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Encyclopedia > Tiger Shark
Tiger shark
Fossil range: Early Eocene to Present[1]

Tiger shark in Antalya,Kas
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Chondrichthyes
Subclass: Elasmobranchii
Order: Carcharhiniformes
Family: Carcharhinidae
Genus: Galeocerdo
Müller & Henle, 1837
Species: G. cuvier
Binomial name
Galeocerdo cuvier
Péron & Lesueur, 1822
Tiger shark range
Tiger shark range
Synonyms

Squalus cuvier Peron and Lessueur, 1822
Galeocerdo tigrinus Müller and Henle, 1837 Tiger shark may refer to: The tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, a large shark in the family Carcharhinidae. ... hfajhfiudshfas == == == --24. ... This article is mostly about the Antalya City; for the province, see Antalya Province. ... For other uses, see Kas (disambiguation). ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species remaining extant either in the present day or the near future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn2. ... Near Threatened (NT) is an conservation status assigned to species or lower taxa which may be considered threatened with extinction in the near future, although it does not currently qualify for the threatened status. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses and Orders See text. ... Superorders Batoidea (rays and skates) Selachimorpha (sharks) Elasmobranchii is the subclass of cartilaginous fish that includes skates, rays (batoidea) and sharks (selachii). ... Families See text. ... Genera Carcharhinus Galeocerdo Glyphis Isogomphodon Lamiopsis Loxodon Nasolamia Negaprion Prionace Rhizoprionodon Scoliodon Sphyrna Triaenodon The requiem sharks are a family (Carcharhinidae) that includes some of the best-known and most common types of sharks, such as the tiger shark, blue shark, bull shark, and milk shark. ... Johannes Peter Müller (July 14, 1801, Koblenz – April 28, 1858, Berlin), was a German physiologist, comparative anatomist, and ichthyologist not only known for his discoveries but also for his ability to synthesize knowledge. ... Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle (b. ... Latin name redirects here. ... François Péron. ... Lesueur in 1818, painted by Charles Wilson Peale. ... In scientific nomenclature, synonyms are different scientific names used for a single taxon. ... François Péron. ... Lesueur in 1818, painted by Charles Wilson Peale. ... Johannes Peter Müller (July 14, 1801, Koblenz – April 28, 1858, Berlin), was a German physiologist, comparative anatomist, and ichthyologist not only known for his discoveries but also for his ability to synthesize knowledge. ... Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle (b. ...

Sharks Portal

The tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, one of the largest predatory sharks, is the only member of the genus Galeocerdo. Mature sharks average 3.25 metres (11 ft) to 4.25 metres (14 ft)[3] [4] and weigh 385 to 909 kg (850 to 2000 lb).[5] It is found in many of the tropical and temperate regions of the world's oceans, and is especially common around islands in the central Pacific. This shark is a solitary hunter, usually hunting at night. Its name is derived from the dark stripes down its body, which fade as the shark matures. Image File history File linksMetadata Greyreefsharksmall2. ... For other uses, see Shark (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Kg redirects here. ... Officially the pound is the name for at least three different units of mass: The pound (avoirdupois). ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ...


The tiger shark is a dangerous predator, known for eating a wide range of items. Its usual diet consists of fish, seals, birds, smaller sharks, squid, and turtles. It has sometimes been found with man-made waste such as license plates or pieces of old tires in its digestive tract. It is notorious for attacks on swimmers, divers and surfers in Hawaii; and is often referred to as the "bane of Hawaiian surfers"[6] and "the wastebasket of the sea". This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Families Odobenidae Otariidae Phocidae Pinnipeds (fin-feet, lit. ... For other meanings of bird, see bird (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Shark (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Squid (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Turtle (disambiguation). ... // Introduction A license plate, number plate or registration plate (often referred to simply as a plate, or colloquially tag) is a small metal or plastic plate attached to a motor vehicle for official identification purposes. ... Firestone tire This article is about pneumatic tires. ... For the Physics term GUT, please refer to Grand unification theory The gastrointestinal or digestive tract, also referred to as the GI tract or the alimentary canal or the gut, is the system of organs within multicellular animals which takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and... For other uses, see Surfing (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


The tiger shark is second only to the great white in number of recorded attacks on humans [7] and is considered, along with the great white, bull shark, and the oceanic whitetip shark to be one of the sharks most dangerous to humans. [8] Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range (in blue) For other uses, see Great White (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range (in blue) For other uses, see Great White (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Poey, 1861) Range of oceanic whitetip shark Synonyms Squalus maou, Lesson 1822-1825 Squalus longimanus, Poey 1861 Pterolamiops longimanus Carcharhinus obtusus, Garman 1881 Carcharhinus insularum, Snyder 1904 Pterolamiops magnipinnis, Smith 1958 Pterolamiops budkeri, Fourmanoir 1961 The oceanic whitetip shark, Carcharhinus longimanus, is a large pelagic shark of tropical...

Contents

Taxonomy

The shark was first described by

 Peron and Lessueur in 1822 and was given the name Squalus cuvier.[9] Müller and Henle, in 1837 renamed it Galeocerdo tigrinus.[3] The genus, Galeocerdo, is derived from the Greek, galeos which means shark and the Latin cerdus which means the hard hairs of pigs.[3] It is often colloquially called the man-eater shark.[3] 

The tiger shark is a member of the order Carcharhiniformes;[9] members of this order are characterized by the presence of a nictitating membrane over the eyes, two dorsal fins, an anal fin, and five gill slits. It is the largest member of the Carcharhinidae family, commonly referred to as requiem sharks. This family includes some other well known sharks such as the blue shark, lemon shark and bull shark. François Péron. ... Lesueur in 1818, painted by Charles Wilson Peale. ... Johannes Peter Müller (July 14, 1801, Koblenz – April 28, 1858, Berlin), was a German physiologist, comparative anatomist, and ichthyologist not only known for his discoveries but also for his ability to synthesize knowledge. ... Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle (b. ... Families See text. ... Many species of land animals have a nictitating membrane, which can move across the eyeball to give the sensitive eye structures additional protection in particular circumstances. ... Dorsal fin of an orca A dorsal fin is a fin located on the backs of fishes, whales, dolphins, and porpoises, as well as the (extinct) ichthyosaurs. ... Fish anatomy is primarily governed by the physical characteristics of water, which is much denser than air, holds a relatively small amount of dissolved oxygen, and absorbs light more than does air. ... For other uses, see Gill (disambiguation). ... Genera Carcharhinus Galeocerdo Glyphis Isogomphodon Lamiopsis Loxodon Nasolamia Negaprion Prionace Rhizoprionodon Scoliodon Sphyrna Triaenodon The requiem sharks are a family (Carcharhinidae) that includes some of the best-known and most common types of sharks, such as the tiger shark, blue shark, bull shark, and milk shark. ... The hierarchy of scientific classification In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is a rank, or a taxon in that rank. ... Genera Carcharhinus Galeocerdo Glyphis Isogomphodon Lamiopsis Loxodon Nasolamia Negaprion Prionace Rhizoprionodon Scoliodon Sphyrna Triaenodon The requiem sharks are a family (Carcharhinidae) that includes some of the best-known and most common types of sharks, such as the tiger shark, blue shark, bull shark, and milk shark. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range of blue shark The blue shark, Prionace glauca, is a carcharhinid shark which is found in the deep waters of the worlds temperate and tropical oceans. ... Binomial name Negaprion brevirostris (Poey, 1868) The lemon shark, Negaprion brevirostris, is a well studied shark belonging to the family Carcharhinidae. ... Binomial name (Müller and Henle, 1839) Range of bull shark The bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas, also known as the bull whaler, Zambezi shark or informally Zambi in Africa and Nicaragua shark in Nicaragua, is common worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and in rivers. ...


The largest tiger shark specimen was 7.3 meters (24 feet) and is a contender for the largest carnivorous fish alongside the great white shark.[citation needed] Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range (in blue) For other uses, see Great White (disambiguation). ...


Distribution

The tiger shark is often found close to the coast, in mainly tropical and sub-tropical waters, though they can reside in temperate waters.Tiger Sharks are the second largest predatory shark other that the Great White. [3] The shark's behavior is primarily nomadic, but is guided by warmer currents, and it stays closer to the equator throughout the colder months. The shark tends to stay in deep waters that line reefs but does move into channels to pursue prey in shallower waters. In the western Pacific Ocean, the shark has been found as far north as Japan and as far south as New Zealand.[10] Communities of nomadic people move from place to place, rather than settling down in one location. ...


The shark has been recorded down to a depth of 350 metres (1,100 ft)[3] but is also known to move into shallow water - water that would normally be considered too shallow for a species of its size. It is also frequently found in river estuaries and harbors. At night it is usually found in shallow water.


Anatomy and appearance

A sketch of a tiger shark
A sketch of a tiger shark
Close up of shark teeth showing serrations.
Close up of shark teeth showing serrations.

Its skin can typically range from a blue or green hue to light with a white or light yellow underbelly. The tiger shark is the second largest predatory shark other than the great white. The distinguishing dark spots and stripes are most outstanding in young sharks and fade as the shark matures. Specimens regularly weigh 385 to 635 kg (850 to 1400 lbs)[3]. It is usually 3 metres (10 ft) to 6 metres (20 ft) long. The heaviest specimen recorded to date, a shark caught in Newcastle, NSW, Australia in 1954 and measuring a mere 5.5 metres (18 ft), scaled 1,524 kg (3,360 lb). Sexual maturity is reached at different stages for each of the sexes; males at 2.26 metres (7 ft) to 2.9 metres (10 ft) whereas females mature at 2.5 metres (8 ft) to 3.25 metres (11 ft). It has been estimated that the tiger shark can swim at a maximum speed of around 32 kilometres per hour (20 mph), with short bursts of higher speeds that last only a few seconds. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 318 KB) Summary closeup of the teeth of the tiger shark, showing the serrated edges. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 318 KB) Summary closeup of the teeth of the tiger shark, showing the serrated edges. ... Underbelly is a company that operates a series of four venues at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. ... Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, is Australias sixth largest city. ... NSW redirects here. ...

Tiger shark swimming below tubing visitors in acrylic tunnel at Atlantis.
Tiger shark swimming below tubing visitors in acrylic tunnel at Atlantis.

The tiger shark's head is somewhat wedge-shaped, which makes it easy for the shark to turn quickly to one side. Tiger sharks, as with other sharks, have small pits on the side of their upper bodies which hold electrical sensors called the ampullae of lorenzini, enabling them to detect small muscle movements of other creatures, allowing them to hunt in darkness. In addition, the tiger shark, like many other sharks, has a mirror-like covering behind their retina called tapetum lucidum that is exposed in darkness to reflect light that has already been seen by the retina back at it as to allow the shark to see better. The tapetum lucidum is covered in bright light, however, as so the shark is not blinded by an excess of light. A tiger shark generally has long fins and a long upper tail; the long fins act like wings and provide lift as the shark maneuvers through water, whereas the long tail provides bursts of speed. A tiger shark normally swims using lithe movements of its body. Its high back and dorsal fin act as a pivot, allowing it to spin quickly on its alliance. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 761 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tiger shark Atlantis Paradise Island ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 761 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tiger shark Atlantis Paradise Island ... The Royal Towers joined by the Bridge. ... Electroreception, sometimes written as electroception, is the biological ability to receive and make use of electrical impulses. ... The ampullae of Lorenzini are special sensing organs, forming a network of jelly-filled canals found on elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) and Chimaera. ...


Its teeth are flat, triangular, notched and serrated.Like most sharks, when a tiger shark loses or breaks one of its teeth, it grows a replacement tooth. The distinctive teeth seem to have evolved to be able to cut through turtle shells, and an adult tiger shark can easily bite through bone.


Diet

The tiger shark, which generally hunts at night, has a reputation for eating anything it has access to, ignoring what nutritional value the prey may or may not hold.[3] Apart from what is thought to be sporadic feeding, its most common foods include; common fish, squid, birds, seals, other sharks, and sea turtles.[3] The shark has a number of features which make it a good hunter, such as excellent eyesight, which allows for access to murkier waters which can offer more varieties of prey and its acute sense of smell which enable it to react to faint traces of blood in its waters and is able to follow them to the source. The tiger shark's ability to pick up on low-frequency pressure waves produced by the movements of swimming animals, for example the thrashing of an injured animal, enables the shark to find a variety of prey. The Nutrition Facts table indicates the amounts of nutrients which experts recommend you limit or consume in adequate amounts. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Squid (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of bird, see bird (disambiguation). ... Families Odobenidae Otariidae Phocidae Pinnipeds (fin-feet, lit. ... Genera Family Cheloniidae (Oppel, 1811) Caretta Chelonia Eretmochelys Lepidochelys Natator Family Dermochelyidae Dermochelys Family Protostegidae (extinct) Family Toxochelyidae (extinct) Family Thalassemyidae (extinct) Sea turtles (Superfamily Chelonioidea) are turtles found in all the worlds oceans except the Arctic Ocean . ... Visual perception is one of the senses, consisting of the ability to detect light and interpret (see) it as the perception known as sight or naked eye vision. ... Olfaction (also known as olfactics) refers to the sense of smell. ...


The shark is known to be aggressive. The ability to pick up low-frequency pressure waves enables the shark to advance towards an animal with confidence, even in the environment of murky water where it is often found.[11] The shark is known to circle its prey and even study it by prodding it with its snout.[11] When attacking the shark devours all of its prey.[11] Because of its aggressive nature of feeding, it is common to find a variety of foreign objects inside the digestive tract of a tiger shark. Some examples of more unusual items are automobile number plates, petroleum cans, tires, suits of armour, and baseballs. For this reason, the tiger shark is often regarded as the ocean's garbage can. Aggression is defined as The act of initiating hostilities or invasion. ... A vehicle registration plate is a metal or plastic plate attached to a motor vehicle or trailer for official identification purposes. ... Petro redirects here. ... Firestone tire This article is about pneumatic tires. ... Armor or armour (see spelling differences) is protective clothing intended to defend its wearer from intentional harm in combat and military engagements, typically associated with soldiers. ... A baseball A baseball is a ball used primarily in the sport of the same name, baseball. ...


Reproduction

The tiger shark breeds by internal fertilization. It is the only species in its family that is ovoviviparous; like mammals, it gives birth to live young.[3] The male tiger shark will insert one of its claspers into the female's genital opening (cloaca), acting as a guide for the sperm to be introduced. The male uses its teeth to hold the female still during the procedure, often causing the female considerable discomfort. Mating in the northern hemisphere will generally take place between the months of March and May, with the young being born around April or June the following year. In the southern hemisphere, mating takes place in November, December, or early January.[3] Ovoviviparous animals develop within eggs that remain within the mother up until they hatch or are about to. ... In biology, clasper is a body part of male insects that is used to hold the female during copulation. ...


The young are nourished inside the mother's body for up to between 14 to 16 months, where the female can produce a litter ranging from 10 to 80 pups.[3] A newborn tiger shark is generally 51 centimetres (20 in) to 76 centimetres (30 in) long[3] and leaves its mother upon birth. It is unknown how long tiger sharks live, but it has been speculated to be 20 years.


Dangers and conservation

A tiger shark caught in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu in 1966.
A tiger shark caught in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu in 1966.

Although shark attacks on humans are a relatively rare phenomenon, the tiger shark is responsible for a large percentage of the fatal attacks that do occur on humans, and is regarded as one of the most dangerous species of sharks. Tiger sharks reside in temperate and tropical waters. They are often found in river estuaries and harbours, as well as shallow water close to shore, where they are bound to come into contact with humans. Because of their curious nature of feeding it is expected that a tiger shark would normally attack a human if it came in contact with it. Tiger sharks are known to dwell in waters with runoff, such as where a river enters the ocean. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 396 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1164 × 1760 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 396 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1164 × 1760 pixel, file size: 1. ... For the film, see Shark Attack (film). ... For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... The tropics are the geographic region of the Earth centered on the equator and limited in latitude by the two tropics: the Tropic of Cancer in the north and the Tropic of Capricorn in the southern hemisphere. ...


Tiger sharks have become a recurring problem in Hawaii and are considered the most dangerous shark species in Hawaiian waters. They are considered to be sacred 'aumakua' or ancestor spirits by the native Hawaiians, however between 1959 and 1976, 4,668 tiger sharks were hunted down in an effort to control what was proving to be detrimental to the tourism industry. Despite these numbers, little decrease was ever detected in the attacks on humans. It is illegal to feed sharks in Hawaii and any interaction with them such as cage diving is discouraged.[12] This article is about the U.S. State. ... Tourist redirects here. ...


While the tiger shark is not directly commercially fished, it is caught for its fins, flesh, liver, which is a valuable source of vitamin A used in the production of vitamin oils, and distinct skin, as well as by big game fishers.[3] Fish anatomy is primarily governed by the physical characteristics of water, which is much denser than air, holds a relatively small amount of dissolved oxygen, and absorbs light more than air does. ... Look up Flesh in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The liver is the largest internal organ in the human body, and is an organ present in vertebrates and some other animals. ... Retinol, the animal form of vitamin A, is a yellow fat-soluble, antioxidant vitamin important in vision and bone growth. ... Big-game fishing, sometimes called offshore sport fishing or offshore game fishing, is a form of recreational fishing, targeting large bony fish such as tuna and marlin in the open sea, often some distance from land and, in some fishing grounds, out of sight of land. ...


They are normilly in th eAlantic Ocean== Trivia ==

  • In 1935, Australian gangster James Smith's arm was found in the stomach of a tiger shark. One of his crooked partners admitted to the crime, saying he killed James and hid him in a metal box, then cut the arm off because it wouldn't fit. [13]

James Smith is the name of: Americans: James Smith (frontiersman) (ca. ...

In popular culture

Hawaiian art item with tiger shark teeth
Hawaiian art item with tiger shark teeth
  • In the first Jaws film, the first shark caught was a tiger shark.
  • In 2007, Discovery Channel presented a special: Deadly Stripes: Tiger Sharks, for its annual Shark Week. During the show, South African shark scientist Mark Addison swam several times with a tiger shark he named "Dolores." The show contained footage of Addison hand-feeding the shark and even getting "rides" by holding onto the shark's dorsal fin for short periods of time. Addison claims that Dolores was able to recognize him on later trips to the same location.[14]
  • Appearances in Deep Blue Sea as one tiger shark mutant
  • In The Spy Who Loved Me, The villain Jaws battles a juvenile tiger shark and ends the fight by giving the shark a fatal bite.

Jaws is a 1975 thriller/horror film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchleys best-selling novel inspired by the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916. ... Discovery Channel is a cable and satellite TV channel founded by John Hendricks which is distributed by Discovery Communications. ... The Discovery Channels Shark Week, which first aired in 1987, is a week-long series of feature television programs dedicated to facts on sharks. ... Deep Blue Sea is a 1999 science fiction horror film that stars Thomas Jane, Samuel L. Jackson, and Saffron Burrows. ... For the James Bond film, see The Spy Who Loved Me (film). ...

See also

// Sharks belong to the superorder Selachimorpha in the subclass Elasmobranchii in the class Chondrichthyes. ... This is a list of fatal, unprovoked shark attacks that occurred in United States territorial waters by decade in reverse chronological order. ...

References

  1. ^ Sepkoski, Jack; = A compendium of fossil marine animal genera (Chondrichthyes entry) (2002). "{{{title}}}". Bulletins of American Paleontology 364: p.560. Retrieved on 2008-01-09. 
  2. ^ Simpfendorfer (2000). Galeocerdo cuvier. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2006. Retrieved on 11 May 2006. Database entry includes justification for why this species is near threatened
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Tiger Shark Biological Profile. Florida Museum of Natural History Icthyology Department. Retrieved on 2005-01-22.
  4. ^ Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger Shark. Marine Bio. Retrieved on 2006-10-14.
  5. ^ Fact Sheet - Tiger Shark. NOAA. Retrieved on 2007-09-28.
  6. ^ McCollam, Douglas (July 18, 2001). The Bull Shark. Slate.com.
  7. ^ ISAF Statistics on Attacking Species of Shark. Florida Museum of Natural History University of Florida. Retrieved on 2008-05-04.
  8. ^ Daley, Audrey (1994). Shark. Hodder & Stroughton. ISBN 0-340-61654-7. 
  9. ^ a b ITIS report, Galeocerdo cuvier. Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved on 2006-09-22.
  10. ^ Galeocerdo cuvier. Fishbase. Retrieved on 2006-09-28.
  11. ^ a b c Tiger Shark. ladywildlife.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  12. ^ Federal Fishery Managers Vote To Prohibit Shark Feeding. Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council. Retrieved on 2007-06-15.}}
  13. ^ Angry Animals, Nick Arnold
  14. ^ Shark Week: 'Deadly Stripes: Tiger Sharks'. LA Times (2007-07-30). Retrieved on 2007-09-28.
General references

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Florida Museum of Natural History is located at the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Florida. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Florida Museum of Natural History is located at the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Florida. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Please note that the ITIS system URL has changed (25 September 2006). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... FishBase is a comprehensive database of information about fish. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Los Angeles Times (also L.A. Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... FishBase is a comprehensive database of information about fish. ... The Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS) is a partnership designed to provide consistent and reliable information on the taxonomy of biological species. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Galeocerdo cuvier
Image File history File links Wikispecies-logo. ... Wikispecies is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation that aims to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species (including animalia, plantae, fungi, bacteria, archaea, and protista). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
TIGER SHARK - Enchanted Learning Software (474 words)
Tiger sharks are solitary animals except during mating.
Tiger sharks swim at an average speed of 2.4 mph (3.85 kph).
Tiger sharks reproduce via aplacental viviparity; the young of tiger sharks are born live in litters of between 10 and 82 pups.
Tiger shark - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1548 words)
Tiger sharks, as with other sharks, have small pits on the side of their upper bodies which hold electrical sensors enabling them to detect small muscle movements of other creatures, allowing them to hunt in darkness.
Although shark attacks on humans are a relatively rare phenomenon, the tiger shark is responsible for a large percentage of the fatal attacks that do occur on humans, and is regarded as one of the most dangerous species of sharks.
Tiger sharks reside in temperate and tropical waters.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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