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Encyclopedia > Timeline of Michigan history

Contents

Natural history

The Upper Paleolithic (or Upper Palaeolithic) is the third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. ... Austrias longest glacier, the Pasterze, winds its 8 km (5 mile) route at the foot of Austrias highest mountain, the Grossglockner A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ... The Wisconsin (in North America), Weichsel (in Scandinavia), Devensian (in the British Isles), Midlandian (in Ireland) and Würm glaciation (in the Alps) are the most recent glaciations of the Pleistocene, which ended around 10,000 BC. The general glacial advance began about 70,000 BC, and reached its maximum... In physical geography, tundra is an area where the tree growth is hindered by low temperatures and short growing seasons. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... The Upper Peninsula of Michigan is the northern of the two major land masses that comprise the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The regions of lower Michigan and their major cities are identified on this map. ... Geologic map of the Michigan Basin The Michigan Basin is a geologic basin centered on the lower peninsula of the US state of Michigan. ... Mastodons or Mastodonts are members of the extinct genus Mammut of the order Proboscidea and form the family Mammutidae; they resembled, but were distinct from, the woolly mammoth which belongs to the family Elephantidae. ... The Wisconsin (in North America), Weichsel (in Scandinavia), Devensian (in the British Isles), Midlandian (in Ireland) and Würm glaciation (in the Alps) are the most recent glaciations of the Pleistocene, which ended around 10,000 BC. The general glacial advance began about 70,000 BC, and reached its maximum... Subclasses Allotheria* Order Multituberculata (extinct) Order Volaticotheria (extinct) Order Palaeoryctoides (extinct) Order Triconodonta (extinct) Prototheria Order Monotremata Theria Infraclass Marsupialia Infraclass Eutheria The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals characterized by the production of milk in females for the nourishment of young, from mammary glands present on most species... Three small ammonite fossils, each approximately 1. ... The Upper Paleolithic (or Upper Palaeolithic) is the third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. ... (10th millennium BC – 9th millennium BC – 8th millennium BC – other millennia) Beginning of the Neolithic time period of the Holocene epoch. ... Paleo-Indians is an English term used to refer to the ancient peoples of America who were present at the end of the last Ice Age. ... Flint biface from Saint-Acheul, France. ...

Early human history

The Upper Paleolithic (or Upper Palaeolithic) is the third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. ... (5th millennium BC – 4th millennium BC – 3rd millennium BC - other millennia) Events City of Ur in Mesopotamia (40th century BC). ... Paleo-Indians is an English term used to refer to the ancient peoples of America who were present at the end of the last Ice Age. ... (5th millennium BC – 4th millennium BC – 3rd millennium BC - other millennia) Events City of Ur in Mesopotamia (40th century BC). ... (Redirected from 2500 BC) (26th century BC - 25th century BC - 24th century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2900 - 2334 BC -- Mesopotamian wars of the Early Dynastic period 2494 BC -- End of Fourth Dynasty, start of Fifth Dynasty in Egypt. ... The name Archaic Period is given by archaeologists to the earliest periods of a culture. ... (Redirected from 2500 BC) (26th century BC - 25th century BC - 24th century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2900 - 2334 BC -- Mesopotamian wars of the Early Dynastic period 2494 BC -- End of Fourth Dynasty, start of Fifth Dynasty in Egypt. ... Europe in 1000 The year 1000 of the Gregorian Calendar was the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the first millennium. ... The Woodland period of North American pre-Columbian cultures lasted roughly from 1000 BCE to 1000 CE. The term Woodland was coined in the 1930s and refers to prehistoric sites between the Archaic period and the Mississippian cultures. ... Europe in 1000 The year 1000 of the Gregorian Calendar was the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the first millennium. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... The Menominee are a nation of Native Americans living in Wisconsin. ... Chippewa redirects here. ... The Ottawa (also Odawa, Odaawa, Outaouais, or Trader) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... Rain dance, Kansas, c. ... The Mascouten were an American Indian tribe, originally from what is now the U.S. state of Michigan. ... For the abbreviation or acronym SAC, please see SAC. The Sauks or Sacs (Asakiwaki in their own language) are a group of Native Americans whose original territory may have been along the St. ... The Fox tribe of Native Americans are an Algonquian language-speaking group that are now merged with the allied Sac tribe as the Sac and Fox Nation. ... For the Tenacious D song, see Kickapoo. ... The Miami are a Native American tribe originally found in Indiana and Ohio. ...

French colonization

1621 was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... Étienne Brûlé (c. ... The St. ... Lake Superior (known as Gichigami in an Ojibwe language), bounded by Ontario and Minnesota to the north and Wisconsin and Michigan in the south, is the largest of North Americas Great Lakes. ... Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement... Jean Nicolet (born 1598 - died November 1, 1642) was a French voyageur noted for exploring the Northwest Territory. ... Huron redirects here. ... The Straits of Mackinac, spanned by the Mackinac Bridge, seen from the southern shore The Mackinac Straits is the strip of water that connects two of the Great Lakes, Lake Michigan and Lake Huron and separates the Lower Peninsula of Michigan from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. ... The Upper Peninsula of Michigan is the northern of the two major land masses that comprise the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The Ho-Chunk or Winnebago (as they are commonly called) are a tribe of Native Americans, native to what are now Wisconsin and Illinois. ... Events The Long Parliament passes a series of legislation designed to contain Charles Is absolutist tendencies. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Isaac Jogues (January 10, 1607-October 18, 1646) was a Jesuit misionary who travelled and worked among the Native Americans in North America. ... Charles Raymbault (1602 in France - 1643 in Quebec) was a Jesuit missionary. ... Chippewa redirects here. ... Sault Sainte Marie — pronounced Soo Saint Marie (IPA ) — is the name of two cities on the Saint Marys River, which forms part of the boundary between the United States and Canada. ... Events February 2 - New Amsterdam (later renamed New York City) is incorporated. ... The French and Iroquois Wars (also called the Iroquois Wars or the Beaver Wars) were an intermittent series of conflicts fought in the late 17th century in eastern North America, in which the Iroquois sought to expand their territory and take control of the role of middleman in the fur... The regions of lower Michigan and their major cities are identified on this map. ... Native Americans are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... This is about the river in Canada. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... // Events May 25 - Richard Cromwell resigns as Lord Protector of England following the restoration of the Long Parliament, beginning a second brief period of the republican government called the Commonwealth. ... Pierre-Esprit Radisson (1636 – 1710) was a French-born explorer and fur trader. ... Médard Chouart des Groseilliers (1618-1696) was a French explorer and fur trader in Canada. ... The fur trade was a huge part in the early economic development of North America. ... Nickname: City of Mary Motto: Concordia Salus Coordinates: Country Canada Province Québec Founded 1642 Established 1832  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1] [2]    - City 185. ... 1661 (MDCLXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... French Jesuit missionary explorer who traveled to Huronia in 1641, learned the language of the wyandot, and was soon in charge of many of the satellite missions around Sainte-Marie among the Hurons. ... Huron redirects here. ... LAnse is a village located in Baraga County, Michigan. ... Chequamegon Bay (pronounced sha-wa-magon), is an inlet of Lake Superior, 12 miles NE-SW and 2-6 miles wide, in Ashland and Bayfield counties in the extreme northern part of Wisconsin. ... 1665 (MDCLXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Claude Jean Allouez (b. ... The coureurs des bois (runners of the woods) or voyageurs (travellers) is the name given to the men who engaged in the fur trade directly with the Amerindians in North America from the time of New France up through the 19th century, when much of the continent was still mostly... General Name, Symbol, Number copper, Cu, 29 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 4, d Appearance metallic pinkish red Atomic mass 63. ... The Keweenaw Peninsula is the most northern part of Michigans Upper Peninsula. ... 1668 (MDCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Father Jacques Marquette (French: Père Jacques Marquette) (June 10, 1637–May 18, 1675) and Louis Jolliet were the first Europeans to see and map the Mississippi River. ... Nickname: The Soo Location of Sault Ste. ... // Events Samuel Pepys stopped writing his diary. ... See also Marché Jean-Talon for the farmers market in Montreal, Canada. ... The Iroquois Confederacy (Haudenosaunee, also known as the League of Peace and Power, Five Nations, or Six Nations) is a group of First Nations/Native Americans. ... The regions of lower Michigan and their major cities are identified on this map. ... Landsat satellite photo, showing Lake Saint Clair, as well as St. ... Landsat satellite photo, showing Lake Saint Clair, as well as St. ... Events May 9 - Thomas Blood, disguised as a clergyman, attempts to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. ... Nickname: The Soo Motto: Naturally Gifted Coordinates: Country Canada Province Ontario District Algoma District Incorporated 1887 (town), 1912 (city) City Mayor John Rowswell Governing body The Corporation of the City of Sault Sainte Marie MPs Tony Martin MPPs David Orazietti Area    - City 715 km²  (276 sq mi) Elevation 192 m... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Claude Jean Allouez (b. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... Millitary officer of New France and deputy of Jean Talon, Lusson was sent to Sault Ste. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638–September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... Events May 9 - Thomas Blood, disguised as a clergyman, attempts to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... St. ... Events January 24 - King Charles II of England disbands Parliament August 7 - The brigantine Le Griffon, which was commissioned by René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, is towed to the southern end of the Niagara River, to become the first ship to sail the upper Great Lakes. ... Engraving of La Salle René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle (November 22, 1643 – March 19, 1687) was a French cleric and explorer. ... Built by René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, Le Griffon is considered to have been the first actual ship on the Upper Great Lakes. ... Washington Island is an island located about 7 miles northeast of the tip of Door Peninsula in Door County, Wisconsin. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one in the group located entirely within the United States. ... Fort Miami was a fort on the bank of the St. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... Fort Miami was a fort on the bank of the St. ... The regions of lower Michigan and their major cities are identified on this map. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... Fort de Buade was a French fort operating at the present site of St. ... St. ... Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ... Niles is a city located in Berrien County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Claude Jean Allouez (b. ... 1686 (MDCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Daniel Greysolon, Sieur du Lhut (c. ... A short lived New France Fort established in 1686 by Daniel Greysolon, Sieur du Lhut. ... Port Huron is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Events March 5 - French troops under Marshal Louis-Francois de Boufflers besiege the Spanish-held town of Mons March 20 - Leislers Rebellion - New governor arrives in New York - Jacob Leisler surrenders after standoff of several hours March 29 - Siege of Mons ends to the city’s surrender May 6... Jacques-Rene de Brisay de Denonville, Marquis de Denonville 10 December 1637 – 22 September 1710 was Governor of New France from 1685 to 1689. ... Fort Saint Joseph was a fort near present day Niles, Michigan. ... Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... Statue of Cadillac commemorating his landing in Detroit Antoine Laumet, dit de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac (March 5, 1658-October 15, 1730), a French explorer, was a colourful figure in the history of New France. ... Pierre Alphonse de Tonty, or Alphonse de Tonty, Baron de Paludy (1659 – 10 November 1727) was an officer who served under the French explorer Cadillac and helped establish the first European settlement at Detroit, Michigan, Fort Pontchartrain du Detroit on the Detroit River in 1701. ... Landsat satellite photo, showing Lake Saint Clair, as well as St. ... Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit or Fort Detroit was a fort established by the French officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac in 1701. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... // Events April 10 - The worlds first copyright legislation became effective, Britains Statute of Anne Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 3 - Richard Gridley, American Revolutionary soldier (d. ... Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit or Fort Detroit was a fort established by the French officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac in 1701. ... The Fox tribe of Native Americans are an Algonquian language-speaking group that are now merged with the allied Sac tribe as the Sac and Fox Nation. ... // Events Treaty of Aargau signed between Catholic and Protestants. ... The Fox tribe of Native Americans are an Algonquian language-speaking group that are now merged with the allied Sac tribe as the Sac and Fox Nation. ... // Events July 24 - Spanish treasure fleet of ten ships under admiral Ubilla leave Havana, Cuba for Spain. ... Fort de Buade was a French fort operating at the present site of St. ... Fort Michilimackinac was an 18th century French, and later British, fort and trading post in the Great Lakes of North America. ... Mackinaw City is a village in Emmet County, with a small portion lying within Cheboygan County, in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... // Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... The fur trade was a huge part in the early economic development of North America. ... Flag Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... An Alberta fur trader in the 1890s. ... Carl D. Perkins Bridge in Portsmouth, Ohio with Ohio River and Scioto River tributary on right. ... Flag Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants France Indian allies: * Algonquin * Huron * Ojibwa * Ottawa * Shawnee Great Britain Indian allies: * Iroquois Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) The French and Indian War was the nine-year North American chapter of the Seven Years War. ... The Battle of Jumonville Glen was a battle of the French and Indian War fought on May 28, 1754 near what is present-day Uniontown in Western Pennsylvania. ...

British colonization

1758 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Plan of Fort Frontenac, 1685 Fort Frontenac was a French trading post and military fort built in 1673 in what is now Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit or Fort Detroit was a fort established by the French officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac in 1701. ... Combatants Britain France Commanders James Wolfe † Louis-Joseph, Marquis de Montcalm † Strength 4,800 regulars 4,000 regulars 300 militia Casualties 658 dead or wounded 644 dead or wounded The Battle of the Plains of Abraham, fought September 13, 1759, was a decisive battle of the North American theatre of... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... No authentic images of Pontiac are known to exist. ... The Ottawa (also Odawa or Odaawa) are a Native American people. ... Combatants Pontiacs confederacy Great Britain Commanders Pontiac Wasson Henry Gladwin Donald Campbell † Strength Casualties For the action in the War of 1812, see the Siege of Detroit The Siege of Fort Detroit was an ultimately unsuccessful attempt by North American Indians to capture Fort Detroit during Pontiacs Rebellion. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Painting by Benjamin West depicting (from left to right) John Jay, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens, and William Temple Franklin. ... Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, Dutch Republic, Spain, American Indians Kingdom of Great Britain, German mercenaries, Loyalists, American Indians Commanders George Washington, Comte de Rochambeau, Nathanael Greene, Bernardo de Gálvez Sir William Howe, Sir Henry Clinton, Lord Cornwallis (more commanders) The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Treaty The Jay Treaty between the United States and Great Britain averted war, solved many issues left over from the Revolution, and opened ten years of peaceful trade in the midst of a large war. ... Wayne County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ...

U.S. territory

1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... From 1805-1818, the western border was a line through Lake Michigan. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Portrait of William Hull William Hull (June 24, 1753–November 29, 1825) was an American soldier and politician. ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (UM or U of M) is a coeducational public research university in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Treaty of Saginaw in 1819 was made between Gen. ... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... The Ottawa (also Odawa or Odaawa) are a Native American people. ... Rain dance, Kansas, c. ... The regions of lower Michigan and their major cities are identified on this map. ... The coronation banquet for George IV 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Treaty of Chicago may refer to either of two treaties between the United States and the the Ottawa, Ojibwe (Chippewa), and Potawatomi Native American peoples. ... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... The Ottawa (also Odawa or Odaawa) are a Native American people. ... Rain dance, Kansas, c. ... Pedestrian bridge over the Grand River in downtown Lansing The Grand River is the longest river in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the first governor of Michigan. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Combatants Michigan Territory militia and citizens Ohio militia and citizens Commanders Acting Governor Stevens T. Mason, Militia Brigadier-General Joseph W. Brown Governor Robert Lucas, Militia General John Bell Casualties 1 wounded none The Toledo War (1835–1836; also known as the Ohio-Michigan War) was the largely bloodless outcome... Nickname: The Glass City Location in the state of Ohio Country United States State Ohio County Lucas Mayor Carty Finkbeiner (D) Area    - City 217. ... Toledo Strip is the name of a piece of disputed land (which includes present-day Toledo, Ohio) that was claimed by both the state of Ohio and the Michigan Territory of the United States in the early 19th century. ... The Upper Peninsula of Michigan is the northern of the two major land masses that comprise the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For the term free state as it arises in United States history, see: Free state. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ...

As a U.S. state

Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1840 Whig campaign poster blames Van Buren for hard times The Panic of 1837 was an economic depression, one of the most severe financial crises in the history of the United States. ... The Clinton-Kalamazoo Canal is an abandoned canal in Michigan that was only partially completed. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Patriot War was a short-lived campaign in the eastern Michigan area of the United States and the Windsor, Ontario area of Canada. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Douglass Houghton (September 21, 1809 – October 13, 1845) was an American geologist, medical doctor and mayor of Detroit, Michigan. ... General Name, Symbol, Number copper, Cu, 29 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 4, d Appearance metallic pinkish red Atomic mass 63. ... The Keweenaw Peninsula is the most northern part of Michigans Upper Peninsula. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Chippewa redirects here. ... General Name, Symbol, Number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Atomic mass 55. ... Negaunee is a city in Marquette County, Michigan, United States. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ingham County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Michigan State University (MSU) is a public university in East Lansing, Michigan. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are American institutions which have been designated by a Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Michigan State Capitol The Michigan State Capitol is the building housing two branches of the government of the U.S. state of Michigan. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... // First flight by the Wright brothers, December 17, 1903. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Ford Motor Company and Ford (vehicles). ... The Chrysler Corporation was a United States-based automobile manufacturer that existed independently from 1925–1998. ... General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), also known as GM, is an American automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sit-down strikers at Fisher Body Plant (1937) The Flint Sit-Down Strike changed the United Automobile Workers from a collection of isolated locals on the fringes of the industry into a major union and led to the unionization of the United States automobile industry. ... The United Auto Workers (UAW), officially the United Automobile, Aerospace & Agricultural Implement Workers of America International Union, is one of the largest labor unions in North America, with more than 700,000 members in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico organized into approximately 950 union locals. ... General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), also known as GM, is an American automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Mackinac Bridge (pronounced , like MACK-in-aw, note the silent c, and affectionately known as the Mighty Mac or Big Mac), is a suspension bridge spanning the Straits of Mackinac to connect the non-contiguous upper and lower peninsulas of the U.S. state of Michigan. ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... The riot featured on the cover of the August 4, 1967 edition of Time Magazine. ... A simulated-color satellite image of Metro Detroit, with Windsor across the river, taken on NASAs Landsat 7 satellite. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Nickname: Location of Grand Rapids within Kent County, Michigan Coordinates: Country United States State Michigan County Kent  - Mayor George Heartwell Area    - City 45. ... The presidential seal was first used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Jennifer Mulhern Granholm (born February 5, 1959) is a Canadian-born American politician and the current Governor of the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ...

External links

1837 Michigan starts statehood. Admitted as a state. The United States of America is located in the middle of the North American continent, between the Commonwealth of Canada to the north and the United States of Mexico to the south. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      A state of the United States is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... Alabama State Flag This is the history of the State of Alabama, in the United States of America. ... The Alaska state flag. ... The first Native Americans arrived in Arizona between 16,000 BC and 10,000 BCE, while the history of Arizona as recorded by Europeans began when Marcos de Niza, a Franciscan, explored the area in 1539. ... A field of California golden poppies circa 1910. ... Prior to the Colorado Gold Rush and organization of Colorado Territory from the western portion of Kansas, the eastern portion of Utah Territory, the southwestern portion of Nebraska Territory and a small portion of northeastern New Mexico Territory on February 28, 1861, [1], a number of French, Spanish and American... The History of Connecticut begins as a number of unrelated colonial villages. ... The History of Delaware is the story of a small American state, in the middle of heart of the nation, and yet until recently often isolated and even invisible to outsiders. ... Five flags of Florida (not including the current State Flag of Florida). ... The history of HawaiÊ»i includes phases of early Polynesian settlement, Euro-American and Asian immigration, the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy, and admission to the United States as a territory and then a state. ... Humans may have been present in the Idaho area as long as 14,500 years ago. ... // Pre-Columbian Cahokia, the urban center of the pre-Columbian Mississippian culture, was located near present-day Collinsville, Illinois. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ... This is the history of the U.S. state of Iowa. ... The history of Kansas is rich with the lore of the American West. ... The history of Kentucky spans hundreds of years, and has been influenced by the states diverse geography and central location. ... The history of Louisiana is long and rich. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Great Seal of Maryland. ... This is the History of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, a state in the United States. ... The following is a timeline of the history of Michigan, USA. // Early European 1620 Étienne Brûlé and his fellow explorers from Grenoble, France, were probably the first white men to see Lake Superior. ... The history of Minnesota concerns the state of Minnesota that forms part of the United States of America. ... // Native Americans Mississippi was part of the Mississippian culture in the early part of the second millennium AD; descendant Native American tribes include the Chickasaw and Choctaw. ... This article is about the history of the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Native Americans were the first inhabitants of modern-day Montana. ... // The colony that became the state of New Hampshire was founded on a land grant given in 1622 by the Council for New England to Captain John Mason and Sir Ferdinando Gorges (who founded Maine). ... The written history of New Jersey began with the exploration of the Jersey Coast by Giovanni da Verrazzano in 1524, though the region had been settled for millennia by Native Americans. ... The History of New Mexico was first recorded by the Spanish who encountered Native American Pueblos when they explored the area in the 1500s. ... New York, the Empire State has been at the center of American politics, finance, industry, transportation and culture since it was created by the Dutch in the 17th century. ... History of North Carolina For the state today see North Carolina // Bibliography Surveys James Clay and Douglas Orr, eds. ... The History of North Dakota is not as dull as one might think; Certainly the subject matter seems that way on the surface. ... Serpent Mound, Ohio, USA Hopewell Mound, Ohio, USA 1775 Ohio is not part of the original 13 colonies, but is part of British territories 1789 U.S. constitution, present day is part of an unorganized territory. ... This article is about the History of Oklahoma. ... Official language(s) None Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... The History of Pennsylvania is as varied as any in the American experience and reflects the melting pot vision of the United States. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article Rhode Island. ... South Carolina is one of the original states of the United States of America, and its history has been remarkable for an extraordinary commitment to political independence, whether from overseas or federal control. ... The Tennessee State Capitol in Nashville has been the sight of much of the States history. ... The history of Texas (as part of the unitited states) began in 1845, but settlement of the region dates back to the end of the Upper Paleolithic Period, around 10,000 BCE. Its history has been shaped by being part of six independent countries: Spain, France, Mexico, the Republic of... The History of Utah (IPA: ) is an examination of the human history and social activity within the state of Utah located in the western United States. ... Mount Mansfield, at 4,393 feet, is the highest elevation point in Vermont. ... // [edit] Native Americans Virginia Indian chief in engraving after John White watercolor The portion of the New World designated Virginia in honor of the Virgin Queen (Elizabeth I) in the late 16th century had been inhabited by many groups of Native Americans for at least 3,000 years, based upon... Washingtons current flag. ... West Virginia is the only American state formed as a direct result of the American Civil War. ... Wisconsin became a state on May 29, 1848, but the land that makes up the state has been occupied by humans for thousands of years. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... Aerial photo of Washington, D.C. The history of Washington, D.C. is tied intrinsically to its role as the capital of the United States. ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... American Samoa is the result of the Second Samoan Civil War and an agreement made between Germany, the United States, and the United Kingdom in 1899. ... The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) is a commonwealth in political union with the United States of America at a strategic location in the West Pacific Ocean. ... Puerto Rico The history of Puerto Rico began with the settlement of the archipielago of Puerto Rico by the Ortoiroid culture, sometime between 3000–2000 BC. Other tribes, such as the Igneri and Arawak Indians, populated the island between 120 and 1000 AD. At the time of Christopher Columbuss... The first European to visit the United States Virgin Islands was Christopher Columbus, in 1498. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′ N, 176°31′ W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Johnston Atoll is a 2. ... Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24 N, 162°24 W. It is the northernmost of the Northern Line Islands and an unincorporated territory of the United States administered... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Wake Island is an atoll (having a coastline of 19. ...


 
 

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