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Encyclopedia > Thymine
Thymine
Chemical name 5-Methylpyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione
Chemical formula C5H6N2O2
Molecular mass 126.11 g/mol
Melting point 316 - 317 °C
CAS number 65-71-4
SMILES CC1=CNC(NC1=O)=O
Chemical structure of thymine
For the similarly-spelled vitamin compound, see Thiamine

Thymine, also known as 5-methyluracil, is a pyrimidine nucleobase. As the name implies, thymine may be derived by methylation of uracil at the 5th carbon. Thymine is found in the nucleic acid DNA. In RNA thymine is replaced with uracil in most cases. In DNA, thymine(T) binds to adenine (A) via two hydrogen bonds to assist in stabilizing the nucleic acid structures. IUPAC nomenclature is a system of naming chemical compounds and of describing the science of chemistry in general. ... A chemical formula (also called molecular formula) is a concise way of expressing information about the atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound. ... The molecular mass (abbreviated MM) of a substance, called molecular weight and abbreviated as MW, is the mass of one molecule of that substance, relative to the unified atomic mass unit u (equal to 1/12 the mass of one atom of carbon-12). ... The melting point of a solid is the temperature at which it changes state from solid to liquid. ... CAS registry numbers are unique numerical identifiers for chemical compounds, polymers, biological sequences, mixtures and alloys. ... The simplified molecular input line entry specification or SMILES is a specification for unambiguously describing the structure of chemical molecules using short ASCII strings. ... Download high resolution version (1269x1363, 6 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Thiamine mononitrate Thiamine or thiamin, also known as vitamin B1, is a colorless compound with chemical formula C12H17N4OS. It is soluble in water and insoluble in alcohol. ... Pyrimidine is a heterocyclic aromatic organic compound similar to benzene and pyridine, containing two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 3 of the six-member ring. ... Adenine Guanine Thymine Cytosine ... Schematic diagram of a double-stranded nucleic acid. ... The general structure of a section of DNA Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid —usually in the form of a double helix— that contains the genetic instructions specifying the biological development of all cellular forms of life, and most viruses. ... Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a nucleic acid polymer consisting of covalently bound nucleotides. ... Uracil is one of the four RNA nucleobases, replacing thymine as found in DNA. Just like thymine, uracil can form a base pair with adenine via two hydrogen bonds, but it lacks the methyl group present in thymine. ... Adenine is one of the two purine nucleobases used in forming nucleotides of the nucleic acids DNA and RNA. In DNA, adenine (A) binds to thymine (T) via two hydrogen bonds to assist in stabilizing the nucleic acid structures. ...


Thymine combined with deoxyribose creates the nucleoside deoxythymidine, which is synonymous with the term thymidine. Thymidine can be phosphorylated with one, two or three phosphoric acid groups, creating respectively TMP, TDP or TTP (thymidine mono- di- or triphosphate). Deoxyribose Deoxyribose, also known as D-Deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribose, is an aldopentose — a monosaccharide containing five carbon atoms, and including an aldehyde functional group. ... Nucleosides are glycosylamines made by attaching a nucleobase (often reffered to simply as bases) to a ribose ring. ... Deoxythymidine is a molecule (known as a nucleoside) that is formed when thymine is attached to a deoxyribose ring (also known as a deoxyribofuranose) via a β-N1-glycosidic bond. ... Deoxythymidine is a molecule (known as a nucleoside) that is formed when thymine is attached to a deoxyribose ring (also known as a deoxyribofuranose) via a β-N1-glycosidic bond. ...


One of the common mutations of DNA involves two adjacent thymines or cytosine, which in presence of ultra violet light may form pyrimidine dimers, causing "kinks" in the DNA molecule that inhibit normal function.

External links

  • Computational Chemistry Wiki
Nucleic acids edit
Nucleobases: Adenine | Thymine | Uracil | Guanine | Cytosine | Purine | Pyrimidine
Nucleosides: Adenosine | Uridine | Guanosine | Cytidine | Deoxyadenosine | Thymidine | Deoxyguanosine | Deoxycytidine
Nucleotides: AMP | UMP | GMP | CMP | ADP | UDP | GDP | CDP | ATP | UTP | GTP | CTP | cAMP | cGMP
Deoxynucleotides: dAMP | dTMP | dGMP | dCMP | dADP | dTDP | dGDP | dCDP | dATP | dTTP | dGTP | dCTP
Nucleic acids: DNA | mtDNA | cDNA | GNA | RNA | mRNA | tRNA | rRNA | ncRNA | sgRNA | shRNA | siRNA | snRNA | miRNA | snoRNA | LNA | PNA | TNA | Oligonucleotide

  Results from FactBites:
 
thymine — FactMonster.com (290 words)
Thymine was the first pyrimidine to be purified from a natural source, having been isolated from calf thymus and beef spleen in 1893–4.
The accepted structure of the thymine molecule was published in 1900; this structure was confirmed when several investigators reported the synthesis of the compound during the period 1901 to 1910.
The analogous nucleosides and nucleotides formed from thymine and ribose occur only very rarely in living systems; such is not the case with the other pyrimidines.
Thymine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (170 words)
Thymine is found in the nucleic acid DNA.
Thymine combined with deoxyribose creates the nucleoside deoxythymidine, which is synonymous with the term thymidine.
One of the common mutations of DNA involves two adjacent thymines or cytosine, which in presence of ultra violet light may form pyrimidine dimers, causing "kinks" in the DNA molecule that inhibit normal function.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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