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Encyclopedia > Tilos
View over Livadhia, the port and main village on Tilos
View over Livadhia, the port and main village on Tilos

Tílos (Greek: Τήλος; ancient form: Telos, Turkish: İlyaki; Italian: Piscopi) is a small Greek island located in the Aegean Sea. It is part of the Dodecanese group of islands, and lies midway between Kos and Rhodes. Image File history File links Livadhia_tilos. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Dodecanese (Greek: Δωδεκάνησα, Dodekánisa, meaning twelve islands; see also List of traditional Greek place names) are a group of Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, off the southwest coast of Turkey. ... Port and city view of Kos town on the island Kos. ... Rhodes (Greek: Ρόδος (pron. ...


Population: 535 (2001) [1]


Popularly, Telos was the son of Helios and Halia, the sister of the Telchines. He came to the island in search of herbs to heal his ill mother, and later returned to found a temple to Apollo and Neptune. However, Telos (Telo or Tilo) does not appear in Greek mythology and the name probably has an unknown pre-Hellenic origin. In Greek mythology the sun was personified as Helius (Greek Ἥλιος / ἥλιος). Homer often calls him Titan and Hyperion. ... In Greek mythology, Halia was a nymph from Rhodes. ... In Greek mythology, the Telchines were the original inhabitants of the island of Rhodes, and were known in Crete and Cyprus. ... Lycian Apollo, early Imperial Roman copy of a fourth century Greek original (Louvre Museum) In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or , Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros (a beardless youth), was the archer-god of medicine and healing, light, truth, archery and also a... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ...


Pliny the Elder notes that in antiquity Telos was known as Agathussa (Αγαθούσσα) (also Agathusa and Agathousa). In the Middle Ages it was known by the Italian Piscopi or Episcopi (also Pisconia). Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ...


Geography

Tílos has an inverted 'S' shape, is about 14.5 km long, north-west to south-east, with a maximum width of 8 km and an area of about 61 km². The island has a mountainous limestone interior, volcanic lowlands, pumice beds and red lava sand, like its north western neighbour Nisyros. It is well supplied by springs, and is potentially very fertile and productive. Its coasts are generally rocky or pebbled, but there are also a number of sandy beaches. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // Specimen of highly porous pumice from Teide volcano on Tenerife, Canary Islands. ... Satellite image of Nisyros island, an active volcano Nisyros (Greek: Νίσυρος; also transliterated Nissiros; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a volcanic Greek island located in the Aegean Sea. ...

Map of Tilos
Map of Tilos

At the north-west end of the island, the Monastery of Áyios Pandeleímon, (also the island's patron saint), sits on the slopes Mt. Profítis Ilías (651 m). The mountain borders a fertile plain running across the island's width, with the settlements of Áyios Andónis to the north and Éristos to the south. To the north-east of the plain is the island's capital, Megálo Chorió, built in the early 19th century at the foot of the ancient city of Telos. The archaic ruins stretch up to the site of the acropolis of the ancient city, dedicated to Pythios Apollo and Poliada Athina, and the Venetian Kástro, built over it. To the west is Kharkhadió Cave, where excavations in 1971 unearthed Neolithic finds and bones of dwarf elephant. Above the cave stand the ruins of the medieval Fortress of Mesariá . At southern end of the island, bordered by more fertile meadows, is Livádhia, the major harbour and economic centre of the island. The island's old capital, Mikró Chorió, first settled in the 15th century by the Knights of the Order of St John, overlooks the bay. It has been completely abandoned since 1960, its inhabitants having moved down to the harbour in the 1930s. A number of other settlements such as Lethrá, Gherá & Panó Méri have similarly been abandoned. Mt. Áyios Nikoláos (367 m) stands to the south of the bay. Image File history File links Tilos. ... Image File history File links Tilos. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lycian Apollo, early Imperial Roman copy of a fourth century Greek original (Louvre Museum) In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or , Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros (a beardless youth), was the archer-god of medicine and healing, light, truth, archery and also a... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Italian, Latin Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789-1797 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 727 (697)  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 Map of the Venetian Republic, circa 1000. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Dwarf elephants are prehistoric members of the order Proboscidea, that, through the process of allopatric speciation, evolved to a fraction of the size of their modern relatives. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... The Knights Hospitaller (also known as the Sovereign Order of Saint John of Jerusalem of Rhodes and of Malta, Knights of Malta, Knights of Rhodes, and Chevaliers of Malta) is an organization that began as an Amalfitan hospital founded in Jerusalem in 1080 to provide care for poor and sick... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ...


Kástros (castles) have protected the island's inhabitants from pirate raids since the dark ages. Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Petrarch, who conceived the idea of a European Dark Age. From Cycle of Famous Men and Women, Andrea di Bartolo di Bargillac, c. ...

  • Megálo Chorió
  • Mesariá
  • Mikró Chorió
  • Agrosikiá
  • Stavroú Lámbrou

History

Neolithic 
Pottery and stone tools discovered in Kharkhadió indicate human activity on Tilos in the early Neolithic period 8000 BC7000 BC, along with the large assembly of dwarf (1.20-1.60 m tall) elephant bones, carbon dated at 4000 – 7000 before present (some now in the museum). Masseti (2001) suggests coexistence of these animals with humans, possibly into the historic period.
Bronze Age 
Excavation has identified Pelasgian masonry, as well as suggesting Tilos was successively dominated by Minoans, Mycenaeans and Dorians.
Classical 
  • The island flourished during the classical era, minting its own coinage and being famed for clothing and perfumes.
  • Telos claims the poetess Erinna (said to be Sappho's equal) was born on the island around 350 BC?. Charles Anthon (1853) describes her thus: "Erinna (Ήριννα) friend & contemporary of Sappho (about 612 BC) died at 19, left behind her poems which were thought worthy to rank with those of Homer. Her poems were of the epic class; the chief of them was entitled Ήλακάτη, " The Distaff" it consisted of three hundred lines, of which only four are extant. It was written in a dialect which was a mixture of the Doric and Æolic, and which was spoken at Rhodes, where, or in the adjacent island of Telos, Erinna was born. She is also called a Lesbian and a Mytilenean, on ac­count of her residence in Lesbos with Sappho. There are several epi­grams upon Erinna, in which her praise is celebrated, and her untimely death is lamented. Three epigrams in the Greek Anthology are ascribed to her, of which the first has the genuine air of antiquity, but the other two, addressed to Baucis, seem to be a later fabrication."
  • In the 7th century BC, colonists from Tilos and Lindos settled in Sicily and founded the city of Gelas.
  • Herodotus (484 BC – c. 425 BC) described the centuries preceding him as the golden age of Tilos.
  • In the 5th century BC, Tilos was a member of the First Delian League and kept its independence until the end of the Peloponnesian War.
  • From the turn of the 4th century BC, for the next 200 years, Tilos was subject to the Seleucid Empire, Caria and then Ptolemaic Egypt under the influence of Rhodes, until in 200 BC, the island was incorporated in to the Rhodian confederacy.
  • The island was conquered by the Romans in 42 BC. Archaeological finds from Roman and early-Christian times demonstrate the prosperity of the island until the great earthquake of 551 AD.
Byzantine 
Tilos followed Rhodes into the Byzantine Empire following the death of Theodosius I and was a member of the naval Theme of Samos between the 9th and 14th centuries.
Crusaders 
The Knights of St John took control of Tilos from 1309, restoring the Byzantine castles, and building new ones in order to defend against pirate raids. It was evacuated in 1470 as the Ottomans began the Siege of Rhodes and control passed to Suleiman I in 1522 when Rhodes fell.
Ottoman 
In 1523, Tilos was occupied by the Ottoman Empire and the island was put under the privileged administrative and tax system known as "maktou". Christian pirates, under the pretext of revenge against the Turks, pillaged the island constantly.
20th Century 
The Ottoman rule lasted until 1912, when the island was ceded to Italy. In 1943 it was invaded by German troops and in 1948, Tilos united with Greece, as did all the Dodecanese islands. Since 1948, the population of the island has declined rapidly, as many Tilians migrated to America or Australia.

An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... Ancient stone tools A stone tool is, in the most general sense, any tool made of stone. ... (9th millennium BC – 8th millennium BC – 7th millennium BC – other millennia) Events The south area of Çatalhöyük. ... (8th millennium BC – 7th millennium BC – 6th millennium BC – other millennia) Events circa 7000 BC – Agriculture and settlement at Mehrgarh in South Asia circa 6500 BC – English Channel formed circa 6100 BC – The Storegga Slide, causing a megatsunami in the Norwegian Sea circa 6000... Radiocarbon dating is the use of the naturally occurring isotope of carbon-14 in radiometric dating to determine the age of organic materials, up to ca. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Ancient Greek writers used the name Pelasgian to refer to groups of people who preceded the Greeks and dwelt in several locations in mainland Greece, Crete, and other regions of the Aegean as neighbors of the Hellenes. ... The Minoan Civilisation was a pre-Hellenic Bronze Age civilization which arose on Crete, a Greek island in the Aegean Sea. ... Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ... [[Im Category: ... Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... Coinage is: A Drinking game also known as Quarters a series of coins struck as part of currency a magazine about numismatics, capitalized: COINage The right or process of making coins The creation of a neologism, or new word; see word coinage The duty or tax on refined tin, abolished... Clothing protects the vulnerable nude human body from the extremes of weather, other features of our environment, and for safety reasons. ... For the book Perfume by Patrick Süskind, see Perfume (book). ... Erinna, Greek poet, contemporary and friend of Sappho, a native of Rhodes or the adjacent island of Telos, flourished about 600 BC (according to Eusebius of Myndus, 350 BC). ... Ancient Greek bust. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC - 350s BC - 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 355 BC 354 BC 353 BC 352 BC 351 BC - 350 BC - 349 BC 348 BC 347... Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 660s BC 650s BC 640s BC 630s BC 620s BC - 610s BC - 600s BC 590s BC 580s BC 570s BC 560s BC Events and Trends 619 BC - Alyattes becomes king of Lydia 619 BC _ Death of Zhou xiang... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 7th century BC started on January 1, 700 BC and ended on December 31, 601 BC. // Overview Events Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria who created the the first systematically collected library at Nineveh A 16th century depiction of the Hanging Gardens of... Acropolis of Lindos: the restored stoa Lindos (Greek Λινδος;) is a town and an archaeological site on the east coast of the island of Rhodes (Rhodhos) in the Dodecanese Islands in south-eastern Greece. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Gela is a commune in the province of Caltanissetta, in the island of Sicily, Italy. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 489 BC 488 BC 487 BC 486 BC 485 BC - 484 BC - 483 BC 482 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC - 420s BC - 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC Years: 430 BC 429 BC 428 BC 427 BC 426 BC - 425 BC - 424 BC 423 BC... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 5th century BC started on January 1, 500 BC and ended on December 31, 401 BC. // The Parthenon of Athens seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ... Delian League (Athenian Empire), right before the Peloponnesian War in 431 BC. Corcyra was not part of the League The Delian League was an association of Greek city-states in the 5th century BC. It was led by Athens. ... For the earlier war beginning in 460 BC, see First Peloponnesian War. ... The 4th century BC started the first day of 400 BC and ended the last day of 301 BC. It is considered part of the Classical era, epoch, or historical period. ... The Seleucid Empire was a Hellenistic successor state of Alexander the Greats dominion. ... Location of Caria Photo of a 15th century map showing Caria. ... The Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt began following Alexander the Greats conquest in 332 BC and ended with the death of Cleopatra VII and the Roman conquest in 30 BC. It was founded when Ptolemy I Soter declared himself Pharaoh of Egypt, creating a powerful Hellenistic state from southern Syria... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC - 200s BC - 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC Years: 205 BC 204 BC 203 BC 202 BC 201 BC - 200 BC - 199 BC 198 BC... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Events October 3 - First Battle of Philippi: The Triumvirs Mark Antony and Octavian fight an indecisive battle with Caesars assassins Marcus Junius Brutus and Cassius. ... Events Jordanes publishes The Origin and Deeds of the Goths. ... It has been suggested that Eastern Roman Empire be merged into this article or section. ... An engraving depicting what Theodosius may have looked like, ca. ... The themata in 950. ... As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was that century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Events August 15 - The city of Rhodes surrenders to the forces of the Knights of St. ... Events May 15 - Charles VIII of Sweden who had served three terms as King of Sweden dies. ... Rhodes is the easternmost island of Greece, located 11 miles west of Turkey. ... Suleiman the Magnificent Suleiman I (November 6, 1494 – September 5/6, 1566); in Turkish Süleyman , (nicknamed the Magnificent in Europe and the Lawgiver in the Islamic World, in Turkish Kanuni) was the sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1520 to 1566 and successor to Selim I. He was... Events January 9 - Adrian Dedens becomes Pope Adrian VI. February 26 - Execution by hanging of Cuauhtémoc, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan under orders of conquistador Hernán Cortés. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish (official); spoken languages include Abkhazian, Adyghe, Albanian, Arabic, Aramaic, Armenian, Azerbaijani... Events April - Battle of Villalar - Forces loyal to Emperor Charles V defeat the Comuneros, a league of urban bourgeois rebelling against Charles in Spain. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from...

References

  • Tilos Island. Travel Guide of Greece - Accommodation, Tours, Sightseeing, Historical Information, Political Situation, Geography. Retrieved on March 28, 2005.
  • Book IV, CHAP. 23.--THE SPORADES.. Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (eds. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.). Retrieved on March 27, 2005.
  • M. Masseti (2001). "Did endemic dwarf elephants survive on Mediterranean islands up to protohistorical times?". Atti Congresso Internazionale “La Terra degli elefanti”, CNR Roma 46-52: 402–406.  [2]
  • The Aegean Islands. Regnal Chronologies. Retrieved on March 28, 2005.
  • Anthon, Charles (1853). A Manual of Greek Literature from the Earliest Authentic Periods to the Close of Byzantine Era. Harper & brothers.  [3]
  • Tilos. Tilos Park website. Retrieved on April 23, 2005.
  • Tilos for sailors. Tilos sailor information. Retrieved on June 18, 2007.

Coordinates: 36°26′N, 27°22′E The Dodecanese (Greek: Δωδεκάνησα, Dodekánisa, meaning twelve islands; see also List of traditional Greek place names) are a group of Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, off the southwest coast of Turkey. ... Afantou (Αφάντου) is a municipality on the island of Rhodes, in the Dodecanese, Greece. ... Archangelos is a village on the island of Rhodes. ... Astipalea Astipalea (or Astypalea or Astypalaia, Αστυπάλαια) is a Greek island with 1. ... Attavyros (Αττάβυρος) is a municipality on the island of Rhodes, in the Dodecanese, Greece. ... Chalki (Halki, Khalki; Greek: Χάλκη) is a Greek island in Dodecanese archipelago in the Aegean Sea, some 6 km west or Rhodes. ... Dikaio (Δίκαιο) is a municipality on the island of Kos, in the Dodecanese, Greece. ... Ialysos (Greek: Ιαλυσός), also known as Trianta, is the second-largest town on the island of Rhodes (Ρόδος, Rhodos) in Greece. ... Irakleides (Ηρακλείδες) is a municipality on the island of Kos, in the Dodecanese, Greece. ... Kallithea (Καλλιθέα) is a municipality on the island of Rhodes, in the Dodecanese, Greece. ... Pothia Kalymnos, Greek: Κάλυμνος; (Turkish: Kilimli; Italian: Càlino) is a Greek island in the south-eastern Aegean Sea. ... Kameiros is a city on the island of Rhodes, lying on a peninsula on the northwest coast of the island. ... Karpathos (Greek: Κάρπαθος, Turkish : Kerpe, Italian :Scarpanto, Latin :Carpathus; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the second largest of the Greek Dodecanese islands, in southeast Aegean sea. ... Kasos is a Greek island in the Dodecanese. ... Port and city view of Kos town on the island Kos. ... Lipsi, viewed from the harbour Leipsoi (Greek: Λειψοί, also: Lipsi) is an island south of Samos and to the north of Leros in Greece. ... Leros: the village of Panteli Leros (Greek: Λέρος; Italian: Lèro) is a Greek island in the Dodecanese, in the southern Aegean Sea. ... Acropolis of Lindos: the restored stoa Lindos (Greek Λινδος;) is a town and an archaeological site on the east coast of the island of Rhodes (Rhodhos) in the Dodecanese Islands in south-eastern Greece. ... Location map Kastelorizo, current official name in Greek is Μεγίστη/Megisti; (Turkish: Meis , Italian: Castelrosso), is a small Greek island located in the Eastern Mediterranean. ... Satellite image of Nisyros island, an active volcano Nisyros (Greek: Νίσυρος; also transliterated Nissiros; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a volcanic Greek island located in the Aegean Sea. ... Skala viewed from the Monastery of Agios Ioannis Theologos, one of the UN World Heritage Sites. ... Petaloudes (Πεταλούδες) is a municipality on the island of Rhodes, in the Dodecanese, Greece. ... Rhodes (Greek: Ρόδος - Ródos) is the main city of the Greek island of Rhodes, in the Aegean Sea. ... South Rhodes (Νότια Ρόδος) is a municipality on the island of Rhodes, in the Dodecanese, Greece. ... Yialos, Symi Harbour, seen from Chorio Symi (Greek: Σύμη, also transliterated Syme or Simi; Ottoman Turkish سومبكى Sömbeki; see also list of traditional Greek place names) is a small but historic Greek island. ... Agathonisi (Αγαθονήσι) is a small island located at the northernmost point of the Dodecanese prefecture in Greece. ... Olympos (Όλυμπος) is a community on the island of Karpathos, in the Dodecanese, Greece. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Tilos - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1168 words)
From the turn of the 4th century BC, for the next 200 years, Tilos was subject to the Seleucid Empire, Caria and then Ptolemaic Egypt under the influence of Rhodes, until in 200 BC, the island was incorporated in to the Rhodian confederacy.
Tilos followed Rhodes into the Byzantine Empire following the death of Theodosius I and was a member of the naval Theme of Samos between the 9th and 14th centuries.
In 1523, Tilos was occupied by the Ottoman Empire and the island was put under the privileged administrative and tax system known as "maktou".
Tilos Radio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (362 words)
Tilos Radio was the first community radio station in Hungary, as a pirate broadcaster established in 1991.
Tilos Radio was established as a pirate community radio station in Budapest in 1991 as a way of bringing the public's attention to the fact that there was at that time no legal framework for independent and community broadcasters.
During the first years of its broadcasting, Tilos (which means "forbidden" in Hungarian) enjoyed wide public interest and has played a key role in the liberalisation of the airwaves in Hungary, which happened in 1995.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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