in Punjab, northeast Pakistan, about 35km (22 miles) southwest of Sahiwal. ... Mohenjo-daro (literally, mound of the dead), like Harappa, was a city of the Indus Valley civilization. ... (Redirected from 2500 BC) (26th century BC - 25th century BC - 24th century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2900 - 2334 BC -- Mesopotamian wars of the Early Dynastic period 2494 BC -- End of Fourth Dynasty, start of Fifth Dynasty in Egypt. ... (7th millennium BC – 6th millennium BC – 5th millennium BC – other millennia) Events c. ... Monsoon in the Vindhya mountain range, central India A monsoon is a heavy rainy season which lasts for several months and has lasting climatic effects. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Lake Chad (in French: Lac Tchad) is a large, shallow lake in Africa. ... A pyramid is any three-dimensional structure where the upper surfaces are triangular and converge on one point. ... Unas Nomen Unas Nebty name Wadj-em- HorusHiero= Golden Horus Bik-nub-wadj Burial Pyramid of Unas Unas (also Wenis, Oenas, Unis, or Ounas) was a Pharaoh of Ancient Egypt, and one of the rulers of the Old Kingdom. ... (Redirected from 2200 BC) (23rd century BC - 22nd century BC - 21st century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2217 - 2193 BC -- Nomadic invasions of Akkad 2181 BC -- Egypt: End of Egypt: End of Seventh Dynasty, start of Eighth Dynasty 2160 BC -- Egypt: End... A drought is a period of time when there is not enough water to support agricultural, urban, human, or environmental water needs. ... The Old Kingdom is the name commonly given to that period in the 3rd millennium BC when Egypt attained its first continuous peak of civilization complexity and achievement – this was the first of three so-called Kingdom periods, which mark the high points of civilization in the Nile Valley (the... The Akkadian Empire usually refers to the Semitic speaking state that grew up around the city of Akkad north of Sumer, and reached its greatest extent under Sargon of Akkad. ... Mesopotamia refers to the region now occupied by modern Iraq, eastern Syria, southeastern Turkey, and Southwest Iran. ...

2nd millennium BC

  • 1900 BC — The Atra-Hasis Epic describes Babylonian flood, with warnings of the consequences of human overpopulation.
  • 1450 BCMinoan civilization in the Mediterranean declines, but scholars are divided on the cause. Possibly a volcanic eruption was the source of the catastrophe (see Minoan eruption). On the other hand, gradual deforestation may have led to materials shortages in manufacturing and shipping. Loss of timber and subsequent deterioration of its land was probably a factor in the decline of Minoan power in the late Bronze Age, according to John Perlin in A Forest Journey.
  • 1206 BC - 1187 BC — Evidence of major droughts in the Eastern Mediterranean. Hittite and Ugarit records show requests for grain were sent to Egypt, probably during the reign of Pharaoh Merenptah. Carpenter has suggested that droughts of equal severity to those of the 1950s in Greece, would have been sufficient to cause the Late Bronze Age collapse. The cause may have been a temporary diversion of winter storms north of the Pyrenees and Alps. Central Europe experienced generally wetter conditions, while those in the Eastern Mediterranean were substantially drier. There seems to have been a general abandonment of peasant subsistence agriculture in favour of nomadic pastoralism in Central Anatolia, Syria and northern Mesopotamia, Palestine, the Sinai and NW Arabia.
  • c 2000 BC-1000 BC - The Sarasvati River dries up. Desertification of the Thar Region begins.

The 2nd millennium BC marks the transition from the Middle to the Late Bronze Age. ... (Redirected from 1900 BC) (20th century BC - 19th century BC - 18th century BC - other centuries) (3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC) Events Hittite empire in Anatolia 1829 - 1818 BC -- Egyptian-Nubian war 1818 BC -- Egyptian Campaign in Palestine 1813 BC -- Amorite Conquest of Northern Mesopotamia 1806 BC... The 18th century BC Akkadian Atra-Hasis epic, named after its human hero, contains both a creation and a flood account, and is one of three surviving Babylonian flood stories. ... (Redirected from 1450 BC) Centuries: 16th century BC - 15th century BC - 14th century BC Decades: 1500s BC 1490s BC 1480s BC 1470s BC 1460s BC - 1450s BC - 1440s BC 1430s BC 1420s BC 1410s BC 1400s BC Events and Trends According to some, 1456 BC was the year that Moses... Minoan may refer to the following: The Minoan civilization The (undeciphered) Eteocretan language The (undeciphered) Minoan language The script known as Linear A An old name for the Mycenean language before it was deciphered and discovered to be a form of Greek. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... This article is about volcanoes in geology. ... Satellite image of Thera The Minoan eruption of Thera (or Santorini) in the Bronze Age (dated via radiocarbon dating of one sample to 1630-1600 BC,[1] corroborated by many other samples to 1654-1611 BC;[2] but 1525-1500 BC archaeologically, according to the Conventional Egyptian chronology[3]) has... Deforestation is the conversion of forested areas to non-forest land use such as arable land, pasture, urban use, logged area or wasteland. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Centuries: 14th century BC - 13th century BC - 12th century BC Decades: 1250s BC 1240s BC 1230s BC 1220s BC 1210s BC - 1200s BC - 1190s BC 1180s BC 1170s BC 1160s BC 1150s BC Events and trends 1204 BC - Theseus, legendary King of Athens, is deposed after a reign of 30... Centuries: 13th century BC - 12th century BC - 11th century BC Decades: 1230s BC 1220s BC 1210s BC 1200s BC 1190s BC - 1180s BC - 1170s BC 1160s BC 1150s BC 1140s BC 1130s BC Events and trends April 24 1184 BC - Traditional date of the fall of Troy. ... Merneptah (occasionally: Merenptah) was pharaoh of Ancient Egypt (1213 – 1203 BC), the fourth ruler of the 19th Dynasty. ... The Bronze Age collapse is the name of the period of history of the Ancient Middle East extending between the collapse of the Hittite and Egyptian Empires in Anatolia, Syria and Palestine between 1206 and 1150 BCE, down to the rise of settled Aramaean kingdoms of the mid 10th century... (Redirected from 2000 BC) (21st century BC - 20th century BC - 19th century BC - other centuries) (3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC) Events 2064 - 1986 BC -- Twin Dynasty wars in Egypt 2000 BC -- Farmers and herders travel south from Ethiopia and settle in Kenya. ... (Redirected from 1000 BC) Centuries: 12th century BC - 11th century BC - 10th century BC Decades: 1050s BC 1040s BC 1030s BC 1020s BC 1010s BC - 1000s BC - 990s BC 980s BC 970s BC 960s BC 950s BC Events and Trends 1006 BC - David becomes king of the ancient Israelites (traditional... The Sarasvati River is an ancient river that is mentioned in Hindu texts. ... A NASA satellite image of the Thar Desert, with the India-Pakistan border superimposed is found in canada, united states. ...

1st millennium BC

  • 800 BC - 500 BC — Sub-Atlantic period in Western Europe. Pollen Zone VIII, sub-Atlantic. End of last Sea Level rise. Spread of "Celtic fields", Iron Age A, and Haalstadt Celts. Increased prosperity in Europe and the Middle East.
  • 500 BCRoman Republic, Cloaca Maxima (big sewer) is built in Rome by Etruscan dynasty of Tarquins. As Rome grows, a network of cloacae (sewers) and aqueducts are built.
World population reached 100 million[1].
  • 250 BCAshoka introduces animal welfare legislation in India
  • Circa 225 BC — The Sub-Atlantic began about 225 BC (estimated on the basis of radiocarbon dating) and has been characterized by increased rainfall, cooler and more humid climates, and the dominance of beech forests. The fauna of the Sub-Atlantic is essentially modern although severely depleted by human activities. The Sub-Atlantic is correlated with pollen zone IX; sea levels have been generally regressive during this time interval, though North America is an exception.
  • Circa 200 BCSri Lanka first country in the world to have a nature reserve, King Devanampiyatissa established a wildlife sanctuary

The 1st millennium BC encompasses the Iron Age and sees the rise of successive empires. ... Centuries: 10th century BC - 9th century BC - 8th century BC Decades: 850s BC 840s BC 830s BC 820s BC 810s BC - 800s BC - 790s BC 780s BC 770s BC 760s BC 750s BC Events and Trends 804 BC - Hadad-nirari IV of Assyria conquers Damascus. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC Events and Trends 509 BC - Foundation of the Roman Republic 508 BC - Office of pontifex maximus created... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC Events and Trends 509 BC - Foundation of the Roman Republic 508 BC - Office of pontifex maximus created... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus Roman provinces on the eve of the assassination of Julius Caesar, c. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Pont du Gard, France, a Roman aqueduct built circa 19 BC. It is one of Frances top tourist attractions and a World Heritage Site. ... Map of countries by population —showing the population of the Peoples Republic of China and India, the only two countries to have a population greater than a billion. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC - 250s BC - 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC Years: 255 BC 254 BC 253 BC 252 BC 251 BC - 250 BC - 249 BC 248 BC... The Edicts of Ashoka are a collection of 33 inscriptions on the Pillars of Ashoka, as well as boulders and cave walls, made by the Emperor Ashoka of the Mauryan dynasty during his reign from 272 to 231 BCE. These inscriptions are dispersed throughout the areas of modern-day Pakistan... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC - 220s BC - 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC Years: 230 BC 229 BC 228 BC 227 BC 226 BC - 225 BC - 224 BC 223 BC... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC - 200s BC - 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC Years: 205 BC 204 BC 203 BC 202 BC 201 BC - 200 BC - 199 BC 198 BC... Tissa, later Devanampiyatissa, c. ...

1st millennium AD

  • 100 to 400 — Decline of Roman Empire may have been partly due to lead poisoning, according to modern historian and toxicologist Jerome Nriagu. Romans used lead acetate ("sugar of lead") to sweeten old wine and turn grape pulp into a sweet condiment. Usually the acidic wine or pulp was simply left in a vat with sheets of lead. An aristocrat with a sweet tooth might have eaten as much as a gram of lead a day. Widespread use of this sweetener would have caused gout, sterility, insanity and many of the symptoms which were, in fact, present among the Roman aristocrats. High levels of lead have been found in the bones of aristocratic Romans. Far more than simply using lead pipes or lead utensils, the direct consumption of lead-sweetened wine and foods created serious and widespread lead poisoning among upper-class Romans.

(Redirected from 1st millennium AD) (1st millennium BC – 1st millennium – 2nd millennium – other millennia) Events Beginning of Christianity and Islam London founded by Romans as Londinium Diaspora of the Jews The Olympic Games observed until 393 The Library of Alexandria, largest library in the world, burned Rise... -1... Events First invasion of Italy by Alaric (probable date). ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... Lead poisoning is a medical condition, also known as saturnism, plumbism or painters colic, caused by increased blood lead levels. ... Toxicology (from the Greek words toxicon and logos) is the study of the adverse effects of chemicals on living organisms. ... Lead acetate (Trihydrate Pb(CH3COO)2·3H2O) is a white crystalline substance made by dissolving lead in acetic acid. ... A glass of red wine This article is about the alcoholic beverage. ... For Pb as an abbreviation, see PB. General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish gray Standard atomic weight 207. ... Aristocracy is a form of government in which rulership is in the hands of an upper class known as aristocrats. ... Infertility is the inability to naturally conceive a child or to carry a pregnancy to full term. ... Inmates at Bedlam Asylum, as portrayed by William Hogarth Insanity, or madness, is a general term for a semi-permanent, severe mental disorder. ...

7th century

The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Events November 2 - Donus becomes Pope. ... Cuthbert of Lindisfarne (ca. ... The Inner Farne seen from Seahouses harbour The Farne Islands (also referred to less formally as the Farnes) are a group of islands off the coast of Northumberland, England. ... Northumberland is a county in the North East of England. ...

8th century

(7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... Events Last Umayyad caliph Marwan II (744-750) overthrown by first Abbasid caliph, Abu al-Abbas al-Saffah Bold textItalic textLink title GARY CANT SWIM GARY CANT SWIM GARY CANT SWIM GARY CANT SWIM GARY CANT SWIM GARY CANT SWIM GARY CANT SWIM... The Medieval Warm Period (MWP) or Medieval Climate Optimum was a time of unusually warm climate in the North Atlantic region, lasting from about the tenth century to about the fourteenth century. ...

9th century

  • Circa 850 — Severe drought exacerbated by soil erosion causes collapse of Central American city states and the end of the Classic Maya civilization.

As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was that century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... Events April 20 - Guntherus becomes Bishop of Cologne. ... Severe soil erosion in a wheat field near Washington State University, USA. For erosion as an operation of Mathematical morphology, see Erosion (morphology) Erosion is displacement of solids (soil, mud, rock and other particles) by the agents of ocean currents, wind, water, or ice by downward or down-slope movement... The Maya civilization is a Mesoamerican civilization, noted for the only known fully developed written language of the pre-Columbian Americas, as well as its spectacular art, monumental architecture, and very sophisticated mathematical and astronomical systems. ...

2nd millennium AD

(1st millennium – 2nd millennium – 3rd millennium – other millennia) Events The Black Death Mongol Empires in Asia The Renaissance in Europe The Protestant Reformation The agricultural and industrial revolutions The rise of nationalism and the nation state European discovery of the Americas and Australia and their colonization European...

13th century

(12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... // April 30 - King Louis IX of France released by his Egyptian captors after paying a ransom of one million dinars and turning over the city of Damietta. ... The Little Ice Age (LIA) was a period of cooling occurring after a warmer era known as the Medieval climate optimum. ...

14th century

  • 1347 to 1350sBubonic plague decimates Europe, creating the first attempts to enforce public health and quarantine laws.
  • 1366 — City of Paris forces butchers to dispose of animal wastes outside the city (Ponting); similar laws would be disputed in Philadelphia and New York nearly 400 years later.
  • 1388Parliament passes an act forbidding the throwing of filth and garbage into ditches, rivers and waters. City of Cambridge also passes the first urban sanitary laws in England.

This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411). ... Events 29 August - An English fleet personally commanded by King Edward III defeats a Spanish fleet in the battle of Les Espagnols sur Mer. ... Bubonic plague is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease plague, which is caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... Events Births Anne of Bohemia, Queen consort of Richard II of England. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Nickname: Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States Commonwealth Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Government  - Mayor John F. Street (D) Area  - City 369. ... NY redirects here. ... Events Beginning of prosecution of Lollards in England The Battle of Otterburn between England and Scotland A Chinese army under Xu Da sacks Karakorum Births September 14 - Claudius Claussön Swart, Danish geographer September 29 - Thomas of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, second son of Henry IV of England (d. ... A parliament is a legislature, especially in those countries whose system of government is based on the Westminster system modelled after that of the United Kingdom. ... Look up garbage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area...

15th century

  • 1420 to 1427, Madeira islands : destruction of the laurisilva forest, or the woods which once clothed the whole island when the Portuguese settlers decided to clear the land for farming by setting most of the island on fire. It is said that the fire burned for seven years.

(14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Events May 21 - Treaty of Troyes. ... Events Lincoln College, a constituent college of the University of Oxford, is founded. ... Location Motto of the autonomous region: Das ilhas, as mais belas e livres (Portuguese: Of the islands, the most beautiful and free) Official language Portuguese Capital Funchal Other towns Porto Santo, Machico, Santa Cruz, Câmara de Lobos, Santana, Ribeira Brava, Caniço Area 797 km² Population  - Total (1991)  - Density...

16th century

  • 1546 — Italian physician Girolamo Fracastoro outlines theory of contagious disease. He reasoned that infectious diseases could be passed on in 3 ways: simple contact, indirect contact, and minute bodies over distance through the air.
  • 1560 to 1600 — Rapid industrialization in England leads to heavy deforestation and increasing substitution of coal for wood.

(15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... // Events Spanish conquest of Yucatan Peace between England and France Foundation of Trinity College, Cambridge by Henry VIII of England Katharina von Bora flees to Magdeburg Science Architecture Michelangelo Buonarroti is made chief architect of St. ... Girolamo Fracastoro (Fracastorius) (1478‑1553) was an Italian physician, scholar and poet. ... Events February 27 - The Treaty of Berwick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland The first tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. ... 1600 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Deforestation is the conversion of forested areas to non-forest land use such as arable land, pasture, urban use, logged area or wasteland. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... Trunks A tree trunk as found at the Veluwe, The Netherlands Wood is a solid material derived from woody plants, notably trees but also shrubs. ...

17th century

  • 1609Hugo Grotius publishes Mare Liberum (The Free Seas) with arguments for the new principle that the sea was international territory and all nations were free to use it for seafaring trade. The ensuing debate had the British empire and France claim sovereignty over territorial waters to the distance within which cannon range could effectively protect it, the three mile limit.
  • 1640Isaac Walton writes The Compleat Angler about fishing and conservation.
  • 1662John Graunt publishes a book of mortality statistics compiled by parish and municipal councils in England. Although the numbers are inaccurate, a start was made in epidemiology and the understanding of disease and public health.
  • 1690 — Colonial Governor William Penn requires Pennsylvania settlers to preserve one acre of trees for every five acres cleared.
— The last Mauritius dodo dies. The extinction was due to hunting, but also by the pigs, rats, dogs and cats brought to the island by settlers. Later the species has become an icon on animal extinction[2].

(16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... Hugo Grotius (Huig de Groot, or Hugo de Groot; Delft, 10 April 1583 – Rostock, 28 August 1645) worked as a jurist in the Dutch Republic and laid the foundations for international law, based on natural law. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme political (e. ... Map of Sealand and the United Kingdom, with territorial water claims of 3nm and 12nm shown. ... Events December 1 - Portugal regains its independence from Spain and João IV of Portugal becomes king. ... Izaak Walton (August 9, 1593 - December 15, 1683) was an English writer, author of The Compleat Angler. ... Events February 1 - The Chinese pirate Koxinga seizes the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege. ... John Graunt (1620-1674) was one of the first demographers. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... William Penn William Penn (October 14, 1644 – July 30, 1718) founded the Province of Pennsylvania, the English North American colony that became the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... Official language(s) English, Pennsylvania Dutch Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Binomial name Raphus cucullatus (Linnaeus, 1758) Former range (in red) Synonyms Struthio cucullatus Linnaeus, 1758 Didus ineptus Linnaeus 1766 Probably the earliest accurate drawings of a dodo (1601-1603). ...

18th century

  • 1700 — Some 600 ships are engaged in hauling "sea coal" from Newcastle to London, an enormous increase compared to 1650, when only two ships regularly carried sea coal. Rapid industrialization and the demand for iron and naval supplies has stripped England's forests.
  • 1711Jonathan Swift notes the contents of London's gutters: "sweepings from butchers' stalls, dung, guts and blood, drowned puppies, stinking sprats, all drenched in mud..."
  • 1720 — In India, hundreds of Bishnois Hindus of Khejadali go to their deaths trying to protect trees from the Maharaja of Jodhpur, who needed wood to fuel the lime kilns for cement to build his palace. This event has been considered as the origins of the 20th century Chipko movement.
  • 1739Benjamin Franklin and neighbors petition Pennsylvania Assembly to stop waste dumping and remove tanneries from Philadelphia's commercial district. Foul smell, lower property values, disease and interference with fire fighting are cited. The industries complain that their rights are being violated, but Franklin argues for "public rights." Franklin and the environmentalists win a symbolic battle but the dumping goes on.
  • 1748Jared Eliot, clergyman and physician, writes Essays on Field Husbandry in New England promoting soil conservation.
  • 1762 to 1769 — Philadelphia committee led by Benjamin Franklin attempts to regulate waste disposal and water pollution.
  • 1773William Bartram, (1739-1823). American naturalist sets out on a five year journey through the US Southeast to describe wildlife and wilderness from Florida to the Mississippi. His book, Travels, is published in 1791 and becomes one of the early literary classics of the new United States of America.

(17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Year 1650 (MDCL) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... General Name, Symbol, Number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... Deforestation is the conversion of forested areas to non-forest land use such as arable land, pasture, urban use, logged area or wasteland. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Temperate rainforest on Northern Slopes of the Alborz mountain ranges, Iran A dense growth of softwoods (a conifer forest) in the Sierra Nevada Range of Northern California A decidous broadleaf (Beech) forest in Slovenia. ... 1711 (MDCCXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer( first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... // Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ... This article is about the Hindu religion; for other meanings of the word, see Hindu (disambiguation). ... HH, Maharaja Gaj Singh (b. ... The Chipko movement was a group of villagers in the Uttarakhand region of India who opposed commercial logging. ... // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Events April 24 - A congress assembles at Aix-la-Chapelle with the intent to conclude the struggle known as the War of Austrian Succession - at October 18 - The Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle is signed to end the war Adam Smith begins to deliver public lectures in Edinburgh Building of... Jared Eliot (Nov. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Waste management is literally the process of managing waste materials (normally those produced as a result of human activities). ... Water pollution is a large set of adverse effects upon water bodies such as lakes, rivers, oceans, and groundwater caused by human activities. ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... William Bartram (April 20, 1739 -July 22, 1823) was an American naturalist, the son of John Bartram. ... // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

19th century

— US first national park, Yellowstone National Park.
Arbor Day was founded by J. Sterling Morton of Nebraska City, Nebraska. It occurs every year on the last Friday in April in the US.
  • 1874Charles Hallock establishes Forest and Stream magazine sparking a US national debate about ethics and hunting.
— German graduate student Othmar Zeider discovers chemical formula for the insecticide DDT.
General Revision Act.

Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Mount Tambora (or Tomboro) is an active stratovolcano on Sumbawa island, Indonesia. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Year Without a Summer, also known as the Poverty Year and Eighteen hundred and froze to death was 1816, in which severe summer climate abnormalities destroyed crops in Northern Europe and the American Northeast. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Map of countries by population —showing the population of the Peoples Republic of China and India, the only two countries to have a population greater than a billion. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Karl or Carl Philipp Sprengel (born 1787; died 1859) was a German botanist. ... Liebigs Law of the Minimum, often referred to simply as Liebigs Law or the Law of the Minimum, is a law developed in agricultural science formulated by Justus von Liebig. ... Growth can mean increase in spatial number or complexity for concrete entities in time or increase in some other dimension for abstract or hard-to-measure entities. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Carrying capacity usually refers to the biological carrying capacity of a population level that can be supported for an organism, given the quantity of food, habitat, water and other life infrastructure present. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally-owned land. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862; born David Henry Thoreau[1]) was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, and philosopher who is best known for Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1859 (MDCCCLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... William Elliott can refer to: Air Chief Marshal Sir William Elliott, a senior commander in the Royal Air Force during World War Two. ... Conservation can be confused with conversation and vice versa. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Forest ecology is the scientific study of patterns and processes in forests. ... Conservationists are those people who tend to more highly rank the wise use of the Earths resources and ecosystems. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... George Perkins Marsh (March 15, 1801 – July 23, 1882), an American diplomat and philologist, is considered by some to be Americas first environmentalist. ... Man and Nature is a book written by George Perkins Marsh in 1864. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lewis Mumford (October 19, 1895 – January 26, 1990) was an American historian of technology and science. ... The conservation movement is a political and social movement that seeks to protect natural resources including plant and animal species as well as their habitat for the future. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Ernst Haeckel Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel (February 16, 1834 - August 8, 1919), also written von Haeckel, was a German biologist and philosopher who popularized Charles Darwins work in Germany. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article is about Darwinism as a philosophical concept; see evolution for the page on biological evolution; modern evolutionary synthesis for neo-Darwinism; and also evolution (disambiguation). ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Samuel Bowles (9 February 1826-16 January 1878) was an American journalist born in Springfield, Massachusetts. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ... Some factual claims in this article need to be verified. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The term acid rain also known as acid precipitation is commonly used to mean the deposition of acidic components in rain, snow, dew, or dry particles. ... Robert Angus Smith (February 15, 1817–May 12, 1884) was a Scottish chemist, who investigated numerous environmental issues. ... Yellowstone National Park is the centerpiece of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, the largest intact ecosystem in the Earths northern temperate zone. ... Arbor Day is a holiday celebrated in the United States, China and other countries, that encourages the planting and care of trees. ... Julius Sterling Morton (NSHC statue) Julius Sterling Morton (April 22, 1832 – April 27, 1902) was born in Adams, New York. ... Nebraska City is a city in Otoe County, Nebraska, United States. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Charles Hallock (13 March 1834 - 2 December 1917) an American author born in New York City to Gerard Hallock and Elizabeth Allen. ... DDT or Dichloro-Diphenyl-Trichloroethane is the first modern pesticide and is one of the best known synthetic pesticides. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... John Wesley Powell, second Director of the USGS. Served from 1881-1894. ... The Colorado River from the bottom of Marble Canyon, in the Upper Grand Canyon Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River from Laughlin The Colorado River is a river in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, approximately 1,450 mi (2,330 km) long... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... Yosemite National Park (pron. ... Crescent Meadow in the Giant Forest, called by John Muir the Gem of the Sierras Sequoia National Park is a national park in the southern Sierra Nevada, east of Visalia, California in the United States of America. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Oscar Baumann (June 25, 1864 - October 12, 1899} was an Austrian cartographer with a keen interest in ethnography. ... Languages Maa (É”l Maa) Religions Monotheism Christianity The Maasai are an indigenous African ethnic group of semi-nomadic people located in Kenya and northern Tanzania. ... The General Revision Act of 1891 provides for the repeal of the Timber Culture and Preemption Acts and authorizes the President, under the Forest Reserve Act, to create forest preserves wholly or in part covered with timber or undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... John Muir appears on the California quarter John Muir (April 21, 1838 – December 24, 1914) was one of the first modern preservationists. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Sierra Club is an American environmental organization founded on May 28, 1892 in San Francisco, California by the well-known preservationist John Muir, who became its first president. ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Thames River may refer to: The River Thames in England, United Kingdom is often mistakenly called the Thames River by people from abroad. ...

20th century

— The National Conservation Commission, appointed in June by President Roosevelt.
— An article by Robert Underwood Johnson in Century magazine, "A High Price to Pay for Water," helps bring the Hetch Hetchy controversy to national attention.

(19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Texas County Galveston Government  - Mayor Lyda Ann Thomas Area  - City 539. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... George Washington Carver, 1906 George Washington Carver (c. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Theodore (Teddy) Roosevelt, Jr. ... Pelican Island was a small uninhabited island that once existed off the west coast of Bridgetown and Fontabelle, in St. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Victorian London was notorious for its thick smogs, or pea-soupers, a fact that is often recreated to add an air of mystery to a period costume drama. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Air pollution is a chemical, physical (e. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Antiquities Act of 1906 is an act passed by the United States Congress and signed into law by Theodore Roosevelt giving the President of the United States authority to place certain lands under control of the federal government by executive order, bypassing Congressional oversight. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Muir Woods National Monument is a unit of the National Park Service in Marin County, California, 12 miles (19 km) north of San Francisco. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... The National Conservation Commission, appointed in June, 1908 by President Roosevelt and composed of representatives of Congress and relevant executive agencies with Gifford Pinchot as chairman, compiles an inventory of U.S. natural resources and presents Pinchots concepts of resource management as a comprehensive policy recommendation in a three... Robert Underwood Johnson (January 12, 1853 – October 14, 1937) was a U.S. writer and diplomat. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... For other uses, see Newfoundland (disambiguation). ...

1910s
  • 1913 — US President Woodrow Wilson signed a dam bill into law on December 19 which destroyed the Hetch Hetchy Valley.
  • 1916 — US Congress created the National Park Service.
  • 1918Scientific American reports alcohol-gasoline anti-knock blend is "universally" expected to be the fuel of the future. Seven years later, in Public Health Service hearings, General Motors and Standard Oil spokesmen will claim that there are no alternatives to leaded gasoline as an anti-knock additive.
— Congress approves the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, which implements a 1916 Convention (between the U.S. and Britain, acting for Canada) for the Protection of Migratory birds, and establishes responsibility for international migratory bird protection.
- Spanish Flu kills between 50 to 100 million people worldwide

// Caitlin wants nathans penis mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Hetch Hetchy Valley is a glacial valley in Yosemite National Park in California. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Scientific American is a popular-science magazine, published (first weekly and later monthly) since August 28, 1845, making it the oldest continuously published magazine in the United States. ... Alternate Fuels (alternate fuel), also known as non-conventional fuels, is any material or substance that can be used as a fuel, other than fossil fuels, or conventional fuels of petroleum (oil), coal, propane, and natural gas. ... Fuel is any material that is capable of releasing energy when its chemical or physical structure is changed or converted. ... Tetra-ethyl lead (also known as TEL, lead tetraethyl and tetraethyllead) is a toxic organometallic chemical compound, with formula (CH3CH2)4Pb, which was once used as a gasoline (petrol) additive. ... Under United States Code Title 16, Chapter 7, Subchapter II, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 is the United States legislation implementing the convention between the U.S. and Great Britain (for Canada). ... The species that periodically migrate are called migratory bird, those that do not are called resident bird See also Resident bird Category: ... Image:Spanish flu notice. ...

1920s

The 1920s is a decade that is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... Thomas Midgley, Jr. ... For Pb as an abbreviation, see PB. General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish gray Standard atomic weight 207. ... An antiknock agent is a gasoline additive used to reduce engine knocking and increase the fuels octane rating. ... Gasoline or petrol is a petroleum-derived liquid mixture consisting mostly of hydrocarbons and enhanced with benzene or iso-octane to increase octane ratings, used as fuel in internal combustion engines. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar). ... The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 was the most destructive river flood in United States history until the Hurricane Katrina flood of 2005. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Thomas Midgley, Jr. ... Tetrafluoroethane (a haloalkane) is a clear liquid which boils well below room temperature (as seen here) and can be extracted from common canned air canisters by simply inverting them during use. ... Global monthly average total ozone amount Ozone depletion describes two distinct, but related observations: a slow, steady decline of about 4 percent per decade in the total amount of ozone in Earths stratosphere since around 1980; and a much larger, but seasonal, decrease in stratospheric ozone over Earths... Mario J. Molina (born March 19, 1943) was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his role in elucidating the threat to the Earths ozone layer of chlorofluorocarbon gases (or CFCs). ... Frank Sherwood Rowland (born June 28, 1927) is a Nobel laureate and a professor of chemistry at the University of California, Irvine. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, Physiology or Medicine and Economics. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer is an international treaty designed to protect the ozone layer by phasing out the production of a number of substances believed to be responsible for ozone depletion. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sources of PCBS PCB manufacture started in 1929 and peaked in the 1960s. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...

1930s
— Publication of Game Management by Aldo Leopold.

The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... A civet, or sea fox, photographed in the Zigong Peoples Zoo, Sichuan, 2001. ... Aldo Leopold (January 11, 1887 - April 21, 1948) was a United States ecologist, forester, and environmentalist. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act (FWCA) provides the basic authority for the United States Fish and Wildlife Services (FWS) involvement in evaluating impacts to fish and wildlife from proposed water resource development projects. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article does not adequately cite its references. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Soil Conservation and Domestic Allotment Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full year calendar). ... DDT or Dichloro-Diphenyl-Trichloroethane is the first modern pesticide and is one of the best known synthetic pesticides. ... Paul Hermann Müller (January 12, 1899 – October 12, 1965) was a Swiss chemist and winner of the 1948 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his 1939 discovery of the insecticidal properties of DDT. Müller was born in Olten/Solothurn. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, Physiology or Medicine and Economics. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ...

1940s

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Flood Control Act of 1944 (P.L. 78-534), enacted by the 78th Congress, authorized the construction of thousands of dams and levies across the United States. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... The Fat Man mushroom cloud resulting from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rises 18 km (11 mi, 60,000 ft) into the air from the hypocenter. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... Gland is a municipality in the district of Nyon in the canton of Vaud in Switzerland. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... Space-filling model of 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Structure of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) Dioxin is the popular name for the family of halogenated organic compounds, the most common consisting of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs). ... Nitro is a city located in West Virginia. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Vietnam. ...

1950s
World Meteorological Organization (WMO) established by the United Nations.
Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Act
Fish and Wildlife Act.

This does not cite its references or sources. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The Nature Conservancy is a leading environmental organization working to protect the most ecologically important lands and waters around the world for nature and people. ... The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is an intergovernmental organization with a membership of 187 Member States and Territories. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A nuclear power station. ... Transmission towers Transmission lines in Lund, Sweden Electric power transmission, or more accurately Electrical energy transmission, is the second process in the delivery of electricity to consumers. ... Obninsk (Russian: ) is a city in Kaluga Oblast, Russia, located 100 km south-west of Moscow, on the main rail line between Moscow and Kiev. ... On October 10, 1957, the graphite core of a British nuclear reactor at Windscale, Cumbria, caught fire releasing substantial amounts of radioactive contamination into the surrounding area. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... The United States Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Act of 1954 has been amended several times. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Minamata disease ), sometimes referred to as Chisso-Minamata disease ), is a neurological syndrome caused by severe mercury poisoning. ... Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956 establishes a comprehensive national fish, shellfish, and wildlife resources policy with emphasis on the commercial fishing industry but also with a direction to administer the Act with regard to the inherent right of every citizen and resident to fish for pleasure, enjoyment, and betterment... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) is an atmospheric baseline station. ... Carbon dioxide is a chemical compound composed of one carbon and two oxygen atoms. ... Top: Increasing atmospheric CO2 levels as measured in the atmosphere and ice cores. ...

1960s
  • 1960 — World population reached 3 billion[3].
— Mobilisation in France to preserve the Vanoise National Park in the Alpes (Val d'Isère, Tignes, etc.) from an important touristic project. The park itself was created three years later, in 1963, and was the first French natural park.
  • 1961World Wildlife Fund (WWF) registered as a charitable trust in Morges, Switzerland, an international organization for the conservation, research and restoration of the natural environment.
  • 1962Wallace Stegner publishes the Wilderness Essay.
Rachel Carson publishes Silent Spring.
Wilderness Act.
— Fur Seal Act.
Endangered Species Preservation Act.
Wild and Scenic Rivers Act.
— Accidental pollution of the Rhine in Europe, by 500 liters of Endosulfan, a kind of insecticide. The river was contaminated on more than 600 km and more than 20 million fish died [7].
— The Icelandic summer-spawning herring stock collapses as a result of a combination of high fishing pressure and deteriorating environmental conditions. From being a stock that was distributed over large areas in the North Atlantic, the stock was reduced to a small stock in Norwegian coastal waters. International efforts have later started to rebuild the stock.

The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Vanoise National Park ( Parc National de la Vanoise), is a national park in the mountains of France. ... Alpes are three departments in south-east France Basses-Alpes Hautes-Alpes Alpes Maritimes Categories: Départements of France | France geography stubs ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... Note: After losing a court case in 2002 on the use of the initials WWF, the organization previously known as the World Wrestling Federation has rebranded itself as World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE. WWF - The Conservation Organization was formerly known as World Wildlife Fund and Worldwide Fund for Nature. ... Morges is a commune in Switzerland in the canton of Vaud, located in the district and is also the seat of Morges. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... Wallace Earle Stegner (February 18, 1909—April 13, 1993) was an American historian, novelist, short story writer, and environmentalist. ... Rachel Louise Carson (27 May 1907 — 14 April 1964) was an American marine biologist whose landmark book, Silent Spring, is often credited with having launched the global environmental movement. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is an international agreement between Governments, drafted as a result of a resolution adopted in 1963 at a meeting of members of the World Conservation Union (IUCN). ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Norman Ernest Borlaug (born March 25, 1914) is an American agricultural scientist, humanitarian, Nobel laureate, and has been called the father of the Green Revolution[1]. Borlaug received his Ph. ... Texcoco is a city in México State, Mexico, located to the east of Mexico City at 19. ... The Green Revolution is a term used to describe the transformation of agriculture in many developing nations that led to significant increases in agricultural production between the 1940s and 1960s. ... President Lyndon Johnson signs the Wilderness Act of 1964 in the White House Rose Garden. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Hurricane Betsy was a powerful hurricane of the 1965 Atlantic hurricane season which caused enormous damage in the Bahamas, Florida, and Louisiana. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Established the National Wildlife Refuge System. ... [[Image:{{npov}} {{expert-subject|Law}} The Endangered Species Act (, et seq. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... The National Trails System Act was legislation first passed by the United States Congress in 1968. ... National Wild and Scenic River is a designation for certain protected areas in the United States. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... The National Environmental Policy Act (or, NEPA) was signed into law on January 1, 1970 by US President Richard Nixon. ... An Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is an assessment of the likely human environmental health impact, risk to ecological health, and changes to natures services that a project may have. ... The Rhine (Dutch: ; French: ; German: ; Italian: ; Romansh: ) is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe at 1,320 kilometres (820 miles), with an average discharge of more than 2,000 cubic meters per second. ... Endosulfan Endosulfan is a cyclodiene insecticide with the formula C9H6Cl6O3S, also used under the name thiodan and benzoepin. ... Binomial name Clupea harengus Linnaeus, 1758 Atlantic herring Clupea harengus is the one of the most abundant species of fish on the planet. ... For other uses, see Atlantic (disambiguation) The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one-fifth of its surface. ...

1970s
  • 1970Earth Day, millions of people gather in the United States for the first Earth day organized by Gaylord Nelson, former senator of Wisconsin, and Denis Hayes, Harvard graduate student.
— US Environmental Protection Agency established.
Clean Air Act.
Resource Recovery Act.
Francis A. Schaeffer publishes Pollution and the Death of Man.
Arne Næss leads the non-violent civil disobedience protest against damming of the Mardalsfossen waterfall, later publishing on the deep ecology philosophy.
  • 1971 — The international environmental organisation Greenpeace founded in Vancouver, Canada. Greenpeace has later developed national and regional offices in 41 countries worldwide.
International Institute for Environment and Development established in London, UK. One offshoot is the World Resources Institute with its biannual report World Resources since 1984.
United Nations Environment Programme founded as a result of the Stockholm conference.
— the Oslo Convention on dumping waste at sea, later merged with the Paris Convention on land-based sources of marine pollution into the Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic.
— The Club of Rome publishes its report Limits to Growth, which has sold 30 million copies in more than 30 translations, making it the best selling environmental book in world history.
Marine Mammal Protection Act.
Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act.
Noise Control Act.
Clean Water Act.
Ocean Dumping Act.
Coastal Zone Management Act.
  • 1973OPEC announces oil embargo against United States.
E. F. Schumacher publishes Small Is Beautiful.
— National Reserves Management Act.
— World population reached 4 billion[3].
— State Natural Heritage Program Network launched in the US.
— Soil and Water Resources Conservation Act.
  • 1978Brominated flame-retardants replaces PCBs as as the major chemical flame retardant. Swedish scientists noticed these substances to be accumulating in human breast milk 1998. First ban on use in the EU 2004.
  • 1979 — The Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution is established to reduce air pollutant emissions and acid rain.
Three Mile Island, worst nuclear power accident in US history.
Hans Jonas publishes The Imperative of Responsibility: In Search of Ethics for the Technological Age.

The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, In the Western world, the focus shifted from the social activism of the sixties to social activities for ones own pleasure, save for environmentalism, which continued in a very visible way. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Earth Day Flag. ... Gaylord Nelson Gaylord Anton Nelson (June 4, 1916 – July 3, 2005) was a Democratic American politician from Wisconsin. ... Denis Hayes, taken while director of the Solar Energy Research Institute (1979-1981) Denis Hayes (1944- ) is a leading environmental activist and proponent of Solar power. ... EPA redirects here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), enacted in 1976, is a Federal law of the United States contained in 42 U.S.C. §§6901-6992k. ... Francis Schaeffer Francis A Schaeffer (January 30, 1912–May 15, 1984), an American Evangelical theologian, philosopher, and Presbyterian pastor, is most famous for his writings and his establishment of the LAbri community in Switzerland. ... Pollution and the Death of Man is a philosophical work by presuppositionalist theologian Francis A. Schaeffer, published in 1970. ... Arne Dekke Eide Næss (born January 27, 1912) is widely regarded as the foremost Norwegian philosopher of the 20th century[1], and is the founder of deep ecology. ... Mardalsfossen is one of the highest waterfalls in the world. ... Deep ecology is a recent branch of ecological philosophy (ecosophy) that considers humankind as an integral part of its environment. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ... Greenpeace protest against Esso / Exxon Mobil. ... Vancouver (pronounced: ) is a city in south-western British Columbia, Canada. ... The International Institute for Environment and Development is a London-based policy centre and thinktank established by Barbara Ward in 1971. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... World Resources Institute (WRI) is an environmental think tank based in Washington, D.C. It was established by James Gustave (Gus) Speth. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Conference on the Human Environment, held in Stockholm, Sweden in 1972, was the first of a series of world environmental conferences. ... Nickname: Location of Stockholm in northern Europe Coordinates: Country Sweden Municipality Stockholm Municipality County Stockholm Province Södermanland and Uppland Charter 13th Century Population (April 2007)  - City 782,885  - Density 4,160/km² (10,774. ... Klaus Töpfer, former UNEP Exec. ... The official logo of the OSPAR Convention The Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic or OSPAR Convention is the current legislative instrument regulating international cooperation on environmental protection in the North-East Atlantic. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Limits to Growth was a 1972 book modeling the consequences of a rapidly growing world population and finite resource supplies, commissioned by the Club of Rome. ... The Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 prohibits, with certain exceptions, the take of marine mammals in U.S. waters and by U.S. citizens on the high seas, and the importation of marine mammals and marine mammal products into the U.S. Congress defines take as “harass, hunt, capture... Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 originally authorized the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate ocean dumping of industrial wastes, sewage sludge, and other wastes through a permit program. ... The Noise Pollution and Abatement Act of 1972 (or Noise Control Act of 1972, 92-574, 86 Stat. ... The Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. Â§ 1251, et seq. ... The Ocean Dumping Act was one of several key environmental laws, passed by the US Congress in 1972. ... The Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (16 USC 1451-1464, Chapter 33; P.L. 92-583, October 27, 1972; 86 Stat. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... OPEC Logo The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is an international organization made up of Iraq, Indonesia, Iran, Kuwait, Libya, Angola, Algeria, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Venezuela. ... Ernst Friedrich Fritz Schumacher (16 August 1911 – 4 September 1977) was an internationally influential economic thinker with a professional background as a statistician and economist in Britain. ... Small Is Beautiful is the title of a book by E. F. Schumacher. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... For other uses, see CFC (disambiguation). ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... President Ford set the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) into motion when he signed the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) on December 22, 1975. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Space-filling model of 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Structure of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) Dioxin is the popular name for the family of halogenated organic compounds, the most common consisting of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs). ... The Seveso disaster was an industrial accident that occurred around 12:37 pm July 10, 1976 in a small chemical manufacturing plant approximately 25 km north of Milan in the Lombardy region in Italy. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... It is the purpose of this Act to - establish a nationwide program to protect society and the environment from the adverse effects of surface coal mining operations; assure that the rights of surface landowners and other persons with a legal interest in the land or appurtenances thereto are fully protected... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Brominated flame-retardants are produced synthetically in 70 variants with very varying chemical properties. ... Labelling transformers containing PCBs Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of organic compounds with 1 to 10 chlorine atoms are attached to biphenyl and a general structure of C12H10-xClx. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by the Smashing Pumpkins, see 1979 (song). ... note - abbreviated as Air Pollution opened for signature - 13 November 1979 entered into force - 16 March 1983 objective - to protect the human environment against air pollution and to gradually reduce and prevent air pollution, including long-range transboundary air pollution parties - (48) Armenia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria... The term acid rain also known as acid precipitation is commonly used to mean the deposition of acidic components in rain, snow, dew, or dry particles. ... Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station consists of two nuclear reactors, each with its own containment building and cooling towers. ... German-born philosopher Hans Jonas (May 10, 1903 - February 5, 1993) studied under Martin Heidegger and Rudolf Bultmann in the 1920s. ...

1980s
Emergency Wetlands Resources Act.
Tetra-ethyl lead phase-out was completed in the US.
  • 1987 — World population reached 5 billion[3].
— The Report of the Brundtland Commission, Our Common Future on sustainable development, is published.
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was established by two United Nations organizations, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to assess the "risk of human-induced climate change".
Montreal Protocol on substances that deplete the ozone layer entered into force on January 1. Since then, it has undergone five revisions, in 1990 (London), 1992 (Copenhagen), 1995 (Vienna), 1997 (Montreal), and 1999 (Beijing).

The 1980s refers to the period where corey sucks peters and has a not little to look at his little penis of and between 1980 and 1989. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... For the mountain in California see Mount Saint Helena. Mount St. ... Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Coastal Barrier Resources Act, enacted October 18, 1982, designated various undeveloped coastal barrier islands, depicted by specific maps, for inclusion in the Coastal Barrier Resources System. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Time cover about Bhopal disaster. ... Methyl isocyanates structure 3D model of the MIC molecule Methyl isocyanate (MIC) is an organic compound with the molecular formula C2H3NO, arranged as H3C-N=C=O. Synonyms are isocyanatomethane, methyl carbylamine, and MIC. It was discovered in 1888 as an ester of isocyanic acid. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chernobyl reactor 4 after the disaster, showing the extensive damage to the main reactor hall (image center) and turbine building (image lower left) The Chernobyl disaster was a major accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on April 26, 1986 at 01:22 a. ... Emergency Wetlands Resources Act of 1986, approved November 10, 1986, authorized the purchase of wetlands from Land and Water Conservation Fund monies, removing a prior prohibition on such acquisitions. ... Tetra-ethyl lead (also known as TEL, lead tetraethyl and tetraethyllead) is a toxic organometallic chemical compound, with formula (CH3CH2)4Pb, which was once used as a gasoline (petrol) additive. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Brundtland Commission - formally the World Commission on Environment and Development (WCED), known by the name of its Chair Gro Harlem Brundtland, was convened by the United Nations in response to the 1983 General Assembly Resolution A/38/161 - Process of preparation of the Environmental Perspective to the Year 2000... Report of the UN WCED (World Commission on Environment and Development). ... Sustainable development has also been defined as the process of balancing the need of humans for economic and social development with the need to protect the natural and built environment so that these needs can be met not only in the present, but in the indefinite future. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ocean Dumping Ban Act of 1988 (§ 2030) amended the Ocean Dumping Act passed in 1972, passed by the US Congress in 1988. ... IPCC is the science authority for the UNFCCC The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was established in 1988 by two United Nations organizations, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), to evaluate the risk of climate change brought on by humans, based mainly on... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is an intergovernmental organization with a membership of 187 Member States and Territories. ... Klaus Töpfer, former UNEP Exec. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400,000 years For current global climate change, see Global warming. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the tank vessel Exxon Valdez. ... The Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer is an international treaty designed to protect the ozone layer by phasing out the production of a number of substances believed to be responsible for ozone depletion. ... The ozone layer, or ozonosphere layer (rarely used term), is the part of the Earths atmosphere which contains relatively high concentrations of ozone (O3). ...

1990s
European Environment Agency was established by EEC Regulation 1210/1990 and became operational in 1994. It is headquartered in Copenhagen, Denmark.
— The IPCC first assessment report was completed, and served as the basis of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
  • 1991 — The Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty was signed 4 October. The agreement provides for the protection of the Antarctic environment through five specific annexes on marine pollution, fauna, and flora, environmental impact assessments, waste management, and protected areas. It prohibits all activities relating to mineral resources except scientific.
— World's worst oil spill occurs in Kuwait during war with Iraq.
Global Environment Facility (GEF) was established by donor governments.
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change opened for signature on 9 May ahead of the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro.
— The international Convention on Biological Diversity opened for signature on 5 June in connection with the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro.
World Ocean Day began on 8 June at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro.
— The Canadian government closes all eastern seaboard fishing grounds due to insufficient recovery of the stock.
— Ireland's Environmental Protection Agency established.
— The metaphor Ecological footprint is coined by William Rees.
— The first genetically modified food crop released to the market. It remains a strongly controversial environmental issue.
  • 1995 — Scotland's Environmental Protection Agency established.
  • 1996Western Shield, a wildlife conservation project is started in Western Australia, and through successful work has taken several species off of the state, national, and international (IUCN) Endangered Species Lists..
  • 1997 — July, U.S. Senate unanimously passed by a 95–0 vote the Byrd-Hagel Resolution, which stated that the United States should not be a signatory to any protocol that did not include binding targets and timetables for developing as well as industrialized nations.
— The Kyoto Protocol was negotiated in Kyoto, Japan in December. It is actually an amendment to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Countries that ratify this protocol commit to reduce their emissions of carbon dioxide and five other greenhouse gases.
  • 1999 — World population reached 6 billion[3].

For the band, see 1990s (band). ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... The National Environmental Education Act of 1990 is an act of Congress of the United States of America to promote environmental education. ... European Environment Agency (EEA), agency of the European Union devoted to establishing a monitoring network for the monitoring of the European environment. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... UNFCCC logo. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, also known as the Antarctic-Environmental Protocol is part of the Antarctic Treaty System. ... An oil spill or oil slick is the unintentional release of liquid petroleum hydrocarbon into the environment as a result of human activity. ... The Global Environment Facility (GEF), established by donor governments in 1991 to pre-empt politically more radically alternative models of conservation finance proposed at the Rio Earth Summit, helps developing countries fund projects and programs that are claimed to protect the global environment. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, also known as the Earth Summit (or, in Portuguese, Eco 92) was a major conference held in Rio de Janeiro from June 3 to June 14, 1992. ... Location of Rio de Janeiro Coordinates: Country Brazil Region Southeast State Rio de Janeiro Government  - Mayor Cesar Maia (PFL) Area  - City 1,260 km²  (486. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... UNFCCC logo. ... The Convention on Biological Diversity is an international treaty that was adopted at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. ... World Ocean Day began on 8 June 1992 at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. ... System of government Canada is a constitutional monarchy as a Commonwealth Realm (see Monarchy in Canada) with a federal system of parliamentary government, and strong democratic traditions. ... William Rees (born December 18, 1943), is a professor at the University of British Columbia and former director of the School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP) at UBC. Rees has taught at the University of British Columbia since 1969-70. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Great Flood of 1993 was a major flood that occurred in the American Midwest, along the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, and their tributaries, from April to October of 1993. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The Mississippi River, derived from the old Ojibwe word misi-ziibi meaning great river (gichi-ziibi big river at its headwaters), is the second-longest named river in North America, with a length of 2320 miles (3733 km) from Lake Itasca to the Gulf of Mexico. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa is an agreement to combat desertification and mitigate the effects of drought through national action programs that incorporate long-term strategies supported by international cooperation and partnership arrangements. ... Genetically Modified (GM) foods are produced from genetically modified organisms (GMO) which have had their genome altered through genetic engineering techniques. ... The GM food controversy is a dispute over the advantages and disadvantages of genetically modified food crops. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Western Shield, managed by the Western Australias Department of Environment and Conservation, is a nature conservation program, safeguarding Western Australias native animals and bringing them back from the brink of extinction. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... In international law and international relations, a protocol is a treaty or international agreement that supplements a previous treaty or international agreement. ... Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 in Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ... Location of Kyoto, on the main island of Japan Kyoto (Japanese: 京都市; Kyōto-shi) is a city in Japan that has a population of 1. ... UNFCCC logo. ... Carbon dioxide is a chemical compound composed of one carbon and two oxygen atoms. ... Top: Increasing atmospheric CO2 levels as measured in the atmosphere and ice cores. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...

21st century

— European Heat Wave resulting in the premature deaths of at least 35,000 people.
— The Kyoto Protocol came into force on February 16 following ratification by Russia on November 18, 2004.
— The BBC's "Climate Chaos" season includes Are We Changing Planet Earth?, a two-part investigation into global warming by David Attenborough.
— The Stern Review is published. The British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, says that it shows that scientific evidence of global warming was "overwhelming" and its consequences "disastrous".
— World population reached 6.5 billion[8]

The 21st century is the present century of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 in Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The World Summit on Sustainable Development, or Earth Summit took place in Johannesburg, South Africa from August 26 to September 4, 2002 to discuss sustainable development issues. ... City motto: Unity in Development Province Gauteng Mayor Amos Masondo Area  - % water 1,644 km² 0. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... // It has been suggested that Three gorges dam endangered species be merged into this article or section. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tsunami strikes Ao Nang, Thailand. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... Lowest pressure 895 mbar (hPa)[1] Damages $10 billion (2005 USD)[1] Fatalities 7 direct, 113 indirect Areas affected Bahamas, Florida, Cuba, Yucatán Peninsula, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas Part of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane Rita is the fourth-most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded and the most... Lowest pressure 882 mbar (hPa) (Lowest pressure ever recorded in an Atlantic hurricane) Damage $28. ... Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 in Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... An Inconvenient Truth is an Academy Award-winning documentary film about climate change, specifically global warming, directed by Davis Guggenheim and presented by former United States Vice President Al Gore. ... Global mean surface temperatures 1850 to 2006 Mean surface temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is the observed increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans in recent decades and the projected... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... Are We Changing Planet Earth? and Can We Save Planet Earth? are two programmes that form a documentary about global warming, presented by David Attenborough. ... Sir David Frederick Attenborough, OM, CH, CVO, CBE, FRS (born on 8 May 1926 in London, England) is one of the worlds best known broadcasters and naturalists. ... Sir Nicholas Stern, author of the report. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency...

See also

// Early events 350 BC - Aristotle wrote Meteorology. ... This is a list of sdfsdfsdfsdfsdfẽsdto the anthropogenic effects on the natural environment. ...

Endnotes

  1. ^ http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/worldhis.html
  2. ^ http://www.petermaas.nl/extinct/speciesinfo/dodobird.htm
  3. ^ a b c d e f United Nations Population Fund moves Day of 6 Billion based on new population estimates. Population Connection (1998-10-28). Retrieved on 2006-03-11.
  4. ^ http://www.physorg.com/pdf83678030.pdf
  5. ^ www.worldbank.org/transport/publicat/b09.pdf
  6. ^ http://www.worldfuturefund.org/wffmaster/Reading/Germany/Nazianimalrights.htm
  7. ^ "Environmental movement" article in the French Encyclopedia Universalis]
  8. ^ David, Leonard (2006-02-25). World population hits 6.5 billion. MSNBC. Retrieved on 2007-04-19.

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (71st in leap years). ... MSNBC, a combination of MSN and NBC, is a 24-hour cable news channel in the United States and Canada, and a news website. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ...

References


 
 

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