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Encyclopedia > Timeline of New Zealand history

This is a timeline of the History of New Zealand. The history of New Zealand dates back at least seven hundred years to when it was discovered and settled by Polynesians. ...

Contents

Pre-Colonial Timeline (to 1839)

Before 1600

Events Antonine Wall is overrun. ... Lake Taupo is a lake situated in the North Island of New Zealand. ... Europe in 1000 The year 1000 of the Gregorian Calendar was the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the first millennium. ... Events February 22 - Jubilee of Pope Boniface VIII. March 10 - Wardrobe accounts of King Edward I of Englanddo (aka Edward Longshanks) include a reference to a game called creag being played at the town of Newenden in Kent. ... Binomial name Cordyline australis (Forst. ... The Otago Peninsula is a long, rugged indented finger of land that forms the easternmost part of Dunedin, New Zealand. ... 1500 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of Rangitoto island (marked in red) Rangitoto Island (, ) is a volcanic island in the Hauraki Gulf near Auckland, New Zealand. ... Schematic map of Auckland. ...

Seventeenth century

1642

Events January 4 - Charles I attempts to arrest five leading members of the Long Parliament, but they escape. ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... See also explorations, sea explorers, astronaut, conquistador, travelogue, the History of Science and Technology and Biography. ... Portrait of Tasman by J. M. Donald (1903) Abel Janszoon Tasman (1603 - October 10, 1659), was a Dutch seafarer, explorer, and merchant. ... The South Island The South Island is the larger of the two major islands of New Zealand, the other being the more populous North Island. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Portrait of Tasman by J. M. Donald (1903) Abel Janszoon Tasman (1603 - October 10, 1659), was a Dutch seafarer, explorer, and merchant. ... Farewell Spit is situated at the northern end of the South Island of New Zealand; running eastwards from Cape Farewell, the islands northernmost point. ... Golden Bay is the name of a bay and a district at the northern end of New Zealands South Island. ... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... North Island The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, the other being the South Island. ...

Eighteenth century

1769
  • October 8: James Cook makes his first visit to New Zealand.
  • Cook maps the majority of the New Zealand coastline.
  • Jean de Surville explores parts of the New Zealand coast.
1772
  • April: Expedition of Marc-Joseph Marion du Fresne visits Northland
1773
1777
  • Cook returns to New Zealand aboard the Resolution, accompanied by the Discovery captained by Charles Clerke.[1]
1788
  • New South Wales founded, which according to Governor Phillip's Commission included the islands of New Zealand.
1790
  • An epidemic of rewha-rewha (possibly influenza) kills 60% of the Māori population in the southern North Island.[1]
1791
1792
1793

1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Blue plaque for Captain James Cook Captain James Cook FRS RN (27 October 1728 (O.S.) – 14 February 1779) was an English explorer, navigator and cartographer. ... Jean-François-Marie de Surville (1717 - April 1770) was a French trader and navigator. ... Year 1772 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Marc-Joseph Marion du Fresne (1724 - 1772) was a French explorer. ... The Northland Region (Māori: ), one of the 16 regions of New Zealand, is, as the name suggests, the northernmost of New Zealands administrative regions. ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Queen Charlotte Sound is the name of two channels: Queen Charlotte Sound, Canada, is located in British Columbia. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Charles Clerke (1741-1779) was an officer in the Royal Navy who sailed with of four voyages of exploration. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Slogan or Nickname: First State, Premier State Motto(s): Orta Recens Quam Pura Nites (Newly Risen, How Brightly You Shine) Other Australian states and territories Capital Sydney Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Professor Marie Bashir Premier Morris Iemma (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 50  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004... her{{Infobox Military Person |name= Arthur Phillip |lived= [[21 October] – 91 August 1819 |placeofbirth= London, England |placeofdeath= sydney, australia |image= |caption=Admiral Arthur Phillip (1786 portrait by Francis Wheatley, National Portrait Gallery, London) |nickname= |allegiance= Kingdom of Great Britain |serviceyears= |rank= Admiral |branch= Royal Navy |commands= |unit= |battles= Seven Years... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Influenza, commonly known as flu, is an infectious disease of birds and mammals caused by an RNA virus of the family Orthomyxoviridae (the influenza viruses). ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chatham Islands from space. ... William Robert Broughton was a British naval officer in the late 18th century. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Families Odobenidae Otariidae Phocidae Pinnipeds (fin-feet, lit. ... Dusky Sound is a fjord on the south west corner of New Zealand, in Fiordland National Park. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Alessandro Malaspina (also found as Alexandro and Alejandro) (1754 - 1810) was a Spanish naval officer and explorer. ... Typical view of the Doubtful Sound. ...

1800s

1806
  • First Pākehā women arrive in New Zealand.
1809
  • The ship Boyd is attacked and burned and all but four of its crew and passengers killed by Ngati Uru. The whaling fleet wrongly blames the massacre on Te Puna chief Te Pahi and retaliates against him.

1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Pākehā is a term generally used to describe New Zealanders of Anglo/European extraction, but some Māori may use it to refer to any non-Māori person. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Boyd was a 395 ton brigantine convict ship which sailed from Sydney Cove to Whangaroa on the east coast of Northland Peninsula in New Zealand in October 1809, under the command of a Captain John Thompson and carrying about 70 passengers. ...

1810s

1814
1815
  • February: Thomas Holloway King is the first Pākehā child born in New Zealand, at Rangihoua.
1819
  • Raids on Taranaki and Te Whanganui-a-tara regions by Ngapuhi and Ngati Toa people led by chiefs Patuone, Nene, Moetara, Tuwhare, and Te Rauparaha.
  • August 17: the country's second mission station is established, at Kerikeri, when Rev Marsden, John Butler, Francis Hall and William Hall mark out the site which was previously visited by Marsden in 1815.
  • September 25: Rev Marsden plants 100 vines, the first grapes grown in New Zealand.
  • November 4: Chiefs Hongi Hika and Rewa sell 13,000 acres (5260 hectares) at Kerikeri to the Church Missionary Society for 48 felling axes.

Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Two Mormon missionaries A missionary is traditionally defined as a propagator of religion who works to convert those outside that community; someone who proselytizes. ... The Rev. ... Russell, Bay of Islands Kerikeri, Bay of Islands Location of the Bay of Islands The Bay of Islands is an area in the Northland region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      A Christian () is a person who... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Pākehā is a term generally used to describe New Zealanders of Anglo/European extraction, but some Māori may use it to refer to any non-Māori person. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... View of Mount Taranaki or Mount Egmont from Stratford, facing west. ... Ngapuhi form one of the major and (with over 100,000 members) the single most numerous of the Maori tribes or iwi in New Zealand, occupying much the Northland Peninsula, also known as Tai Tokerau, north of the city of Auckland. ... Mai i Miria te kakara ki Whitireia, Whakawhiti te moana Raukawa ki Wairau ki WhakatÅ«, Te Waka Tainui. ... Nene may refer to: The River Nene in England The Rolls-Royce Nene, a jet engine The Hawaiian Goose, also called the NÄ“nÄ“. Nene (trail), a Seminole Indian word meaning street Nêne was a Prix Goncourt-winning book. ... Tuwhare could possibly be another name for Te Wharerahi. ... Te Rauparaha (1760s?-1849) was a Maori Chief and War Leader of the Ngati Toa tribe who took a leading part in the Musket Wars. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kerikeri, the largest town in the Bay of Islands on the North Island of New Zealand, is a popular tourist destination about three hours drive north of Auckland, and 80 kilometres north of Whangarei. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hongi Hika (1772?–1828) was a New Zealand Maori rangatira (chief) and war leader of the Ngapuhi iwi (tribe). ... Kerikeri, the largest town in the Bay of Islands on the North Island of New Zealand, is a popular tourist destination about three hours drive north of Auckland, and 80 kilometres north of Whangarei. ...

1820s

1820
1821
  • Musket Wars begin with raids by Hongi Hika and Te Morenga on southern iwi and continue throughout the decade.
1822
1823
  • Jurisdiction of New South Wales courts is extended to British citizens in New Zealand.
  • Wesleyan Missionary Society mission established.
  • First Church of England marriage between Philip Tapsell and Māori girl, Maria Ringa.
1824
  • Te Heke Niho-puta migration of Taranaki iwi to the Kapiti Coast.
  • Rawiri Taiwhanga in Bay of Islands sells dairy produce and other food supplies to visiting ships.
1827

1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Hongi Hika (1772?–1828) was a New Zealand Maori rangatira (chief) and war leader of the Ngapuhi iwi (tribe). ... Ngapuhi form one of the major and (with over 100,000 members) the single most numerous of the Maori tribes or iwi in New Zealand, occupying much the Northland Peninsula, also known as Tai Tokerau, north of the city of Auckland. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... Muskets and bayonets aboard the frigate Grand Turk. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Musket Wars were a series of battles fought between various tribal groups of Maori in the early 1800s, primarily on the North Island in New Zealand. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Mai i Miria te kakara ki Whitireia, Whakawhiti te moana Raukawa ki Wairau ki WhakatÅ«, Te Waka Tainui. ... A view of from the summit of Mount Victoria, Wellington - Cook Strait stretches to the right (west). ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Slogan or Nickname: First State, Premier State Motto(s): Orta Recens Quam Pura Nites (Newly Risen, How Brightly You Shine) Other Australian states and territories Capital Sydney Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Professor Marie Bashir Premier Morris Iemma (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 50  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Kapiti Island seen from Waikanae Beach, Kapiti Coast. ... Russell, Bay of Islands Kerikeri, Bay of Islands Location of the Bay of Islands The Bay of Islands is an area in the Northland region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... A dairy farm near Oxford, New York in the United States. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Te Rauparaha (1760s?-1849) was a Maori Chief and War Leader of the Ngati Toa tribe who took a leading part in the Musket Wars. ... The South Island The South Island is the larger of the two major islands of New Zealand, the other being the more populous North Island. ... Kapiti can refer to: Kapiti Island, a small island a short distance off the New Zealand coast north of Wellington. ...

1830s

1831
  • Whaling stations established at Tory Channel and Preservation Inlet.
1832
1833
1834
1835
1837
1838
1839
  • William Hobson instructed to establish British rule in New Zealand, as a dependency of New South Wales.
  • Colonel William Wakefield of the New Zealand Company arrives on the Tory to purchase land for a settlement.

Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Tory Channel is one of the drowned valleys that form the Marlborough Sounds in New Zealand. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Kerikeri, the largest town in the Bay of Islands on the North Island of New Zealand, is a popular tourist destination about three hours drive north of Auckland, and 80 kilometres north of Whangarei. ... Kerikeri, the largest town in the Bay of Islands on the North Island of New Zealand, is a popular tourist destination about three hours drive north of Auckland, and 80 kilometres north of Whangarei. ... James Busby James Busby (7 February 1801 - 15 July 1871) was involved in the drafting of the Treaty of Waitangi and is widely regarded as the father of the Australian wine industry, as he took the first collection of vine stock from Spain and France to Australia. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Russell, Bay of Islands Kerikeri, Bay of Islands Location of the Bay of Islands The Bay of Islands is an area in the Northland region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand, New Zealands first flag, selected in 1834 The United Tribes of New Zealand was a loose confederation of Māori tribes based in the north of the North Island. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A Declaration of the Independence of New Zealand was the title of a declaration of independence of the United Tribes of New Zealand, drafted by the official British Resident of New Zealand, James Busby, and signed by himself and 35 Maori chiefs at Waitangi on October 28, 1835. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The New Zealand Company formed in 1839 to promote the colonisation of New Zealand. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Edward Gibbon Wakefield Edward Gibbon Wakefield (20 March 1796 – May 16, 1862) was the driving force behind much of the early colonization of South Australia, and later New Zealand. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Jean Baptiste Pompallier (born: 11 December 1802; died 21 December 1871 was the first apostolic vicar to what is now New Zealand. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Hokianga Harbour, also known as The Hokianga River or more frequently simply as The Hokianga is a long estuarial drowned valley and its surrounding area on the west coast in the north of the North Island of New Zealand. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... William Hobson (September 26, 1792 - September 10, 1842), was the first Governor of New Zealand and co-author of the Treaty of Waitangi. ... Colonel William Wakefield (1801-1848), married 1826 to Emily Sydney, the fifth child of Edward Wakefield and Priscilla Bell, he was the leader of the first colonizing expedition to New Zealand and founder of Wellington. ...

Colony and self-government (1840 to 1946)

1840s

1840
  • January 29: Hobson arrives in the Bay of Islands.
  • New Zealand Company settlers arrive at Te Whanganui a Tara which became Port Nicholson, site of Wellington.
  • February 6: Hone Heke is the first to sign the Treaty of Waitangi at Bay of Islands.
  • May 21: Hobson proclaims British sovereignty over New Zealand.
  • August: French colony established in Akaroa.
  • Hobson becomes first Governor and sets up executive and legislative councils.
1841
1842
1843
  • Twenty-two European settlers and four Māori killed at a confrontation at Tua Marina, near the Wairau, in Marlborough.
  • Robert FitzRoy becomes Governor.
1844
  • Hone Heke begins the "War in the North".
  • New Zealand Company suspends its colonising operations due to financial difficulties.
1845
1846
1848

1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Port Nicholson, also known by the Maorified name of Poneke, is a large natural harbour at the southwestern end of New Zealands North Island. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Wellington Region. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hone Heke with his wife Hariata, circa 1845 Hone Wiremu Heke Pokai (1810? - August 6, 1850) was a Māori chief and war leader in New Zealand. ... One of the few extant copies of the Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Tiriti o Waitangi) is a treaty signed on February 6, 1840 by representatives of the British Crown, and Māori chiefs from the North Island of New Zealand. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A view of the Akaroa harbour. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... New Plymouth is the port and main city in the Taranaki region on the west coast of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Wanganui   is an urban area and district on the west coast of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Russell, formerly known as Kororareka, was the first permanent European settlement in New Zealand. ... Schematic map of Auckland. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Slogan or Nickname: First State, Premier State Motto(s): Orta Recens Quam Pura Nites (Newly Risen, How Brightly You Shine) Other Australian states and territories Capital Sydney Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Professor Marie Bashir Premier Morris Iemma (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 50  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The City of Nelson is situated very close to the centre of New Zealand. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Hobson (September 26, 1792 - September 10, 1842), was the first Governor of New Zealand and co-author of the Treaty of Waitangi. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Marlborough on a Wednesday Market morning The town-centre of Marlborough Marlborough (pronounced Maulbruh - /ˈmɔːlbɹə/ in IPA) is a market town in the English county of Wiltshire on the Old Bath Road, the old main road from London to Bath. ... Vice-Admiral Robert FitzRoy (5 July 1805 – 30 April 1865) achieved lasting fame as the captain of HMS Beagle and as a pioneering meteorologist who made accurate weather forecasting a reality, also proving an able surveyor and hydrographer as well as Governor-General of New Zealand. ... Jan. ... Hone Heke with his wife Hariata, circa 1845 Hone Wiremu Heke Pokai (1810? - August 6, 1850) was a Māori chief and war leader in New Zealand. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... George Edward Grey Statue of Sir George Grey in Albert Park, Auckland For other men with a similar name, see George Grey or George Gray Sir George Edward Grey KCB (April 14, 1812–September 19, 1898) was a soldier, explorer, Governor of South Australia, twice Governor of New Zealand, Governor... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Photo by Terry Macdonald Charles Heaphy (1820? - August 3, 1881) was a New Zealander recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Sir William Fox, KCMG served as Premier of New Zealand on four occasions in the 19th century, while New Zealand was still a colony. ... Thomas Brunner (baptised August 22, 1821, in Oxford, England; died April 22, 1874 in Nelson, New Zealand) was an English-born surveyor and explorer remembered for his exploration of the western coastal areas of New Zealands South Island. ... The West Coast is one of the administrative regions of New Zealand, located on the west coast of the South Island, and is one of the more remote and most sparsely populated areas of the country. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Dunedin (ÅŒtepoti in Maori) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the region of Otago. ... This article is about the country. ... Otago (help· info) is one of the regions of New Zealand and lies in the south-east of the South Island. ... The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, the other being the South Island. ... New Munster was originally the name of South Island New Zealand, it was given the name by an Irishman Captain William Hobson in honour of Munster in Ireland. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... Brunner is a town in the northwest of New Zealands South Island, with a population of somewhat under 1000 people. ... An earthquake is the result of a sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Wellington Region. ...

1850s

1850
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
  • Henry Sewell forms first ministry under responsible government and becomes first Premier.
  • Edward Stafford forms first stable ministry.
1858
  • New Provinces Act passed.
  • Te Wherowhero installed as first Māori King, taking name Pōtatau I.
1859
  • First session of Hawke's Bay and Marlborough provincial councils.
  • Gold discovered in Buller River.
  • New Zealand Insurance Company established.

For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The New Zealand region of Canterbury is mainly composed of the Canterbury Plains and the surrounding mountains. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The New Zealand Constitution Act 1852 was the first enactment to grant the colony of New Zealand self-government. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Tāwhiao, second Māori King (1860-1894) The Māori King Movement or Kīngitanga is a movement that arose among some of the Māori tribes of New Zealand in the 1850s to establish a symbolic role similar in status to that of the monarch of the colonising... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1853 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 1st term. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The 1st New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir Thomas Robert Gore Browne (July 3, 1807- April 17, 1887) was a Governor of St Helena, Governor of New Zealand, Governor of Tasmania and Governor of Bermuda. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For more coverage of cricket, go to the Cricket portal. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1855 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 2nd term. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Sewell (1807 - 1879) was a prominent 19th century New Zealand politician. ... A premier is an executive official of government. ... There have been two well-known people by the name of Edward Stafford. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Tāwhiao, second Māori King (1860-1894) The Māori King Movement or Kīngitanga is a movement that arose among some of the Māori tribes of New Zealand in the 1850s to establish a symbolic role similar in status to that of the monarch of the colonising... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Hawkes Bay is a region of New Zealand. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... ...

1860s

1860
  • Waitara dispute develops into general warfare in Taranaki.
  • December 12March 28: New Zealand general election, 1860-1861.
1861
1862
  • First electric telegraph line opens from Christchurch to Lyttelton.
  • First gold shipment from Dunedin to London.
1863
  • War resumes in Taranaki and begins in Waikato when General Cameron crosses the Mangatawhiri stream.
  • New Zealand Settlements Act passed to effect land confiscation.
  • First steam railway in New Zealand opened.
  • February 7: HMS Orpheus sinks in Manukau Harbour, killing 189 people.
1864
  • War in the Waikato ends with battle of Orakau.
  • Land in Waikato, Taranaki, Bay of Plenty, and Hawke's Bay confiscated.
  • Gold discovered in Marlborough and Westland.
  • Arthur, George, and Edward Dobson are the first Pākehā to cross what becomes known as Arthur's Pass.
1865
  • Seat of government transferred from Auckland to Wellington.
  • Native Land Court established.
  • Māori resistance continues.
  • Auckland streets lit by gas for first time.
1866
1867
  • Thames goldfield opens; soon the town has more people than Auckland.
  • Four Māori seats established in Parliament.
  • Lyttelton railway tunnel completed.
  • Armed constabulary established.
1868
  • Māori resistance continues through campaigns of Te Kooti Arikirangi and Titokowaru.
  • New Zealand's first sheep breed, the Corriedale, is developed.
1869

1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1860 was held between December 12 and March 28 to elect 53 MPs to the third session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... Gabriel Read was an Australian gold prospector who, after working on the goldfields of California and Victoria, Australia travelled to New Zealand. ... Gabriels Gully is a locality in Otago, New Zealand, three kilometres from Lawrence township and close to the Tuapeka River. ... Lawrence is a small town of some 500 inhabitants in Otago, in New Zealands South Island. ... Location of Gabriels Gully. ... (For the current top-level subdivision of Southland in New Zealand, see Southland Region) The Southland Province was a province of New Zealand from the March 1861 until the province rejoined with Otago Province in 1870. ... The Bank of New Zealand (BNZ) is one of New Zealands largest banks. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Lyttelton on a sunny day Lyttelton (43. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Waikato is the name of a region in the North Island of New Zealand. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... HMS Orpheus was a corvette that sank off the west coast of Auckland, New Zealand in 1863. ... Location of Manukau Harbour. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Arthurs Pass Arthurs Pass is an alpine crossing of the Southern Alps of the South Island of New Zealand. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... A view of from the summit of Mount Victoria, Wellington - Cook Strait stretches to the right (west). ... Hokitika is a township on the West Coast of New Zealand, 38 kilometres south of Greymouth, and close to the mouth of the Hokitika River. ... The Synod of Otago and Southland is a synod of the Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand (PCANZ). ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1866 was held between February 12 and April 6 to elect 70 MPs to the fourth session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Location of Thames Thames is a town at the southwestern end of the Coromandel Peninsula in New Zealands North Island. ... Schematic map of Auckland. ... Māori Seats giving positions for Māori in the New Zealand Parliament were not created until 1867 even though Westminster-style Parliamentary Government was established in New Zealand in 1852. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Te Kooti Arikirangi Te Turuki (c. ... Corriedale sheep are a dual purpose breed. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Thomas Burns (ca. ... The University of Otago (Māori: ) in Dunedin is New Zealands oldest university with over 20,000 students enrolled during 2006. ...

1870s

1870
1871
1872
  • Te Kooti retreats to the King Country and Māori armed resistance ceases.
  • Telegraph communication links Auckland, Wellington and southern provinces.
1873
  • New Zealand Shipping Company established.
1874
  • First New Zealand steam engine built at Invercargill.
1875
1876
  • Abolition of the provinces and establishment of local government by counties and boroughs.
  • New Zealand-Australia telegraph cable established.
1877
  • Education Act passed, establishing national system of primary education, "free, secular, and compulsory".
1878
1879

1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir Julius Vogel Sir Julius Vogel KCMG (February 24, 1835 - March 12, 1899) was New Zealands only practicing Jewish prime minister. ... // National Rail Network The national rail network (currently owned by a State-Owned Enterprise, the New Zealand Railways Corporation) was constructed largely by government entities from 1863 onwards. ... The former University of New Zealand existed as New Zealands only degree awarding university from 1870 to 1961. ... The University of London is a university based primarily in London. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1871 was held between January 14 and February 1 to elect 78 MPs to the fifth session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1875 was held between December 29 and January 4 (1876) to elect a total of 88 MPs to the 6th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Cnr of Esk and Dee Streets, looking up Esk st, one of the main shopping streets of Invercargill. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Kaitangata is a town near the coast of South Otago, New Zealand, on the left bank of the Clutha River ten kilometres south east of Balclutha. ... A view of from the summit of Mount Victoria, Wellington - Cook Strait stretches to the right (west). ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1879 was held between August 15 and September 1 to elect a total of 88 MPs to the 7th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ...

1880s

1881
1882
  • First shipment of frozen meat leaves Port Chalmers for England on the "Dunedin".
1883
  • Te Kooti pardoned, Te Whiti and other prisoners released.
  • Direct steamer link established between New Zealand and Britain.
1884
  • King Tawhiao visits England with petition to the Queen, appealing to the Treaty of Waitangi, and is refused access.
  • First overseas tour by a New Zealand rugby team, to New South Wales.
  • Construction of King Country section of North Island main trunk railway begins.
  • June 22: New Zealand general election, 1884.
1886
1887
1889
  • Abolition of non-residential or property qualification to vote.
  • First New Zealand-built locomotive completed at Addington.

Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Parihaka, 19. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1881 was held December 9 to elect a total of 95 MPs to the 8th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Tāwhiao I, Māori King (Matutaera Te Pukepuke Te Paue Te Karato Te-a-Pōtatau Tāwhiao), (1822? - August 26, 1894) was leader of the Waikato tribes, the second Māori King and a religious visionary. ... The King Country is a region of the western North Island of New Zealand. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1884 was held July 22 to elect a total of 95 MPs to the 9th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Pink and White Terraces were a natural wonder located at Lake Rotomahana near Rotorua in New Zealand. ... View of Mount Taranaki or Mount Egmont from Stratford, facing west. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Tongariro National Park is the oldest national park in New Zealand, located in the central North Island. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1887 was held July 22 to elect 95 MPs to the ninth session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

1890s

1890
1891
1892
  • First Kotahitanga Māori Parliament meets.
1893
1894
  • Compulsory arbitration of industrial disputes and reform of employment laws.
  • Advances to Settlers Act.
  • Clark, Fyfe and Graham become the first people to climb Mt Cook.
  • Wreck of SS "Wairarapa".
1896
1897
  • First of series of colonial and later imperial conferences held in London.
  • Apirana Ngata and others form Te Aute College Students' Association. [1]
1898
  • Old Age Pensions Act.
  • First cars imported to New Zealand.
1899

1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1890 was held on December 5 to elect 74 MPs to the 11th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir John McKenzie KCMG (1838 - 6 August 1901) was a New Zealand politician. ... John Ballance (March 27, 1839 - 27 April 1893), served as Premier of New Zealand at the end of the 19th century, and was the founder of the Liberal Party (the countrys first organized political party). ... The First Liberal Government of New Zealand was the first responsible government in New Zealand politics organised along party lines. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... John Ballance (March 27, 1839 - 27 April 1893), served as Premier of New Zealand at the end of the 19th century, and was the founder of the Liberal Party (the countrys first organized political party). ... Richard John Seddon (1845 - 1906), sometimes known as King Dick, was the longest serving Prime Minister of New Zealand. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Universal suffrage (also general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of the right to vote to all adults, without distinction as to race, sex, belief, intelligence, or economic or social status. ... Elizabeth Yates (c. ... Onehunga is a suburb of Auckland, New Zealand. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1893 was held November 28 to elect a total of 74 MPs to the 12th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... New Zealand cinema refers to films made by New Zealand-based production companies in New Zealand. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1896 was held December 4 to elect a total of 74 MPs to the 13th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1899 was held December 6 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 14th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ...

1900s

1900
  • Māori Councils Act passed.
  • Public Health Act passed setting up Department of Public Health in 1901.
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
  • "Red" Federation of Labour formed.
  • SS Penguin wrecked in Cook Strait, 75 people die.
  • Compulsory military training introduced.
  • Stamp–vending machine invented and manufactured in New Zealand.

Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Anthem Te Atua Mou E God is Truth Capital (and largest city) Avarua Official languages English Cook Islands Māori Government  -  Head of State Queen Elizabeth II  -  Queens Representative Sir Frederick Goodwin  -  Prime Minister Jim Marurai Associated state  -  Self-government in free association with New Zealand 4 August 1965... The Synod of Otago and Southland is a synod of the Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand (PCANZ). ... The Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand (PCANZ) is the main Presbyterian church in the country of New Zealand. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... SS Elingamite is well known in New Zealand and Australia and among the international diving fraternity despite sinking more than a century ago, because of the drama associated with it, and wild tales of lost treasure. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1902 was held November 25 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 15th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Richard Pearse Richard William Pearse (3 December 1877 — 29 July 1953), a New Zealand farmer and inventor, performed pioneering experiments in aviation. ... Timaru is a major port city in the southern Canterbury region of New Zealand, located 160 kilometres south of Christchurch and about 200 kilometres north of Dunedin on the eastern Pacific coast of the South Island. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... First international Australia 3 - 22 New Zealand (15 August 1903) Largest win New Zealand 145 - 17 Japan (4 June 1995) Worst defeat Australia 28 - 7 New Zealand (28 August 1999) World Cup Appearances 5 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 1987 The All Blacks are New Zealands national rugby... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1905 was held December 6 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 16th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard John Seddon (1845 - 1906), sometimes known as King Dick, was the longest serving Prime Minister of New Zealand. ... Joseph George Ward (1856 - 1930) was Prime Minister of New Zealand on two occasions in the early 20th century. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Tohunga Suppression Act was passed in New Zealand in 1907, sponsored by Maui Pomare who was at that time a Māori District Health Officer. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The North Island Main Trunk line (NIMT) connects Auckland and Wellington, the two major cities of New Zealands North Island. ... Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games Medal count Winter Olympic Games Medal count Olympic sports Medal counts Participating NOCs Olympic symbols Olympics WikiProject Olympics Portal Athens 2004 • Beijing 2008 Torino 2006 • Vancouver 2010 ... Australasia is the area that includes Australia, New Zealand, New Guinea, and the many smaller islands in the vicinity, most of which are the eastern part of Indonesia. ... Edward Henry (Harry) Kerr (January 28, 1879 – May 17, 1951) was a New Zealand athlete, who created sports history on July 14, 1908 by becoming the first New Zealander to win an Olympic medal. ... Blackball is a small town located on the West Coast of the New Zealand. ... Ernest Rutherford Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson, PC, OM, FRS (August 30, 1871 – October 19, 1937), was a New Zealand nuclear physicist. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awarded for Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, and Physiology or Medicine. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1908 was held November 17, November 24 and December 1 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 17th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

1910s

1910
1911
1912
  • Waterfront strikes in Auckland and Wellington.
1914
1915
  • New Zealand forces take part in Gallipoli campaign.
  • Reform and Liberal parties form National War Cabinet.
  • Britain announces its intention to purchase all New Zealand meat exports during war.
  • April 25: First landings at Gaba Tepe and Cape Hellas on the Gallipoli Peninsula.
  • April 27: Counterattack launched by Turkish forces under the command of Mustafa Kemal.
  • December 20: Final withdraw of all troops from Anzac Cove.
1916
  • New Zealand troops transfer from Western Front.
  • Conscription introduced.
  • Labour Party formed.
  • Lake Coleridge electricity supply scheme opened.
  • June 10: Passing of the Military Services Bill introduces conscription.
  • July: Battle of Romani defaults Turkish force advancing towards the Suez Canal.
1917
1918
  • New Zealand Division in the Battle of the Somme.
  • End of World War I.
  • Influenza epidemic in which an estimated 8,500 die.
  • Creation of power boards for electricity distribution.
  • Prohibition petition with 242,001 signatures presented to Parliament.
1919

Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the comet. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1911 was held December 7 and December 14 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 18th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... William Ferguson Massey (often known simply as Bill Massey or Farmer Bill) served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1912 to 1925, and was the founder of the Reform Party. ... It has been suggested that World War I coalition Government of New Zealand, Second Reform Government of New Zealand be merged into this article or section. ... The Waihi miners strike was a major strike action in 1912 by gold miners in the New Zealand town of Waihi. ... Malcolm Eadie Champion (12 November 1883 – July 27, 1939) was New Zealands first Olympic gold medallist, and the first swimmer to represent New Zealand at an Olympic Games. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF) was the title of the military force sent from New Zealand to fight for Britain in World War I. Upon the outbreak of war, New Zealand immediately offered to provide two brigades — one of infantry and one of mounted troops — a total of 8... Location of Huntly in New Zealand. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Apia, Samoa is the capital of Samoa. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The New Zealand general election of 1914 was held December 10 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 19th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Gallipoli peninsula (Turkish: ) is located in Turkish Thrace, the European part of Turkey, with the Aegean Sea to the west and the Dardanelles straits to the east. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gallipoli peninsula (Turkish: ) is located in Turkish Thrace, the European part of Turkey, with the Aegean Sea to the west and the Dardanelles straits to the east. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Mustafa Kemal Atatürk Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (1881 – November 10, 1938), Turkish soldier and statesman, was the founder and first President of the Republic of Turkey. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Anzac Cove looking towards Ari Burnu, 1915. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The New Zealand Labour Party is a New Zealand political party. ... Lake Coleridge is located in inland Canterbury, in New Zealands South Island. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Suez (disambiguation). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Passchendaele village, before and after the Battle of Passchendaele The Battle of Passchendaele, otherwise known as the Third Battle of Ypres, was one of the major battles of World War I, fought by British, ANZAC, and Canadian soldiers against the German army near Ypres ( Ieper in Flemish) in West Flanders... Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool (June 7, 1770 - December 4, 1828) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1812 to 1827. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... For other battles known as Battle of the Somme, see Battle of the Somme (disambiguation). ... The 1918 flu pandemic, commonly referred to as the Spanish flu, was a category 5 influenza pandemic caused by an unusually severe and deadly Influenza A virus strain of subtype H1N1. ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article is about the Treaty of Versailles of June 28 1919, which ended World War I. For other uses, see Treaty of Versailles (disambiguation) . The Treaty of Versailles (1919) was the peace treaty which officially ended World War I between the Allied and Associated Powers and Germany. ... Dargaville is a town in the North Island of New Zealand. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1919 was held December 17 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 20th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ...

1920s

1920
  • Anzac Day established.
  • New Zealand gets League of Nations mandate to govern Western Samoa.
  • First aeroplane flight across Cook Strait.
  • New Zealand sents first team to Olympic Games (previously they have competed as part of Australasian team).
  • Clarence Hadfield D'Arcy wins first Olympic medal for New Zealand.
1921
  • New Zealand Division of Royal Navy established.
1922
1923
1924
  • All Black 'Invincibles' tour of Britain and France.
1925
1926
  • National public broadcasting begins under auspices of Radio Broadcasting Co. Ltd.
1927
1928
1929
  • Economic depression worsens.
  • Severe earthquake in Murchison-Karamea district, 17 people die.
  • First health stamps issued.

See also: 1919 in New Zealand, other events of 1920, 1921 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... ANZAC Day is commemorated by Australia and New Zealand on 25 April every year to remember members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who in the Battle of Gallipoli landed at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I. ANZAC Day is also a public holiday in the... The League of Nations was an international organization founded as a result of the Paris Peace Conference in 1919-1920. ... The Independent State of Samoa (conventional long form) or Samoa (conventional short form) is a country comprising a group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean. ... Australasia is the area that includes Australia, New Zealand, New Guinea, and the many smaller islands in the vicinity, most of which are the eastern part of Indonesia. ... D. Clarence Hadfield DArcy (also credited as Darcy Hadfield) (born 1 December 1889 - died 15 September 1964) was a New Zealand rower who won a bronze medal at the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ... See also: 1920 in New Zealand, other events of 1921, 1922 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... See also: 1921 in New Zealand, other events of 1922, 1923 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1922 was held December 7 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 21st session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... See also: 1922 in New Zealand, other events of 1923, 1924 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Political status Dependency of New Zealand Governor Anand Satyanand Area   – Total  450 000 km² (174 000 mi²) Population Scott Base: 10-80 seasonally McMurdo Station: 200-1000 seasonally Currency New Zealand dollar The Ross Dependency comprises an area of Antarctica (and other land masses in the Southern Ocean) claimed by... See also: 1923 in New Zealand, other events of 1924, 1925 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The All Blacks are the national rugby union representative team of New Zealand. ... See also: 1924 in New Zealand, other events of 1925, 1926 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1925 was held November 4 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 22nd session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... This article is about the New Zealand prime minister. ... See also: 1925 in New Zealand, other events of 1926, 1927 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... See also: 1926 in New Zealand, other events of 1927, 1928 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... See also: 1927 in New Zealand, other events of 1928, 1929 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... This article is about the original New Zealand Liberal Party. ... Kingsford Smith in his flying gear Air Commodore Sir Charles Edward Kingsford Smith MC, AFC (February 9, 1897 - November 8, 1935), often called Charles Kingsford Smith, or by his nickname Smithy, was a well-known early Australian aviator. ... fuck you Map of the Tasman Sea Satellite photo of the Tasman Sea The Tasman Sea is the large body of water between Australia and New Zealand, some 2000 kilometres (1250 miles) across. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1928 was held on November 14 to elect 80 MPs to the 23rd session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... For the French-American writer, see Ted Morgan Edward (Ted) Morgan (born April 5, 1906 – died November 22, 1952) was a boxer from New Zealand, who won the gold medal in the mens welterweight division at the 1928 Summer Olympics in Amsterdam, Netherlands. ... See also: 1928 in New Zealand, other events of 1929, 1930 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ...

1930s

1930
  • Unemployment Board set up to provide relief work.
1931
1932
  • Compulsory arbitration of industrial disputes abolished.
  • Unemployed riots in Auckland, Dunedin and Christchurch.
  • Reductions in old-age and other pensions.
  • Elizabeth McCombs becomes first woman MP.
  • Distinctive New Zealand coins first issued.
1934
  • Reserve Bank and Mortgage Corporation established.
  • First trans-Tasman airmail.
1936
1936
  • Reserve Bank taken over by state.
  • State housing programme launched.
  • Guaranteed prices for dairy products introduced.
  • National Party formed from former Coalition MPs.
  • Inter-island trunk air services introduced.
  • Jack Lovelock wins Olympic gold and sets world record for 1500m.
  • Jean Batten's record flight from England.
  • Working week reduced from 44 to 40 hours.
1937
  • April: Federation of Labour unifies trade union movement.
  • RNZAF set up as separate branch of armed forces.
  • March: Free Milk in schools introduced.
1938
1939

See also: 1929 in New Zealand, other events of 1930, 1931 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... See also: 1930 in New Zealand, other events of 1931, 1932 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... George William Forbes (12 March 1869 - 17 May 1947) served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1930 to 1935. ... Airmail imprint on an envelope (Thailand) Airmail (or air mail) is mail that is transported by aircraft. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1931 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 24th term. ... See also: 1931 in New Zealand, other events of 1932, 1933 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Elizabeth Reid McCombs (19 November 1873 - 7 June 1935, née Henderson) was a New Zealand politician, and the first woman to be elected to the New Zealand Parliament. ... See also: 1933 in New Zealand, other events of 1934, 1935 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... See also: 1934 in New Zealand, other events of 1935, 1936 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Michael Joseph Savage (March 23, 1872 - March 27, 1940) was a New Zealand politician and the first Labour Prime Minister of New Zealand. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1935 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 25th term. ... See also: 1935 in New Zealand, other events of 1936, 1937 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The New Zealand National Party (National or the Nats) currently forms the second-largest (in terms of seats) political party represented in the New Zealand Parliament, and thus functions as the core of the parliamentary Opposition. ... John Edward Jack Lovelock (January 5, 1910-December 28, 1949) was a New Zealand athlete, and a 1936 Olympic champion. ... (Redirected from 1500m) The middle distances are races where the runner tries to go as fast as his training has let him. ... Jean Gardner Batten (September 15, 1909 – November 22, 1982) was a New Zealand aviator, born in Rotorua. ... See also: 1936 in New Zealand, other events of 1937, 1938 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... See also: 1937 in New Zealand, other events of 1938, 1939 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1938 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 26th term. ... See also: 1938 in New Zealand, other events of 1939, 1940 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF) was the title of the military force sent from New Zealand to fight for Britain in World War I. Upon the outbreak of war, New Zealand immediately offered to provide two brigades — one of infantry and one of mounted troops — a total of 8... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 28th Māori Battalion, or more commonly known as the Maori Battalion, was part of the 2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force (2NZEF) during World War II. // Background The 28th Māori Battalion was formed following pressure on the Labour government by the Māori MPs and Māori organisations... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Rt Hon. ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... HMS Achilles (from 1941 HMNZS Achilles) was a Leander class cruiser of 7,200 tons built in Birkenhead, England and launched on 1 September 1932. ... Combatants Germany United Kingdom New Zealand Commanders Hans Langsdorff Henry Harwood Strength 1 heavy cruiser 1 heavy cruiser 2 light cruisers Casualties 1 heavy cruiser damaged 36 dead 60 wounded 1 heavy cruiser heavily damaged 2 light cruisers damaged 72 dead 28 wounded For other uses, see The Battle of...

1940 to 1946

1940
1941
  • Māori War Effort Organisation set up.
  • Pharmaceutical and general practitioner medical benefits introduced.
1942
  • Economic stabilisation.
  • New Zealand troops in Battle of El Alamein.
  • Food rationing introduced.
  • Mobilisation of women for essential work.
  • June 12: First 5 ships of American troops from the 37th US Army Division land in Auckland.
  • June 14: First American Marines from the 1st Corps Division land in Wellington.
1943
1944
  • Australia-New Zealand Agreement provides for co-operation in the South Pacific.
1945
1946

Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF) was the title of the military force sent from New Zealand to fight for Britain in World War I. Upon the outbreak of war, New Zealand immediately offered to provide two brigades — one of infantry and one of mounted troops — a total of 8... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Maadi (Arabic: el-Ma‛adi) is a suburb south of Cairo, Egypt. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Joseph Savage (March 23, 1872 - March 27, 1940) was a New Zealand politician and the first Labour Prime Minister of New Zealand. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A statue of Fraser outside the Government Buildings Historic Reserve in Wellington The Right Honourable Peter Fraser (1884 - 1950) served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 27 March 1940 until 13 December 1949. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RMS Niagara was a 13,415 gross ton ocean liner, length 165. ... Bream Head is a promontory on the northern North Island coast in New Zealand. ... The Northland Region (Māori: ), one of the 16 regions of New Zealand, is, as the name suggests, the northernmost of New Zealands administrative regions. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A Home Guard is a part-time civilian reserve military force similar to a militia. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cape Egmont is the westernmost point of Taranaki, on the west coast of New Zealands North Island. ... Eric Stanley Graham ( 1900–21 October 1941) was a mass murderer in New Zealand who killed seven people. ... Hokitika is a township on the West Coast of New Zealand, 38 kilometres south of Greymouth, and close to the mouth of the Hokitika River. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chatham Islands from space. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... East Cape is the easternmost point of the main islands of New Zealand. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Sidney George Holland, GCMG, CH, (October 18, 1893-August 5, 1961) was Prime Minister of New Zealand from December 13, 1949 to September 20, 1957. ... A true-colour image showing Auckland city (left), the Hauraki Gulf (centre) and the Coromandel Peninsula (right). ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sup G There were two battles of El Alamein, both during 1942. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Featherston prisoner of war camp was an internment camp for captured Japanese soldiers during World War II established near Featherston, New Zealand. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Paekakariki is a town in the Kapiti Coast District in the south-western North Island of New Zealand. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her stature as First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945 to promote her husbands (Franklin D. Roosevelts) New Deal, as well as civil rights. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1943 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 27th term. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... National Airways Corporation was the national domestic airline of New Zealand. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bank of New Zealand (BNZ) is one of New Zealands largest banks. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1946 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 28th term. ...

Full independence (1947 to 1983)

1947 to 1949

1947
1948
  • Protest campaign against exclusion of Māori players from rugby tour of South Africa.
  • Polio epidemic closes schools.
  • Mount Ruapehu and Mount Ngauruhoe erupt.
  • Meat rationing ends.
1949

See also: 1946 in New Zealand, other events of 1947, 1948 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... This article is about the Statute of Westminster relating to the British Empire and its dominions. ... The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ... Mabel Howard (18 April 1894 – 23 June 1972) had the full name Mabel Bowden Howard. ... See also: 1947 in New Zealand, other events of 1948, 1949 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Poliomyelitis (polio), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. ... Composite satellite image of Ruapehu Mount Ruapehu, or just Ruapehu, is an active stratovolcano at the southern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone in New Zealand. ... Mount Ngauruhoe is an active stratovolcano in New Zealand. ... See also: 1948 in New Zealand, other events of 1949, 1950 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1949 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 29th term. ...

1950s

1950
1951
1952
  • Population reaches over two million.
1953
1954
1955
  • Pulp and paper mill opens at Kawerau.
  • Rimutaka rail tunnel opened.
1956
  • New Zealand troops sent to Malaya.
  • Roxburgh and Whakamaru power stations in operation.
1957
1958
  • PAYE tax introduced.
  • Arnold Nordmeyer's "Black Budget".
  • First geothermal electricity generated at Wairakei.
  • First heart-lung machine used at Greenlane Hospital, Auckland.
1959

See also: 1949 in New Zealand, other events of 1950, 1951 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... The Legislative Council of New Zealand was the upper house of the New Zealand Parliament from 1853 until 1951. ... The New Zealand wool boom of 1951 was one of the greatest economic booms in the history of New Zealand, and the direct result of US policy in the 1950-53 Korean War. ... See also: 1950 in New Zealand, other events of 1951, 1952 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The 1951 New Zealand waterfront dispute is the largest and most widespread industrial dispute in New Zealand history. ... The Australia, New Zealand, United States Security Treaty (ANZUS or ANZUS Treaty) is the military alliance which binds Australia and the United States, and separately Australia and New Zealand to cooperate on defence matters in the Pacific Ocean area, though today the treaty is understood to relate to attacks in... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... The 1951 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 30th term. ... See also: 1951 in New Zealand, other events of 1952, 1953 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... See also: 1952 in New Zealand, other events of 1953, 1954 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Sir Edmund Percival Hillary, KG, ONZ, KBE (born 20 July 1919) is a New Zealand mountaineer and explorer. ... Tenzing Norgay (May 1914 – 9 May 1986), often referred to as Sherpa Tenzing, was a Nepalese Sherpa mountaineer. ... The Tangiwai disaster on December 24, 1953 was the worst rail accident in New Zealand. ... See also: 1953 in New Zealand, other events of 1954, 1955 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... “Security Council” redirects here. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A moral panic is a reaction by a group of people based on the false or exaggerated perception that some cultural behavior or group, frequently a minority group or a subculture, is dangerously deviant and poses a menace to society. ... The Mazengarb Report of 1954, formally titled the Report of the Special Committee on Moral Delinquency in Children and Adolescents, is the well-known report of a ministerial inquiry (the Special Committee on Moral Delinquency in Children and Adolescents) sparked primarily by two infamous and well-publicised events in New... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1954 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 31st term. ... See also: 1954 in New Zealand, other events of 1955, 1956 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... See also: 1955 in New Zealand, other events of 1956, 1957 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Map of Peninsular Malaysia Peninsular Malaysia (Malay: Semenanjung Malaysia) is the part of Malaysia which lies on the Malay Peninsula, and shares a land border with Thailand in the north. ... The Roxburgh Dam is the earliest of the large hydroelectric projects in the southern South Island of New Zealand. ... See also: 1956 in New Zealand, other events of 1957, 1958 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Sir Walter Nash, GCMG (12 February 1882–4 June 1968) served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1957 to 1960 and was also highly influential in his role as Minister of Finance. ... Aerial photograph of Scott Base, Ross Island, Antarctica. ... Political status Dependency of New Zealand Governor Anand Satyanand Area   – Total  450 000 km² (174 000 mi²) Population Scott Base: 10-80 seasonally McMurdo Station: 200-1000 seasonally Currency New Zealand dollar The Ross Dependency comprises an area of Antarctica (and other land masses in the Southern Ocean) claimed by... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1957 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 32nd term. ... See also: 1957 in New Zealand, other events of 1958, 1959 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The Honourable Sir Heinrich Arnold Nordmeyer, ONZ, KCMG, (1901 - 1989), often later known as Arnold Henry Nordmeyer, was a New Zealand politician. ... A heart-lung machine (upper right) in a coronary artery bypass surgery. ... See also: 1958 in New Zealand, other events of 1959, 1960 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... For the Antarctic Treaty from the Gundam anime, see Antarctic Treaty (Gundam) The Antarctic Treaty and related agreements, collectively called the Antarctic Treaty System or ATS, regulate the international relations with respect to Antarctica, Earths only uninhabited continent. ... The bridge from Watchman Island, west of it. ...

1960s

1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
  • Marsden Point oil refinery opens at Whangarei.
  • Cook Strait power cables laid.
  • Auckland's population reaches half a million.
1965
  • NAFTA agreement negotiated with Australia.
  • Support for United States in Vietnam; New Zealand combat force sent, protest movement begins.
  • Cook Islands becomes self-governing.
1966
1967
  • Referendum extends hotel closing hours to 10pm.
  • Decimal currency introduced.
  • Lord Arthur Porritt becomes first New Zealand-born Governor-General.
  • Breath and blood tests introduced for suspected drinking drivers.
  • Denny Hulme becomes New Zealand's first (and currently only) Formula 1 World Champion.
1968
  • Inter-island ferry Wahine sinks in severe storm in Wellington Harbour, 51 people die.
  • Three die in Inangahua earthquake.
1969

See also: 1959 in New Zealand, other events of 1960, 1961 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1960 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 33rd term. ... See also: 1960 in New Zealand, other events of 1961, 1962 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... See also: 1961 in New Zealand, other events of 1962, 1963 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The Indonesia-Malaysia confrontation was an intermittent war over the future of the island of Borneo, between British-backed Malaysia and Indonesia in 1962-1966. ... The Independent State of Samoa (conventional long form) or Samoa (conventional short form) is a country comprising a group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean. ... Sir Guy Richardson Powles, ONZ, KBE, ED, (b. ... An ombudsman (English plural: ombudsmans or ombudsmen) is an official, usually (but not always) appointed by the government or by parliament, who is charged with representing the interests of the public by investigating and addressing complaints reported by individual citizens. ... See also: 1962 in New Zealand, other events of 1963, 1964 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1963 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 34th term. ... See also: 1963 in New Zealand, other events of 1964, 1965 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Whangarei (the initial consonant is pronounced F as in fa-nga-ray) is the northernmost city in New Zealand and the regional capital of Northland Region. ... See also: 1964 in New Zealand, other events of 1965, 1966 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... New Zealand Australia Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) was partial free trade treaty between Australia and New Zealand. ... See also: 1965 in New Zealand, other events of 1966, 1967 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Auckland International Airport (IATA: AKL, ICAO: NZAA) is the largest and busiest international airport in New Zealand serving over 12 million passengers a year, which is expected to more than double in less than 15 years. ... Te Atairangi Kaahu is the reigning Māori Queen, elected in 1966 following the passing of her father, Koroki. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1966 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 35th term. ... See also: 1966 in New Zealand, other events of 1967, 1968 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Decimal currency is the term used to describe any currency for which the ratio between the basic unit of currency and its sub-unit is a power of 10. ... Arthur Espie Porritt, Baron Porritt, GCMG, GCVO, CBE (August 10, 1900 - January 1, 1994) was a New Zealand physician, statesman and athlete. ... Denis Clive Denny Hulme OBE (18 June 1936–4 October 1992) was a New Zealand car racer, the 1967 Formula One World Champion for the Brabham team. ... See also: 1967 in New Zealand, other events of 1968, 1969 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The TEV Wahine was a New Zealand inter-island ferry that foundered on Barrett Reef at the entrance to Wellington Harbour in a storm on 10 April 1968, and capsized near Steeple Rock. ... Inangahua Junction is a small town in the northwest of New Zealands South Island. ... See also: 1968 in New Zealand, other events of 1969, 1970 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The final results of the New Zealand General Election 1969 were 45 seats won by the National Party, and 39 seats won by the Labour Party, with no minor parties winning any seats. ...

1970s

1970
1971
1972
1973
  • Naval frigate despatched in protest against French nuclear testing in the Pacific.
  • New Zealand's population reaches three million.
  • Oil price hike means worst terms of trade in 30 years.
  • Colour TV introduced.
1974
1975
1976
  • New Zealand's national day February 6 renamed from 'New Zealand Day to Waitangi Day
  • Matrimonial Property Act passed.
  • Pacific Islands "overstayers" deported.
  • EEC import quotas for New Zealand butter set until 1980.
  • Introduction of metric system of weights and measures.
  • Subscriber toll dialling introduced.
  • 1976 in New Zealand television
1977
1978
1979

See also: 1969 in New Zealand, other events of 1970, 1971 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... Kapuni is a small petroleum field and drilling site in the North Island of New Zealand. ... See also: 1970 in New Zealand, other events of 1971, 1972 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Nga Tamatoa (the young warriors) was a Māori activist group that operated from the early 1970s until 1979, and existed to fight perceived threats to Māori culture and confront injustices perpetrated by the New Zealand Government, particularly violations of the Treaty of Waitangi. ... Tiwai Point lies at the entrance to Bluff Harbour on the southern coast of the South Island of New Zealand. ... General Name, symbol, number aluminium, Al, 13 Chemical series poor metals Group, period, block 13, 3, p Appearance silvery Standard atomic weight 26. ... Historic smelter in Florence, Colorado In extractive metallurgy, a smelter is a factory for producing metal by the reduction of ore. ... Warkworth is a town in the Rodney District of New Zealand. ... See also: 1971 in New Zealand, other events of 1972, 1973 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The New Zealand Labour Party is a New Zealand political party. ... Norman Eric Kirk served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1972 until his sudden death in 1974 and led the New Zealand Labour Party from 1965 to 1972. ... A logo used by the Values Party The Values Party, sometimes considered the worlds first national-level environmentalist party, was established in 1972 at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1972 was held to elect MPs to the 37th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... See also: 1972 in New Zealand, other events of 1973, 1974 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... See also: 1973 in New Zealand, other events of 1974, 1975 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Norman Eric Kirk served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1972 until his sudden death in 1974 and led the New Zealand Labour Party from 1965 to 1972. ... Current flag of the Commonwealth Games Federation Locations of the games, and participating countries Commonwealth Games Federation seal, adopted in 2001 The Commonwealth Games is a multinational, multi-sport event. ... {{Commonwealth Games | Name = 10th British Commonwealth Games | Logo = 10th British Commonwealth Games- Christchurch 1974. ... See also: 1974 in New Zealand, other events of 1975, 1976 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lynne Cox (born 1957) is an American long-distance open-water swimmer and writer. ... A view of from the summit of Mount Victoria, Wellington - Cook Strait stretches to the right (west). ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dame Whina Cooper ONZ DBE, (9 December 1895 - March 26, 1994), was born Hohewhina Te Wake, daughter of Heremia Te Wake of the Te Rarawa iwi, at Te Karaka, Hokianga, in northern New Zealand. ... Sir Wallace Edward Rowling KCMG, (15 November 1927 - 31 October 1995), often known as Bill Rowling, was a Prime Minister of New Zealand. ... Matiu Rata was a New Zealand Māori politician who was Minister of Lands and Minister of Maori Affairs in the Third Labour Government of New Zealand between 1972 and 1975. ... The Waitangi Tribunal is a New Zealand court empowered to compensate Maori people for land obtained by fraud or by force since 1840. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1975 New Zealand general election was held to elect MPs to the 38th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The Right Honourable Sir Robert David (Rob) Muldoon GCMG CH (25 September 1921–5 August 1992) served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1975 to 1984. ... This is a list of New Zealand television-related events in 1975. ... See also: 1975 in New Zealand, other events of 1976, 1977 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The International System of Units (symbol: SI) (for the French phrase Syst me International dUnit s) is the most widely used system of units. ... This is a list of New Zealand television-related events in 1976. ... See also: 1976 in New Zealand, other events of 1977, 1978 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The Gleneagles Agreement was unanimously approved by the Commonwealth of Nations at a meeting at Gleneagles, Auchterarder, Scotland. ... Sea areas in international rights Under the law of the sea, an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) is a seazone over which a state has special rights over the exploration and use of marine resources. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bastion Point (Takaparawha in Māori) is a coastal piece of land in Orakei, Auckland, New Zealand, overlooking the Waitemata Harbour. ... See also: 1977 in New Zealand, other events of 1978, 1979 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eva Rickard (1925-1997) was a New Zealand - Aotearoa Māori of Tainui ancestry; a mother of 9, a grandmother, a spiritual guardian of New Zealand Māori traditions, a political land rights activist and a valuable member of the (Te Kòpua) Raglan community where she was born and... Raglan is a seaside town and surrounding district associated with Whaingaroa Harbour (also known as Raglan Harbour) on the west coast of the Waikato region in New Zealands North Island. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bastion Point (Takaparawha in Māori) is a coastal piece of land in Orakei, Auckland, New Zealand, overlooking the Waitemata Harbour. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1978 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to elect the 39th New Zealand Parliament. ... See also: 1978 in New Zealand, other events of 1979, 1980 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Air New Zealand Flight 901 (TE901) was a scheduled Antarctic sightseeing flight from Auckland International Airport in New Zealand. ... Mount Erebus in Antarctica is the southernmost active volcano on Earth. ... Carless days was a policy instigated by the government of New Zealand on July 30, 1979. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Matiu Rata was a New Zealand Māori politician who was Minister of Lands and Minister of Maori Affairs in the Third Labour Government of New Zealand between 1972 and 1975. ... The New Zealand Labour Party is a New Zealand political party. ... Mana Maori Motuhake is a Maori political party in New Zealand. ... Nambassa was a series of hippie-conceived festivals held between 1976 and 1981 on large farms around Waihi and Waikino in New Zealand. ... Waihi is a town in the North Island of New Zealand. ...

1980s

1980
  • Social Credit wins East Coast Bays by-election.
  • Saturday trading partially legalised.
  • Eighty-day strike at Kinleith Mill.
1981
1982
  • CER agreement signed with Australia.
  • First köhanga reo established.
  • Year-long wage, price and rent freeze imposed lasts until 1984.
1983

See also: 1979 in New Zealand, other events of 1980, 1981 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... One of the several logos used during the history of the Social Credit Party The New Zealand Social Credit Party (sometimes called Socred) was a political party which served as the countrys third party from the 1950s through into the 1980s. ... See also: 1980 in New Zealand, other events of 1981, 1982 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The 1981 Springbok Tour (still known by many in New Zealand as The Tour) was a controversial tour of New Zealand by the South African Springbok rugby team. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1981 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... See also: 1981 in New Zealand, other events of 1982, 1983 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Kohanga reo (Māori: kōhanga reo, meaning language nests) are kindergartens where all instruction is given in the Māori language. ... See also: 1982 in New Zealand, other events of 1983, 1984 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The Official Information Act 1982 is a New Zealand law passed by the 3rd National government in 1982 to make official information more freely available, to provide for proper access by each person to official information relating to that person, to protect official information to the extent consistent with the... Party logo The New Zealand Party was, as its name suggests, a political party operating in New Zealand. ...

Restructuring (1984 to date)

1984 to 1989

1984
1985
  • Anti-nuclear policy leads to refusal of a visit by the American warship, the USS "Buchanan".
  • July 10: Greenpeace vessel Rainbow Warrior bombed and sunk by French DGSE agents in Auckland harbour.
  • New Zealand dollar floated.
  • First case of locally-contracted AIDS is reported.
  • Waitangi Tribunal given power to hear grievances arising since 1840.
  • November 20 Archbiship Paul Reeves appointed Governor General.
1986
1987
  • Share prices plummet by 59 percent in four months.
  • Labour wins general election.
  • Māori Language Act making Māori an official language passed.
  • Anti-nuclear legislation enacted.
  • First lotto draw.
  • New Zealand's first heart transplant is performed.
  • New Zealand wins Rugby World Cup.
  • Significant earthquake in the Bay of Plenty.
  • August 15: New Zealand general election, 1987.
1988
  • Number of unemployed exceeds 100,000.
  • Bastion Point land returned to Māori ownership.
  • Combined Council of Trade Unions formed. Royal Commission on Social Policy issues April Report.
  • Gibbs Report on hospital services and Picot Report on education published.
  • State Sector Act passed.
  • Cyclone Bola strikes northern North Island.
  • Electrification of North Island's main trunk line completed.
  • New Zealand Post closes 432 post offices.
  • Fisheries quota package announced for Māori iwi.
1989
  • Prime Minister David Lange suggests formal withdrawal from ANZUS.
  • Jim Anderton founds NewLabour Party.
  • Lange resigns and Geoffrey Palmer becomes Prime Minister.
  • First annual balance of payments surplus since 1973.
  • Reserve Bank Act sets bank's role as one of maintaining price stability.
  • First school board elections under Tomorrow's Schools reforms.
  • First elections under revised local government structure.
  • Sunday trading begins.
  • Third TV channel begins.
  • Māori Fisheries Act passed.

See also: 1983 in New Zealand, other events of 1984, 1985 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1984 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand constitutional crisis of 1984 was an important constitutional and political event in the history of New Zealand. ... The Right Honourable Sir Robert David (Rob) Muldoon GCMG CH (25 September 1921–5 August 1992) served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1975 to 1984. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... David Russell Lange (who pronounced his name long-ee IPA: lɔŋi) CH, ONZ (4 August 1942 — 13 August 2005), served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1984 to 1989. ... David Lange led the Fourth Labour government for most of its time in power. ... Sir Roger Douglas is a former New Zealand politician and senior Cabinet minister, best known for his leading role in the radical economic restructuring undertaken by the New Zealand Labour Party government in the 1980s. ... Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women Opened for signature 18 December 1979 in New York City Entered into force 3 September 1981 Conditions for entry into force 20 ratifications Parties 185[1] The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW... See also: 1984 in New Zealand, other events of 1985, 1986 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Greenpeace protest against Esso / Exxon Mobil. ... Rainbow Warrior is the name of a series of ships operated by Greenpeace. ... The sinking of the Rainbow Warrior, codenamed Operation Satanic [1], was a special operation by the action branch of the French foreign intelligence services, the Direction Générale de la Sécurité Extérieure (DGSE), carried out on July 10, 1985. ... The Direction Générale de la Sécurité Extérieure (generally known as DGSE) is Frances external intelligence agency. ... Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Paul Alfred Reeves, ONZ, GCMG, GCVO, CF, QSO, (Born December 6, 1932) was Archbishop and Primate of New Zealand from 1980 to 1985 and Governor-General of New Zealand from 22 November 1985 to 20 November 1990. ... See also: 1985 in New Zealand, other events of 1986, 1987 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The Right Honourable James Brendan Jim Bolger, ONZ, (born 31 May 1935) was Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1990 to 1997. ... Mikhail Lermontov in 1837 Mikhail Yuryevich Lermontov (Михаил Юрьевич Лермонтов), (October 15, 1814–July 27, 1841), a Russian Romantic writer and poet, sometimes called the poet of the Caucasus, was the most important presence in the Russian poetry from Alexander Pushkins death until his own four years later, at the age... Sea kayakers in the Marlborough Sounds. ... Goods and Services Tax (a Value Added Tax)was introduced in New Zealand on the 1st of October 1986 at 10%. Only the end-consumer pays this tax (on the goods or service), and GST registered businesses generally are not charged GST upfront, or, if they are, are able to... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... The Constitution Act 1986 is the principal formal statement of New Zealands Constitution. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons The Right Honourable Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, Baroness Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups (as of May 5, 2005 elections) Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats... See also: 1986 in New Zealand, other events of 1987, 1988 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... For the world cup that is contested in rugby league, see Rugby League World Cup. ... The Bay of Plenty, often abbreviated to BoP, is a region in the North Island of New Zealand situated around the body of water of the same name. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1987 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... See also: 1987 in New Zealand, other events of 1988, 1989 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Bastion Point (Takaparawha in Māori) is a coastal piece of land in Orakei, Auckland, New Zealand, overlooking the Waitemata Harbour. ... New Zealand Post Limited is the dominant postal operator in New Zealand. ... See also: 1988 in New Zealand, other events of 1989, 1990 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... David Russell Lange (who pronounced his name long-ee IPA: lɔŋi) CH, ONZ (4 August 1942 — 13 August 2005), served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1984 to 1989. ... James Patrick Anderton, almost always referred to as Jim Anderton, is leader of the Progressive Party, a political party in the New Zealand Parliament. ... NewLabour Party logo NewLabour was the name chosen by Jim Anderton, an MP and former President of the New Zealand Labour Party, for his new left-of-centre party in 1989. ... Sir Geoffrey Winston Russell Palmer, KCMG, AC, PC, (born 21 April 1942), served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from August 1989 until September 1990, leading the Labour Party. ...

1990s

1990
1991
  • First budget of new Finance Minister, Ruth Richardson. Welfare payments further reduced.
  • The Alliance party is formed.
  • Employment Contracts Act passed.
  • Consumers Price Index has lowest quarterly increase for 25 years.
  • Number of unemployed exceeds 200,000 for the first time.
  • New Zealand troops join multi-national force in the Gulf War.
  • An avalanche on Aoraki/Mount Cook reduces its height by 10.5 metres.
1992
  • Government and Māori interests negotiate Sealord fisheries deal.
  • Public health system reforms.
  • State housing commercialised.
  • New Zealand gets seat on United Nations Security Council.
  • Student Loan system is started / Tertiary Fees raised
1993
1994
  • Government commits 250 soldiers to front-line duty in Bosnia.
  • Government proposes $1 billion cap in plan for final settlement of Treaty of Waitangi claims.
  • Sharemarket reaches highest level since 1987 crash.
  • New Zealand's first casino opens in Christchurch.
  • David Bain is convicted of murdering five members of his family.
  • First fast-ferry service begins operation across Cook Strait.
1995
1996
1997
  • America's Cup damaged in attack by a Māori activist.
  • TV4 begins daily broadcasts.
  • Customs Service cracks down on imported Japanese used cars following claims of odometer fraud.
  • Auckland's Sky Tower is opened.
  • Compulsory superannuation is rejected by a margin of more than nine to one in New Zealand's first postal referendum.
  • Jim Bolger resigns as Prime Minister after losing support of the National Party caucus; he is replaced by New Zealand's first woman Prime Minister, Jenny Shipley.
1998
  • Auckland city businesses hit by a power cut lasting several weeks. The crisis continues for over a month and results in an inquiry into Mercury Energy.
  • The women's rugby team, the Black Ferns, become the world champions.
  • Interest rates and the New Zealand dollar both take a slide, leaving NZ$1 below the US50c mark for the first time in 12 years.
  • The National - New Zealand First coalition Government is dissolved leaving the Jenny Shipley led National Party as a minority government.
  • Several cases of tuberculosis discovered in South Auckland in the worst outbreak for a decade.
  • The Hikoi of Hope marches to Parliament, calling for more support for the poor.
  • The government announces plans to lease 28 new fighter aircraft but says no to a new naval frigate.
  • Road toll 514
1999

See also: 1989 in New Zealand, other events of 1990, 1991 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Dame Catherine Anne Tizard (nee Maclean) GCMG GCVO DBE QSO (4 April 1931–) was a Governor-General of New Zealand, and the first woman to be appointed to the office. ... Sir Geoffrey Winston Russell Palmer, KCMG, AC, PC, (born 21 April 1942), served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from August 1989 until September 1990, leading the Labour Party. ... This page is about the New Zealand politician and Director-General of the World Trade Organization. ... The 1990 Commonwealth Games were held in Auckland, New Zealand. ... Telecom New Zealand NZX: TEL ASX: TEL NYSE: NZT is a Wellington-based telephone company run as a publicly-traded private company since 1990. ... SKY Network Television Limited (ASX: SKT; NZX: SKT), often trading as SKY, was New Zealands first pay television service and is at present, 2006, New Zealands largest pay television operator. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1990 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 43rd term. ... The Right Honourable James Brendan Jim Bolger, ONZ, (born 31 May 1935) was Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1990 to 1997. ... See also: 1990 in New Zealand, other events of 1991, 1992 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Ruth Richardson (born December 13, 1950) served as New Zealands Minister of Finance from 1990 to 1993, and is known for her strong pursuit of radical economic reforms (sometimes known as Ruthanasia). Early life Richardson was born in southern Taranaki on 13 December 1950. ... Current Alliance logo The Alliance, when referring to New Zealand politics, refers to a left-wing political party. ... Jarred rocks!Yoa sucks!Iverson rocks! == Headline text == For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Mt Cook is the highest mountain in New Zealand. ... See also: 1991 in New Zealand, other events of 1992, 1993 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... “Security Council” redirects here. ... See also: 1992 in New Zealand, other events of 1993, 1994 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Current New Zealand First logo New Zealand First is a political party in New Zealand. ... Winston Raymond Peters, PC, (born April 11, 1945) is a New Zealand politician and the current Minister of Foreign Affairs, outside cabinet. ... Sir Peter Wilfred Tapsell KNZM MBE (born January 21, 1930) was Speaker of the New Zealand House of Representatives from 1993 to 1996. ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). ... The Additional Member System (AMS) is a voting system where some representatives are elected from geographic constituencies and others are elected under proportional representation from party lists. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1993 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... See also: 1993 in New Zealand, other events of 1994, 1995 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Motto None Anthem Intermeco Bosnia and Herzegovina() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Sarajevo Official languages Bosnian Croatian Serbian Government Parliamentary democracy  -  Presidency members Željko KomÅ¡ić1 NebojÅ¡a Radmanović2 Haris Silajdžić3  -  Chairman of the Council of Ministers Nikola Å pirić  -  High Representative 4 Independence... One of the few extant copies of the Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Tiriti o Waitangi) is a treaty signed on February 6, 1840 by representatives of the British Crown, and Māori chiefs from the North Island of New Zealand. ... David Bain (born March 27, 1972 in Dunedin, New Zealand) was convicted in May 1995 for the murder of his parents and siblings on 20 June the previous year. ... See also: 1994 in New Zealand, other events of 1995, 1996 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The Americas Cup trophy The Americas Cup is the most famous and most prestigious regatta in the sport of sailing, and the oldest active trophy in international sport, predating the FA Cup by two decades and the Modern Olympics by 45 years. ... Moutoa Gardens, also known as Pakaitore, is a park in the city of Wanganui, New Zealand. ... Wanganui   is an urban area and district on the west coast of the North Island of New Zealand. ... This article is about the minor party founded by Ross Meurant in 1994. ... Christian Heritage New Zealand (formerly known as the Christian Heritage Party) was a New Zealand political party promoting evangelical Christian-based social conservatism. ... United New Zealand logo   This article is about the party founded in 1995. ... Moruroa Moruroa Moruroa (Mururura, Mururoa) (21°50′S 138°55′W.) is an atoll which forms part of the Tuamoto archipelago in French Polynesia in the southern Pacific Ocean. ... Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (IPA: ) (born 18 July 1918) is the former President of South Africa, and the first to be elected in fully representative democratic elections. ... See also: 1995 in New Zealand, other events of 1996, 1997 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Kahurangi National Park is a National Park in the northwest of the South Island of New Zealand. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The City of Nelson is situated very close to the centre of New Zealand. ... Radio New Zealand Limited is New Zealands public service radio broadcaster. ... Clear channel stations are AM radio stations that are designated as such so that only one or two 50,000 watt powerhouses operate at night on each designated frequency, covering a wide area via sky wave propagation. ... The Radio Network was created when the commerical activities of Radio New Zealand were divested by the New Zealand government in the 1980s. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1996 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... See also: 1996 in New Zealand, other events of 1997, 1998 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Looking up at the Sky Tower / Sky Tower lit up at night. ... Jenny Shipley, DCNZM, (b. ... See also: 1997 in New Zealand, other events of 1998, 1999 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The 1998 Auckland power crisis was an event that occurred in the Auckland, New Zealand Central Business District. ... The Black Ferns is New Zealands national womens rugby team. ... See also: 1998 in New Zealand, other events of 1999, 2000 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1999 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 46th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... For other persons named Helen Clark, see Helen Clark (disambiguation). ... The Fifth Labour Government of New Zealand is the current government of New Zealand. ...

2000s

2000
  • January: The name suppression of American billionaire Peter Lewis, who was arrested and convicted of drug possession charges, causes controversy.
2001
  • Interest accrual is removed from student loans while studying. Students who accrued interest prior to 2001 are still required to pay.
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
  • Labour enacts its election promise to remove interest on loans to students living in New Zealand.
  • Five cent coins are dropped from circulation and existing 10 cent, 20 cent and 50 cent coins are replaced with smaller coins.
  • 11 October: $11.5 Billion dollar government surplus announced by Minister of Finance Dr Michael Cullen.
2007
  • Last Privy Council appeal results in David Bain's convictions for the murder of his family being quashed; re-trail ordered by the Solicitor-General of New Zealand.
  • KiwiSaver retirement savings scheme introduced.
  • The New Zealand Dollar briefly exceeds 80 cents against the US Dollar.

Note: Population figures sourced from Statistics New Zealand See also: 1999 in New Zealand, other events of 2000, 2001 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... A billionaire is a person who has a net worth of at least one billion units of currency, such as United States Dollars (USD), Pounds or Euros. ... Peter B. Lewis is the Cleveland, Ohio-area based Chairman of Progressive Insurance Companies. ... See also: 2000 in New Zealand, other events of 2001, 2002 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand region of Canterbury is mainly composed of the Canterbury Plains and the surrounding mountains. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2002 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 47th New Zealand Parliament. ... See also: 2002 in New Zealand, other events of 2003, 2004 in New Zealand and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council is one of the highest courts in the United Kingdom. ... The Supreme Court of New Zealand is the highest court of appeal in New Zealand, having formally come into existence at the beginning of 2004, and sitting for the first time on 1 July 2004. ... See also: 2003 in New Zealand, other events of 2004, 2005 in New Zealand and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... The New Zealand foreshore and seabed controversy is a debate in the politics of New Zealand. ... The Māori Party, a political party in New Zealand based around Māori citizens, formed around Tariana Turia, a former Labour Party member who had been a New Zealand Cabinet minister in the current Labour-dominated coalition government. ... See also: 2004 in New Zealand, other events of 2005, 2006 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikinews has news related to: Results of the 2005 New Zealand General Election The 2005 New Zealand general election took place on 17 September 2005 and determined the composition of the 48th New Zealand Parliament. ... See also: 2005 in New Zealand, other events of 2006, 2007 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history. ... Student loans are loans offered to students to assist in payment of the costs of professional education. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Cullen The Hon. ... See also: 2006 in New Zealand, other events of 2007, 2008 in New Zealand, and the Timeline of New Zealand history // Head of State - Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of New Zealand, since February 6, 1952 Governor-General - Anand Satyanand since August 23, 2006 2007 will be the second full year... David Bain (born March 27, 1972 in Dunedin, New Zealand) was convicted in May 1995 for the murder of his parents and siblings on 20 June the previous year. ... The Solicitor-General of New Zealand is the second law officer of state in New Zealand. ... The KiwiSaver scheme is an initiative of the New Zealand Government to combat New Zealands (allegedly) low average rate of saving. ... ISO 4217 Code NZD User(s) New Zealand, Cook Islands, Niue, Pitcairn Islands, Tokelau Inflation 2. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Statistics New Zealand (Te Tari Tatau) is a New Zealand government department, and the source of the countrys official statistics. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c McLauchlan, Gordon A Short History of New Zealand Penguin Group, 2005.

See also

This is a timeline of environmental history of New Zealand. ...

External links

  • Timeline
  • Today in New Zealand History calendar

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