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Encyclopedia > Timeline of French history

This is a timeline of French history. To read about the background to these events, see History of France. See also the list of Frankish kings, French monarchs, and presidents of the French Republic and the list of years in France. The History of France has been divided into a series of separate historical articles navigable through the list to the right. ... The Franks were originally lead by dukes (military leaders) and reguli (petty kings). ... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the political and administrative structures of the French government. ... This is a list of years in France. ...


This timeline is incomplete; some important events may be missing. Please help add to it.

3rd - 4th - 5th - 6th - 7th - 8th - 9th - 10th - 11th - 12th - 13th - 14th - 15th - 16th - 17th - 18th - 19th - 20th - 21st

3rd century

Year Date Event
297 The Salian Franks were allowed to settle on the territory of the Batavians.

Gauls Asterix Events Narseh of Persia and Diocletian conclude a peace treaty between Persia and Rome. ... The Salian Franks were a subgroup of the Franks. ... The Batavii (or Batavi, Batavians) were a Germanic, or possibly Celtic tribe reported by Julius Caesar and Tacitus to have lived around the Rhine delta, in the area which is currently the Netherlands. ...


4th century

Year Date Event

5th century

Year Date Event
426 Clodio, the earliest recorded king of the Salian Franks, began his reign.
448 Clodio died. He was succeeded by Merovech.
457 Merovech died. His son Childeric I succeeded him as king.
481 Childeric died. His son Clovis I succeeded him.
486 Battle of Soissons (486): A Frankish army under Clovis I defeated Syagrius and conquered the Domain of Soissons.

Events Saint Augustine of Hippo publishes the City of God. ... Clodio1 (c. ... The Salian Franks were a subgroup of the Franks. ... Events Eutyches is accused of heresy at a council held in Constantinople. ... Clodio1 (c. ... Merowig (fl. ... Events February 7 - Leo I becomes East Roman emperor. ... Merowig (fl. ... Childeric I (c. ... Events Clovis I becomes king of the Franks upon the death of Childeric I (or 482) Baekje, Silla, and Daegaya form an alliance against Goguryeo. ... Childeric I (c. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... For the processor, see Intel 80486. ... The Battle of Soissons in the year 486 was a milestone on the way of the Franks under Clovis I to establish themselves as a major power. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... The captured Syagrius is brought before Alaric II who orders him sent to Clovis I Afranius Syagrius (born 430, died 486 or 487) was the son of Aegidius, the last Roman magister militum per Gallias, who had preserved a rump state around Soissons after the collapse of central rule in... In the Late Classical period, two states in the area of modern-day northwest France were termed the Domain of Soissons. ...

6th century

Year Date Event
507 Battle of Vouillé: Clovis defeated a Visigoth army under Alaric II, and conquered Gallia Aquitania.
511 November 27 Clovis died. His kingdom was divided among his four sons; the territory with its seat at Paris went to Childebert I.
524 June 25 Battle of Vézeronce: The united armies of Clovis' sons inflicted a serious defeat on the Burgundian king Godomar. Chlodomer, the king of Orléans, was killed in battle.
Clothar I, the Old, the king of Neustria, had two of Chlodomer's sons killed and forced the third into hiding.
558 December 13 Childebert died. His brother Chlothar inherited his territory.

Events Battle of Vouillé: Clovis I defeats the Visigoths near Poitiers, ends Visigothic power in Gaul. ... The Battle of Vouillé or Campus Vogladensis was fought in the northern marches of Visigothic territory, at a small place near Poitiers, (Gaul) in the spring 507. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... Migrations The Visigoths (Western Goths) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... Alaric II, also known as Alarik, Alarich, and Alarico in Spanish or Alaricus in Latin (d. ... Gallia Aquitania, a province of The Roman Empire Gallia Aquitania, in ancient geography, was a province of the Roman Empire, located in present-day southwest France and bordered by the provinces of Gallia Lugdunensis, Gallia Narbonensis, and Hispania Tarraconensis. ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Childebert I (Rheims, c. ... Events Childebert I annexes Orléans and Chartres after the death of Chlodomer. ... The Battle of Vézeronce took place on June 25, 524 close to Vézeronce (then Veseruntia) in Isère. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... Coat of arms of the second Duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: ; German: ) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks; the former gave their... Godomar, son of king Gundobad, was king of Burgundy. ... Chlodomer, also spelled Clodomir or Clodomer, born around 495, was the second of the four sons of Clovis I, King of the Franks. ... Coat of arms of the second Duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: ; German: ) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks; the former gave their... Chlothar I (or Chloderic, Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 497 – 561), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis. ... Neustria & Austrasia The territory of Neustria originated in A.D. 511, made up of the regions from Aquitaine to the English Channel, approximating most of the north of present-day France, with Paris and Soissons as its main cities. ... Chlodomer, also spelled Clodomir or Clodomer, born around 495, was the second of the four sons of Clovis I, King of the Franks. ... Events May 7 - In Constantinople, the dome of the Hagia Sophia collapses. ... Childebert I (Rheims, c. ... Chlothar I (or Chloderic, Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 497 – 561), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis. ...

7th century

Year Date Event
613 Sigebert II, the king of Burgundy and Austrasia, was executed by Chlothar II, who inherited his kingdoms.
623 Clothar gave Austrasia its independence under the kingship of his son, Dagobert I.
629 Clothar died. Under an agreement forged after his death, Dagobert succeeded him as king of Neustria but ceded what would become Aquitaine to his brother, Charibert II.
632 April 8 Charibert died, possibly in an assassination ordered by his brother Dagobert. His infant son Chilperic succeeded him as king of Aquitaine.
Chilperic was also killed. Dagobert reacquired Aquitaine.

Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Sigebert II can refer to: Sigebert II of the East Saxons, a seventh century ruler of Essex Sigebert II of Austrasia and Burgundy, an early seventh century Frankish ruler This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Coat of arms of the second Duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: ; German: ) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks; the former gave their... Austrasia & Neustria Austrasia formed the north-eastern portion of the Kingdom of the Merovingian Franks, comprising parts of the territory of present-day eastern France, western Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands. ... Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 584 – 629), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria, and, from 613 to 629, King of all the Franks, was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in... Events Clotaire II, king of the Franks, makes his son Dagobert I king of Austrasia Samo, reputedly a Frankish merchant, governs in Moravia, Slovakia and Lower Austria. ... Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 584 – 629), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria, and, from 613 to 629, King of all the Franks, was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in... Austrasia & Neustria Austrasia formed the north-eastern portion of the Kingdom of the Merovingian Franks, comprising parts of the territory of present-day eastern France, western Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands. ... Dagobert I (c. ... Events Jerusalem reconquered by Byzantine Empire from the Persian Empire (September). ... Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 584 – 629), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria, and, from 613 to 629, King of all the Franks, was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in... Dagobert I (c. ... Neustria & Austrasia The territory of Neustria originated in A.D. 511, made up of the regions from Aquitaine to the English Channel, approximating most of the north of present-day France, with Paris and Soissons as its main cities. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Dordogne Gironde Landes Lot-et-Garonne Pyrénées-Atlantiques Arrondissements 18 Cantons 235 Communes 2,296 Statistics Land area1 41,308 km² Population (Ranked 6th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Charibert II (after 618 – April 8, 632), a son of Clotaire II and his second wife Sichilde, of the Merovingian dynasty, was briefly king in Aquitaine, 629-631/2, with his capital at Toulouse. ... Events Abu Bakr becomes first caliph or Successor of the Prophet, leader of Islam Abu Bakr defeats Mosailima in the Battle of Akraba. ... Charibert II (after 618 – April 8, 632), a son of Clotaire II and his second wife Sichilde, of the Merovingian dynasty, was briefly king in Aquitaine, 629-631/2, with his capital at Toulouse. ... Dagobert I (c. ... Chilperic (sometimes Childeric in the chronicles of the time) was the infant son of Charibert II, and briefly king of Aquitaine in 632. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Dordogne Gironde Landes Lot-et-Garonne Pyrénées-Atlantiques Arrondissements 18 Cantons 235 Communes 2,296 Statistics Land area1 41,308 km² Population (Ranked 6th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Chilperic (sometimes Childeric in the chronicles of the time) was the infant son of Charibert II, and briefly king of Aquitaine in 632. ... Dagobert I (c. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Dordogne Gironde Landes Lot-et-Garonne Pyrénées-Atlantiques Arrondissements 18 Cantons 235 Communes 2,296 Statistics Land area1 41,308 km² Population (Ranked 6th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ...

8th century

Year Date Event
711 April 23 Childebert died. He was succeeded by his son Dagobert III.
715 Dagobert died. He was succeeded by Chilperic II, the youngest son of Childeric II.
721 February 13 Chilperic died. He was succeeded by Theuderic IV, Dagobert III's son.
732 October 10 Battle of Tours: Frankish and Burgundian soldiers under the Mayor of the Palace Charles Martel inflicted a significant defeat on the invading armies of the Umayyad Caliphate.
737 Theuderic died. Charles Martel prevented succession.

See also: phone number 711. ... When King Sigebert III died in 656, Grimoald had Sigeberts son Dagobert II shorn of hair and packed off to an Irish monastery and then proclaimed his own son, Childebert the Adopted, king of Austrasia. ... Dagobert III (c. ... Events August 11 - Germanus is translated from the bishopric of Cyzicus to the Patriarch of Constantinople Umayyad caliph al-Walid I ibn Abd al-Malik succeeded by Sulayman ibn Abd al-Malik End of the reign of Empress Gemmei of Japan, she is succeeded by Empress Gensho. ... Dagobert III (c. ... Chilperic II refers to either: Chilperic II of Neustria and I of Austrasia Chilperic II of the Franks This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Childeric II (c. ... Former Byzantine emperor Anastasius II leads a revolt against emperor Leo III Theuderic IV succeeds Chilperic II Battle of Toulouse - Al-Samh ibn Malik al-Khawlani, the governor Muslim Spain (al-Andalus) is defeated by Duke Odo of Aquitaine preventing an Arab invasion of Gaul. ... Chilperic II refers to either: Chilperic II of Neustria and I of Austrasia Chilperic II of the Franks This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Theuderic IV (or Theuderich, Theoderic, or Theodoric; in French, Thierry) was the Merovingian King of the Franks from 721 until his death in 737. ... Dagobert III (c. ... Events October 10 - Battle of Tours: Near Poitiers, France, leader of the Franks Charles Martel and his men, defeat a large army of Moors, stopping the Muslims from spreading into Western Europe. ... Combatants Carolingian Franks Umayyad Caliphate Commanders Charles Martel ‘Abdul Rahman Al Ghafiqi† Strength Possibly 20,000-30,000 Unknown, but the earliest Muslim sources, still after the era of the battle[1] mention a figure of 80,000. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Mayor of the Palace was an early medieval title and office, also known by the Latin name, maior domus or majordomo, used most notably in the Frankish kingdoms in the 7th and 8th centuries. ... Charles Martel (or, in modern English, Charles the Hammer) (23 August 686 – 22 October 741) was proclaimed Mayor of the Palace, ruling the Franks in the name of a titular King, and proclaimed himself Duke of the Franks (the last four years of his reign he did not even bother... The Courtyard of the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, one of the grandest architectural legacies of the Umayyads. ... Events Favila becomes king of Asturias after Pelayos death Births Emperor Kammu of Japan (d. ... Theuderic IV (or Theuderich, Theoderic, or Theodoric; in French, Thierry) was the Merovingian King of the Franks from 721 until his death in 737. ... Charles Martel (or, in modern English, Charles the Hammer) (23 August 686 – 22 October 741) was proclaimed Mayor of the Palace, ruling the Franks in the name of a titular King, and proclaimed himself Duke of the Franks (the last four years of his reign he did not even bother...

9th century

Year Date Event
814 January 28 Charlemagne died of pleurisy. His son Louis the Pious succeeded him as emperor and king of the Franks.
840 June 20 Louis died, igniting a civil war among his sons for division of the empire.
843 Louis' three surviving sons signed the Treaty of Verdun, under whose terms the Frankish Empire was divided into three states: Middle Francia, to Lothair; Eastern Francia, to Louis the German; and Western Francia, to Charles the Bald. Louis the Pious' grandson Pepin II became the king of Aquitaine, a vassal state of Western Francia.
855 September 23 Lothair died. Middle Francia was divided among his three sons into the Kingdom of Italy, the Kingdom of Burgundy, and Lotharingia, which went to his second son, Lothair II.
869 August 8 Lothair II died, leaving no legitimate children.

Events Louis the Pious succeeds Charlemagne as king of the Franks and Emperor. ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ... Pleurisy, also known as pleuritis, is an inflammation of the pleura, the lining of the pleural cavity surrounding the lungs, which can cause painful respiration and other symptoms. ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... Events After the death of Louis the Pious, his sons Lothar, Charles the Bald and Louis the German fight over the division of the empire, with Lothar succeeding as Emperor. ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... Events Treaty of Verdun divides the Carolingian empire between the 3 sons of Louis the Pious. ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... Geopolitical divisions according to the Treaty of Verdun. ... Middle Francia describes the realm created for Emperor Lothair I, wedged between East Francia and West Francia. ... Lothair I Lothair I (German: Lothar, French: Lothaire, Italian: Lotario) (795 – 2 March 855), king of Italy (818 – 855) and Holy Roman Emperor (840 – 855), was the eldest son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his wife Ermengarde of Hesbaye, daughter of Ingerman, duke of Hesbaye. ... East Francia was the land of Louis the German after the Treaty of Verdun of 843, which divided the Carolingian Empire of the Franks. ... Louis the German (also known as Louis II or Louis the Bavarian or German Ludwig der Deutsche) (804 – August 28, 876), the third son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his first wife, Ermengarde of Hesbaye, was the king of Bavaria from 817, when his father partitioned the empire... The Frankish Empire after the treaties of Verdun and Meerssen. ... Charles the Bald[1] (numbered Charles II of France and the Holy Roman Emperor) (French: , German: ) (13 June 823 – 6 October 877), Holy Roman Emperor (875–877) and king of West Francia (840–877), was the youngest son of Emperor Louis the Pious, by his second wife Judith. ... Pepin II, called the Younger (823-after 864, Senlis), was King of Aquitaine from 838 as the successor upon the death of his father, Pepin I. Pepin II was eldest son of Pepin I and Ingeltrude (also called Engelberga, Hringard, or Ringart), daughter of the count of Madrie, Theodobert. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Dordogne Gironde Landes Lot-et-Garonne Pyrénées-Atlantiques Arrondissements 18 Cantons 235 Communes 2,296 Statistics Land area1 41,308 km² Population (Ranked 6th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Events Louis II succeeds Lothar as western emperor. ... Lothair I Lothair I (German: Lothar, French: Lothaire, Italian: Lotario) (795 – 2 March 855), king of Italy (818 – 855) and Holy Roman Emperor (840 – 855), was the eldest son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his wife Ermengarde of Hesbaye, daughter of Ingerman, duke of Hesbaye. ... Middle Francia describes the realm created for Emperor Lothair I, wedged between East Francia and West Francia. ... The medieval Kingdom of Italy was a state originally comprising the northern two thirds of Italy, which formed from the break-up of the Carolingian Empire in the 9th century. ... Lotharingia (yellow), as established by the Treaty of Verdun, 843, and reduced by the Treaty of Mersen, 870 Lotharingia was a short-lived kingdom in western Europe, the aggregate of territories belonging to Lothair, King of Lotharingia (reigned 855–869), who received it in 855 from his father, Lothair I... Lothair (825 - August 8, 869), was the second son of the emperor Lothair I. On his fathers death in 855, he received for his kingdom a district lying west of the Rhine, between the North Sea and the Jura mountains, which was called Regnum Lotharii and early in the... Events Western Emperor Louis II allies with eastern Emperor Basil I against the Saracens. ... Lothair (825 - August 8, 869), was the second son of the emperor Lothair I. On his fathers death in 855, he received for his kingdom a district lying west of the Rhine, between the North Sea and the Jura mountains, which was called Regnum Lotharii and early in the...

10th century

Year Date Event
911 Charles signed the Treaty of Saint Clair-sur-Epte with Rollo, the king of the Vikings, allowing their settlement in what would become the Duchy of Normandy.
922 Charles was overthrown by a noble revolt and replaced by Robert I, Odo's brother.
923 June 15 Battle of Soissons (923): Robert was killed. Charles was captured by Rudolph, the duke of Burgundy.
Rudolph was elected king of France by an assembly of nobles. He left the Duchy of Burgundy to his brother.
936 January 15 Rudolph died. He was succeeded by Louis IV, a son of Charles the Simple.

This article is about the year 911 A.D.. For the emergency telephone number, see 9-1-1. ... Charles the Simple or Charles (September 17, 879 - October 7, 929) was a member of the Carolingian dynasty. ... The Treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte was signed in the autumn of 911 between Charles the Simple and Rollo, the leader of the Vikings, for the purpose of settling the Normans in Neustria and to protect Charles kingdom from any new invasion from the northmen. No written records survive... Rollo on the Six Dukes statue in the Falaise town square. ... Viking, also called Norseman or Northman, refers to a member of the Scandinavian seafaring traders, warriors and pirates who raided and colonized wide areas of Europe from the 8th to the 11th century[1] and reached east to Russia and Constantinople, referred to as Varangians by the Byzantine sources and... The Duchy of Normandy stems from the Viking invasions of France in the 8th century. ... Events Births Deaths March 26 - Al-Hallaj, Sufi writer and teacher Categories: 922 ... Charles the Simple or Charles (September 17, 879 - October 7, 929) was a member of the Carolingian dynasty. ... Robert I (c. ... Odo (or Eudes) (c. ... Events June 15 - Battle of Soissons: King Robert I of France is killed, King Charles the Simple is arrested by the supporters of Duke Rudolph of Burgundy. ... The Battle of Soissons in 923 was a battle during which King Robert I of France was killed, possibly by King Charles III, and the latter was defeated and imprisoned by Rudolph, Duke of Burgundy who succeeded Robert I as French monarch. ... Robert I (c. ... Charles the Simple or Charles (September 17, 879 - October 7, 929) was a member of the Carolingian dynasty. ... Rudolph (also Radulf, Ralph, or Raoul) (died 15 January 936) was the duke of Burgundy between 921 and 923 and king of France from thereafter to his death. ... Rudolph (also Radulf, Ralph, or Raoul) (died 15 January 936) was the duke of Burgundy between 921 and 923 and king of France from thereafter to his death. ... Events King Taejo of Goryeo (Wanggeon) defeats Hubaekje. ... Rudolph (also Radulf, Ralph, or Raoul) (died 15 January 936) was the duke of Burgundy between 921 and 923 and king of France from thereafter to his death. ... Louis IV dOutremer: King of France 936 to 954, member of the Carolingian dynasty. ... Charles the Simple or Charles (September 17, 879 - October 7, 929) was a member of the Carolingian dynasty. ...

11th century

Year Date Event
1004 Robert annexed the Duchy of Burgundy.
1031 July 20 Robert died in a civil war against his sons. His second son, Henry I, succeeded him; his third, Robert I Capet, disputed the succession and led a new revolt.
1032 Henry bought peace by reversing the annexation of the Duchy of Burgundy and giving it to his brother.
1060 August 4 Henry died. The throne passed to his seven-year-old son, Philip I, with his wife Anne of Kiev acting as regent.
1066 Philip entered his majority.

Events December: End of the Samanid dynasty in Bokhara. ... Robert II the Pious (French: Robert II le Pieux) (March 27, 972 – July 20, 1031) was King of France from 996 to 1031. ... Events Collapse of the Moorish Caliphate of Córdoba. ... Robert II the Pious (French: Robert II le Pieux) (March 27, 972 – July 20, 1031) was King of France from 996 to 1031. ... Henry I (French: Henri Ier) (May 4, 1008–August 4, 1060) was King of France from 1031 to 1060. ... Robert I Capet (1011 – March 21, 1076) was duke of Burgundy between 1032 to his death. ... Events February 2 - Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, becomes King of Burgundy. ... Henry I (French: Henri Ier) (May 4, 1008–August 4, 1060) was King of France from 1031 to 1060. ... May — The Norman leader Robert Guiscard conquers Taranto. ... Henry I (French: Henri Ier) (May 4, 1008–August 4, 1060) was King of France from 1031 to 1060. ... Philip I (23 May 1053 – 29 July 1108) was King of France from 1060 to his death. ... 11th-century fresco of the St. ... Events January 6 - Harold II is crowned September 20 - Battle of Fulford September 25 - Battle of Stamford Bridge September 29 - William of Normandy lands in England at Pevensey. ... Philip I (23 May 1053 – 29 July 1108) was King of France from 1060 to his death. ...

12th century

Year Date Event
1108 July 29 Philip died. He was succeeded by his son Louis VI, the Fat.
1131 October 25 Louis' son, the future Louis VII, the Young, was crowned the junior king and heir to the throne.
1137 July 22 Louis the Young became duke of Aquitaine by marriage to the duchess Eleanor.
August 1 Louis the Fat died. Louis the Young became king.
1152 March 21 The marriage of Louis and Eleanor was annulled.

Events May - Battle of Ucles Consecration of Chichester cathedral Saint Magnus becomes the first earl of Orkney In Pistoia, Italy, Cathedral of San Zeno burned to the ground. ... Philip I (23 May 1053 – 29 July 1108) was King of France from 1060 to his death. ... Louis VI the Fat (French: Louis VI le Gros) (December 1, 1081 – August 1, 1137) was King of France from 1108 to 1137. ... Events May 9 - Tintern Abbey is founded. ... Louis VI the Fat (French: Louis VI le Gros) (December 1, 1081 – August 1, 1137) was King of France from 1108 to 1137. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... // Groups BL1137 is the (now defunct) Unix group at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ where Unix and C were invented. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Eleanor of Aquitaine Eleanor of Aquitaine (or Aliénor), Duchess of Aquitaine and Gascony and Countess of Poitou (1122[1] – April 1, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ... Louis VI the Fat (French: Louis VI le Gros) (December 1, 1081 – August 1, 1137) was King of France from 1108 to 1137. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Events March 4 - Frederick I Barbarossa is elected King of the Germans Eleanor of Aquitaine has her marriage to Louis VII annulled May 18 - Eleanor of Aquitaine marries Henry of Anjou Church of Ireland acknowledges Popes authority Almohad Dynasty conquers Algeria Establishment of the archbishopric of Nidaros (Trondheim), Norway... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Eleanor of Aquitaine Eleanor of Aquitaine (or Aliénor), Duchess of Aquitaine and Gascony and Countess of Poitou (1122[1] – April 1, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ...

13th century

Year Date Event
1214 July 27 Battle of Bouvines: The French army defeated a combined English-Flemish force, enabling the kingdom to consolidate its control over Anjou, Brittany, Maine, Normandy and the Touraine.
1223 July 14 Philip died. He was succeeded by his son Louis VIII, the Lion.
1226 November 8 Louis died. He was succeeded by his son Louis IX.
1241 June Louis IX announced that the County of Poitiers would go to his brother Alphonse - offending Isabella of Angoulême, whose son would have inherited the territory had the English won the Battle of Bouvines.
1242 May 20 Saintonge War: Henry III of England arrived with an army in support of Isabella's claim to Poitiers.

Events Simon Apulia becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... The Battle of Bouvines, July 27, 1214, was the first great international conflict of alliances among national forces in Europe. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Coat of arms of the Counts of Flanders (or a lion rampant sable, armed and langued gules). ... Modern département of Maine-et-Loire, which largely corresponds to Anjou Anjou is a former county (c. ... Historical province of Brittany, showing the main areas with their name in Breton language The traditional flag of Brittany (the Gwenn-ha-du), formerly a Breton nationalist symbol but today used as a general civic flag in the region. ... Flag of Maine Location of Maine in France Maine is one of the traditional provinces of France. ... The Duchy of Normandy stems from the Viking invasions of France in the 8th century. ... The Touraine is a former province of France. ... // Events August 6 - Louis VIII is crowned King of France. ... Philip II Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (21 August 1165 – 14 July 1223) was the King of France from 1180 until his death. ... Louis VIII the Lion (5 September 1187 – 8 November 1226) reigned as King of France from 1223 to 1226. ... Events Carmelite Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II calls Imperial Diet of Cremona Births June 21 - King Boleslaus V of Poland (died 1279) Abul-Faraj, Syriac scholar (died 1286) Bar-Hebraeus, Syriac historian and bishop (died 1286) Deaths March 7 - William de Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, English... Louis VIII the Lion (5 September 1187 – 8 November 1226) reigned as King of France from 1223 to 1226. ... Louis IX (25 April 1215 – 25 August 1270), commonly Saint Louis, was King of France from 1226 to his death. ... Events April 5 - Mongols of Golden Horde under the command of Subotai defeat feudal Polish nobility, including Knights Templar, in the battle of Liegnitz April 27 - Mongols defeat Bela IV of Hungary in the battle of Sajo. ... Louis IX (25 April 1215 – 25 August 1270), commonly Saint Louis, was King of France from 1226 to his death. ... Alphonse, Count of Toulouse and of Poitiers (November 11, 1220 – August 21, 1271). ... Statue of Isabella of Angoulême, in front of the city hall of Angoulême Isabella of Angoulême (fr. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... The Battle of Bouvines, July 27, 1214, was the first great international conflict of alliances among national forces in Europe. ... // Events April 5 - During a battle on the ice of Chudskoye Lake, Russian forces rebuff an invasion attempt by the Teutonic Knights. ... Combatants France England Commanders Louis IX Henry III Strength around 50,000 around 30,000 Casualties unknown unknown The Saintonge War occurred in 1242 between France under Louis IX and England under Henry III. It was fought because some vassals of Louis were displeased with the land that Louis had... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ... Statue of Isabella of Angoulême, in front of the city hall of Angoulême Isabella of Angoulême (fr. ...

14th century

Year Date Event
1302 May 18 Bruges Matins: The exiled citizens of Bruges, in Flanders, returned to their hometown and killed every Frenchman.
July 11 Battle of the Golden Spurs: Flemish insurrectionists soundly defeated a French occupation force.
1314 November 29 Philip died. He was succeeded by his eldest son Louis X, the Headstrong.
1316 June 5 Louis died, possibly of poisoning. His wife was pregnant with their first child; his brother Philip was appointed regent.
November 15 Louis' son was born John I, the Posthumous.
1357 The States-General pass Étienne Marcel's Great Ordinance in an attempt to impose limits on the monarchy, in particular in fiscal and monetary matters.

Events July 11 - Battle of the Golden Spurs (Guldensporenslag in Dutch), major victory of Flanders over the French occupier. ... The Bruges Matins or Brugse Metten was the nocturnal massacre of the French garrison in Bruges by the members of the local Flemish militia on 18 May 1302. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Bruges Coordinates , , Area 138. ... Coat of arms of the Counts of Flanders (or a lion rampant sable, armed and langued gules). ... Combatants Flanders France Commanders Willem van Gullik Pieter de Coninc Guy of Namur Robert II of Artois Strength 9,000 8,000 Casualties 100 est. ... Coat of arms of the Counts of Flanders (or a lion rampant sable, armed and langued gules). ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... “Philip the Fair” redirects here. ... Louis X of France Louis X the Quarreller, also called the Headstrong or the Stubborn, (French: Louis X le Hutin, Spanish: Luis el Obstinado) (October 4, 1289 – June 5, 1316), King of France from 1314 to 1316, was a member of the Capetian Dynasty. ... Events Pope John XXII elected to the papacy. ... Louis X of France Louis X the Quarreller, also called the Headstrong or the Stubborn, (French: Louis X le Hutin, Spanish: Luis el Obstinado) (October 4, 1289 – June 5, 1316), King of France from 1314 to 1316, was a member of the Capetian Dynasty. ... Philip V (17 November 1293 – 3 January 1322), called the Tall (French: le Long), was King of France and Navarre (as Philip II) and Count of Champagne from 1316 to his death, and the second to last of the House of Capet. ... Louis X of France Louis X the Quarreller, also called the Headstrong or the Stubborn, (French: Louis X le Hutin, Spanish: Luis el Obstinado) (October 4, 1289 – June 5, 1316), King of France from 1314 to 1316, was a member of the Capetian Dynasty. ... John I the Posthumous (French: Jean Ier le Posthume) (November 15, 1316 – November 20, 1316) was King of France for the five days he lived. ... // May 28 - Peter I becomes King of Portugal after the death of his father, Alfonso IV. July 9 - Charles Bridge in Prague is founded King David II of Scotland is released by the English in return for a ransom. ... In France under the Ancien Regime, the States-General or Estates-General (French: états généraux), was a legislative assembly (see The States) of the different classes (or estates) of French subjects. ... Statue of Étienne Marcel by Antonin Idrac next to the Hôtel de Ville of Paris Étienne Marcel (died July 31, 1358) was provost of the merchants of Paris under King John II. Étienne Marcel belonged by birth to the wealthy Parisian bourgeoisie, being the son of a clothier named... Grande ordonnance de 1357 Great Ordinance of 1357 ---- (more info) Stage 3 : Proofreaders Needed (How-to) comment here Tim! 11:04, 23 October 2007 (UTC) Important event in French history Neddyseagoon - talk 100%   [URL date] Join this translation   ---   Update this information (instructions)   In French history, the Great Ordinance of 1357... Kings ruled in France from the Middle Ages to 1848. ...

15th century

Year Date Event
1415 August 13 Hundred Years' War (1415-1429): An English army under King Henry V landed in the north of France.
1418 May 30 The army of John the Fearless, duke of Burgundy, captured Paris. The dauphin, the future Charles VII, fled.
1419 September 20 John the Fearless was assassinated by companions of the dauphin. He was succeeded by his son Philip the Good, who would ally himself with the English against the French crown.
1420 The Burgundians compelled Charles VI to sign the Treaty of Troyes, under which the throne was to pass to Henry V.
1422 August 14 Henry V died. He was succeeded as King of England by his infant son Henry VI.

Events Friedrich I Hohenzollern (b. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Henry V of England (16 September 1387 – 31 August 1422) was one of the great warrior kings of the Middle Ages. ... Events May 19 - Capture of Paris by John, Duke of Burgundy September - Beginning of English Siege of Rouen Mircea the Old, ruler of Wallachia dies and is succeeded by Vlad I Uzurpatorul. ... John the Fearless (French: Jean sans Peur), also John II, Duke of Burgundy, known as John of Valois and John of Burgundy (May 28, 1371 – September 10, 1419), was Duke of Burgundy from 1404 to 1419. ... Coat of arms of the second Duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: ; German: ) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks; the former gave their... This article is about the capital of France. ... Coat of Arms of the Dauphins of France. ... Charles VII the Victorious, a. ... Events January 19 – Hundred Years War: Rouen surrenders to Henry V of England which brings Normandy under the control of England. ... John the Fearless (French: Jean sans Peur), also John II, Duke of Burgundy, known as John of Valois and John of Burgundy (May 28, 1371 – September 10, 1419), was Duke of Burgundy from 1404 to 1419. ... Philip III, Duke of Burgundy (Philip the Good or Philippe le Bon) (1396–1467) was Duke of Burgundy from 1419 until his death. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Events May 21 - Treaty of Troyes. ... The Burgundian party was a political allegiance in France that formed during the reign of Charles VI during the latter half of the Hundred Years War. ... Charles VI Charles VI the Well-Beloved, later known as the Mad (French: Charles VI le Bien-Aimé, later known as le Fol) (December 3, 1368 – October 21, 1422) was a King of France (1380 – 1422) and a member of the Valois Dynasty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Henry V of England (16 September 1387 – 31 August 1422) was one of the great warrior kings of the Middle Ages. ... Events January 10 - Battle of Nemecky Brod during the Hussite Wars. ... Henry V of England (16 September 1387 – 31 August 1422) was one of the great warrior kings of the Middle Ages. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ...

16th century

Year Date Event
1508 December 10 War of the League of Cambrai: Representatives of the Papacy, France, and the Holy Roman Empire and Ferdinand I of Spain established the League of Cambrai, whose purpose was to defeat Venice and partition its territory.
1514 May 18 Claude, the duchess of Brittany, was married to Francis of Angouleme, the heir to the French throne.
1515 January 1 Louis died. Francis of Angouleme succeeded him as Francis I.
1524 July 20 Claude died. Her eldest son Francis, Dauphin of France, became Duke of Brittany.
1532 Francis I issued an edict incorporating Brittany into the kingdom of France.

1508 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The War of the League of Cambrai, sometimes known as the War of the Holy League and by several other names,[1] was a major conflict in the Italian Wars. ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Ferdinand V of Castile & II of Aragon the Catholic (Spanish: , Catalan: , Aragonese: ; March 10, 1452 – January 23, 1516) was king of Aragon (1479–1516), Castile, Sicily (1468–1516), Naples (1504–1516), Valencia, Sardinia and Navarre and Count of Barcelona. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... 1514 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Claude of France with her daughters, Louise and Charlotte (who died young); Madeleine, Queen of Scotland (right); her youngest daughter, Marguerite, duchess of Savoy (left), and Eleanor of Spain Claude of France (14 October 1499 – 20 July 1524), Queen consort of France and duchess of Brittany in her own right... Historical province of Brittany, showing the main areas with their name in Breton language The traditional flag of Brittany (the Gwenn-ha-du), formerly a Breton nationalist symbol but today used as a general civic flag in the region. ... Francis I of France (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Louis XII (b. ... Francis I of France (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... Events March 1, 1524/5 - Giovanni da Verrazano lands near Cape Fear (approx. ... Claude of France with her daughters, Louise and Charlotte (who died young); Madeleine, Queen of Scotland (right); her youngest daughter, Marguerite, duchess of Savoy (left), and Eleanor of Spain Claude of France (14 October 1499 – 20 July 1524), Queen consort of France and duchess of Brittany in her own right... Francis (French: François), Dauphin of France, also Francis III, Duke of Brittany (September 28, 1518 – August 10, 1536), was the first son and heir of King Francis I of France and Claude of France, daughter of Louis XII of France. ... Historical province of Brittany, showing the main areas with their name in Breton language The traditional flag of Brittany (the Gwenn-ha-du), formerly a Breton nationalist symbol but today used as a general civic flag in the region. ... Events May 16 - Sir Thomas More resigns as Lord Chancellor of England. ... Francis I of France (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... Historical province of Brittany, showing the main areas with their name in Breton language The traditional flag of Brittany (the Gwenn-ha-du), formerly a Breton nationalist symbol but today used as a general civic flag in the region. ...

17th century

Year Date Event
1610 May 14 King Henry IV died, possibly at the hands of his Florentine wife Marie de' Medici. He was succeeded by his eldest son Louis XIII, with de' Medici ruling as regent.
1617 16-year old Louis exiled his mother and took control of the government.
1624 August Louis took Armand Jean du Plessis, Cardinal Richelieu, as his chief minister.
1643 May 14 Louis died. His five-year-old son Louis XIV succeeded him. Jules Cardinal Mazarin became regent.
1648 August Fronde: Mazarin ordered the arrest of the leaders of the parlement of Paris, which provoked widespread rioting.

// Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... Henry IV of France, also Henry III of Navarre (13 December 1553 – 14 May 1610), ruled as King of France from 1589 to 1610 and King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Portrait of Marie de Medici. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed I (1603-1617) to Mustafa I (1617-1623). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Events January 24 - Alfonso Mendez, appointed by Pope Gregory XV as Prelate of Ethiopia, arrives at Massawa from Goa. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cardinal Richelieu was the French chief minister from 1624 until his death in 1642. ... // Events January 21 - Abel Tasman discovers Tonga February 6 - Abel Tasman discovers the Fiji islands. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Louis XIV redirects here. ... Jules Mazarin, French diplomat and statesman, by Pierre-Louis Bouchart. ... 1648 (MDCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Fronde (disambiguation). ... Jules Mazarin, French diplomat and statesman, by Pierre-Louis Bouchart. ... This article is for the Ancien Régime institution. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...

18th century

Year Date Event
1701 July 9 Battle of Carpi: Austrian invaders encountered the French army at Carpi, and defeated them.
1713 April 11 War of the Spanish Succession: France and England signed the Treaty of Utrecht, under which Philip renounced for himself and his descendants any right to the French throne. Similarly, possible heirs to the French crown renounced all rights to the rulership of Spain.
1714 March 7 War of the Spanish Succession: The Treaty of Rastatt ended hostilities between France and Austria.
1715 September 1 Louis XIV died of gangrene. His five-year-old great-grandson Louis XV succeeded him, with his nephew Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, acting as regent.
1723 February 15 Louis XV entered his majority.

Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... Combatants Austria France Commanders Prince Eugene of Savoy Nicolas Catinat Strength 30,000 25,000 Casualties unknown unknown The Battle of Carpi was a serie of manoeuvres in the summer of 1701, and the first battle of the War of the Spanish Succession that took place on July 9, 1701... Carpi is a town in Emilia Romagna (northern Italy). ... Year 1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants Habsburg Empire England (1701-6) Great Britain (1707-14)[1] Dutch Republic Kingdom of Portugal Crown of Aragon Duchy of Savoy [2] Kingdom of France Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Bavaria Hungarian Rebels [3] Commanders Eugene of Savoy Margrave of Baden Count Starhemberg Duke of Marlborough Marquis de Ruvigny... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... A map depicting the major changes in Western Europes borders as a result of the Treaties of Utrecht and Rastatt. ... King Philip V of Spain (December 19, 1683 – July 9, 1746) or Philippe of Anjou was king of Spain from 1700 to 1746, the first of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ... The Treaty of Rastatt, in March 7, 1714, was essentially part of the Treaty of Utrecht. ... Year 1715 (MDCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Louis XIV redirects here. ... Louis XV, called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ... Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, Philippe Charles (August 2, 1674 – December 23, 1723) called Duke of Chartres (1674–1701), and then Duke of Orléans (1701–1723) was Regent of France from 1715 to 1723. ... Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ... Louis XV, called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ...

19th century

Year Date Event
1801 February 9 War of the Second Coalition: The Treaty of Lunéville ended the conflict between France and the Holy Roman Empire. The French border was extended to the Rhine, and the Grand Duchy of Tuscany became a French possession.
1802 March 25 War of the Second Coalition: The Treaty of Amiens established a peace between France and the United Kingdom.
1803 November 18 Battle of Vertières: The viscount of Rochambeau was defeated and forced to surrender to the revolutionary army of Jean-Jacques Dessalines.
1804 January 1 Haitian Revolution: Dessalines declared the independence of Haiti.
May 18 Napoleon was declared Emperor by the Senate, marking the beginning of the First French Empire.

The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The name Second Coalition (1798 - 1800) designates the second major concerted effort of multiple European powers to contain Revolutionary France. ... The Treaty of Lunéville was signed on February 9, 1801 between the French Republic and the Holy Roman Empire by Joseph Bonaparte and Louis, Count Cobentzel, respectively. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... It has been suggested that River Rhine Pollution: November 1986 be merged into this article or section. ... The Grand Duchy of Tuscany was a state in central Italy which came into existence in 1569, replacing the Duchy of Florence, which had been created out of the old Republic of Florence in 1532, and which annexed the Republic of Siena in 1557. ... --69. ... The Treaty of Amiens was signed on March 25, 1802 (Germinal 4, year X in the French Revolutionary Calendar) by Joseph Bonaparte and the Marquis Cornwallis as a Definitive Treaty of Peace between France and the United Kingdom. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Battle of Vertières, the last major battle of the Haitian Revolution (or Haitian War of Independence) was fought between Haitian rebels and French expeditionary forces on November 18, 1803 at Vertières. ... Donatien-Marie-Joseph de Vimeur, vicomte de Rochambeau (1755 – October 16, 1813) was a French soldier, the son of Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau. ... Jean-Jacques Dessalines Jean-Jacques Dessalines (September 20, 1758–October 17, 1806) was a leader of the Haitian Revolution and an Emperor of Haiti (1804–1806 under the name of Jacques I). ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants Haiti France Commanders Toussaint Louverture, Jean-Jacques Dessalines Charles Leclerc, vicomte de Rochambeau, Napoleon Bonaparte Strength Regular army: <55,000, Volunteers: <100,000 Regular army: 60,000, 86 warships and frigates Casualties Military deaths: unknown, Civilian deaths: <100,000 Military deaths: 57,000 (37,000 combat; 20,000 yellow... Jean-Jacques Dessalines Jean-Jacques Dessalines (September 20, 1758–October 17, 1806) was a leader of the Haitian Revolution and an Emperor of Haiti (1804–1806 under the name of Jacques I). ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Map of the First French Empire in 1811, with the Empire in dark blue and satellite states in light blue Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1804 - 1814/1815 Napoleon I  - 1814/1815 Napoleon II Legislature Parliament  - Upper house Senate  - Lower house Corps législatif Historical era Napoleonic...

20th century

Year Date Event
1905 December 9 The 1905 French law on the separation of Church and State ended government funding of religious groups.
1914 August 3 World War I: Germany declares war on France

For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... The first page of the bill, as brought before the Chambre des Députés in 1905 On 9 December 1905, a law was passed in France separating the church and the state. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...

21st century

Year Date Event
2002 April 21 French presidential election, 2002: President Jacques Chirac went into a runoff against Jean-Marie Le Pen.
May 5 French presidential election, 2002: Chirac won reelection with eighty-two percent of the runoff vote.
2005 May 29 French European Constitution referendum, 2005: Fifty-five percent of French voters rejected the adoption of the proposed Constitution of the European Union.
October 27 2005 civil unrest in France: Hundreds began rioting after the accidental deaths of two teenagers in Clichy-sous-Bois.
November 8 2005 civil unrest in France: President Chirac declared a state of emergency.

boobies Also see: 2002 (number). ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for April, 2002. ... The 2002 French presidential election consisted of a first round election on 21 April 2002, and a runoff election between the top two candidates (Jacques Chirac and Jean-Marie Le Pen) on 5 May 2002. ... “Chirac” redirects here. ... Jean-Marie Le Pen (born June 20, 1928, La Trinité-sur-Mer, France) is a French far-right nationalist politician, founder and president of the Front National (National Front) party. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for May, 2002. ... “Chirac” redirects here. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... On 29 May 2005 a referendum was held in France to decide whether the country should ratify the proposed Constitution of the European Union. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe The constitutional treaty as signed in Rome on 29 October 2004 by representatives of the EU member states The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe (TCE), commonly referred to as the European Constitution, was an unimplemented... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A torched car in Strasbourg, 5 November. ... For other places with the same name, see Clichy. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A torched car in Strasbourg, 5 November. ... “Chirac” redirects here. ...


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