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Encyclopedia > Tikopia

Tikopia is the southernmost of the Santa Cruz Islands, located in the province of Temotu. It is also the southernmost of the Solomon Islands. The Santa Cruz Islands are a group of islands in the Pacific Ocean, part of the nation of the Solomon Islands. ... Temotu is the easternmost province of the Solomon Islands. ...

Tikopia and inset showing position
Tikopia and inset showing position

Tikopia is a high island, covering an area of 5 km² (2 sq. mi.). The island is the remnant of an extinct volcano, its highest point, Mt. Reani, reaching an elevation of 380 m (1,247 ft) above sea level. Image File history File links TikopiaMap. ... Image File history File links TikopiaMap. ... High Island is the name of several places in the United States: Communities High Island, Texas Islands High Island (Michigan) High Island (New York) High Island (Connecticut) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A volcano is a geological landform usually generated by the eruption through a planets surface of magma, molten rock welling up from the planets interior. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ...


The population of Tikopia is about 1,200. Historically the tiny island has supported a high-density population of a thousand or so. Strict reproductive policy prevented further increase. Unlike most of the Solomon Islands, the inhabitants are Polynesians, and their language Tikopian is a member of the Samoic branch of the Polynesian languages. Polynesia (from Greek, poly = many and nesi = island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands in the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... The Samoic languages are one of the primary classes of Polynesian languages, encompassing the Polynesian languages of Samoa, Tuvalu, American Samoa, Tokelau, Wallis and Futuna, as well as a number of languages, spoken in parts of Tonga, the Cook Islands, New Caledonia, the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea, and... The Polynesian languages are a group of related languages spoken in the region known as Polynesia. ...


Tikopians practice an intensive permaculture system similar in principle to forest gardening, and the gardens of the New Guinea highlands. Their agricultural practices are strongly and consciously tied to the population density. For example, around 1600, the people agreed to slaughter all pigs on the island, and substitute fishing, because the pigs were taking too much food that could be eaten by people. Permaculture Mandala summarising the ethics and principles of permaculture design. ... Forest gardening (also known as 3-Dimensional Gardening) is a food production and land management system based on replicating woodland edge ecosystems, substituting trees (such as fruit or nut trees), bushes, shrubs, herbs and vegetables which have yields directly useful to humankind. ...


Unlike the rapidly westernizing society of much of the rest of Temotu province, Tikopia society is little-changed from ancient times. Its people take great pride in their customs, and see themselves as holding fast to their Polynesian traditions while they regard the Melanesians around them to have lost most of theirs.


Four chiefs reign over the islands of Tikopia and Anuta. The chiefs still hold court in their huts.


Tikopians have a highly developed culture with a strong Polynesian influence, including a complex social structure. The influence of Polynesian culture is not so far distant from local memory: it has not been so long since widespread infanticide was as natural and as necessary as sharing food and learning to dance. Because of these population control methods, pre-contact Tikopian society was described as idyllic. Its society was strongly communal: the sea was full of fish, the land grew excellent food, and the people supported one another. In sociology and biology, infanticide is the practice of intentionally causing the death of an infant of a given species, by members of the same species. ...


New Zealand anthropologist, Raymond Firth, who lived on Tikopia in 1928 and 1929 found a "cult of virginity" and widespread infanticide among the islanders, whom he described as gentle and loving. Reproductive policy was particularly restrictive, however: only the eldest son in each family was allowed to have children and when an unwanted child was born, the face of the child was "turned down", a euphemism for infanticide. The most common method was the deliberate blocking of the infant's nasal passages by an adult's fingers. See Anthropology. ... Sir Raymond William Firth (born March 25, 1901 in Auckland; died February 22, 2002 in London) was an ethnologist from New Zealand. ... A euphemism is an expression intended by the speaker to be less offensive, disturbing, or troubling to the listener than the word or phrase it replaces, or in the case of doublespeak to make it less troublesome for the speaker. ... In sociology and biology, infanticide is the practice of intentionally causing the death of an infant of a given species, by members of the same species. ...


Today, Firth's "cult of virginity" is long since gone. While the reasons for this might be regarded as due to the introduction of Christianity, there is an important demographic element as well: many of the young men leave the island, heading to either the Russell Islands or the national capital, Honiara, in search of work. As a result of this outflow of men, population control is less necessary. Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as recounted in the New Testament. ... The Russell Islands are two important small islands, as well as several islets, of volcanic origin, in the central Solomon Islands. ... Honiara, population 30,413 (1986), is the capital of the Solomon Islands. ...


Vegetation and human settlements in Tikopia were devastated following Cyclone Zoe's landfall in December 2002. Surprisingly, despite the extensive damage, no deaths were reported. Severe tropical cyclone Zoe was one of the most intense tropical cyclones which have been detected at Southern Pacific Ocean. ... Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


See also

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Oceania is a geographical, often geopolitical, region consisting of numerous lands – mostly islands but often including Australia – in the Pacific Ocean and vicinity. ... The Pacific Ocean has an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 islands; the exact number has not been precisely determined. ... Polynesian outliers are a number of Polynesian islands which lie in Melanesia and Micronesia. ... Severe tropical cyclone Zoe was one of the most intense tropical cyclones which have been detected at Southern Pacific Ocean. ... Jared Diamond Jared Mason Diamond (born 10 September 1937) is a Jewish-American nonfiction author, evolutionary biologist, physiologist, and biogeographer. ... Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed cover Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed is a 2005 English-language book by University of California, Los Angeles geography professor Jared M. Diamond, (ISBN 0143036556). ... Location of Easter Island. ...

External links

  • An essay on Tikopia, prepared for the BBC
  • BBC photo essay, from the aftermath of Cyclone Zoe Despite the overwhelming devastation and the greatest fears, no one on Tikopia was killed in the disaster.
  • Tools and practical help after the cyclone
  • Restoring the freshwater lagoon of Tikopia
Island groups in Polynesia
Austral Islands • Cook Islands • Easter Island • Gambier Islands • Hawaiian Islands • Kermadec Islands • Loyalty Islands • Marquesas • Islands of New Zealand • Pitcairn Islands • Samoan Islands • Society Islands • Tokelau • Tonga Islands • Tuamotus • Tuvalu • Wallis and Futuna Islands

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tikopia - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article (546 words)
Tikopia is the southernmost of the Santa Cruz Islands, located in the province of Temotu.
Tikopia is a high island, covering an area of 5 km² (2 sq.
Reproductive policy was particularly restrictive, however: only the eldest son in each family was allowed to have children and when an unwanted child, for economic or virginic ideal reasons, was born, the face of the child was "turned down", a euphemism for infanticide.
Solomon Islands: About Tikopia (389 words)
Tikopia is part of Temotu Province, the most easterly part of the Solomon Islands.
Four chiefs rule the island of Tikopia and the neighbouring islands of Anuta and Fatutaka.
Only the eldest son in each family was allowed to have children and when an unwanted child was born to a single woman who became pregnant or to a married couple who could not cope with another child, the face of the child is turned down.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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