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Encyclopedia > Tilde
~

v  d  e

Punctuation Magglio Jose Ordóñez (IPA /or. ... The term punctuation has two different linguistic meanings: in general, the act and the effect of punctuating, i. ...

apostrophe ( ' )
brackets ( ), [ ], { }, < >
colon ( : )
comma ( , )
dashes ( , , , )
ellipsis ( , ... )
exclamation mark ( ! )
full stop/period ( . )
guillemets ( « » )
hyphen ( -, )
question mark ( ? )
quotation marks ( ‘ ’, “ ” )
semicolon ( ; )
slash/stroke ( / )
solidus ( )
For the prime symbol (′) used for feet and inches, see Prime (symbol). ... For technical reasons, :) and some similar combinations starting with : redirect here. ... This article is about colons in punctuation. ... For other uses, see Comma. ... For other uses, see Dash (disambiguation). ... This article is about the punctuation symbol. ... an exclamation mark An exclamation mark, exclamation point or bang, !, is usually used after an interjection or exclamation to indicate strong feeling. ... A full stop or period (sometimes stop, full point or dot), is the punctuation mark commonly placed at the end of several different types of sentences in English and many other languages. ... Guillemets, also called angle quotes, are line segments, pointed as if arrows (« or »), sometimes forming a complementary set of punctuation marks used as a form of quotation mark. ... This article is about the punctuation mark. ... The question mark(?) (also known as an interrogation point, query,[1] or eroteme) is a punctuation mark that replaces the full stop at the end of an interrogative sentence. ... Quotation marks or inverted commas (also called quotes and speech marks) are punctuation marks used in pairs to set off speech, a quotation, a phrase or a word. ... A semicolon (  ;  ) is a punctuation mark. ... Due to technical limitations, /. redirects here. ... A solidus, oblique or slash, /, is a punctuation mark. ...

Interword separation

spaces ( ) ( ) ( )
interpunct ( · )
This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A space is a punctuation convention for providing interword separation in some scripts, including the Latin, Greek, Cyrillic, and Arabic. ... An interpunct · is a small dot used for interword separation in ancient Latin script, being perhaps the first consistent visual representation of word boundaries in written language. ...

General typography

ampersand ( & )
asterisk ( * )
at ( @ )
backslash ( )
bullet ( )
caret ( ^ )
currency ( ¤ ) ¢, $, , £, ¥, ₩,
dagger/obelisk ( ) ( )
degree ( ° )
inverted exclamation point ( ¡ )
inverted question mark ( ¿ )
number sign ( # )
numero sign ( )
percent and related signs
( %, ‰, )
pilcrow ( )
prime ( )
section sign ( § )
tilde/swung dash ( ~ )
umlaut/diaeresis ( ¨ )
underscore/understrike ( _ )
vertical/pipe/broken bar ( |, ¦ )
A specimen of roman typefaces by William Caslon Typography is the art and techniques of type design, modifying type glyphs, and arranging type. ... An ampersand (&), also commonly called an and sign is a logogram representing the conjunction and. ... An asterisk (*), is a typographical symbol or glyph. ... “@” redirects here. ... First introduced in 1960 by Bob Bemer , the backslash, , is a typographical mark (glyph) used chiefly in computing. ... In typography, a bullet is a typographical symbol or glyph used to introduce items in a list, like below, also known as the point of a bullet: This is the text of a list item. ... For other uses, see Caret (disambiguation). ... A two cent euro coin A US penny In currency, the cent is a monetary unit that equals th of the basic unit of value. ... $ redirects here. ... The euro (&#8364;; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve of the twenty-five nations that form the European Union (and four outside it, as well as Montenegro and Kosovo), which form the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). ... The Pound sign (£) is the symbol for Pound sterling, the currency of the United Kingdom, and some other currencies of the same name in other countries. ... ¥ ¥9 Chinese price sticker ¥ is a currency sign used for the following currencies: Chinese yuan (CNY) Japanese yen (JPY) The base unit of the two currencies above share the same Chinese character (圓/元/円), pronounced yuan in Mandarin Chinese and en in Standard Japanese. ... ₩ is a currency sign that is used for the following currencies: North Korean won South Korean won Woolong, a fictional currency in Cowboy Bebop Category: ... ₪ ₪ is a currency sign that is used for the Israeli new sheqel currency which replaced the Israeli sheqel in 1985. ... Everyone please stop nitpicking on the use of daggers in theoldnewthing blog! This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article describes the typographical or mathematical symbol. ... The inverted question mark and exclamation point are used to begin interrogative and exclamatory sentences, respectively, in written Spanish. ... The inverted question mark and exclamation point are used to begin interrogative and exclamatory sentences, respectively, in written Spanish. ... Number sign is one name for the symbol #, and is the preferred Unicode name for the codepoint represented by that glyph. ... The Numero sign (U+2116) or Number sign is used in many languages to indicate ordinal numbering, especially in names and titles, rather than the US-derived number sign, #. For example, instead of Number 4 Privet Drive or #4 Privet Drive, one could write № 4 Privet Drive. The symbol is... The percent sign (%) is the symbol used to indicate a percentage (that the preceding number is divided by one hundred). ... A pilcrow from the font Gentium, designed by J. Victor Gaultney, 2002. ... This article is not about the symbol for the set of prime numbers, ℙ. The prime (′, Unicode U+2032, &prime;) is a symbol with many mathematical uses: A complement in set theory: A′ is the complement of the set A A point related to another (e. ... The section sign (§; Unicode U+00A7, HTML entity &sect;) is a typographical character used mainly to refer to a particular section of a document, such as a legal code. ... The umlaut mark (or simply umlaut) and the trema or diaeresis mark (or simply diaeresis) are two diacritics consisting of a pair of dots placed over a letter. ... The underscore _ is the character with ASCII value 95. ... Vertical bar, verti-bar, vertical line, divider line, or pipe is the name of the character (|). Broken bar (¦) is a separate character. ...

Uncommon typography

asterism ( )
index/fist ( )
therefore sign ( )
lozenge ( )
interrobang ( )
irony mark ( ؟ )
reference mark ( )
sarcasm mark (+ +)
A specimen of roman typefaces by William Caslon Typography is the art and techniques of type design, modifying type glyphs, and arranging type. ... In typography, an asterism is a rare symbol consisting of three asterisks placed in a triangle, used to call attention to a passage or to separate sub-chapters in a book. ... The symbol ☞ is a rare punctuation mark, called an index or fist. ...   In a mathematical proof, the therefore sign is a symbol that is sometimes placed before a logical consequence, such as the conclusion of a syllogism. ... A lozenge (â—Š) is a form of rhombus. ... For other uses, see Interrobang (disambiguation). ... The Irony mark (ØŸ) (French: point d’ironie) is a punctuation mark that purports to indicate that a sentence should be understood at a second level. ... This page lists Japanese typographic symbols which are not included in kana or kanji. ... A sarcasm mark, also called a sarcasm point, helps the reader identify certain messages as being derogatory or ironic. ...

The tilde (~) is a grapheme with several uses. The name of the character comes from Spanish, from the Latin titulus meaning a title or superscription, and is pronounced til-de. It was originally written over a letter as a mark of abbreviation, but has since acquired a number of other uses as a diacritic mark or a character in its own right. In the latter capacity (especially in lexicography) it is also sometimes known as the swung dash (usually lengthened to ), twiddle or the squiggle. In typography, a grapheme is the atomic unit in written language. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Example of a letter with a diacritic A diacritical mark or diacritic, also called an accent, is a small sign added to a letter to alter pronunciation or to distinguish between similar words. ... The pursuit of lexicography is divided into two related disciplines: Practical lexicography is the art or craft of compiling, writing and editing dictionaries. ...

Contents

Diacritical use

In languages, the tilde is a diacritical mark (~) placed over a letter to indicate a change in pronunciation, such as nasalization. Example of a letter with a diacritic A diacritical mark or diacritic, also called an accent, is a small sign added to a letter to alter pronunciation or to distinguish between similar words. ... A Specimen of typeset fonts and languages, by William Caslon, letter founder; from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... In phonetics, nasalization is the production of a sound while the velum is lowered, so that air escapes partially or wholly through the nose during the production of the sound. ...


It was first used in the polytonic orthography of Ancient Greek, as a variant of the circumflex accent, representing a rise in pitch followed by a return to standard pitch. It has been suggested that Diacritics (Greek alphabet) be merged into this article or section. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Pitch accent is a kind of accent system employed in many languages around the world. ...


Later, it was used to make abbreviations in medieval Latin documents. When an "n" or "m" followed a vowel, it was often omitted, and a tilde (i.e. a small "n") was placed over the preceding vowel to indicate the missing letter. This is the origin of the use of tilde to indicate nasalization. The practice of using the tilde over a vowel to indicate omission of an "n" or "m" continued in printed books in French as a means of reducing text length until the 17th century. It was also used in Spanish. The tilde was also used occasionally to make other abbreviations, such as over the letter "q" to signify the word que (Fr. "that"). Scribal abbreviations were used by medieval scribes writing in Latin. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...


Languages where the tilde is part of the symbol "ñ", for the palatal nasal consonant /ɲ/ include: Ñ and ñ in Arial and Times New Roman, with an example word from Panare Ñ is a letter of the modern Roman alphabet formed by an N with a diacritical tilde. ... The palatal nasal is a type of consonant, used in some spoken languages. ...

  • Basque
  • Galician
  • Guarani
  • Mapudungun
  • Spanish. The tilded "n" ("ñ") developed from the grapheme "nn". It is usually regarded as a separate letter called eñe, rather than a letter-diacritic combination. The word tilde often designates any accent mark; for example, the acute accent in José is also called a tilde in Spanish.
  • Tetum

Languages and alphabets where the tilde is used as a sign of nasalization include: Basque (native name: euskara) is the language spoken by the Basque people who inhabit the Pyrenees in North-Central Spain and the adjoining region of South-Western France. ... Galician (Galician: galego, IPA: ) is a language of the Western Ibero-Romance branch, spoken in Galicia, an autonomous community with the constitutional status of historic nationality, located in northwestern Spain and small bordering zones in neighbouring autonomous communities of Asturias and Castilla y León. ... Guaraní (gwah-rah-nee) [gwarani] (local name: avañe&#7869;) is a language spoken in Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and southwestern Brazil. ... Mapudungun test of Wikipedia at Wikimedia Incubator Mapudungun (mapu means earth and dungun means to speak) is a language isolate spoken in central Chile and west central Argentina by the Mapuche (mapu is earth and che means people) people. ... Ñ and ñ in Arial and Times New Roman, with an example word from Panare Ñ is a letter of the modern Roman alphabet formed by an N with a diacritical tilde. ... A diacritic mark or accent mark is an additional mark added to a basic Greek &#948;&#953;&#945;&#954;&#961;&#951;&#964;&#953;&#954;&#972;&#962;, distinguishing and diacritical is used to mean distinguishing or distinctive. ... Tetum (also written as Tetun) is an Austronesian language, and one of its forms, Tetum- Praca, is one of the national languages of East Timor. ... In phonetics, nasalization is the production of a sound while the velum is lowered, so that air escapes partially or wholly through the nose during the production of the sound. ...

Languages and alphabets that use the tilde for other purposes: Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... In music, see elision (music). ... In Portuguese, the character Ã/ã represents a nasal central unrounded vowel, normally transcribed in IPA as (its exact height varies from open to mid according to the speakers dialect). ... Õ, or õ is a composition of the Latin letter O with the diacritic mark tilde. ... Indigenous languages of the Americas (or Amerindian Languages) are spoken by indigenous peoples from the southern tip of South America to Alaska and Greenland, encompassing the land masses which constitute the Americas. ... Guaraní (gwah-rah-nee) [gwarani] (local name: avañe&#7869;) is a language spoken in Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and southwestern Brazil. ... The Nheengatu tongue, often spelled Nhengatu, is also known by the Portuguese names língua geral da Amazônia and língua geral amazônica, both meaning Amazonian General Language, or even by the Latin lingua brasilica (Brazilian Language). ...

Vowels See also: IPA, Consonants Near‑close Close‑mid Mid Open‑mid Near‑open Open Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a rounded vowel. ... Guaraní (gwah-rah-nee) [gwarani] (local name: avañe&#7869;) is a language spoken in Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and southwestern Brazil. ... The Unicode Standard, Version 5. ... The velar nasal is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Velarization is a secondary articulation of consonants by which the back of the tongue is raised toward the velum during the articulation of the consonant. ... Australian English (AuE, AusE, en-AU) is the form of the English language used in Australia. ... A dark l is a common way of referring to a velarised alveolar lateral approximant. ... It has been suggested that Tonal language be merged into this article or section. ...

Lexicography

The tilde is often used in dictionaries to save space

In dictionaries, both bilingual and monolingual, the tilde is often referred to as a swung dash. It is often used to replace the headword of an entry when it occurs within the entry, in order to save space. For example, ~ enough would represent ironically enough at the entry for ironically. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Dictionary (disambiguation). ... A headword (or head word) is the word under which a set of related dictionary definitions will be listed. ...


Logic

In written mathematical logic, it represents negation (e.g. "~p" equals "not p".) Modern use has been replacing the tilde with the exclamation mark (!) for this purpose, to avoid confusion with equivalence relations. Logic (from Classical Greek λόγος logos; meaning word, thought, idea, argument, account, reason, or principle) is the study of the principles and criteria of valid inference and demonstration. ... Negation (i. ... In mathematics, an equivalence relation is a binary relation between two elements of a set which groups them together as being equivalent in some way. ...


Electronics

It can approximate the sine wave symbol (∿, U+223F), which is used in electronics to indicate alternating current, in place of +, −, or ⎓ for direct current. The Unicode Standard, Version 5. ... This article is about the engineering discipline. ... City lights viewed in a motion blurred exposure. ... Direct current (DC or continuous current) is the continuous flow of electricity through a conductor such as a wire from high to low potential. ...


Punctuation

The Spanish language motto of the Catholic Monarchs, "tanto monta" ("it rises as much"), is written in this inscription as "tãto mõta"
The Spanish language motto of the Catholic Monarchs, "tanto monta" ("it rises as much"), is written in this inscription as "tãto mõta"

It is sometimes used as punctuation (instead of a hyphen or dash) between two numbers, to indicate that they are a range, rather than subtraction, or a hyphenated number (such as a part number or model number). Japanese and other East Asian languages almost always use this convention, but it is often done for clarity in other languages as well. For example: 12~15 means "12 to 15", ~3 means "up to three" and 100~ means "100 and greater." However in English, a tilde preceding a number sometimes represents an approximation (see the following section). Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 994 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Alhambra Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 994 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Alhambra Metadata This file contains additional... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... Ferdinand on the left with Isabella on the right Coffins of the Catholic Monarchs at the Granada Cathedral The Catholic Monarchs (Spanish: los Reyes Católicos) is the collective title used in history for Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon. ... The term punctuation has two different linguistic meanings: in general, the act and the effect of punctuating, i. ... This article is about the punctuation mark. ... For other uses, see Dash (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Number (disambiguation). ... In mathematics, interval is a concept relating to the sequence and set-membership of one or more numbers. ... 5 - 2 = 3 (verbally, five minus two equals three) An example problem Subtraction is one of the four basic arithmetic operations; it is the inverse of addition. ... East Asian languages or the East Asian sprachbund describe two notional groupings of languages in East and Southeast Asia, either (1) languages which have been greatly influenced by Classical Chinese, or the CJKV Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese) area or (2) a larger grouping including the CJKV area as well...


In Japanese, the tilde is also used to separate a title and a subtitle in the same line. A colon is usually used in English for this purpose. This article is about colons in punctuation. ...


When used in conversations via email or instant messenger it might have been intended as a sarcasm mark or, in Asian cultures, as an extension of the final syllable to produce the same effect as "whyyyyyy" with "why~~". Used at the end of a word or sentence in fanfiction, it often denotes something said in a sing-song voice, or similar to the use in instant messengers and email, depending on context. A sarcasm mark, also called a sarcasm point, helps the reader identify certain messages as being derogatory or ironic. ...


Mathematics

In mathematics, the tilde, sometimes pronounced "twiddle," is often used to denote an equivalence relation between two objects. Thus "x ~ y" means "x is equivalent to y". (Note that this is usually quite different from stating that x equals y.) The expression "x ~ y" is sometimes read aloud as "x twiddles y," perhaps as an analogue to the verbal expression of "x = y." For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... In mathematics, an equivalence relation is a binary relation between two elements of a set which groups them together as being equivalent in some way. ... In mathematics, two mathematical objects are considered equal if they are precisely the same in every way. ...


There are two common contexts in which "~" is used to denote particular equivalence relations: It can be used to denote the asymptotical equality of two functions. For example, f(x) ~ g(x), means that limx→∞ f(x)/g(x) = 1. Additionally, in statistics and probability theory, ~ means "is distributed as." See random variable. In mathematics and applications, particularly the analysis of algorithms, asymptotic analysis is a method of classifying limiting behaviour, by concentrating on some trend. ... This article is about the field of statistics. ... Probability theory is the branch of mathematics concerned with analysis of random phenomena. ... In probability theory, a random variable is a quantity whose values are random and to which a probability distribution is assigned. ...


There is also a triple-tilde (≋), which is often used to show congruence, an equivalence relation in geometry. As an abstract term, congruence means similarity between objects. ... As an abstract term, congruence means similarity between objects. ...


In English it is sometimes used to represent approximation, for example ~10 would mean "approximately 10." Similar symbols are used in mathematics, such as in π ≈ 3.14, "π is about equal to 3.14." Since the double-tilde (≈) is not available from the keyboard except on the Macintosh (where it is Option-x on English layouts), the tilde (~) became a substitute for use in typed entry. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with estimation. ... When a circles diameter is 1, its circumference is Ï€. Pi or Ï€ is the ratio of a circles circumference to its diameter in Euclidean geometry, approximately 3. ... As an abstract term, congruence means similarity between objects. ... A 104-key PC US English QWERTY keyboard layout The Dvorak Simplified Keyboard layout A standard Hebrew keyboard showing both Hebrew and QWERTY. A computer keyboard is a peripheral partially modelled after the typewriter keyboard. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... A standard Hebrew keyboard showing both Hebrew and English (QWERTY) letters. ... This article is about entering text. ...


A tilde is also used to indicate "approximately equal to" (e.g. 1.902 ~= 2). This usage probably developed as a typed alternative to the libra symbol used for the same purpose in written mathematics, which is an equal sign (=) with the upper bar replaced by a bar with an upward hump or loop in the middle or, sometimes, a tilde. [Also see Approximation]. The symbol "≈" is also used for this purpose. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with estimation. ...


A tilde placed below a letter in mathematics can represent a vector quantity.


Computing

Directories and URLs

In Unix shells, the tilde indicates the current user's home directory (e.g., /home/username). When prepended to a particular username, it indicates that user's home directory (e.g., ~janedoe for the home directory of user janedoe, typically /home/janedoe). When some Unix shell commands overwrite a file, they can be made to keep a backup by renaming the original file as filename~. Screenshot of a sample Bash session, taken on Gentoo Linux. ... In computing, a home directory is a directory which contains the personal files of a particular user of the system. ...


Used in URLs on the World Wide Web, it often denotes a personal website on a Unix-based server. For example, http://www.example.com/~johndoe/ might be the personal web site of John Doe. This mimics the Unix shell usage of the tilde. However, when accessed from the web, file access is usually directed to a subdirectory in the user's home directory, such as /home/username/public_html or /home/username/www. “URL” redirects here. ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ... Filiation of Unix and Unix-like systems Unix (officially trademarked as UNIX®, sometimes also written as or ® with small caps) is a computer operating system originally developed in 1969 by a group of AT&T employees at Bell Labs including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie and Douglas McIlroy. ... This article is about the computing term. ...


In URLs, the characters %7E (or %7e) may substitute a tilde if an input device lacks a tilde key. Thus, http://www.example.com/~johndoe/ and http://www.example.com/%7Ejohndoe/ are essentially the same URL.


Computer languages

It is used in the Perl programming language as part of the pattern match operators for regular expressions: Wikibooks has a book on the topic of Perl Programming Perl is a dynamic programming language created by Larry Wall and first released in 1987. ... A programming language is an artificial language that can be used to control the behavior of a machine, particularly a computer. ... In computing, a regular expression is a string that is used to describe or match a set of strings, according to certain syntax rules. ...

  • $a =~ /regex/ returns true if the variable is matched.
  • $a !~ /regex/ returns false if the variable is matched.

The popularity of Perl's regular expression and syntax has led to the use of these operators in other programming languages, such as Ruby or the SQL variant of the database PostgreSQL. Ruby is a reflective, object-oriented programming language. ... SQL (IPA: or ), commonly expanded as Structured Query Language, is a computer language designed for the retrieval and management of data in relational database management systems, database schema creation and modification, and database object access control management. ... PostgreSQL is a free software object-relational database management system (ORDBMS), released under a BSD-style license. ...


In the C and C++ programming languages, the tilde character is used as an operator to invert all bits of an integer (bitwise NOT), following the notation in logic (an ! causes a logical NOT, instead). In C++, the tilde is also used as the first character in a class's method name (where the rest of the name must be the same name as the class) to indicate a destructor - a special method which is called at the end of the object's life. C is a general-purpose, block structured, procedural, imperative computer programming language developed in 1972 by Dennis Ritchie at the Bell Telephone Laboratories for use with the Unix operating system. ... C++ (pronounced see plus plus, IPA: ) is a general-purpose programming language with high-level and low-level capabilities. ... It has been suggested that Comma operator be merged into this article or section. ... BIT is an acronym for: Bannari amman Institute of Technology Bangalore Institute of Technology Beijing Institute of Technology Benzisothiazolinone Bilateral Investment Treaty Bhilai Institute of Technology - Durg Birla Institute of Technology - Mesra Battles in Time (Doctor Who magazine) BIT International College, formerly the Bohol Institute of Technology in Bohol, Philippines... The integers are commonly denoted by the above symbol. ... In object-oriented programming, a class is a programming language construct used to group related fields and methods. ... In object-oriented programming, the term method refers to a subroutine that is exclusively associated either with a class (called class methods, static methods, or factory methods) or with an object (called instance methods). ... In object-oriented programming, a destructor (sometimes shortened to dtor) is a method which is automatically invoked when the object is destroyed. ... In computer science, the object lifetime (or life cycle) of an object in object-oriented programming is the time between an objects creation (also known as instantiation or construction) till the object is no longer used, and is destructed or freed. ...


In the D programming language, the tilde is used as an array concatenation operator, as well as to indicate an object destructor. D is an object-oriented, imperative system programming language designed by Walter Bright of Digital Mars as a re-engineering of C/C++. He has done this by re-designing many C++ features, and borrowing ideas from other programming languages. ... For the microarray in genetics, see SNP array. ... Concatenation is a standard operation in computer programming languages (a subset of formal language theory). ...


In the CSS stylesheet language, the tilde is used for the indirect adjacent combinator as part of a selector. “CSS” redirects here. ...


In the Inform programming language, the tilde is used to indicate a quotation mark inside a quoted string. Inform is a programming language and design system for interactive fiction originally created in 1993 by Graham Nelson. ...


In Max/MSP, a tilde is used to denote objects that process at the computer's sampling rate, i.e. mainly those that deal with sound. Alternate meanings: MAX Max is a graphical development environment for music and multimedia developed and maintained by San Francisco-based software company Cycling74. ...


In "text mode" of the LaTeX typesetting language a stand-alone tilde can be obtained with ~{} and for use as a diacritics, e.g., like ~{n} rendering "ñ". In "math mode" a stand-alone tilde can be written as tilde{~} and as diacritics, e.g., tilde{x}. For a wider tilde the widetilde can be used. The sim command produce a tilde-like character that is often used in probability mathematical equations, and the double-tilde is obtained with approx. In both text and math mode a tilde on its own (~) is rendering a white space with no line breaking. This article is about the typesetting system. ... Probability is the likelihood that something is the case or will happen. ... This article is about equations in mathematics. ...


The Emacs text editor forms the names used for backup files by appending a tilde to the original file name. This article is about the text editor. ...


Microsoft filenames

The tilde was part of Microsoft's filename mangling scheme when it developed the VFAT filesystem. This upgrade introduced long filenames to Microsoft Windows, and permitted additional characters (such as the space) to be part of filenames, which were prohibited in previous versions. Programs written prior to this development could only access filenames in the so-called 8.3 format—the filenames consisted of a maximum of eight alphanumeric characters, followed by a period, followed by three more alphanumeric characters. In order to permit these legacy programs to access files in the VFAT filesystem, each file had to be given two names—one long, more descriptive one, and one that conformed to the 8.3 format. This was accomplished with a name-mangling scheme in which the first six characters of the filename are followed by a tilde and a digit. For example, "Program Files" becomes "PROGRA~1". Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... For the concept of name mangling within compilers, see name mangling The process of name mangling, in computing, involves a re-writing of the file name for compatibility at the operating system level. ... File Allocation Table (FAT) is a partially patented file system developed by Microsoft for MS-DOS and was the primary file system for consumer versions of Microsoft Windows up to and including Windows Me. ... “Windows” redirects here. ...


Also, the tilde symbol is used to prefix hidden temporary files that are created when a document is opened in Windows. For example, when you open a Word document called "Document1.doc," a file called "~ocument1.doc" will be created in the same directory. This file contains information about which user has the file open, to prevent multiple users from attempting to change a document at the same time.


In Games

In many games, the tilde key is used to open the developer console, this is evident in games such as Half-Life 2 and Unreal. Half-Life 2 (HL2) is a science fiction first-person shooter computer game that is the sequel to Half-Life. ... Unreal is a first-person shooter computer game developed by Epic Games and published by GT Interactive (now owned by Atari) on May 22, 1998. ...


Other uses

Computer programmers use the tilde in various ways and often call the symbol (as opposed to the diacritic) a squiggle or a twiddle. According to the Jargon File, other synonyms sometimes used in programming include not, approx, wiggle, enyay (after eñe) and (humorously) sqiggle. In computing, a programmer is someone who does computer programming and develops computer software. ... The Jargon File is a glossary of hacker slang. ... Computer programming (often simply programming) is the craft of implementing one or more interrelated abstract algorithms using a particular programming language to produce a concrete computer program. ... Ñ and ñ in Arial and Times New Roman, with an example word from Panare Ñ is a letter of the modern Roman alphabet formed by an N with a diacritical tilde. ...


In Google search, the tilde entered before a search query word displays listings with that word and synonyms of it.[1] Google is owned by Google, Inc. ...


In MediaWiki, three subsequent tildes (~~~) create a "signature" (which can be customised by the user), five subsequent tildes (~~~~~) result the time in UTC, and four subsequent tildes (~~~~) result in signature followed by the time in UTC. For the organization that manages Wikipedia and its sister projects, see Wikimedia Foundation. ... ...


Juggling notation

In the juggling notation system beatmap, tilde can be added to either "hand" in a pair of fields to say "cross the arms with this hand on top". Mills Mess is thus represented as (~2x,1)(1,2x)(2x,~1)*.[2] Juggling is a form of skillful, often artful, object manipulation. ... An illustration of the 3-ball Mills mess. ...


Vertical tilde

Unicode has a combining vertical tilde character, at U+033E  ̾. It is used to indicate middle tone in the Lithuanian language[3] and for transliteration of the Cyrillic palatalization sign (U+484   ҄)[citation needed]. The Unicode Standard, Version 5. ... Combining diacritical marks are Unicode characters that are intended to modify other characters (see Diacritic). ... It has been suggested that Tonal language be merged into this article or section. ... Lithuanian is the official language of Lithuania, spoken by about 4 million native speakers (Lithuanians). ... The Cyrillic alphabet (or azbuka, from the old name of the first two letters) is an alphabet used for several East and South Slavic languages; (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Rusyn, Serbian, and Ukrainian) and many other languages of the former Soviet Union, Asia and Eastern Europe. ...


How to type a tilde

How to type a single tilde ~ depends on the computer's country settings:[4]

Country:          Keys:
Australia Shift + `
Canada (English) Shift + `
Canada (French) Alt Gr + ç, release both and click space bar (for two tildes at once Alt Gr + two times ç ).
France Alt Gr + é, release both and click space bar (for two tildes at once Alt Gr + two times é ).
Germany Alt Gr + +
India (Hindi) Shift + Alt Gr + the key on the left from 1 .
Spain Alt Gr + 4, release both and click space bar (for two tildes at once Alt Gr + two times 4 ).
Sweden Alt Gr + ¨, release both and click space bar (for two tildes at once Alt Gr + two times ¨ ).
Switzerland (German or French) Alt Gr + ^, release both and click space bar (for two tildes at once Alt Gr + two times ^ ).
UK Shift + #
US Shift + `

Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from...

See also

The circumflex ( ˆ ) (often called a caret, a hat or an uppen) is a diacritic mark used in written Greek, French, Dutch, Esperanto, Norwegian, Romanian, Slovak, Vietnamese, Japanese romaji, Welsh, Portuguese, Italian, Afrikaans and other languages, and formerly in Turkish [citation needed]. It received its English name from Latin circumflexus (bent... The term punctuation has two different linguistic meanings: in general, the act and the effect of punctuating, i. ... A quick access to special characters, especially unicode graphical characters, the high density of graphical characters per squared centimeters of screen is seen as an excellent browsing tool, however the raw numbers of each group also greatly benefit from a semantic description of its content // 0000 ! # $ % & ( ) * + , - . / 0 1 2 3... i j A tittle is a small distinguishing mark, such as a diacritic or the dot over an i or a j. ... P with tilde (majuscule: , minuscule: ) is a letter of the Latin alphabet, derived from P with the addition of a tilde. ...

References

  1. ^ www.google.com
  2. ^ The Internet Juggling Database
  3. ^ Lithuanian Standards Board (LST), proposal for a zigazag diacritic.
  4. ^ Windows XP settings

External links

The ISO basic Latin alphabet
Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz
Letters using tilde sign
ÃãẼẽĨĩÑñÕõŨũṼṽỸỹ

  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia4U - Tilde - Encyclopedia Article (324 words)
A tilde is a diacritic mark (~) put over a letter (usually a vowel) to indicate nasalization.
In Spanish, tilde over n (ñ;) is a separate letter (called eñe) and is a palatal [n] (SAMPA J, IPA [ɲ;]), pronounced like nh in Portuguese.
The tilde was originally used as a form of contraction in Latin documents.
Tilde - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1730 words)
The practice of using the tilde over a vowel to indicate omission of an "n" or "m" continued in printed books in French as a means of reducing text length until the 17th century.
In C++, the tilde is also used as the first character in a class's method name (where the rest of the name must be the same name as the class) to indicate a destructor - a special method which is called at the end of the object's life.
In the CSS stylesheet language, the tilde is used for the indirect adjacent combinator as part of a selector.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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