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Encyclopedia > Timeline of LGBT history
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The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... Queer studies is the study of issues relating to sexual orientation and gender identity. ... Image File history File links Gay_flag. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... Bisexual redirects here. ... A transwoman with XY written on her hand, at a protest in Paris, October 1, 2005. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... LGBT history refers to the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender cultures around the world, dating back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality within ancient civilizations. ... Gay Liberation (or Gay Lib) is the name used to describe the radical lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered movement of the late 1960s and early to mid 1970s in North America, Western Europe, and Australia and New Zealand. ... For the LGBT rights article for a particular country, see LGBT rights by country. ... This is a timeline of AIDS, including some discussion of early AIDS cases (especially those before 1980). ... Christopher Street Parade Sexuality and gender identity-based cultures concern the culture, knowledge, and references shared by members of sexual minorities or transgendered people by virtue of their membership in those minorities or their state of being transgendered. ... The sociological construct of a gay community is complex among those that classify themselves as homosexual, ranging from full-embracement to complete and utter rejection of the concept. ... Front line of Gay Pride parade in Paris, France; June 2005 Gay pride or LGBT pride refers to a world wide movement and philosophy asserting that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals should be proud of their sexual orientation and gender identity. ... For other uses, see Coming out (disambiguation). ... Gay slang or LGBT slang in linguistics refers to a form of English slang used predominantly among LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) people. ... A gay village (also gay ghetto or gayborhood) is an urban geographic location with generally recognized boundaries where a large number of gay, lesbian, transgender, and bisexual people live. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... For other uses, see Queer (disambiguation). ... Questioning is a term that can refer to a person who is questioning their gender identity, sexual identity or sexual orientation. ... World laws on homosexuality Legality of same-sex unions in the US. Legality of same-sex unions in Europe. ... Recognized in some regions United States (MA, CA eff. ... As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law... LGBT adoption refers to the adoption of children by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered people. ... A sodomy law is a law that defines certain sexual acts as sex crimes. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      The militaries of the world have a variety of responses to gays, lesbians and bisexuals. ... A Jewish cemetery in France after being defaced by Neo-Nazis. ... World laws on homosexuality Legality of same-sex unions in the US. Legality of same-sex unions in Europe. ... Heterosexism is the presumption that everyone is straight or heterosexual (i. ... A protest by The Westboro Baptist Church, a group identified by the Anti-Defamation League as virulently homophobic. ... Lesbophobia (sometimes Lesbiphobia) is a term which describes prejudice, discrimination, harassment or abuse, either specifically targeting a lesbian person, based on their lesbian identity, or, more generally, targetting lesbians as a class. ... Biphobia is the fear of, discrimination against, or hatred of bisexuals (although in practice it extends to pansexual people too). ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · Holocaust · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Pedophobia · Ephebiphobia Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Supremacism Kahanism Anti-discriminatory Abolitionism · Civil rights LGBT rights Womens/Universal suffrage · Feminism Mens/Fathers rights · Masculinism Children... For the LGBT rights article for a particular country, see LGBT rights by country. ... Image File history File links Gay_flag. ...


Around the world World laws on homosexuality Legality of same-sex unions in the US. Legality of same-sex unions in Europe. ...


By country This list indexes the articles on LGBT rights in each country and significant non-country region (e. ...


History · Groups · Activists LGBT history refers to the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender cultures around the world, dating back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality within ancient civilizations. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      Here is a list of gay-rights organizations around the world. ... A list of LGBT rights activists by country, in alphabetical order. ...


Declaration of Montreal Martina Navrátilová and Mark Tewksbury read the Declaration of Montreal at the opening ceremonies of the World Outgames. ...


Same-sex relationships Same-sex union can refer to: same-sex marriage -- the civil or religious rites of marriage that make it equivalent to opposite-sex marriages in all aspects. ...


Same-sex marriage · LGBT adoption Recognized in some regions United States (MA, CA eff. ... LGBT adoption refers to the adoption of children by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered people. ...


LGBT rights opposition · Heterosexism LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      LGBT rights opposition refers to various movements or attitudes which oppose the extension of certain rights to lesbian and gay people, and by extension to bisexuals, and... Heterosexism is the presumption that everyone is straight or heterosexual (i. ...


Violence It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Gay bashing. ...


Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

This box: view  talk  edit

This timeline of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) history details notable events in the Common Era West. This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... Bisexual redirects here. ... A transwoman with XY written on her hand, at a protest in Paris, October 1, 2005. ... The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... BCE redirects here. ... Occident redirects here. ...


12,000 BC

Near the end of the Upper Paleolithic Era, human beings have left artifacts and artwork suggesting an appreciation of homo eroticism.[citation needed] Examples include a few cave paintings and hundreds of phallic "batons" among which is a graphically carved double dildo from Gorge d'Enfer (in present-day France) that seems to have been crafted for two women to use together.[1]


5,000 BC

Possible examples of homo eroticism in European Mesolithic art include a rock engraving found in Addaura, Sicily, in which men and women dance around two cavorting sexually aroused male figures.


Source: Timeline of more History


25th/24th century BC

It is believed that the two men may have been lovers, making this the first record of a possible homosexual relationship.[2] From the tomb of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep. ... Known rulers, in the History of Egypt, for the Fifth Dynasty. ...


7th century BC

Pederasty spread through ancient Greece, influencing sports, literature, politics, philosophy, art and warfare, and causing, according to some, a flowering of culture; it was associated with gymnasia and athletic nudity.[3][4] This article or section should include material from Dorian invasion The Dorians were one of the ancient Hellenic (Greek) races. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Pederasty or paederasty (literally boy-love, see Etymology below) refers to an intimate or erotic relationship between an adolescent boy and an adult male outside his immediate family. ... Theoretical Human population increase from 10,000 BC – AD 2000. ... Zeus and Ganymede The Cretans, a Dorian people described by Plutarch as renowned for their moderation and conservative ways, practiced an archaic form of pederasty [1] in which the man enacted a ritual kidnapping (known as the harpagmos, or seizing) of a boy of his choosing, with the consent of... Pederastic courtship scene Athenian black-figure amphora, 5th c. ... Pompeii gymnasium, seen from the top of the stadium wall. ...


6th century BC

This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... Lesbos may refer to: Lesbos Island, a large Greek island in the Aegean Sea Lesbos Prefecture, the Greek prefecture that contains the island Slang word for Lesbians. ... Etymologies redirects here. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ...

4th century BC

  • 338 BCE The Sacred Band of Thebes, an undefeated elite battalion made up of one hundred and fifty pederastic couples, is destroyed by the forces of Philip II of Macedon who bemoans their loss and praises their honor.

The Sacred Band of Thebes (ancient Greek: ) was a troop of picked soldiers, numbering 150 age-structured which formed the elite force of the Theban army in the 4th century BC.[1] It was organized by the Theban commander Gorgidas in 378 BC and it played a crucial role in... Philip II of Macedon: victory medal (niketerion) struck in Tarsus, 2nd c. ...

1st century BC

  • 27 BCE The Roman Empire begins with the reign of Augustus. The first recorded same-sex marriages occur during this period.[6]

For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Nicomedes IV, known as Philopator, was the king of Bithynia, from c. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ...

1st century AD

  • 54Nero becomes Emperor of Rome. Nero married two men in legal ceremonies, with at least one spouse accorded the same honours as a Caesar's wife.[7]
  • 98Trajan, one of the most beloved of Roman emperors, begins his reign. Trajan was well known for his homosexuality and fondness for young males and this was used to advantage by the king of Edessa, Abgarus, who, after incurring the anger of Trajan for some misdeed, sent his handsome young son to make his apologies, thereby obtaining pardon. [8]

For other uses, see Nero (disambiguation). ... This is a list of Roman Emperors with the dates they controlled the Roman Empire. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ...

2nd century AD

  • 130 - Emperor Hadrian's beloved Antinous drowns in the Nile, and upon Hadrian's death, Antinous was deified. He is actually the last non-imperial human to be deified. Antinous' likeness is found on numerous statues; he is often believed to have one the most recognizable faces from antiquity.

Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 –– July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was emperor of Rome from 117 A.D. to 138 A.D., as well as a Stoic and Epicurean philosopher. ... Antinous or Antinoös (Greek: ) born circa 110 or 111 CE, died 130 CE), was the lover of the Roman Emperor Hadrian Bust of Antinous in the Palazzo Altemps museum in Rome // He was born to a Greek family in Bithynion-Claudiopolis, in the Roman province of Bithynia in what...

3rd century AD

  • 218 - The emperor Elagabalus begins his reign. He married a man named Zoticus, an athlete from Smyrna, in a lavish public ceremony at Rome amid the rejoicings of the public.[9]

Elagabalus Elagabalus (c. ...

4th century AD

  • 342 — Homosexuality had been accepted by all ancient cultures as a normal part of human sexuality. The rise of Christianity, however, led to the beginning of homophobia. The first law against homosexual marriage was promulgated by the Christian emperors Constantius and Constans. [10]
  • 390 — In the year 390, the Christian emperors Valentinian II, Theodoisus and Arcadius declared homosexual sex to be illegal and those who were guilty of it were condemned to be burned alive in front of the public. [11]

Constantius can refer to a number of Roman emperors: Constantius Chlorus - emperor 305-306 Constantius II - emperor 337-361 Constantius III - co-emperor in 421 This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Flavius Julius Constans (320 - 350), was a Roman Emperor who ruled from 337 to 350. ...

5th century AD

  • 498 — In spite of the laws against gay sex, the Christian emperors continued to collect taxes on male prostitutes until the reign of Anastasius I, who finally abolishes the tax.[12]

Pope Anastasius I -- Pope from 399-401 Anastasius I of the Byzantine Empire -- (c. ...

6th century AD

  • 529 — The Christian emperor Justinian (527-565) made homosexuals a scape goat for problems such as "famines, earthquakes, and pestilences." [13]
  • 589 — The Visigothic kingdom in Spain, is converted from Arianism to Catholicism. This conversion leads to a revision of the law to conform to those of Catholic countries. These revisions include provisions for the persecution of gays and Jews.[14]

A votive crown belonging to Reccesuinth (653–672) The Visigoths (Latin: ) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe, the Ostrogoths being the other. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Arminius · Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box... As a Christian ecclesiastical term, Catholic—from the Greek adjective , meaning general or universal[1]—is described in the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: ~Church, (originally) whole body of Christians; ~, belonging to or in accord with (a) this, (b) the church before separation into Greek or Eastern and Latin or...

9th century AD

Sample of Carolingian minuscule, one of the products of the Carolingian Renaissance. ... Flaccus Albinus Alcuin (about 735 - May 19, 804) was a monk from York, England. ... For other uses, see Abbot (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). ...

11th century AD

  • 1000–1100 — An eleventh century Byzantine legal treatise makes it clear that gay unions are well-known and legal in early medieval Byzantine society.
  • 1000–1100 — In Scandinavia, cult transvestitism persisted for centuries. As well, only sons who inherited their fathers’ land could marry in early medieval Scandinavia. The others had to leave the land, and they joined warrior societies. Women, expected to remain strictly chaste, and punished severely for violating this rule, were largely unavailable. Thus, in these warriors clubs, pederasty was practiced as an institutionalized way of life.
  • 1051 — St. Peter Damian composed the Book of Gomorrah, in which he luridly described several varieties of gay sex, and said that they were quite common, especially among priests. He was unable to convince his contemporaries that homosexuality was a grave problem that had to be stopped. While Pope Leo IX saw homosexuality as a "grave sin", he was nevertheless reluctant to come down as harshly as Peter Damian wanted him to.
  • 1100Ivo of Chartres attempts to convince Pope Urban II of the dangers of homosexuality. Ivo charged that Raoul/Ralph, Archbishop of Tours, had the king of France install John as bishop of Orleans. John was well-known as Ralph’s lover, and had even had relations with the king himself, which the king openly bragged about. Urban, however, did not see this as a major problem. John ruled effectively as bishop for almost forty years and Ralph was well-known and well-respected, and continued to be so.

For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... Cult typically refers to a cohesive social group devoted to beliefs or practices that the surrounding culture considers outside the mainstream, with a notably positive or negative popular perception. ... This article deals with the history of the word transvestite. For information about cross-dressing, see there. ... Sexual abstinence or chastity is the practice of voluntarily refraining from sexual intercourse and (usually) other sexual activity. ... Pederasty or paederasty (literally boy-love, see Etymology below) refers to an intimate or erotic relationship between an adolescent boy and an adult male outside his immediate family. ... Pietro Damiani (St Peter Damian), (c. ... Leo IX, né Bruno dEguisheim-Dagsbourg (June 21, 1002 - April 19, 1054) was pope from February 12, 1049 to his death. ... Ivo (Yves) (born about 1040; died 1117) was bishop of Chartres from 1090-1117 and an important ecclesiastical figure and canon lawyer during the Investiture Crisis. ... Urban II, né Otho of Lagery (or Otto or Odo) (1042 - July 29, 1099), pope from 1088 to July 29, 1099, was born into nobility in France at Lagery (near Châtillon-sur-Marne) and was church educated. ... This is a list of the bishops and archbishops of Tours: Bishops 1 Gatianus ca 249-301 vacant 301-338 2 Lidorius 338-370 3 St. ... Kings ruled in France from the Middle Ages to 1848. ... The diocese of Orléans (Aurelianum in Latin) comprised the Départment of Loiret, and was suffragan of the archbishopric of Paris since 1622, previously of the archbishopric of Sens. ...

12th century AD

  • 1102 — The Council of London took measures to ensure that the English public knew that it was sinful, marking a significant shift in church attitudes towards homosexuality, which previously had been more or less indifferent, at worst amounting to mild condemnation. Many priests were homosexuals, likely one of the causes of the change in attitude, as moral reformers such as Bernard of Cluny called for change.

For other uses, see Sin (disambiguation). ... This article is about religious workers. ... Bernard of Cluny (or of Morlaix) was a Benedictine monk of the first half of the twelfth century, poet, satirist, and hymn-writer, author of the famous verses On the Contempt of the World. Life His parentage, native land, and education are hidden in obscurity. ...

13th century AD

  • 1250–1300 — "Between 1250 and 1300, homosexual activity passed from being completely legal in most of Europe to incurring the death penalty in all but a few contemporary legal compilations." — John Boswell, Christianity, Social Tolerance, and Homosexuality (1980) p. 293. Other historians dispute Boswell's claim, however.

Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... John Eastburn Boswell (March 20, 1947 - December 24, 1994), was a prominant gay historian and a professor at Yale University. ...

14th century AD

  • 1327 — The deposed King Edward II of England allegedly is anally penetrated deeply with a red-hot poker, killing him. Edward II, a well-known homosexual, had a history of conflict with the nobility, who repeatedly banished his former lover Piers Gaveston, the Earl of Cornwall.
  • 1370s — Jan van Aersdone and Willem Case were two men executed in Antwerp in the 1370s. The charge against them was gay sex, which was illegal and strenuously vilified in medieval Europe. Aersdone and Case stand out because records of their names have survived. One other couple still known by name from the 14th century were Giovanni Braganza and Nicoleto Marmagna of Venice.[15]

Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall (c. ... The title of Earl of Cornwall was created several times in the Peerage of England before 1337, when it was superseded by the title Duke of Cornwall, which became attached to heirs-apparent to the throne. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... Gay sex is a part of some males sexual needs, it is very popular in China and Greenland. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ...

16th century AD

Henry VIII redirects here. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... A sodomy law is a law that defines certain sexual acts as sex crimes. ... François Elluin, Sodomites provoking the wrath of God, from Le pot pourri de Loth (1781). ... Sexual behavior is a form of physical intimacy that may be directed to reproduction (one possible goal of sexual intercourse) and/or to the enjoyment of activity involving sexual gratification. ... Woman masturbating, 1913 drawing by Gustav Klimt. ... Roman men having anal sex. ... Oral sex consists of all sexual activities that involve the use of the mouth, which may include use of the tongue, teeth, and throat, to stimulate genitalia. ... Gender in common usage refers to the sexual distinction between male and female. ...

17th century AD

  • 1624 — Richard Cornish of the Virginia Colony is tried and hanged for sodomy.[16]
  • 1649 — The first known conviction for lesbian activity in North America occurs in March when Sarah White Norman is charged with "Lewd behaviour each with other upon a bed" with Mary Vincent Hammon in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Hammon was under 16 and not prosecuted.[17]

A map of the Colony of Virginia. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... In general use, lascivious is synonymous with lustful. ...   Settled: 1620 â€“ Incorporated: 1620 Zip Code(s): 02360 â€“ Area Code(s): 508 / 774 Official website: http://www. ...

18th century AD

  • 1726Mother Clap's molly house in London is raided by police, resulting in Clap's death and the execution at Tyburn of all the men arrested.[citation needed]
  • Between 1730 and 1811, a widespread panic in the Dutch Republic leads to a spectacular series of trials for sodomy, with persecutions at their most severe from 1730 to 1737, 1764, 1776, and from 1795 to 1798.[citation needed]
  • 1779USA In 1779, Jefferson prepared a draft of Virginia’s criminal statute, envisaging that the punishment for sodomy should be castration. See Thomas Jefferson, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, Andrew A. Lipscomb, ed. (Washington, Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904) Vol. I, pp.226–27, from Jefferson’s “For Proportioning Crimes and Punishments.”

The bill read: “Whosoever shall be guilty of rape, polygamy, or sodomy with a man or woman, shall be punished; if a man, by castration, a woman, by boring through the cartilage of her nose a hole of one half inch in diameter at the least.” (Virginia Bill number 64; authored by Jefferson; 18 June 1779). Margaret Clap (better known as Mother Clap, died circa 1726) was a woman who ran a brothel for homosexual men in London in the early part of the 18th century. ... A Molly house is an archaic English term for a tavern or private room where homosexual males and transwomen could meet each other and possible sexual partners. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Tyburn was a former village in the county of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch. ... Map of Dutch Republic by Joannes Janssonius United Netherlands redirects here. ... François Elluin, Sodomites provoking the wrath of God, from Le pot pourri de Loth (1781). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized...

  • 1791Revolutionary France adopts a new penal code which no longer criminalizes sodomy. France thus becomes the first West European country to decriminalize homosexual acts between consenting adults.
  • 1795Luxembourg, and Tuscany decriminalize homosexual acts.[citation needed]

The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ...

19th century AD

Karl Heinrich Ulrichs, 1825–1895, the pioneer of the LGBT rights movement
Magnus Hirschfeld, 1868–1935, was a prominent German physician, sexologist, and gay rights advocate.
Oscar Wilde, 1854–1900

Karl-Heinrich Ulrichs File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Karl-Heinrich Ulrichs File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... -1... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... A Criminal Code is a compilation of government laws that outline a nations criminal offenses, and the maximum and minimum punishments that courts can impose upon offenders when such crimes are committed. ... This article is about human asexuality; asexual reproduction is a separate topic. ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: Βιολογία - βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... Execution is a synonym for the actioning of something, of putting something into effect. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... The Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, commonly known as East Timor, is an island nation in Southeast Asia, consisting of the eastern half of the island of Timor, the nearby islands of Atauro and Jaco, and Oecussi-Ambeno, a political exclave of East Timor situated on the western side of... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about death by hanging. ... This article is about the institution. ... The Offences Against the Person Act 1861 (OAP) was a major piece of Victorian legislation passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which consolidated the previously complex mixture of common law and statute into a single Act designed to deal with all the offences which affected the physical health... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a punishment for a serious crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... Bugger is an expletive used in vernacular British English, South African English, Australian English, New Zealand English and Sri Lankan English. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Karl-Heinrich Ulrichs Karl-Heinrich Ulrichs (1825 – 1895), pioneer gay rights activist, was born in Westerfeld, in north-western Germany. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... Magnus Hirschfeld, taken from the Connection website. ... Magnus Hirschfeld, taken from the Connection website. ... Magnus Hirschfeld in 1933. ... Sexology is the systematic study of human sexuality. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Karl-Maria Kertbeny Karl-Maria Kertbeny or Károly Mária Kertbeny (born Karl-Maria Benkert) (1824 – 1882), Austrian-born Hungarian journalist, memoirist and human rights campaigner who coined the word homosexual, was born in Vienna, the son of a writer and a painter. ... Paragraph 175 (known formally as §175 StGB; also known as Section 175 in English) was a provision of the German Criminal Code from 15 May 1871 to 10 March 1994. ... See also: 1885 in gay rights, other events of 1886, 1887 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events The Criminal Law Amendment Act of 1885, whose Labouchere Amendment (Clause 11), outlawed sexual relations between men (but not women) is given Royal Assent by Queen Victoria... The Criminal Law Amendment Act of 1885, An Act to make further provision for the Protection of Women and Girls, the suppression of brothels, and other purposes was the latest in a twenty-five year series of legislation in the United Kingdom beginnning with the Offences against the Person Act... This article is about homosexual women, not inhabitants of the Greek island of Lesbos A lesbian (lowercase L) is a homosexual woman. ... // The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which a constitutional monarch completes the legislative process of lawmaking by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence and Avondale The most famous name associated with the male brothel. ... In human sexuality, bisexuality describes a man or woman having a sexual orientation to persons of either or both sexes (a man or woman who sexually likes both sexes; people who are sexually and/or romantically attracted to both males and females). ... Heterosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love or sexual desire exclusively for members of the opposite sex or gender, contrasted with homosexuality and distinguished from bisexuality and asexuality. ... Psychopathia Sexualis may refer to: Psychopathia Sexualis (book), a psychology book on sexuality by Richard Freiherr von Krafft-Ebing Psychopathia Sexualis (album), an album by Whitehouse An album by The Makers (American band) Psychopathia Sexualis (play), a play by John Patrick Shanley A controversial comic by Miguel Ángel Martín... Alfred Charles Kinsey (June 23, 1894 – August 25, 1956), was an American biologist and professor of entomology and zoology who in 1947 founded the Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University, now called the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction. ... (Redirected from 23 June) June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... A dictionary definition of Indecent not conforming with accepted standards of behaviour or morality. ... Magnus Hirschfeld in 1933. ... The WHK board in 1901: left to right, Georg Plock, Dr Ernst Burchard, Dr Magnus Hirschfeld, and baron von Teschenberg. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Paragraph 175 (known formally as §175 StGB; also known as Section 175 in English) was a provision of the German Criminal Code from 15 May 1871 to 10 March 1994. ... George Ives around 1900 George (Cecil) Ives (born in Germany on October 1, 1867 - died June 4, 1950) was a German-British poet, writer, penal reformer and early gay rights campaigner. ... The Order of Chaeronea was a secret society for the cultivation of a homosexual and pederastic ethos. ...

20th century AD

1900s

This article is about the state. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... NYPD redirects here. ... Gay bathhouses, also known as (gay) saunas or steam baths (and sometimes called, in gay slang in some regions, the baths or the tubs), are places where men can go to have sex with other men. ... François Elluin, Sodomites provoking the wrath of God, from Le pot pourri de Loth (1781). ... First issue of Der Eigene, one of the earliest homosexual periodicals, published by Adolf Brand in (1896) Adolf Brand (1874-1945) was a German writer, anarchist and pioneer activist for the acceptance of male homosexuality. ... Paragraph 175 (known formally as §175 StGB; also known as Section 175 in English) was a provision of the German Criminal Code from 15 May 1871 to 10 March 1994. ... Prince  , born Bernhard Heinrich Karl Martin von Bülow (May 3, 1849 – October 28, 1929) was a German statesman who served as Chancellor of the German Empire from 1900 to 1909. ...

1910s

  • 1910Emma Goldman first begins speaking publicly in favor of homosexual rights.
May 14, 1928 issue of German lesbian periodical Die freundin (Friedrich Radszuweit)
  • 1913 — The word faggot is first used in print in reference to gays in a vocabulary of criminal slang published in Portland, Oregon: "All the fagots [sic] (sissies) will be dressed in drag at the ball tonight".
  • 1917 — The October Revolution in Russia repeals the previous criminal code in its entirety — including Article 995.

Emma Goldman, circa 1910 Emma Goldman (June 27, 1869 – May 14, 1940) was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing, and speeches. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1268x1356, 105 KB) An issue of German lesbian periodical Die freundin, 1928. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1268x1356, 105 KB) An issue of German lesbian periodical Die freundin, 1928. ... Friedrich Radszuweit (born 15 April 1876- 15 March 1932) was a German manager, publisher and author. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Type Commission  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... For other uses, see October Revolution (disambiguation). ...

1920s

  • 1920 — The word Gay is used for the first time in reference to homosexual in the Underground.
  • 1921 — In England an attempt to make lesbianism illegal for the first time in Britain's history fails.
  • 1922 — A new criminal code comes into force in the USSR officially decriminalizing homosexual acts.
  • 1923 — The word fag is first used in print in reference to gays in Nels Anderson's The Hobo: "Fairies or Fags are men or boys who exploit sex for profit."
  • 1924 — The first homosexual rights organization in America is founded in ChicagoThe Society for Human Rights. The movement exists for a few months before being ended by the police. Panama, Paraguay and Peru legalize homosexuality.
  • 1928The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall is published in the United States. This sparks great legal controversy and brings the topic of homosexuality to public conversation.
  • 1929 May 22Katharine Lee Bates, author of America the Beautiful dies.
  • 1929 October 16 — a Reichstag Committee votes to repeal Paragraph 175. The Nazis' rise to power prevents the implementation of the vote.

GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Well of Loneliness is a 1928 lesbian novel by the English author Radclyffe Hall. ... Image:Radclyffe-hall-190x274. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Katharine Lee Bates, (August 12, 1859 – March 28, 1929), is remembered as the author of the words to the anthem America the Beautiful. Bates was born in Falmouth, Massachusetts. ... America the Beautiful is an American patriotic song. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Reichstag (German for Imperial Diet) was the parliament of the Holy Roman Empire, the North German Confederation, and of Germany until 1945. ... Paragraph 175 (known formally as §175 StGB; also known as Section 175 in English) was a provision of the German Criminal Code from 15 May 1871 to 10 March 1994. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ...

1930s

Danish penalty law (Danish: Straffeloven) is the codification of the central legal text and constitutes the foundation of the Kingdom of Denmarks criminal law. ... The National Socialist German Workers Party (German: , or NSDAP, commonly, the Nazi Party), was a political party in Germany between 1920 and 1945. ... Magnus Hirschfeld in 1933. ... The Institut für Sexualwissenschaft was an early private sexology research institute in Germany from 1919 to 1933. ... Federico García Lorca Federico García Lorca (June 5, 1898 – August 19, 1936) was a Spanish poet and dramatist, also remembered as a painter, pianist, and composer. ... The pink triangle, a popular gay pride symbol, was originally used to denote homosexual men as a Nazi concentration camp badge. ... Piles of bodies in a liberated Nazi concentration camp in Germany Prior to and during World War II, Nazi Germany under Hitler maintained concentration camps (Konzentrationslager, abbreviated KZ or KL) throughout the territories it controlled. ...

1940s

  • 1940Iceland decriminalizes homosexuality.
  • 1941Transsexuality was first used in reference to homosexuality and bisexuality.
  • 1942Switzerland decriminalizes homosexuality, with the age of consent set at 20.
  • 1944Sweden decriminalizes homosexuality, with the age of consent set at 20 and Suriname legalizes homosexuality.
  • 1945 — Upon the liberation of Nazi concentration camps by Allied forces, those interned for homosexuality are not freed, but required to serve out the full term of their sentences under Paragraph 175; Portugal decriminalises homosexuality for the second time in its history.
  • 1946 — "COC" (Dutch acronym for "Center for Culture and Recreation"), one of the earliest homophile organizations, is founded in the Netherlands. It is the oldest surviving LGBT organization.
  • 1947Vice Versa, the first North American LGBT publication, is written and self-published by Edith Eyde in Los Angeles.
  • 1948 — "Forbundet af 1948" ("League of 1948"), a homosexual group, is formed in Denmark.
  • 1948 — The communist authorities of Poland make age 15 the age of consent for all sexual acts, homosexual or heterosexual.

Look up Transsexuality in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Piles of bodies in a liberated Nazi concentration camp in Germany Prior to and during World War II, Nazi Germany under Hitler maintained concentration camps (Konzentrationslager, abbreviated KZ or KL) throughout the territories it controlled. ... Paragraph 175 (known formally as §175 StGB; also known as Section 175 in English) was a provision of the German Criminal Code from 15 May 1871 to 10 March 1994. ... COC Nederland is a Dutch organization for LGBT men and women. ... Cover of French homophile literary journal Arcadie, 1975 The word homophile is an alternative to the word homosexual, preferred by some because it emphasizes love (-phile from Greek φιλία) over sex. ... Edith Eyde is an American editor, writer, and song writer. ... The history of Poland from 1945 to 1989 spans the period of Soviet Communist dominance over the Peoples Republic of Poland in the decades following World War II. These years, while featuring many improvements in the standards of living in Poland, were marred by political instability, social unrest, and...

1950s

Image File history File linksMetadata Mattachine_Review_1959. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mattachine_Review_1959. ... The Mattachine Society was the earliest homophile organization in the United States. ... The Mattachine Society was the earliest homophile organization in the United States. ... Swedish Federation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Rights (RFSL, Riksförbundet för sexuellt likaberättigande) is a Swedish organization working for LGBT rights. ... This article is about the state which existed from 1949 to 1990. ... The Mattachine Society was the earliest homophile organization in the United States. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... For the film, see Entrapment (film). ... Solicitation is a crime; it is an inchoate offense that consists of a person inciting, counseling, advising, urging, or commanding another to commit a crime with the specific intent that the person solicited commit the crime. ... ONE, Inc. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954) was an English mathematician, logician, and cryptographer. ... This article is about the chemical compound. ... The Daughters of Bilitis (DOB) was formed in San Francisco, California in 1955 by Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon along with six other women. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... A transsexual (sometimes transexual) person establishes a permanent identity with the opposite gender to their assigned (usually at birth) sex. ... Harry Benjamin (1885-1986) was a German-born sexologist[1]. He is best known for his pioneering work with transsexualism. ... The Report of the Departmental Committee on Homosexual Offences and Prostitution (better known as the Wolfenden report, after Lord Wolfenden, the chairman of the committee) was published in Britain on September 3, 1957 after a succession of well-known men, including Peter Wildeblood, were convicted of homosexual offences. ... Evelyn Hooker (September 2, 1907 - November 18, 1996), United States psychologist most notable for her 1957 paper The Adjustment of the Male Overt Homosexual in which she administered psychological tests to groups of homosexual and heterosexual people and asked experts, based on those tests alone, to select the homosexuals. ... Due to the epidemic of medical errors, readers are cautioned to be aware that the American Psychiatric Association isnt immune to this. ... The Homosexual Law Reform Society was an organisation that campaigned in the United Kingdom for changes in the laws that crimialised homosexual relations between men. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Same-sex relationships Opposition · Persecution Violence Barbara Gittings is a prominent LGBT activist. ... The Daughters of Bilitis (DOB) was formed in San Francisco, California in 1955 by Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon along with six other women. ...

1960s

  • 1961Czechoslovakia and Hungary decriminalize sodomy, the Vatican declare that anyone who is "affected by the perverse inclination" towards homosexuality should not be allowed to take religious vows or be ordained within the Roman Catholic Church.
  • 1962Jose Sarria becomes the first openly gay candidate in the world when he ran for the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Illinois becomes first U.S. state to remove sodomy law from its criminal code.
  • 1963Israel decriminalizes de-facto sodomy and sexual acts between men by judicial decision against the enforcement of the relevant section in the old British-mandate law from 1936 (which in fact was never enforced).
  • 1966 — The National Planning Conference of Homophile Organizations is established (to became NACHO — North American Conference of Homophile Organizations — in 1967); The Compton's Cafeteria riot occurred.
  • 1967Chad decriminalizes homosexuality; The Sexual Offences Act 1967 decriminalises male homosexual behaviour in England and Wales; The book "Homosexual Behavior Among Males" by Wainwright Churchill breaks ground as a scientific study approaching homosexuality as a fact of life and introduces the term "homoerotophobia", a possible precursor to "homophobia"; The Oscar Wilde Bookshop, the world's first homosexual-oriented bookstore, opens in New York City; "Our World" ("Nuestro Mundo"), the first Latino-American homosexual group, is created in Argentina; A raid on the Black Cat Bar in San Francisco, CA promotes homosexual rights activity. The Student Homophile League at Columbia University is the first institutionally recognized gay student group in the United States.
  • 1968 — Paragraph 175 is eased in East Germany decriminalizing homosexual acts over the age of 18; Bulgaria decriminalizes adult homosexual relations.
  • 1969 — The Stonewall riots occur in New York; Paragraph 175 is eased in West Germany; Homosexual behavior legalized in Canada with an Age of Consent of 21 for sodomy, and 14 for non-sodomy; Poland decriminalizes homosexual prostitution; The Canadian Prime Minister is quoted as saying: "The government has no business in the bedrooms of the nation"; An Australian arm of the Daughters of Bilitis forms in Melbourne and is considered Australia's first homosexual rights organisation.

Catholic Church redirects here. ... See also: 1961 in gay rights, other events of 1962, 1963 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events January 1 - Illinoiss new criminal code goes into effect, making it the first U.S. state to strike down sodomy laws, thus decriminalizing homosexuality in the... José Sarria (b. ... San Francisco skyline. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... See also: 1965 in gay rights, other events of 1966, 1967 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence In August of 1966, the Comptons Cafeteria Riot occurred in the Tenderloin district of San Francisco. ... See also: 1966 in gay rights, other events of 1967, 1968 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline. ... The Sexual Offences Act 1967 is an Act of Parliament in the United Kingdom (citation 1967 c. ... This article is about the country. ... The Black Cat Bar was a gay bar in San Francisco, California. ... This article is about the city in California. ... See also: 1967 in gay rights, other events of 1968, 1969 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline. ... See also: 1968 in gay rights, other events of 1969, 1970 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events California Assemblyman Willie Brown starts an annual tradition of introducing legislation to repeal the states sodomy law. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      The Stonewall riots were a series of violent conflicts between New York City police officers and groups of gay and transgender people that began during the early... Age of consent laws Worldwide While the phrase age of consent typically does not appear in legal statutes,[1] when used with reference to criminal law the age of consent is the minimum age at which a person is considered to be capable of legally giving informed consent to any... Whore redirects here. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only country to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/Oceania. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ...

1970s

Main article: 1970s in gay rights

Dr. Frank Kameny becomes the first openly gay candidate for the United States Congress; The University of Michigan establishes the first collegiate LGBT programs office, then known as the "Gay Advocate's Office." See also: 1969 in gay rights, other events of 1970, 1971 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events March 17 - American film Boys in the Band premiers, the first major studio release focusing solely on homosexuality issues. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... See also: 1970 in gay rights, other events of 1971, 1972 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights // Events Dr. Frank Kameny becomes the first openly gay candidate for the United States Congress when he runs in the District of Columbias first election for a... Society Five was a gay rights organisation formed in Melbourne, Australia, in January 1971, as the local branch of the national Campaign Against Moral Persecution network. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... VIC redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... -1... The term Mormon is a colloquial name, most-often used to refer to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ... The Roman Catholic Church is the largest religious denomination of Christianity with over one billion members. ... Age of consent laws Worldwide While the phrase age of consent typically does not appear in legal statutes,[1] when used with reference to criminal law the age of consent is the minimum age at which a person is considered to be capable of legally giving informed consent to any... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... Victimless crime has the following applications: A victimless crime is one in which the victim is the accused. ... Franklin E. Kameny (born May 21, 1925 in New York City) was one of the first American gay rights activists. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ...

  • 1972 — Sweden becomes first country in the world to allow transsexuals to legally change their sex, and provides free hormone therapy; Hawaii legalizes homosexuality; In Australia, the Dunstan Labor government introduces a consenting adults in private type defence in South Australia. This defence was initiated as a bill by Murray Hill, father of former Defence Minister Robert Hill, and later repealed the state's sodomy law in 1975; Norway decriminalizes homosexuality; East Lansing and Ann Arbor, Michigan and San Francisco, California become the first cities in United States to pass a homosexual rights ordinance. Jim Foster, San Francisco and Madeline Davis, Buffalo, NY, first gay and lesbian delegates to the Democratic Convention, Miami, McGovern; give the first speeches advocating a gay rights plank in the Democratic Party Platform. "Stonewall Nation" first gay anthem is written and recorded by Madeline Davis and is produced on 45 rpm record by the Mattachine Society of the Niagara Frontier. Lesbianism 101, first lesbianism course in the U.S. taught at the University of Buffalo by Margaret Small and Madeline Davis.
  • 1973 — The American Psychiatric Association removes homosexuality from its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-II), based largely on the research and advocacy of Evelyn Hooker; Malta legalises homosexuality; In West Germany, the age of consent is reduced for homosexuals to 18 (though it is 14 for heterosexuals).
  • 1974Kathy Kozachenko becomes the first openly homosexual American elected to public office when she wins a seat on the Ann Arbor, Michigan city council; Ohio repeals sodomy laws. Robert Grant founds American Christian Cause to oppose the "gay agenda", the beginning of modern Christian politics in America. In London, the first openly LGBT telephone help line opens, followed one year later by the Brighton Lesbian and Gay Switchboard.
The Gay Pride Flag, symbol of the Gay Rights Movement, was first flown in 1978 in San Francisco. This is the current version, flying over the Castro in June 2005
  • 1974- The Brunswick Four are arrested on January 5th, 1974, in Toronto, Ontario. This incident of Lesbophobia galvanizes the Toronto Lesbian and Gay community.[21]
  • 1975Elaine Noble becomes the second openly homosexual American elected to public office when she wins a seat in the Massachusetts State House; South Australia becomes the first state in Australia to make homosexuality legal between consenting adults in private. Panama is the second country in the world to allow transsexuals who have gone through gender reassignment surgery to get their personal documents reflecting their new sex.
  • 1976Robert Grant founds the Christian Voice to take his anti-homosexual-rights crusade national in United States; The Homosexual Law Reform Coalition and the Gay Teachers Group are started in Australia; The Australian Capital Territory decrimilizes homosexuality between consenting adults in private and equalizes the age of consent; and Denmark equalizes the age of consent.
  • 1977Harvey Milk is elected city-county supervisor in San Francisco, becoming the third out American elected to public office; Dade County, Florida enacts a Human Rights Ordinance; it is repealed the same year after a militant anti-homosexual-rights campaign led by Anita Bryant. Quebec becomes the first jurisdiction larger than a city or county in the world to prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation in the public and private sectors; Croatia, Montenegro, Slovenia and Vojvodina legalised homosexuality.
  • 1978 — San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone are assassinated by former Supervisor Dan White; The Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras for the first time; The rainbow flag is first used as a symbol of homosexual pride; Sweden establishes a uniform age of consent. Samois the earliest known lesbian-feminist BDSM organization is founded in San Francisco; well-known members of the group include Pat Califia and Gayle Rubin; the group is among the very earliest advocates of what came to be known as sex-positive feminism.
  • 1979 — The first national homosexual rights march on Washington, DC is held; Harry Hay issues the first call for a Radical Faerie gathering in Arizona, and Cuba and Spain decriminalize homosexuality.

See also: 1971 in gay rights, other events of 1972, 1973 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline. ... For the song, see South Australia (song). ... A bill is a proposed new law introduced within a legislature that has not been ratified, adopted, or received assent. ... Murray Hill may refer to one of the following places: Murray Hill, Kentucky Murray Hill, Manhattan, a residential neighborhood in New York City Murray Hill, Queens, a different locality in New York City Murray Hill, New Jersey Murray Hill, Pennsylvania Murray Hill, Christmas Island, the highest point on Christmas Island... Senator Robert Hill Robert Murray Hill (born 25 September 1946), Australian politician, was a Liberal member of the Australian Senate from July 1981 to January 2006, representing South Australia. ... A repeal is the removal or reversal of a law. ... A sodomy law is a law that defines certain sexual acts as sex crimes. ... Ann Arbor redirects here. ... See also: 1972 in gay rights, other events of 1973, 1974 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline. ... Due to the epidemic of medical errors, readers are cautioned to be aware that the American Psychiatric Association isnt immune to this. ... The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual published by the American Psychiatric Association The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is a handbook for mental health professionals that lists different categories of mental disorder and the criteria for diagnosing them, according to the publishing organization the American Psychiatric Association. ... Evelyn Hooker (September 2, 1907 - November 18, 1996), United States psychologist most notable for her 1957 paper The Adjustment of the Male Overt Homosexual in which she administered psychological tests to groups of homosexual and heterosexual people and asked experts, based on those tests alone, to select the homosexuals. ... See also: 1973 in gay rights, other events of 1974, 1975 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline Events January January 1 - Ohio repeals state sodomy laws. ... In January, 1974, Kathy Kozachenkos successful bid for a seat on the Ann Arbor, Michigan city council made her the first openly gay American to hold political office. ... Ann Arbor redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Robert Grant may refer to: Robert Grant UConn (Romantic writer) (1779–1838), Romantic period writer Robert Grant (novelist) (1852–1940), 20th century novelist Robert Grant (soldier) (1837–1874), Victoria Cross recipient Robert Grant (Christian Leader) (*1936), radio personality, pastor, founder Christian Voice, American Christian Cause, American Freedom Coalition Robert Grant... The term gay agenda is primarily a talking point (a political tool) used by those who oppose gay rights. ... Image File history File linksMetadata RainbowFlagCastroSF2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata RainbowFlagCastroSF2005. ... Six color rainbow gay pride flag flying over the Castro gay village in San Francisco, June 2005 The six colors of the most common gay pride flag. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The flag at the corner of Market, Castro, and 17th St. ... See also: 1973 in gay rights, other events of 1974, 1975 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline Events January January 1 - Ohio repeals state sodomy laws. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Image:Toronto, Ontario Location. ... Lesbophobia (sometimes Lesbiphobia) is a term which describes prejudice, discrimination, harassment or abuse, either specifically targeting a lesbian person, based on their lesbian identity, or, more generally, targetting lesbians as a class. ... See also: 1974 in gay rights, other events of 1975, 1976 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline. ... Elaine Noble served in the Massachusetts state House of Representatives for two terms starting in January, 1975. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... See also: 1975 in gay rights, other events of 1976, 1977 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline. ... Robert Grant may refer to: Robert Grant UConn (Romantic writer) (1779–1838), Romantic period writer Robert Grant (novelist) (1852–1940), 20th century novelist Robert Grant (soldier) (1837–1874), Victoria Cross recipient Robert Grant (Christian Leader) (*1936), radio personality, pastor, founder Christian Voice, American Christian Cause, American Freedom Coalition Robert Grant... Formerly known as Repent UK, Christian Voice is a Christian fundamentalist organisation based in the United Kingdom which strives, through the basis of prayer and public campaigning, for national repentance. It is led by Stephen Green (a former Chairman of the Conservative Family Campaign), with Lord Ashbourne as its patron. ... Capital Canberra Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator none Chief Minister Jon Stanhope (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2006)  - Product ($m)  $19,167 (6th)  - Product per capita  $57,303/person (1st) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  333,667 (7th)  - Density  137. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... See also: 1976 in gay rights, other events of 1977, 1978 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights // Events Dade County, Florida enacts a Human Rights Ordinance providing that rights can not be abridged on the basis of sexuality. ... For other uses, see Harvey Milk (disambiguation). ... County slogan: Delivering Excellence Every Day Location of county in the state of Florida County Seat Miami, Florida Area  - Total  - Water 6,297 km² (2,431 mi²) 1,257 km² (485 mi²) 19. ... Anita Jane Bryant (born March 25, 1940, in Barnsdall, Oklahoma) is an American singer. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity... Sexual orientation refers to an enduring emotional, romantic, sexual, or affectional attraction toward others,[1] usually conceived of as classifiable according to the sex or gender of the persons whom the individual finds sexually attractive. ... This article is about the country in Europe. ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... See also: 1977 in gay rights, other events of 1978, 1979 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events Anti-Gay Briggs Initiative Prop. ... For other uses, see Harvey Milk (disambiguation). ... Mayor Moscone George Richard Moscone (November 24, 1929 – November 27, 1978) was the mayor of San Francisco, California from January 1976 until his assassination in November 1978. ... San Francisco Examiners front page for Moscone-Milk Assassinations; November 28, 1978 The Moscone-Milk Assassinations took place on Monday, November 27, 1978, when San Francisco Mayor George Moscone and San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk were shot and killed in San Francisco City Hall by former Supervisor Dan White. ... This article is about the San Francisco Supervisor. ... Performers in the 2006 Sydney Mardi Gras The Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras is an annual gay pride parade and festival for the LGBT community in Sydney, Australia. ... Six color rainbow gay pride flag flying over the Castro gay village in San Francisco, June 2005 The six colors of the most common gay pride flag. ... SAMOIS was a lesbian-feminist BDSM organization based in San Francisco and founded in 1978, taking its name from the estate of Anne-Marie, a lesbian dominatrix in Story of O who pierces and brands O. Samois-sur-Seine is a village found south of Paris, near Fontainebleau. ... Collars are a commonly used symbol of BDSM and can be ornamental or functional. ... Patrick Califia (born 1954 near Corpus Christi, Texas) is a writer about womens sexuality and of erotic fiction. ... Gayle Rubin is best known as an activist and influential theorist of sex and gender politics. ... Sex-positive feminism, sometimes known as pro-sex feminism, sex-radical feminism, or sexually liberal feminism, is a movement that was formed in the early 1980s. ... See also: 1978 in gay rights, other events of 1979, 1980 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events May 21 - White Night Riots occur in San Francisco after Dan White uses the Twinkie defense to get a conviction of voluntary manslaughter instead of murder in... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... For the Australian Olympic swimmer, see Henry Hay. ... The Radical Faerie community developed in America among Gay men during the 1970s sexual revolution. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ...

1980s

  • 1980 — The Democratic National Convention becomes the first major political party in America to endorse a homosexual rights platform plank; Scotland decriminalizes homosexuality; David McReynolds becomes the first openly GLBT individual to run for President of the United States, appearing on the Socialist Party U S A ticket; The Human Rights Campaign Fund founded by Steve Endean, an advocate for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender equality.
  • 1981 — The European Court of Human Rights in Dudgeon v. United Kingdom strikes down Northern Ireland's criminalisation of homosexual acts between consenting adults, leading to Northern Ireland decriminalising homosexual sex the following year; Victoria, Australia and Colombia decriminalize homosexuality with a uniform age of consent; The Moral Majority starts its anti-homosexual crusade; Norway becomes the first country in the world to enact a law to prevent discrimination against homosexuals; Hong Kong's first sex-change operation is performed.
  • 1982 — France equalizes the age of consent; The first Gay Games is held in San Francisco, attracting 1,600 participants; Northern Ireland decriminalizes homosexuality; Wisconsin becomes the first US state to ban discrimination against homosexuals; New South Wales becomes the first Australian state to outlaw discrimination on the basis of actual or perceived homosexuality.
  • 1983Massachusetts Representative Gerry Studds reveals he is a homosexual on the floor of the House, becoming the first openly homosexual member of Congress; Guernsey (Including Alderney, Herm and Sark) and Portugal decriminalizes homosexuality, AIDS is described as a "gay plague" by Reverend Jerry Falwell.
  • 1984 — The lesbian and gay association "Ten Percent Club" is formed in Hong Kong; Massachusetts voters reelect representative Gerry Studds, despite his revealing himself as homosexual the year before; New South Wales and the Northern Territory in Australia make homosexual acts legal; Chris Smith, newly elected to the UK parliament declares: "My name is Chris Smith. I'm the Labour MP for Islington South and Finsbury, and I'm gay", making him the first openly out homosexual politician in the UK parliament. The Argentine Homosexual Community (Comunidad Homosexual Argentina, CHA) is formed uniting several different and preexisting groups. Berkeley, California becomes the first city in the U.S. to adopt a program of domestic partnership health benefits for city employees.
  • 1985 — France prohibits discrimination based on lifestyle (moeurs) in employment and services; The first memorial to gay Holocaust victims is dedicated; Belgium equalizes the age of consent.
  • 1986Homosexual Law Reform Act passed in New Zealand, legalizing sex between males over 16; June in Bowers v. Hardwick case, U.S. Supreme Court upholds Georgia law forbidding oral or anal sex, ruling that the constitutional right to privacy does not extend to homosexual relations, but it did not state whether the law could be enforced against heterosexuals.
  • 1987ACT UP stages its first major demonstration, seventeen protesters are arrested; U.S. Congressman Barney Frank comes out; Homomonument, a memorial to persecuted homosexual, opens in Amsterdam.
  • 1988 — Sweden is the first country to pass laws protecting homosexual regarding social services, taxes, and inheritances. Section 28 passes in England and Wales; Scotland enacts almost identical legislation; Canadian MP Svend Robinson comes out; Canada lowers the age of consent for sodomy to 18; Belize and Israel decriminalize (de jure) sodomy and sexual acts between men (the relevant section in the old British-mandate law from 1936 was never enforced in Israel).
  • 1989Western Australia de-crimilizes male homosexuality (but the age of consent is set at 21); Liechtenstein legalizes homosexuality; Denmark is the first country in the world to enact registered partnership laws (like a civil union) for same-sex couples, with most of the same rights as marriage (excluding the right to adoption and the right to marriage in a church).

See also: 1979 in gay rights, other events of 1980, 1981 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... This article is about the country. ... David McReynolds David McReynolds (born October 25, 1929) is an American socialist politician. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Socialist Party of the United States of America (SPUSA) is one of the heirs to the Socialist Party of America of Eugene V. Debs and Norman Thomas. ... HRC logo The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) is one of the largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) equal rights organization in the United States. ... See also: 1980 in gay rights, other events of 1981, 1982 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events February February 5 - In Canada, Toronto police raid city bath houses, arresting 286 people. ... European Court of Human Rights building in Strasbourg The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), often referred to informally as the Strasbourg Court, was created to systematise the hearing of human rights complaints against States Parties to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, adopted by... Dudgeon v. ... VIC redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... See also: 1981 in gay rights, other events of 1982, 1983 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events August August 28 - The first Gay Games, Challenge 82, kicks off in San Francisco, California with 1,600 participants. ... The Federation of Gay Games logo The Gay Games is the worlds largest sporting and cultural event organized by LGBT athletes, artists, musicians, and others. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... NSW redirects here. ... See also: 1982 in gay rights, other events of 1983, 1984 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Gerry Studds Gerry Eastman Studds (May 12, 1937 – October 14, 2006) (pronounced , hard g as in get, rhymes with merry) was an American Democratic Congressman from Massachusetts who served from 1973 until 1997. ... Capital St Anne Status Part of Guernsey, Crown dependency of the UK Official language(s) English Head of Government Sir Norman Browse Population 2,400 Currency Pound sterling (GBP). ... This article is about the island. ... For other uses, see Sark (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jerry Falwell, Sr. ... See also: 1983 in gay rights, other events of 1984, 1985 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline. ... For similar terms, see Northern Territories (disambiguation) Slogan or Nickname: The Territory, The NT, The Top End Motto(s): none Other Australian states and territories Capital Darwin Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator Ted Egan Chief Minister Clare Martin (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2004... Christopher Robert Chris Smith, Baron Smith of Finsbury, PC (born 24 July 1951) is a British Labour Party politician and former Member of Parliament and Cabinet minister. ... See also: 1984 in gay rights, other events of 1985, 1986 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline // Events March March 26 - The United States Supreme Court overturns Oklahoma law that banned homosexuals from teaching in state public schools. ... Once vibrant, Eldorado gay night club in Berlin after being shut down in 1933 Gay men and, to a lesser extent, lesbians, were two of several groups targeted by Nazis during the Holocaust. ... See also: 1985 in gay rights, other events of 1986, 1987 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events In New Zealand the Homosexual Law Reform Act made the age of consent for sexual acts between 2 men the same as that for between a man... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Holding A Georgia law prohibiting sodomy was valid because there was no constitutionally protected right to engage in homosexual sodomy. ... See also: 1986 in gay rights, other events of 1987, 1988 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events Radical AIDS activist group, ACT-UP, organizes in New York City. ... ACT UP, or the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, is a diverse, non-partisan group of individuals . ... Barnett Barney Frank (born March 31, 1940) is an American politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives. ... One point of the Homomonument in Amsterdam, showing part of the inscription The Homomonument is a memorial in the centre of Amsterdam, the capital of the Netherlands. ... For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ... See also: 1987 in gay rights, other events of 1988, 1989 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events In the United Kingdom, the Conservative government passes Section 28, a clause that bans the promotion of homosexuality by local government. ... Sir Ian McKellen with Michael Cashman at the 1988 Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest against Section 28. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Svend Robinson Svend Johannes Robinson (born March 4, 1952) is a Canadian politician and prominent activist for gay rights. ... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... See also: 1988 in gay rights, other events of 1989, 1990 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events Stonewall, the major UK lobbying group for the rights of lesbians and gay men, is founded. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      Recognized in some regions United States (MA) Foreign marriages recognized Civil unions and registered partnerships Recognized in some regions Argentina (C, R) Australia (TAS, VIC 1 July... As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law...

1990s

  • 1990OutRage!, an LGBT rights direct action group, forms in the UK; Czechoslovakia equalizes the age of consent and Jersey legalizes homosexual acts. Justin Fashanu is the first professional footballer to come out in the press.
  • 1991Bahamas, Hong Kong, Ukraine and Queensland in Australia decriminalize sodomy; The red ribbon is first used as a symbol of the campaign against HIV/AIDS.
  • 1992 — The World Health Organization removes homosexuality from its ICD-10; Australia allows homosexuals to serve in the military for the first time; Isle of Man, Estonia and Latvia legalize homosexuality; Iceland, Luxembourg and Switzerland all equalize the age of consent; Nicaragua recriminalizes homosexuality (then de-crimilizes homosexuality again in March 2008).
  • 1993Brandon Teena is raped and murdered; The third homosexual rights march on Washington, DC is held; Sodomy laws are repealed in Norfolk Island and the Republic of Ireland; Gibraltar and Russia decriminalizes consensual male sodomy (with the exception of the Chechen Republic); Lithuania legalizes homosexuality; Norway enacts registered partnership civil union laws that grant same-sex couples the same rights as married couples, except for the right to adopt or marry in a church.
  • 1994Bermuda, Serbia and South Africa legalize homosexuality; The United Kingdom reduces the age of consent for homosexual men to 18; The AMA denounces supposed cures for homosexuality; Canada grants refugee status to homosexuals fearing for their well-being in their native country; Paragraph 175 is repealed in Germany; Israel’s supreme court defines homosexual couple’s rights as the same as any common-law-couple’s rights.
  • 1995 — Sweden legalizes registered partnerships; The Supreme Court of Canada rules that sexual orientation is a prohibited reason for discrimination under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms; Albania and Moldova decriminalize homosexuality; The Human Rights Campaign drops the word fund from their title and broadens their mission to promote "an America where gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people are ensured equality and embraced as full members of the American family at home, at work and in every community."
  • 1996 — The age of consent is equalised in Burkina Faso; Iceland legalizes registered partnerships; Hungary recognizes same-sex partners in unregistered domestic partnerships; Romania decriminalizes homosexuality that is not scandalous; Macedonia decriminalizes homosexuality.
  • 1997South Africa becomes the first country to prohibit explicitly discrimination based on sexual orientation in its constitution and comes into force; The UK extends immigration rights to same-sex couples akin to marriage; Fiji becomes the second country to protect explicitly against discrimination based on sexual orientation in its constitution; Laws prohibiting private homosexual acts are finally repealed in Tasmania, Australia, the last Australian state to do so, as well as in Ecuador; Russia equalizes the age of consent.
  • 1998Matthew Shepard is murdered; The Employment Equality Act is introduced in Ireland, covering wrongful dismissal based on the grounds of sexual orientation; Sexual orientation is read into the IRPA, Alberta's human rights act, through Vriend v. Alberta; Ecuador is the third country in the world to explicitly prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation; Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chile, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan legalize homosexuality; Croatia and Latvia equalize the age of consent. Cyprus decriminalizes homosexuality;
  • 1999California adopts a domestic partnership law; France enacts civil union laws; The "Queer Youth Alliance" is founded in the UK; Israel’s supreme court recognizes a lesbian partner as another legal mother of her partner’s biological son; Finland equalizes the age of consent.

See also: 1989 in gay rights, other events of 1990, 1991 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events German reunification The German reunification treaty has an article to stop West Germanys higher age of consent for sex between men taking effect in the former... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence OutRage! is a direct action campaigning group in the United Kingdom which was formed to fight for the rights of lesbian, gay and bisexual people. ... Justinus Soni Fashanu (February 19, 1961 – May 2, 1998) was an English footballer. ... See also: 1990 in gay rights, other events of 1991, 1992 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events May May 19 - Hong Kongs Executive Council votes to decriminalize homosexuality. ... [--168. ... The red ribbon, a ribbon colored red, has several different meanings in different contexts. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... See also: 1991 in gay rights, other events of 1992, 1993 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline // Events The World Health Organisation declassifies homosexuality as a mental illness in the latest edition of its list of diseases and health problems, the ICD-10. ... WHO redirects here. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... See also: 1992 in gay rights, other events of 1993, 1994 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events Sodomy laws in the Republic of Ireland were repealed. ... Brandon Teena[1] (December 12, 1972 - December 31, 1993), born Teena Renae Brandon in Lincoln, Nebraska, and known simply as Brandon, was a physiological female living as a transsexual man[2] who was raped and eventually murdered[3] in one of the most infamous American hate crimes of the 1990s. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Capital Grozny Area - total - % water 79th - 15,500 km² - negligible Population - Total - Density 49th _ est. ... As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law... See also: 1993 in gay rights, other events of 1994, 1995 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights // Events In Germany, a new Article 182 introduced a common age of consent of 14. ... Anthem:  Serbia() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn 1 Albanian 2 Demonym Serbian Government Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica    -  First state 7th century   -  Serbian Kingdom3 1217   -  Serbian Empire 1345   -  Independence lost... The American Medical Association (AMA) is the largest association of medical doctors in the United States. ... See also: 1994 in gay rights, other events of 1995, 1996 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights // Events May May 25 - Egan v. ... The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ... The Charter, signed by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1981. ... HRC logo The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) is one of the largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) equal rights organization in the United States. ... See also: 1995 in gay rights, other events of 1996, 1997 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights // Events May May 8 - South Africa becomes the first nation to explicitly prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation in its constitution. ... See also: 1996 in gay rights, other events of 1997, 1998 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline // Events Sodomy is decriminalized in Peoples Republic of China. ... Slogan or Nickname: Island of Inspiration; The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product... See also: 1997 in gay rights, other events of 1998, 1999 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events August August 1 - The fifth Gay Games, Friendship 98, kicks off in Amsterdam with 14,700 participants. ... Matthew Wayne Shepard (December 1, 1976 – October 12, 1998) was an American student at the University of Wyoming who was fatally attacked near Laramie, on the night of October 6 – October 7, 1998 in what was widely reported by international news media as a savage beating because of his homosexuality. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... Vriend v. ... See also: 1998 in gay rights, other events of 1999, 2000 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events June June 11 - American president Bill Clinton proclaims June as Gay and Lesbian Pride Month in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... International recognition Civil unions and Domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      A domestic partnership is a legal or personal relationship between individuals who live... The Queer Youth Alliance (Q.Y.A.) is a national non-profit making organisation that is run by and for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered (LGBT) Young People and is based in the United Kingdom. ...

21st century AD

2000s

(See individual year page for more info)

  • 2000 — The United Kingdom's ban on homosexuals serving in the armed forces is abolished and Clause 2A is repealed in Scotland; the former USSR states of Azerbaijan and Georgia legalize homosexual acts; Gabon decriminalize homosexuality; the age of consent is equalised in the United Kingdom, Belarus, and Israel; The Bundestag officially apologizes to gays and lesbians persecuted under the Nazi regime, and for "harm done to homosexual citizens up to 1969"; Vermont becomes the first U.S. state to legalize civil unions; Israel recognizes same-sex relations for immigration purposes for a foreign partner of an Israeli resident.
  • 2001 — The state of Arizona repeals its sodomy law; Albania and Liechtenstein equalize the age of consent; Same-sex marriage is legalized in the Netherlands, making it the first country to do so; Germany enacts registered partnership legislation; Protesters disrupt the first Pride march in Belgrade; and the rest of the United Kingdom's territories legalize homosexuality.
  • 2002Austria, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Estonia, Hungary, Moldova, Romania and Western Australia all equalize their age of consent; Romania repeals article 200, which was used to punish "scandalous sodomy"; Sweden legalizes adoption for same-sex couples; Zurich extends marriage-like rights to same-sex couples; openly gay Dutch politician Pim Fortuyn is assassinated by Volkert van der Graaf; homosexuality is decriminalized in China; a civil unions law is passed in Buenos Aires, making it the first Latin-American city to legalize same-sex unions.
  • 2003Belize recriminalizes homosexuality; Section 28 is repealed in England and Wales; the U.S. Supreme Court strikes down remaining state sodomy laws; Armenia decriminalizes male homosexual sodomy; Lithuania, the Northern Territory and New South Wales all equalize their age of consent; same-sex marriage in Belgium is legalized; Germany's Supreme Court upholds the country's civil union.
  • 2004 — In Tasmania, the Relationships Act 2003 providing a registered partnership becomes affective from 1 January, 2004; Cape Verde and Marshall Islands legalize homosexuality, both from 1 February 2004; Portugal is the fourth country in the world to protect people from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in their Constitution; Massachusetts legalizes same-sex marriage while eleven other U.S. states ban the practice through public referendums; Domestic partnerships are legalized in New Jersey; Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil accepts civil unions; Australia bans same-sex marriage on the 13 August, 2004; New Zealand provides passes a civil union bill; Luxembourg introduces civil partnerships; Same-sex marriages in Belgium get adoption rights and are equal to marriage.
  • 2005New Zealand is the first nation in the world to outlaw hate crime and employment discrimination on the basis of gender identity; Puerto Rico repeals anti-sodomy law; Hong Kong age of consent equalized through legal ruling;[22] Uganda and Latvia amend their constitutions to prohibit same-sex marriage; Same-sex marriage is legalized in Spain and Canada (together with adoption); Andorra recognizes same-sex partners in "Stable Unions"; Two gay male teenagers, Mahmoud Asgari and Ayaz Marhoni, are executed in Iran; Switzerland votes in favor of extending rights for registered same-sex couples; South Africa's Supreme Court rules that it is unconstitutional to ban gay marriages, legalizing same-sex marriage effective 1 December 2006; André Boisclair is chosen leader of the Parti Québécois, becoming the first openly homosexual man elected as the leader of a major political party in North America. UK introduces civil partnerships with rights all but equal to marriage; Maine adds sexual orientation and gender identity to existing anti-discrimination laws.
  • 2006Serbia and Isle of Man equalized the age of consent;[23] Illinois outlaws sexual orientation discrimination; Washington adds sexual orientation to its existing anti-discrimination laws; Missouri legalizes homosexuality between consenting adults;[24] The first homosexual pride march in Moscow ends with violence; The first regional Eastern European Pride is held in Zagreb, Croatia; The United States Senate fails to pass the Federal Marriage Amendment; The International Conference on LGBT Human Rights is held in Montreal; The Czech Republic and Slovenia introduce civil partnerships; Mexico City introduces civil unions; South Africa legalizes same-sex marriage; The Israeli High Court orders Israeli law to recognize same-sex marriages performed abroad; Fiji legalizes consensual homosexuality[25] and Germany includes gender identity in anti-discrimination law;[26] South Australia the only state left in Australia to enact most laws that includes all couples;[27] Another section 28 "successfully repealed" in Isle of Man[28] and the Faroe Islands make sexual orientation discrimination illegal by a narrow vote of 17:15.[29] Human Rights Campaign, 2006 Summary of legislative issues in each state of USA
A diagram showing the varying regulation by country of same-sex unions throughout Europe.      Same sex marriage recognised      Civil unions recognised      Unregistered cohabitation recognised      Issue under political consideration      Unrecognised or unknown      Same sex marriage banned
  • 2007Registered partnership takes effect in Switzerland; age of consent equalized in Jersey;[30][31] In New Jersey and Coahuila, Mexico civil unions law come into effect; The first ever gay pride parade in a Muslim country was held in Istanbul, Turkey See video; domestic partnership law comes into effect in South Australia on 1 June 2007 and in Washington state on 22 July 2007; Equality Act 2006 comes into force for the UK (with provisions protecting people from discrimination in goods and services on the grounds of sexual orientation and establishing the Commission for Equality and Human Rights). Oregon, Colorado, Ohio, and Iowa ban discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity in the private sector. On August 9, 2007, the Logo cable channel hosts the first presidential forum in the United States focusing specifically on LGBT issues. Six Democratic Party candidates participate in the event. GOP candidates were asked to attend but turned it down. Nepal make homosexuality legal, by Supreme Court orders; [2] [3] Portugal and South Africa equal age of consent come into force from a new Penal Code.
  • 2008 — The "civil union" law goes into effect in New Hampshire and Uruguay since 1 January, 2008 and also a "domestic partnership" legislation in Oregon came into effect from 4 February — Lots of couples sign up for these; Nicaragua re-legalizes homosexuality (with an equal age of consent), under a new Penal Code from 1 March, 2008; Kosovo declares to be an international country with a new constitution that includes "sexual orientation" the first of its kind in Eastern Europe, and the Registered partnership legislation called the Relationships Act 2008 will come into effect from 1 December, 2008 in Victoria (Australia) and the Australian Capital Territory will provide a Civil Partnership called the Civil Partnership Act 2008 will commence from 15 November, 2008. On May 15, 2008, the California State Supreme Court ruled it was unconstitutional to deny same-sex couples equal marriage rights, thus making California the second state to legalize same-sex marriage. On June 3 the first two same sex civil marriages (two men and two women)take place in Greece on the island of Telos. The supreme court prosecutor and the minister of Justice claim the marriages are null and void.
  • 2009 — SSMs law in Norway and Hungary's "Registered partnership" law goes into effect on 1 January 2009. "Unregistered co-habitation" has been provided since 1996 [4] and Northern Cyprus legalizes male homosexuality by a new Criminal Code, effective from 1 January 2009;[citation needed]; Austria and Ireland indroduce "civil partnerships" which both comes into effect from 1 December, 2009.

See also: 1999 in gay rights, other events of 2000, 2001 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights // Events January 12 January - the ban on lesbians and gay men serving in the United Kingdom armed forces is lifted. ... Sir Ian McKellen with Michael Cashman at the 1988 Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest against Section 28. ... Type Lower house President of the Bundestag Dr. Norbert Lammert, CDU since October 18, 2005 Members 614 Political groups Christian Democratic Union/Christian Social Union of Bavaria Bloc (226) Social Democratic Party of Germany (222) Free Democratic Party (61) The Left. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... See also: 2000 in gay rights, other events of 2001, 2002 in gay rights and the list of years in gay rights Events April April 1 Same-sex marriage in the Netherlands: Dutch legislation to allow same-sex couples to marry becomes active. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence // Sweden legalizes adoption for same-sex couples, making Swedens registered partnership nearly identical to marriage, with the exception of right to marriage in a church. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person... Location within Switzerland   Zürich[?] (German pronunciation IPA: ; usually spelled Zurich in English) is the largest city in Switzerland (population: 366,145 in 2004; population of urban area: 1,091,732) and capital of the canton of Zürich. ... Wilhelmus Simon Petrus (Pim) Fortuyn (pronounced , (February 19, 1948 – May 6, 2002), was a controversial, openly gay, charismatic[1] populistic right-wing politician in the Netherlands who formed his own party Lijst Pim Fortuyn (List Pim Fortuyn or LPF). ... Volkert van der Graaf (born July 9, 1969) is an animal welfare activist and is the confessed murderer of Dutch politician Pim Fortuyn. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... See also: 2002 in gay rights, other events of 2003, 2004 in gay rights and the Timeline of LGBT history // Events January January 30 Same-sex marriage in Belgium: Belgian legislation to allow same-sex couples to marry becomes active. ... Sir Ian McKellen with Michael Cashman at the 1988 Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest against Section 28. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... See also: 2003 in gay rights, other events of 2004, 2005 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline Events January January 1 Same-sex marriage in Australia: Tasmanian laws come into effect recognising civil unions between same-sex couples. ... Slogan or Nickname: Island of Inspiration; The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Flag of Rio Grande do Sul See other Brazilian States Capital Porto Alegre Largest City Porto Alegre Area 282,062 km² Population   - Total   - Density 10. ... Civil unions in New Zealand were ratified on 9 December 2004 when Parliament passed the Civil Union Bill to establish the institution of civil union for same-sex and opposite-sex couples. ... A civil union is one of several terms for a civil status similar to marriage, typically created for the purposes of allowing homosexual couples access to the benefits enjoyed by married heterosexuals (see also same-sex marriage); it can also be used by couples of differing sexes who do not... On January 30, 2003, Belgium became the second country in the world to legally recognize same-sex marriage. ... See also: 2004 in gay rights, other events of 2005, 2006 in gay rights and the Gay rights timeline // Events Uganda: Uganda[1] amended its constitution to prohibit same-sex marriage. ... A Jewish cemetery in France after being defaced by Neo-Nazis. ... A transwoman with XY written on her hand, at a protest in Paris, October 1, 2005. ... Mahmoud Asgari (Persian: ) and Ayaz Marhoni (Persian: ) were Iranian teenagers from the province of Khuzestan who were publicly hanged in Edalat (Justice) Square in Mashhad, northeast Iran, on July 19, 2005. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... André Boisclair (born April 14, 1966 in Montreal, Quebec) is a politician in Quebec, Canada. ... The Parti Québécois [PQ] (translation: Quebecker Party) is a separatist political party that advocates national sovereignty for the Canadian province of Quebec and secession from Canada, as well as social democratic policies and has traditionally had support from the labour movement. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Same-sex relationships Opposition · Persecution Violence // January 1 Serbia equalized age of consent law to 14 for all. ... Anthem:  Serbia() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn 1 Albanian 2 Demonym Serbian Government Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica    -  First state 7th century   -  Serbian Kingdom3 1217   -  Serbian Empire 1345   -  Independence lost... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... A gay couple during the 2006 gay pride gathering in Zagreb, Croatia. ... Location of Zagreb within Croatia Coordinates: , Country RC diocese 1094 Free royal city 1242 Unified 1850 Government  - Mayor Milan Bandić Area [1]  - Total 641. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The United States Federal Marriage Amendment (FMA) is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution which would define marriage in the United States as a union of one man and one woman. ... The 1st World Outgames took place in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from July 26, 2006 to August 5, 2006. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... The Supreme Court (Hebrew: בית המשפט העליון, Beit Hamishpat Haelyon ) is at the head of the court system in the State of Israel. ... For the song, see South Australia (song). ... Image File history File links Same_sex_marriage_map_Europe_detailed. ... Image File history File links Same_sex_marriage_map_Europe_detailed. ... // January 1 Civil unions came into effect in Switzerland. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      Recognized in some regions United States (MA) Foreign marriages recognized Civil unions and registered partnerships Recognized in some regions Argentina (C, R) Australia (TAS, VIC 1 July... Age of consent laws Worldwide While the phrase age of consent typically does not appear in legal statutes,[1] when used with reference to criminal law the age of consent is the minimum age at which a person is considered to be capable of legally giving informed consent to any... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Coahuila (formal name: Coahuila de Zaragoza) is one of Mexicos 31 component states. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Location of Istanbul on the Bosphorus Strait, Turkey Coordinates: , Country Turkey Region Province Istanbul Founded 667 BC as Byzantium Roman/Byzantine period AD 330 as Constantinople Ottoman period 1453 as Constantinople (internationally) and various other names in local languages Turkish Republic period 1923 as Constantinople, officially renamed as Istanbul in... International recognition Civil unions and Domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      A domestic partnership is a legal or personal relationship between individuals who live... 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LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      Recognized in some regions United States (MA) Foreign marriages recognized Civil unions and registered partnerships Recognized in some regions Argentina (C, R) Australia (TAS, VIC 1 July... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... VIC redirects here. ... Capital Canberra Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator none Chief Minister Jon Stanhope (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2006)  - Product ($m)  $19,167 (6th)  - Product per capita  $57,303/person (1st) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  333,667 (7th)  - Density  137. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anthem: Ä°stiklâl Marşı(Turkish) Independence March Capital Nicosia (LefkoÅŸa in Turkish) Official languages Turkish Government Representative democratic republic1  -  President Mehmet Ali Talat  -  Prime Minister Ferdi Sabit Soyer Independence from Cyprus   -  Proclaimed November 15, 1983   -  Recognition By Turkey only  Area  -  Total 3,355 km² (167th ranked together with Cyprus... A Criminal Code is a compilation of government laws that outline a nations criminal offenses, and the maximum and minimum punishments that courts can impose upon offenders when such crimes are committed. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This is the main article for the Category:Sexual orientation and medicine and Category:LGBT physicians. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Explaining the early human mind (html). Retrieved on 2008-01-28.
  2. ^ Reeder, Greg (October 2000). "Same-sex desire, conjugal constructs, and the tomb of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep". World Archaeology 32 (2): 193–208. 
  3. ^ Devereaux, George, "Greek Pseudo-homosexuality and the Greek Miracle", Symbolae Osloenses, 13 (1967), pp.70–92
  4. ^ (Percy III, 1996)
  5. ^ Suetonius, Julius 2-3; Plutarch, Caesar 2-3; Cassius Dio, Roman History 43.20
  6. ^ Martial attests to same-sex marriages between men during the early Roman Empire, q.v. Martial Epigrams 1.24, 12.42
  7. ^ Ancient History Sourcebook: Suetonius: De Vita Caesarum-Nero, c. 110 C.E Although this action was criticized by contemporary historians, these same historians do not criticize emperors such as Hadrian and Trajan who also had male lovers. The real reason behind the criticism of Nero and Elagabalus is that both of these emperors ignored the Senators (who wrote the surviving historical accounts) and appointed low class men (such as freedmen) to important positions of power, thereby incurring the hatred of the Senatorial class.
  8. ^ Dio Cassius, Epitome of Book 68.6.4; 68.21.2–6.21.3
  9. ^ Augustan History, Life of Elagabalus 10
  10. ^ Theodosian Code 9.8.3: "When a man marries and is about to offer himself to men in womanly fashion {quum vir nubit in feminam viris porrecturam), what does he wish, when sex has lost all its significance; when the crime is one which it is not profitable to know; when Venus is changed to another form; when love is sought and not found? We order the statutes to arise, the laws to be armed with an avenging sword, that those infamous persons who are now, or who hereafter may be, guilty may be subjected to exquisite punishment.
  11. ^ (Theodosian Code 9.7.6): All persons who have the shameful custom of condemning a man's body, acting the part of a woman's to the sufferance of alien sex (for they appear not to be different from women), shall expiate a crime of this kind in avenging flames in the sight of the people.
  12. ^ Evagrius Ecclesiastical History 3.39
  13. ^ Justinian Novels 77, 144
  14. ^ Visigothic Code 3.5.5, 3.5.6; Online at: http://libro.uca.edu/vcode/vg3-5.htm; "The doctrine of the orthodox faith requires us to place our censure upon vicious practices, and to restrain those who are addicted to carnal offences. For we counsel well for the benefit of our people and our country, when we take measures to utterly extirpate the crimes of wicked men, and put an end to the evil deeds of vice. For this reason we shall attempt to abolish the horrible crime of sodomy, which is as contrary to Divine precept as it is to chastity. And although the authority of the Holy Scriptures, and the censure of earthly laws, alike, prohibit offences of this kind, it is nevertheless necessary to condemn them by a new decree; lest if timely correction be deferred, still greater vices may arise. Therefore, we establish by this law, that if any man whosoever, of any age, or race, whether he belongs to the clergy, or to the laity, should be convicted, by competent evidence, of the commission of the crime of sodomy, he shall, by order of the king, or of any judge, not only suffer emasculation, but also the penalty prescribed by ecclesiastical decree for such offences, and promulgated in the third year of our reign."
  15. ^ Crompton, Louis. Homosexuality and Civilization. Cambridge & London: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2003
  16. ^ Godbeer, Richard (2002). Sexual revolution in early America. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-8018-6800-9.  p.123
  17. ^ Borris, Kenneth (2004). Same-sex desire in the English Renaissance: a sourcebook of texts, 1470–1650. New York: Routledge. ISBN 0-8153-3626-8.  p.113
  18. ^ (Chauncey, 1995)
  19. ^ Getting Rid of Sodomy Laws: History and Strategy that Led to the Lawrence Decision
  20. ^ Sodomy Laws, Idaho
  21. ^ Warner, Tom. ‘’Never Going Back: A History of Queer Activism in Canada’’, 2002 University of Toronto Press, ISBN 0802084605 p41
  22. ^ Hong Kong Gay Sex Law Dead
  23. ^ Gay sex at 16 legal, Man
  24. ^ of anti gay law in Missouri
  25. ^ Fiji legalizes consensual homosexuality
  26. ^ World Legal Wrap Up — November, 2006
  27. ^ South Australia gays get new rights
  28. ^ Timeline of lesbian and gay history
  29. ^ Island Chain Votes To Ban Discrimination Against Gays
  30. ^ BBC: State votes for consent age drop
  31. ^ Sexual Offences (Jersey) Law 2007

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cassius Dio Cocceianus (ca. ... Marcus Valerius Martialis, known in English as Martial, was a Latin poet from Hispania (the Iberian Peninsula) best known for his twelve books of Epigrams, published in Rome between AD 86 and 103, during the reigns of the emperors Domitian, Nerva and Trajan. ... Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 –– July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was emperor of Rome from 117 A.D. to 138 A.D., as well as a Stoic and Epicurean philosopher. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... Elagabalus Elagabalus (c. ...

References

  • Chauncey, George (1995), Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890–1940 (Reprint ed.), Basic Books, ISBN 0465026214 
  • Percy III, William Armstrong (1996), Pederasty and pedagogy in archaic Greece, University of Illinois Press, ISBN 0252022092 

Basic Books is a book publisher founded in 1952. ... The University of Illinois Press is a major American university press. ...

External links

LGBT history refers to the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender cultures around the world, dating back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality within ancient civilizations. ... Two athletes about to have sex, while a man watches; Apulian red-figure vase by the Dinos painter, 420BCE In classical antiquity, writers such as Herodotus,[1] Plato,[2] Xenophon,[3] Athenaeus[4] and many others explored aspects of same-sex love in ancient Greece. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... From the tomb of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep. ... Enlarge Achilles bandages the arm of his friend Patroclus. ... Prior to the Third Reich, Berlin was considered a liberal city, with many gay bars, nightclubs and cabarets. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      The Stonewall riots were a series of violent conflicts between New York City police officers and groups of gay and transgender people that began during the early... // Relatively little is known about pre-colonial Singapore, let alone the history of homosexuality during this period. ... // Since its humble beginnings as a hobbyist website hosted on Geocities in March 1999, the year 2000 saw the tremendous growth of www. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Same-sex relationships Opposition · Persecution Violence Lesbian American history is the history of women who are attracted to other women, or Lesbians, in the United States. ... International recognition Civil unions and Domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      A timeline of significant events regarding same-sex marriage and legal recognition of... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      For Biblical... // It is speculated that many men in ancient Greece sought homosexual relationships because of the low intellectual status of women, as in classical Athens. ... Although state-recognized same-sex marriage is a relatively new phenomenon in Western society, there is a long history of same-sex unions around the world. ...

 
 

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