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Encyclopedia > Timeline of Scottish history

This timeline outlines the main events in Scottish history. Alternative meanings: Timeline is a 1999 science fiction novel by Michael Crichton Timeline is a 2003 film based on the novel. ... Stirling Castle has stood for centuries atop a volcanic crag defending the lowest ford of the River Forth. ...

Contents


4th century BC - 9th century

Events Council of Carthage: Definitive declaration of the biblical canon Candida Casa founded by Saint Ninian. ... Saint Ninian (c. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the life, teachings, and actions of Jesus, the Christ, as recounted in the New Testament. ... Whithorn is a small burgh in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, about ten miles south of Wigtown. ... Events Euric, king of the Visigoths, defeats an attempted invasion of Gaul by the Celtic magnate Riothamus. ... The Votadini (the Wotādīnī, or Votādīnī) were a people of the Iron Age in Great Britain, and their territory was briefly part of the Roman province Britannia. ... Gododdin (pronounced god-o-th-in), or Guotodin (Votadini in Latin), refers to both the people and to the region of a Dark Ages Brythonic kingdom south of the Firth of Forth, extending from the Stirling area to the Northumberland kingdom of Brynaich, and including what are now the Lothian... There are other rivers with this name: see Tweed River The River Tweed at Abbotsford, near Melrose The River Tweed at Coldstream The River Tweed (156 kilometres or 97 miles long) flows primarily through the Borders region of Scotland. ... This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ... Dalriada or Dál Riata (as it was called in Ireland) was the kingdom of the Scotti, who spread from eastern Ulster to Argyll and eventually gave their name to Scotland. ... Strathclyde (Welsh: Ystrad Clud) was one of the kingdoms of ancient Scotland in the post-Roman period. ... The Picts inhabited Pictavia or Pictland - Caledonia (Scotland), north of the River Forth _ prior to the Scotticisation of the area. ... Gododdin (pronounced god-o-th-in), or Guotodin (Votadini in Latin), refers to both the people and to the region of a Dark Ages Brythonic kingdom south of the Firth of Forth, extending from the Stirling area to the Northumberland kingdom of Brynaich, and including what are now the Lothian... Events Ida founds the kingdom of Bernicia at Bamburgh (traditional date). ... Angles (German: Angeln, Old English: Englas, Latin: singular Anglus, plural Anglii) were Germanic people, from Angeln in Schleswig, who settled in East Anglia, Mercia and Northumbria in the 5th century. ... looking east from the village green. ... Bernicia (Brythonic, Brynaich or Bryneich) was a kingdom of the Angles in northern England during the 6th and 7th centuries AD. It later merged with the kingdom of Deira to form the kingdom of Northumbria. ... Events Saint Columba, the Irish missionary, founds his mission to the Picts and his monastery on Iona. ... A separate article is titled Columba (constellation). ... Iona village viewed from a short distance offshore. ... Events April 13 - Sabinianus becomes Pope, succeeding Gregory I. September 13 - Pope Sabinianus is consecrated. ... Æthelfrith (d. ... Bernicia (Brythonic, Brynaich or Bryneich) was a kingdom of the Angles in northern England during the 6th and 7th centuries AD. It later merged with the kingdom of Deira to form the kingdom of Northumbria. ... Italic textBold text --203. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles, Danes and Norwegians which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, and of the much smaller earldom... Events Islamic calendar introduced The Muslims capture Antioch, Caesarea Palaestina and Akko Births Deaths October 12 - Pope Honorius I Categories: 638 ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles, Danes and Norwegians which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, and of the much smaller earldom... Edinburgh (pronounced ), Dùn Èideann () in Scottish Gaelic, is the second-largest city in Scotland and its capital city. ... Events Umayyad caliph Marwan I (684-685) succeeded by Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan (685-705) Justinian II succeeds Constantine IV as emperor of the Byzantine Empire Sussex attacks Kent, supporting Eadrics claim to the throne held by Hlothhere Pope Benedict II succeeded by Pope John V Cuthbert consecrated... Combatants Picts Northumbrians Commanders Bridei III Ecgfrith Strength Casualties {{{notes}}} The Battle of Dunnichen (known to the English as Nechtansmere, and to the Welsh Linn garan) was fought between the Picts and Northumbrians on May 20, 685, near Forfar, Angus. ... Events Treaty of Verdun divides the Carolingian empire between the 3 sons of Louis the Pious. ... Kenneth I the Hardy (ca. ... Events The sovereignty of prince Svatopluk I in Bohemia is confirmed. ... Gwynedd was one of the kingdoms or principalities of medieval Wales. ...

10th century - 13th century

Events Eadred I succeeds his brother as king of England End of the reign of Emperor Suzaku of Japan Emperor Murakami ascends the throne of Japan Births Deaths May 26 - King Edmund I of England Abu-Bakr Muhammad ben Yahya as-Suli Categories: 946 ... Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), the son of Donald I of Scotland, became the King of Scotland in 942 or 943 after his cousin King Constantine II of Scotland abdicated and became a monk. ... Events King Malcolm I of Scotland is killed in battle against Highlanders. ... Indulf (Indulb mac Causantín) was king of Scotland from 954 to 962. ... Events August: Canute the Great invades England. ... Malcolm II of Scotland (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) (c. ... Lothian (Lowden in Scots, Lodainn in Gaelic) forms a traditional region of Scotland, lying between the southern shore of the Firth of Forth and the Lammermuir Hills. ... Events March 17 - King Lulach I of Scotland is killed in battle against his cousin and rival Malcolm Canmore, who later becomes King of Scotland as Malcolm III of Scotland. ... Scene from Macbeth, depicting the witches conjuring of an apparition in Act IV, Scene I. Painting by William Rimmer This article is on the play Macbeth by Shakespeare. ... King Malcolm III of Scotland, (1031? - November 13, 1093) also known as Malcolm Canmore (Malcolm with the large head), was the eldest son of King Duncan I of Scotland and first king of the House of Dunkeld. ... Anglicisation is a process of making something English. ... Events March 26 - Henry I of Englands forces defeat Norman rebels at Bourgtheroulde. ... David I, known as the Saint, (1084 - May 24, 1153), king of Scotland, the youngest son of Malcolm Canmore and of Saint Margaret (sister of Edgar Ætheling), was born in 1084. ... Events Establishment of the Carmelite Order Hogen Rebellion in Japan January 20 - According to legend, freeholder Lalli slays English crusader Bishop Henry with an axe on the ice of the lake Köyliönjärvi in Finland. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Godfred I mac Fergus lord of the Hebrides (836-853) Sub-Kings under Norse Dublin Kingdom: Caitill Find Tryggvi (870-880) Asbjorn Skerjablesi (880-899) Gibhleachan (921-937) Mac Ragnall (937-942) Magnus I (972-978) Godfred II (978-989) Sub-Kings under Norse Orkney Rule: Harald I (989-999... The name Viking is a loanword from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, the British Isles, and other parts of Europe from the late 8th century to the 11th century. ... // Events Count Henry I of Champagne marries Marie de Champagne. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Lord of the Isles, now a Scottish title of nobility, originally referred to a series of hybrid Viking/Gaelic rulers of the west coast and islands of Scotland in the Middle Ages, who wielded sea-power with fleets of galleys Although at times nominal vassals of the King of Norway... The Battle of Renfrew ( 1164 ) was a signficant battle between the Scottish Crown and Somerled, Lord of the Isles which saw the death and defeat of the latter. ... Events Canonization of Saint Dominic Collapse of the Jin Dynasty (1115-1234) Deaths Emperor Chukyo of Japan Emperor Go-Horikawa of Japan Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile - Ferdinand III, the Saint King of Castile and Leon (reigned... Alan FitzRoland (c. ... // Events Thomas II of Savoy becomes count of Flanders. ... Treaty of York 1237 Signed between Henry III and Alexander II, king of Scots (1214-1249), this treaty secured Englands northern border. ... Events Detmold, Germany was founded. ... Largs (Grid reference NS203592) is a burgh on the Firth of Clyde in North Ayrshire, Scotland, about 33 miles (53 km) from Glasgow. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... The Western Isles are an archipelago in Scotland. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... Edward I (June 17, 1239–July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch frame and the Hammer of the Scots (his tombstone, in Latin, read, Hic est Edwardvs Primus Scottorum Malleus, Here lies Edward I, Hammer of the Scots), achieved fame as the monarch... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... John Balliol and his wife. ... Events 8 January - Monaco gains independence. ... Andrew de Moray, a member of the Scottish nobility, went to prison with his father, Sir Andrew de Moray, following the 1296 Battle of Dunbar. ... Sir William Wallace (circa. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... The Battle of Stirling Bridge was one of the series of conflicts of the Wars of Scottish Independence. ...

14th century - 16th century

Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... Robert I, (Roibert a Briuis in medieval Gaelic, Raibeart Bruis in modern Scottish Gaelic and Robert de Brus in Norman French), usually known in modern English today as Robert the Bruce (July 11, 1274 – June 7, 1329), was King of Scotland (1306 – 1329). ... The Battle of Bannockburn (June 23, 1314 – June 24, 1314) was a significant Scottish victory in the Wars of Scottish Independence. ... Events Augustiner brew Munich May 1 - Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton - England recognises Scotland as an independent nation after the Wars of Scottish Independence May 12 - Nicholas V is consecrated at St Peters Basilica in Rome by the bishop of Venice. ... The Treaty of Edinburgh was drawn up in 1560 by the Scottish Parliament in an attempt to formally end the Auld Alliance. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Walter Thomas Monningtons 1925 painting called Parliamentary Union of England and Scotland 1707 hangs in the Palace of Westminster depicting the official presentation of the law that formed the United Kingdom of Great Britain. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Kogon of Japan, fourth of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Start of the reign of Emperor Go-Enyu of Japan, fifth and last of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Charterhouse Carthusian Monastery founded in Aldersgate, London. ... Robert II (March 2, 1316 – April 19, 1390), king of Scotland, called the Steward, a title that gave the name to the House of Stewart (or Stuart). ... Stewart is a common surname and male first name. ... Events September 14 - Battle of Homildon Hill. ... In 1402, Scottish nobles launched a coordinated invasion of Northern England. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... 1493 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lord of the Isles, now a Scottish title of nobility, originally referred to a series of hybrid Viking/Gaelic rulers of the west coast and islands of Scotland in the Middle Ages, who wielded sea-power with fleets of galleys Although at times nominal vassals of the King of Norway... 1513 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... James IV (March 17, 1473 - September 9, 1513) was king of Scotland from 1488 to 1513. ... Western side of the battlefield, looking south-south-east from the monument erected in 1910 (marked red in the key below). ... Events January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... John Knox (1505, 1513 or 1514 – 1572) was a Scottish religious reformer who played the lead part in reforming the Church in Scotland in a Presbyterian manner. ... Geneva (French: Genève, German: Genf, Italian: Ginevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland, situated where Lake Geneva (French Lac Léman) flows into the Rhône River. ... Calvinism is a system of Christian theology and an approach to Christian life and thought, articulated by Theodore Beza, a Protestant Reformer in the 16th century, and subsequently by successors, associates, followers and admirers of Beza and his interpretation of Scripture. ... Events February 27 - The Treaty of Berwick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland The first tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which emerged in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church in Western Europe. ... The Church of Scotland (C of S, also known informally as The Kirk; until the 17th century officially the Kirk of Scotland) is the Christian national church of Scotland. ... Events March 23 - Peace of Longjumeau ends the Second War of Religion in France. ... Mary, Queen of Scots is the name of: Mary I of Scotland, the former queen of France and Scotland executed by her cousin Elizabeth I of England Mary, Queen of Scots (movie), a 1971 film about that queen starring Vanessa Redgrave Mary, Queen of Scots (1969 book), a 1969 book... Henry Stewart (or Stuart, which was the style adopted by his father, and thence perpetuated as the House of Stuart), 1st Duke of Albany (7 December 1545 – 9 or 10 February 1567), commonly known as Lord Darnley, King Consort of Scotland, was the first-cousin and second husband of Mary... Events January 31 - Battle of Gemblours - Spanish forces under Don John of Austria and Alexander Farnese defeat the Dutch. ... James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... James Douglas, 4th Earl of Morton (c. ... 1587 was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. ... Events January 30 - The death of Pope Innocent IX during the previous year had left the Papal throne vacant. ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ...

17th century - 18th century

King James I of England/VII of Scotland, the first monarch to rule the Kingdoms of England and Scotland at the same time Events March - Samuel de Champlain, French explorer, sails to Canada March 24 - Elizabeth I of England dies and is succeeded by her cousin King James I of... James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... Scotland and James I of England and Ireland (occasionally known as King James the Vain) (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was King of England, King of Scotland, and King of Ireland. ... Events March 29 - Swedish colonists establish first settlement in Delaware, called New Sweden. ... The Covenanters are a radical Presbyterian movement that played an important part in the history of Scotland, and to a lesser extent in that of England and Ireland, during the 17th century. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... // Events January 21 - Abel Tasman discovers Tonga February 6 - Abel Tasman discovers the Fiji islands. ... The Solemn League and Covenant was an agreement between the Scottish Covenanters and the leaders of the English Parliamentarians. ... // Events January 1 - Charles II crowned King of Scotland in Scone. ... Events Expulsion of the Carib indigenous people from Martinique by French occupying forces. ... Unfinished portrait miniature of Oliver Cromwell by Samuel Cooper, 1657. ... Events January 24 - King Charles II of England disbands Parliament August 7 - The brigantine Le Griffon, which was commissioned by René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, is towed to the southern end of the Niagara River, to become the first ship to sail the upper Great Lakes. ... James Crofts, later Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, 1st Duke of Buccleuch (April 9, 1649–July 15, 1685) recognised by some as James II of England and James VII of Scotland, was born in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, the son of Charles II and his mistress, Lucy Walter, who had... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... This article concerns the political movement supporting the restoration of the House of Stuart, not the earlier Jacobean period. ... William III of England (14 November 1650 – 8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William III of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and a Protestant Prince of Orange from his birth, King of England and King of Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scots... Battle of Killiecrankie Conflict Jacobite Rising Date July 27, 1689 Place Killiecrankie Scotland Result Royalist Victory The Battle of Killiecrankie was fought between Highland clans supporting James II and English troops (though mostly lowland Scots) supporting William of Orange on July 27, 1689 during the Glorious Revolution. ... Dunkeld is a town in Strathtay (= the River Tay valley) on the south edge of the Highlands of Scotland. ... Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... The mountains of Glen Coe: The Aonach Eagach ridge, to the north side of the glen. ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Act of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... Act of Union can mean: United Kingdom The Act of Union is a name given to several acts passed by the English, Scottish and British Parliaments from 1536 onwards. ... // Events July 24 - Spanish treasure fleet of ten ships under admiral Ubilla leave Havana, Cuba for Spain. ... Each Jacobite Rising formed part of a series of military campaigns by Jacobites attempting to restore the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland (and after 1707, Great Britain) after James VII of Scotland and II of England was deposed in 1688 and the thrones usurped by his... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... Each Jacobite Rising formed part of a series of military campaigns by Jacobites attempting to restore the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland (and after 1707, Great Britain) after James VII of Scotland and II of England was deposed in 1688 and the thrones usurped by his... Events January 8 - Bonnie Prince Charlie occupies Stirling April 16 - Battle of Culloden brings an end to the Jacobite Risings October 22 - The College of New Jersey is founded (it becomes Princeton University in 1896) October 28 - An earthquake demolishes Lima and Callao, in Peru Catharine de Ricci (born 1522... Combatants British Army Jacobites Commanders William Augustus Charles Edward Stuart Strength ca. ... Each Jacobite Rising formed part of a series of military campaigns by Jacobites attempting to restore the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland (and after 1707, Great Britain) after James VII of Scotland and II of England was deposed in 1688 and the thrones usurped by his... Events April 24 - A congress assembles at Aix-la-Chapelle with the intent to conclude the struggle known as the War of Austrian Succession - at October 18 - The Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle is signed to end the war Adam Smith begins to deliver public lectures in Edinburgh Building of... David Hume (April 26, 1711 – August 25, 1776*) was a Scottish philosopher and historian. ... An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding is a book by philosopher David Hume, published in 1748. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Highland Clearances were part of a process of agricultural change throughout the United Kingdom, but the late timing, the abruptness of the change from the Clan System in the Scottish Highlands and the brutality of many of the evictions gave the Highland Clearances particular notoriety. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... James Watt James Watt (19 January 1736 – 19 August 1819) was a Scottish inventor and engineer whose improvements to the steam engine were fundamental to the changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution. ... A steam engine is an external combustion heat engine that makes use of the thermal energy that exists in steam, converting it to mechanical work. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... Adam Smith, FRSE (baptised June 5, 1723 – July 17, 1790) was a Scottish political economist and moral philosopher. ... An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations is the magnum opus of Adam Smith, published in 1776. ...

19th century - Present

--69. ... Professor John Playfair FRSE (March 10, 1748 – July 20, 1819) was a Scottish scientist. ... James Hutton, painted by Abner Lowe. ... Geology (from Greek γη- (ge-, the earth) and λογος (logos, word, reason)) is the science and study of the Earth, its composition, structure, physical properties, history and the processes that shape it. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Sir David Wilkies flattering portrait of the kilted King George IV, with lighting chosen to tone down the brightness of his kilt and his knees shown bare, without the pink tights he wore at the event. ... Portrait of Sir Walter Scott, by Sir Edwin Henry Landseer Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet (14 August 1771–21 September 1832) was a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet popular throughout Europe during his time. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... In the Highlands of Scotland, in the mid 19th century, most croftters were very dependent on potatoes as a source of food. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... James Clerk Maxwell (June 13, 1831–November 5, 1879) was a Scottish mathematical physicist, born in Edinburgh. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Combatants Allies: • Serbia, • Russia, • France, • Romania, • Belgium, • British Empire and Dominions, • United States, • Italy, • ...and others Central Powers: • Germany, • Austria-Hungary, • Ottoman Empire, • Bulgaria Casualties 5 million military, 3 million civilian (full list) 3 million military, 3 million civilian (full list) World War I, also known as the First World... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Combatants Allies: • Soviet Union, • UK & Commonwealth, • USA, • France/Free France, • China, • Poland, • ...and others Axis: • Germany, • Japan, • Italy, • ...and others Casualties Military dead: 18 million Civilian dead: 33 million Full list Military dead: 7 million Civilian dead: 4 million Full list World War II, also known as the Second World... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) (Pàrtaidh Nàiseanta na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII in Roman) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the national legislative body adjourned in 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...

See also

Topics on Scotland
History Timeline | Prehistoric Scotland | Scotland in the High Middle Ages | Wars of Scottish Independence | Scottish Enlightenment | Colonization | Acts of Union 1707 | Jacobitism | Highland Clearances
Politics Scottish Parliament | Scottish Executive | First Minister of Scotland | Member of the Scottish Parliament | Secretary of State for Scotland | Scotland Office
Geography Geology | Climate | Mountains and hills | Islands | Lochs
Economy Companies | Bank of Scotland | Royal Bank of Scotland | North Sea oil | Scotch whisky | Harris Tweed
Demographics Scottish Gaelic language | Scots language | Scottish English | Highland English | Burghs
Culture Education | Scottish Football Association | Scottish Rugby Union | Highland games | Hogmanay | Innovations & discoveries
Symbols Flags (National Flag | Royal Standard) | Royal Arms (UK/Scottish) | Tartan | Bagpipes | Tartan Day

  Results from FactBites:
 
Undiscovered Scotland: Timeline of Scottish History (413 words)
It might be one of the 2700 castles built in an often vain attempt to defend land, property and lives: or one of the innumerable battlefields where ordinary Scots fought, often with one another, and usually in pursuit of someone else's ambitions or beliefs.
Or it might be one of the seemingly endless succession of castles and houses, large and small, in which Mary Queen of Scots is said to have spent the night.
Some understanding of Scottish history is essential if you are to get any real feel for a country with such a turbulent past.
History of Scotland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8314 words)
The written history of Scotland largely begins with the arrival of the Roman Empire in Britain, when the Romans occupied what is now England and Wales, administering it as a Roman province called Britannia.
Charles Edward Stuart, known to history as Bonnie Prince Charlie or the Young Pretender, son of the Old Pretender, landed on the island of Eriskay in the Outer Hebrides.
His romantic portrayals of Scottish life in centuries past still continue to have a disproportionate effect on the public perception of "authentic Scottish culture," and the pageantry he organised for the Visit of King George IV to Scotland made tartan and kilts into national symbols.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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