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Encyclopedia > Tigranes the Great

This article is about a king of Armenia in the 1st century BCE. For other historical figures with the same name (including other kings of Armenia) see Tigranes. “BCE” redirects here. ... Tigranes (sometimes Tigran or Dikran) was the name of a number of historical figures, primarily kings of Armenia. ...

Tigranes II
King of Armenia
Tigranes II
Reign 95 BCE55 BCE
Predecessor Tigranes I
Successor Artavasdes II
Wife/wives Cleopatra
Royal House Artaxiad
Father Artavasdes I or Tigranes I

Tigranes the Great (Armenian: Տիգրան Մեծ, EA: Tigran Mets, WA: Dikran Medz, Greek: Τιγράνης ο Μέγας) (ruled 95 BCE55 BCE) (also called Tigranes II and sometimes Tigranes I) was a king of Armenia under whom the country became, for a short time, the strongest state in the Roman East.[1] Tigranes was born around 140 BCE and was the son or nephew of either Artavasdes I or Tigranes I.[2] Tigranes the Great represented the Artaxiad Royal House. He was married to Cleopatra, daughter of Mithridates VI of Pontus. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 316 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (422 × 800 pixel, file size: 145 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC - 90s BC - 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC Years: 100 BC 99 BC 98 BC 97 BC 96 BC - 95 BC - 94 BC 93 BC 92... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 60 BC 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56 BC 55 BC 54 BC 53 BC 52... Tigranes I of Armenia (Armenian: Տիգրան Ô±Õ¼Õ¡Õ»Õ«Õ¶) reigned as King of Armenia from 115 BC to 95 BC. Artavasdes I did not leave any heir; his brother, Tigranes ascended to the throne of the Artaxiads. ... Artavasdes II King Artavasdes II ruled Armenia from 53 to 34 BC. He succeeded his father, Tigranes the Great. ... Cleopatra of Pontus (born 110 BC) was the Pontian wife of Tigranes the Great and daughter of Mithridates VI of Pontus. ... The Artaxiad Dynasty ruled Armenia from 189 BC until their overthrow by the Romans in AD 12. ... External Links and References Armenica. ... Tigranes I of Armenia (Armenian: Տիգրան Ô±Õ¼Õ¡Õ»Õ«Õ¶) reigned as King of Armenia from 115 BC to 95 BC. Artavasdes I did not leave any heir; his brother, Tigranes ascended to the throne of the Artaxiads. ... Eastern Armenian is one of the two modern dialects of Armenian (an Indo-European language), spoken in the Caucasus mountains (particularly in the Armenian Republic). ... Western Armenian is one of the two modern dialects of Armenian, an Indo-European language spoken by the Armenian Diaspora, mainly in North America and Europe, but also in limited pockets of western Turkey and northern Syria. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC - 90s BC - 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC Years: 100 BC 99 BC 98 BC 97 BC 96 BC - 95 BC - 94 BC 93 BC 92... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 60 BC 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56 BC 55 BC 54 BC 53 BC 52... (Redirected from 140 BCE) Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC - 140s BC - 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC Years: 145 BC 144 BC 143 BC 142 BC 141 BC - 140 BC... External Links and References Armenica. ... Tigranes I of Armenia (Armenian: Տիգրան Ô±Õ¼Õ¡Õ»Õ«Õ¶) reigned as King of Armenia from 115 BC to 95 BC. Artavasdes I did not leave any heir; his brother, Tigranes ascended to the throne of the Artaxiads. ... The Artaxiad Dynasty ruled Armenia from 189 BC until their overthrow by the Romans in AD 12. ... Cleopatra of Pontus (born 110 BC) was the Pontian wife of Tigranes the Great and daughter of Mithridates VI of Pontus. ... A silver coin depicting Mithradates VI of Pontus. ...


He was involved in many battles during his reign. He fought battles against the Parthian, Seleucid empires, and Roman Republic. Parthian Empire at its greatest extent, c60 BCE. The Parthian Empire was the dominating force on the Iranian plateau beginning in the late 3rd century BCE, and intermittently controlled Mesopotamia between ca 190 BCE and 224 CE. Parthia was the arch-enemy of the Roman Empire in the east and... The Seleucid Empire was a Hellenistic successor state of Alexander the Greats dominion. ... This article refers to the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For alternate meanings, see Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ...

Contents

Early years

Tigranes had been a hostage until the age of 40 at the court of King Mithradates II of Parthia who defeated the Armenians in 105 BCE. Other sources also give the date much earlier, at around the years of 112-111.[2] After the death of King Tigranes I in 95 BCE, Tigranes bought his freedom by handing over "seventy valleys" in Atropatene (Iranian Azerbaijan) to the Parthians.[3] Coin of Mithridates II from the mint at Seleucia. ... Parthia[1] (Middle Persian: اشکانیان Ashkâniân) was a civilization situated in the northeast of modern Iran, but at its height covering all of Iran proper, as well as regions of the modern countries of Armenia, Iraq, Georgia, eastern Turkey, eastern Syria, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Pakistan, Kuwait, the Persian Gulf... (Redirected from 105 BCE) Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC - 100s BC - 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC Years: 110 BC 109 BC 108 BC 107 BC 106 BC - 105 BC... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC - 90s BC - 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC Years: 100 BC 99 BC 98 BC 97 BC 96 BC - 95 BC - 94 BC 93 BC 92... Azerbaijan or Azerbeijan (Azerbaijani: Azərbaycan, Azərbeycan) is a country in the Caucaus region, adjacent to the Caspian Sea. ... Azerbaijan or Azarbaijan, also Iranian Azarbaijan, Iranian Azerbaijan, or Persian Azarbaijan (Persian: آذربایجان ایران; Ä€zārbāijān-e Irān; Azerbaijani language: آذربایجان), is a region in northwestern Iran and south of Armenia and the Republic of Azerbaijan. ...

Coin of Tigranes II. The Greek inscription reads ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΤΙΓΡΑΝΟΥ ("[coin] of King Tigranes").

When he came to power, the foundation upon which Tigranes was to build his Empire was already in place thanks to the founder of the Artaxiad Dynasty, Artaxias I, and subsequent kings. The mountains of Armenia, however, formed natural borders between the different regions of the country and as a result, the feudalistic nakharars had significant influence over the regions or provinces in which they were based. This didn't suit Tigranes who wanted to create a centralist empire. He thus proceeded by consolidating his power in Armenia before embarking on his campaign.[4] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Artaxias I (also called Artaxes or Artashes) (reigned 190 BCE-159 BCE) was one of the founders of the kingdom of Armenia and its first independent ruler. ... Nakharar (Armenian: , plural Armenian Nakhararq, Õ†Õ¡Õ­Õ¡Ö€Õ¡Ö€Ö„, meaning first born) was a hereditary title of the highest order for the ancient and medieval Armenian nobility. ...


He deposed Artanes, the last king of Armenian Sophene and a descendant of Zariadres.[3] Roman province of Sophene, 120 CE Armenia Sophene was a short-lived (c. ... Zariadres I (died 190 BC) was King of Sophene and the son of Xerses I and Antiochis of Syria. ...


Alliance with Pontus

During the First Mithridatic War (90-85 BCE) he supported Mithridates VI of Pontus but was careful not to become directly involved in the war. The First Mithridatic War was fought between the Roman Republic and Mithridates VI Eupator Dionysius, the king of Pontus. ... A silver coin depicting Mithradates VI of Pontus. ... Traditional rural Pontic house A man in traditional clothes from Trabzon, illustration Pontus is the name which was applied, in ancient times, to extensive tracts of country in the northeast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) bordering on the Euxine (Black Sea), which was often called simply Pontos (the main), by...


He rapidly built up his power, allying with Mithridates VI of Pontus and marrying his daughter Cleopatra. Tigranes had agreed that he was to extend his influence in the East, while Mithridates was to conquer Roman land in Anatolia and in Europe. By creating a stronger Hellenistic state, Mithridates was to contend the well-established Roman foothold in Europe.[4] At that time, in 88 BCE, the Romans had accused Mithridates of massacring about 80,000 Romans in the Anatolian province of Asia. Ultimately the two kings' attempts to control Cappadocia, as well as the alleged massacres, resulted in Roman intervention. The senate decided on Lucius Cornelius Sulla, who was then one of the current consuls, to be commander of the army against Mithridates.[5] Cleopatra of Pontus (born 110 BC) was the Pontian wife of Tigranes the Great and daughter of Mithridates VI of Pontus. ... Roman conquest of Asia minor The Roman province of Asia was the administrative unit added to the late Republic, a Senatorial province governed by a proconsul. ... For other uses, see Cappadocia (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix (Latin: L•CORNELIVS•L•F•P•N•SVLLA•FELIX)[1] (ca. ...


Wars against the Parthian Empire

After the death of Mithridates II of Parthia in 88 BCE, Tigranes took advantage of the fact that the Parthian Empire had been weakened by Scythian invasions and internal squabbling: Coin of Mithridates II from the mint at Seleucia. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC - 80s BC - 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC Years: 93 BC 92 BC 91 BC 90 BC 89 BC - 88 BC - 87 BC 86 BC 85... Scythia was an area in Eurasia inhabited in ancient times by an Indo-Aryans known as the Scythians. ...

"When he acquired power, he recovered these (seventy) valleys, and devastated the country of the Parthians, the territory about Ninus (Nineveh), and that about Arbela. He subjected to his authority the Atropatenians (in Azerbaijan), and the Goryaeans (on the Upper Tigris); by force of arms he obtained possession also of the rest of Mesopotamia and, after crossing the Euphrates, of Syria and Phoenicea." Strabo, (XI.xiv.16)
Tigranes the Great's Empire
Tigranes the Great's Empire

, For other uses, see Nineveh (disambiguation). ... Arbil, (or Erbil or Irbil, known as Hewler in Kurdish), is one of Iraqs larger cities, located at 36. ... The Tigris is the eastern member of the pair of great rivers that define Mesopotamia, along with the Euphrates, which flows from the mountains of Anatolia through Iraq. ... Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ... For the song River Euphrates by the Pixies, see Surfer Rosa. ... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 453 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 850 pixel, file size: 195 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 453 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 850 pixel, file size: 195 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...

Conqueror of the Seleucid Empire

In 83 BCE, after a bloody strife for the throne of Syria, governed by the Seleucids, the Syrians decided to choose Tigran as the protector of their kingdom and offered him the crown of Syria.[6] He then conquered Phoenicia and Cilicia, effectively putting an end to the Seleucid Empire, though a few holdout cities appear to have recognized the shadowy boy-king Seleucus VII Philometor as the legitimate king during his reign. The southern border of his domain reached as far as Ptolemais (modern Akko). Many of the inhabitants of conquered cities were sent to his new metropolis of Tigranakert (Latin name, Tigranocerta). Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC - 80s BC - 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC Years: 88 BC 87 BC 86 BC 85 BC 84 BC - 83 BC - 82 BC 81 BC 80... Phoenicia (or Phenicia ,[1] from Biblical Phenice [1]) was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coast of modern day Lebanon and Syria. ... Cilicia as Roman province, 120 AD In Antiquity, Cilicia (Κιλικία) was the name of a region, now known as Çukurova, and often a political unit, on the southeastern coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey), north of Cyprus. ... The Seleucid Empire was a Hellenistic successor state of Alexander the Greats dominion. ... The last members of the once mighty Seleucid dynasty are shadowy figures; local dynasts with complicated family ties whose identities are hard to ascertain: many of them also bore the same names. ... Ptolemais is the Ancient name for several cities in the Mediterranean region: Ptolemais (Cyrenaica), a city in the Pentapolis of Cyrenaica; Ptolemais Ace (modern Akko), a city in the province of Syria; Ptolemais Hermiou, a city in Egypt; and Ptolemais Theron, a city founded on the coast of the Red... The Old City of Akko in the 19th or early 20th century, looking south-west from atop the Land Wall Promenade, the open space now a parking lot. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tigranakert (also spelled Dikranagerd), now known as Dyarbekir, was founded by the Armenian Emperor Dikran the Great in the 1st century BC and after the fall of Julius Caesar. ...


At its height his empire extended from the Pontic Alps (in modern north-eastern Turkey) to Mesopotamia, and from the Caspian to the Mediterranean. Tigranes apparently invaded as far as Ecbatana and took the title king of kings which, at the time, according to their coins, even the Parthian kings did not assume. The Pontic Mountains (Turkish Doğu Karadeniz Dağları) are a range of mountains in northern Turkey, whose eastern end extends into southeastern Georgia. ... Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ... For Caspian Sea, go to: Caspian Sea CASPIAN Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (CASPIAN) is a national grass-roots consumer group dedicated to fighting supermarket loyalty or frequent shopper cards. ... Golden Rhyton from Irans Achaemenid period. ... King of Kings is a lofty title that has been used by several monarchies (usually empires in the informal sense of great powers) throughout history, and in many cases the literal title meaning King of Kings, i. ...


He was called "Tigranes the Great" by many Western historians and writers such as Plutarch. The "King of Kings" never appeared in public without having four kings attending him. Cicero, probably speaking of his success in the East, said that he "made the Republic of Rome tremble before the prowess of his arms."[7] Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ... For other uses, see Cicero (disambiguation). ...


Armenian rulers prior to Tigranes didn't issue coins; he was the first one to do it. He took up the Seleucid tradition and struck coins of great interest. These were minted at Antioch and Damascus, cities under his rule during his occupation of Syria from 83 to 69 BC. They consist of tetradrachms and copper coins having on the obverse his portrait wearing a decorated Armenian tiara with ear-flaps. The reverse has a completely original design. There's the seated Tyche of Antioch and the river god Orontes at her feet. There are even specimens struck in gold.[8] ISO 4217 Code GRD User(s) Greece Inflation 3. ... Tyche on the reverse of this coin by Gordian III. The Tyche of Antioch, Galleria dei Candelabri, Vatican Museums In Greek mythology, Tyche (Τύχη, meaning luck in Greek, Roman equivalent: Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. ... The Orontes or ‘Asi is a river of Lebanon and Syria. ...


Wars against Rome

Mithridates had found refuge in Armenian land after confronting Rome, considering the fact that Tigranes was his ally and relative. The "King of Kings" eventually came into direct contact with Rome. Lucullus demanded the expulsion of Mithridates from Armenia; such a thing was impossible for Tigranes. Rollins, in his Ancient History, says:[7]

" Tigranes, to whom Lucullus had sent an ambassador, though of no great power in the beginning of his reign, had enlarged it so much by a series of successes, of which there are few examples, that he was commonly surnamed "King of Kings". After having overthrown and almost ruined the family of the kings, successors of the great Seleucus; after having very often humbled the pride of the Parthians, transported whole cities of Greeks into Media, conquered all Syria and Palestine, and given laws to the Arabians called Scenites, he reigned with an authority respected by all the princes of Asia. The people paid him honours after the manners of the East, even to adoration."

On October 6, 69 BCE Tigranes was defeated by the Lucullus' Roman army after a heated battle at Tigranocerta. Non-Armenian guards of Tigranocerta had betrayed Tigranes during the battle by opening the gates of city to the Romans. Tigranes proceeded by sending 6000 cavalrymen to the city in order to rescue his wives and assets.[4] Tigranes' and Mithridates' combined Armeno-Pontian army of 70,000 men met Lucullus at the old capital of Artaxata on 6th October 68 BCE. Because of heavy losses on the Roman side,[4] Lucullus' troops staged three mutinies in 68-67 BCE. Frustrated because of the rough terrain of Northern Armenia, Lucullus moved back south and plundered Nisibis which was held by the brother of Tigranes. Regardless, Lucullus was never able to capture either one of the monarchs. Because of his failures, he was recalled to Rome and replaced by Gnaeus Pompey. is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 74 BC 73 BC 72 BC 71 BC 70 BC 69 BC 68 BC 67 BC 66... Lucius Licinius Lucullus (c. ... Tigranocerta (also spelled Dikranagerd) was the capital of the Armenian Empire that Tigranes the Great founded (95‑56BC) south of the present city of Diyarbakır, Turkey. ... Marble statue of a woman found in Artashat. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 73 BC 72 BC 71 BC 70 BC 69 BC 68 BC 67 BC 66 BC 65... For other meanings see Pompey (disambiguation). ...


Tigranes defeated his younger son (also named Tigranes) who had been supplied an army by the Parthian king, Phraates III, who was then forced to seek protection with the Roman general, Pompey. Tigranes the Great then managed to recover much of his former territory, and Mithridates returned to Pontus with 8,000 men. Coin of Phraates III from the mint at Ecbatana. ...


Decline

But his empire was not a lasting one. In 66 BCE Pompey advanced into Armenia with the younger Tigranes and Tigranes the Great, now almost 75 years old, surrendered. Pompey treated him generously and returned some of the remnants of his kingdom in return for 6,000 talents of silver. His unfaithful son was sent back to Rome as a prisoner. [9] For other meanings see Pompey (disambiguation). ... A talent is an ancient unit of mass. ...


Tigranes continued to rule Armenia as an ally of Rome until his death in 55 BCE.[10] Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 60 BC 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56 BC 55 BC 54 BC 53 BC 52...


Halley's comet

A recent ABC News article on May 19, 2004 noted that according to the Armenian and Italian researchers the "symbol on his crown that features a star with a curved tail may represent the passage of Halley's Comet in 87 BC."[11][12] Tigranes could have seen Halley's comet when it passed closest to the Sun on August 6 in 87 BC according to the researchers, who said the comet would have been a 'most recordable event' -- heralding the New Era of the brilliant King of Kings. is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the comet. ...


References

  1. ^ Tigranes II The Great. (2007). In Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved April 20, 2007, from Encyclopedia Britannica Online: [1]
  2. ^ a b (Armenian) Manaseryan, R. Տիգրան Բ (Tigran II). Soviet Armenian Encyclopedia, vol. xi. Yerevan, Armenian SSR, 1985, 687-698
  3. ^ a b Strabo. Book 11.14.15. Geography, 11.14.15
  4. ^ a b c d (Armenian) Kurdoghlian, Mihran (1994). Badmoutioun Hayots, Volume I. Athens, Greece: Hradaragoutioun Azkayin Oussoumnagan Khorhourti, p. 67-76. 
  5. ^ Lucius Cornelius Sulla
  6. ^ King Tigran II - The Great. Hye Etch. Retrieved on 2007-01-17.
  7. ^ a b Jacob Seth, Mesrob (2004). History Of The Armenians In India. Gorgias Press LLC, p. 10. ISBN 1593330499. 
  8. ^ Mørkholm, Otto (1991). Early Hellenistic Coinage from the Accession of Alexander to the Peace of Apamaea. Cambridge University Press, p. 176. ISBN 0521395046. 
  9. ^ Tigranes the Great: A Biography By Hrand Kʻ Armēn, king of Armenia Tigranes, Herant K. Armen
  10. ^ Fuller, J.F.C. (1991). Julius Caesar: Man, Soldier, and Tyrant. Da Capo Press, p. 45. ISBN 0306804220. 
  11. ^ Halley's comet portrayed on ancient coin. ABC Science Online. Retrieved on 2007-01-17.
  12. ^ Gurzadyan, V. G. and Vardanian, R., http://www.arxiv.org/abs/physics/0405073 Halley's comet of 87 BC on the coins of Armenian king Tigranes?, Astronomy & Geophysics (Journal of The Royal Astronomical Society, London), Vol. 45 (August 4, 2004), p.4.06, 2004.

is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • K. Armen, Hrand (1940). Tigranes the Great: A Biography. Avondale press, 216. ASIN B0006AP946. 
  • Chahin, M. (1991). The Kingdom of Armenia. New York, Dorset Press. ISBN 0-88029-609-7
  • Frye, Richard N. 1984. The History of Ancient Iran. Richard N. Frye. München : Beck. ISBN 3-406-09397-3
  • Lang, David Marshall (1980). Armenia. Cradle of Civilisation. 1st Edition, London, George Allen & Unwin, 1970. 3rd Edition (Corrected). London, George Allen & Unwin. ISBN 0-04-956009-3
  • The heritage of Armenian literature Vol.1 - Page 50
  • The Building Program of Herod the Great by Duane W. Roller
Preceded by
Philip I and Antiochus XII
Ruler of the Seleucid Empire
83–69 BCE
Succeeded by
Antiochus XIII
Preceded by
Tigranes I
King of Armenia
95–55 BCE
Succeeded by
Artavasdes II

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tigranes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (265 words)
Tigranes (sometimes Tigran or Dikran) was the name of a number of historical figures, primarily kings of Armenia.
However, Tigranes the Great is also sometimes known as Tigranes I, in his capacity as a successor to the Seleucid dynasty.
Another Tigranes was a member of the Achaemenid family who, according to Herodotus, commanded the Medes in the army of Xerxes during the invasion of Greece.
Tigranes the Great - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (383 words)
Tigranes the Great (Armenian: Տիգրան Մեծ) (ruled 95 BC-55 BC) (also called Tigranes II and sometimes Tigranes I) was a king of Armenia.
Tigranes was born around 140 BCE and was the son or nephew of Artavasdes I.
Tigranes' son went over to Pompey, and as they approached Artaxata, Tigranes himself surrendered, gave up all his territories except Armenia, and finished out his life as a tributary of Rome.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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