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Encyclopedia > Thutmose I
Thutmose I
Preceded by:
Amenhotep I
Pharaoh of Egypt
18th Dynasty
Succeeded by:
Thutmose II
Painted relief of Thutmose I
Reign 1506 BC to 1493 BC
(though disputed)
Praenomen


Aakheperkare
Great is the Soul of Re[1]
Nomen

Thutmose
Thoth is born
Horus
name

Image:srxtail2.GIF
Kanekhet meri maat
Mighty Bull, Beloved of Maat
Nebty
name




Kham neseret aa pehet
Crowned with the royal serpent, Great of power
Golden
Horus


Nefer Reneput Sankhibu
Good of Years,
Making Hearts to Live
Consort(s) Queen Ahmose, Mutnofret
Issue Thutmose II, Hatshepsut,
Amenmose, Wadjmose,
Nefrubity
Father Unknown
Mother Semiseneb
Died 1492 BC
Burial KV38, later KV20
Major
Monuments
Pylons IV and V, two obelisks,
and a hypostyle hall at Karnak

Thutmose I (sometimes read as Thutmosis or Tuthmosis I and meaning Thoth is Born) was the third Pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Egypt. He was given the throne after the death of the previous king Amenhotep I. During his reign, he campaigned deep into the Levant and Nubia, pushing the borders of Egypt even further than ever before. He also built many temples in Egypt and dug a tomb in the Valley of the Kings; he is the first king confirmed to have done this (though Amenhotep I may have preceded him). He was succeeded by his son Thutmose II, who in turn was succeeded by Thutmose II's sister, Hatshepsut. His reign is generally dated from 1506 to 1493 BCE. Djeserkare Holy is the Soul of Re[1] Nomen Amenhotep Amun is Satisfied Horus name Kanaftau Bull who subdues the lands Nebty name Aaneru Who inspires great fear Golden Horus Uahrenput Enduring of years Consort(s) Ahmose-Meritamon Issue Amenemhat (died young), possibly Ahmes Father Ahmose I Mother Ahmose-Nefertari... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... The Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Dynasties of ancient Egypt are often combined under the group title, New Kingdom. ... Aakheperenre Great is the manefestation of Re Nomen Thutmose Thoth is born Horus name Ka Nekhet User Pekhet The strong bull, the great one of power Nebty name Neter Nesyt Divine of kingship Golden Horus Sekhem Kheperu Powerful of Forms Consort(s) Hatshepsut, Iset Issue Thutmose III, Neferure Father Thutmose... Image File history File links ThutmoseI.jpg‎ Summary This ought to be public domain. ... Image File history File links ThutmoseI.jpg‎ Summary This ought to be public domain. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... (Redirected from 1506 BC) Centuries: 17th century BC - 16th century BC - 15th century BC Decades: 1550s BC 1540s BC 1530s BC 1520s BC 1510s BC - 1500s BC - 1490s BC 1480s BC 1470s BC 1460s BC 1450s BC Events and Trends Stonehenge built in Wiltshire, England The element Mercury has been... (Redirected from 1493 BC) Centuries: 16th century BC - 15th century BC - 14th century BC Decades: 1540s BC 1530s BC 1520s BC 1510s BC 1500s BC - 1490s BC - 1480s BC 1470s BC 1460s BC 1450s BC 1440s BC Events and Trends Egypt conquers Nubia and the Levant (1504 BC - 1492 BC). ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... For other uses, see Ra (disambiguation). ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... Thoth (Ramesseum, Luxor) Thoth (his Greek name derived from the Egyptian *, written by Egyptians as ) was considered one of the most important deities of the Egyptian pantheon, often depicted with the head of an ibis. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... Image File history File links Srxtail2. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... Queen Ahmose was the mother of Hatshepsut of Egypt. ... Mutnofret (“Mut is Beautiful”) was a queen during the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt. ... Aakheperenre Great is the manefestation of Re Nomen Thutmose Thoth is born Horus name Ka Nekhet User Pekhet The strong bull, the great one of power Nebty name Neter Nesyt Divine of kingship Golden Horus Sekhem Kheperu Powerful of Forms Consort(s) Hatshepsut, Iset Issue Thutmose III, Neferure Father Thutmose... Maatkare[1] Truth is the Ka of Re Nomen Khnumt-Amun Hatshepsut[1] Joined with Amun, Foremost of Noble Ladies Horus name Wesretkau [1] Mighty of Kas Nebty name Wadjrenput[1] Flourishing of years Golden Horus Netjeretkhau[1] Divine of appearance Consort(s) Thutmose II Issue Neferure Father Thutmose I... Semiseneb was the mother of Egyptian Pharaoh Thutmosis I. She is thought to have been a commoner. ... (Redirected from 1492 BC) Centuries: 16th century BC - 15th century BC - 14th century BC Decades: 1540s BC 1530s BC 1520s BC 1510s BC 1500s BC - 1490s BC - 1480s BC 1470s BC 1460s BC 1450s BC 1440s BC Events and Trends Egypt conquers Nubia and the Levant (1504 BC - 1492 BC). ... Tomb KV38, located in the Valley of the Kings, in Egypt was used for the burial of Thutmose I of the Eighteenth dynasty, and was where his body was removed to (from KV20), by Thutmose III. Categories: Ancient Egypt stubs | Valley of the Kings ... Tomb KV20 in Egypts Valley of the Kings was possibly the first tomb to be constructed in the valley. ... This article is about the Karnak temple complex in Egypt. ... Thoth (Ramesseum, Luxor) Thoth (his Greek name derived from the Egyptian *, written by Egyptians as ) was considered one of the most important deities of the Egyptian pantheon, often depicted with the head of an ibis. ... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... The Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Dynasties of ancient Egypt are often combined under the group title, New Kingdom. ... Archaeological evidence indicates that a distinct culture was developing in the Nile valley from before 5000 BC. What is now called the Pharaonic Period is dated from around 3100 BC, when Egypt became a unified state, until its survival as an independent state ceased in 332 BC, with its conquest... Djeserkare Holy is the Soul of Re[1] Nomen Amenhotep Amun is Satisfied Horus name Kanaftau Bull who subdues the lands Nebty name Aaneru Who inspires great fear Golden Horus Uahrenput Enduring of years Consort(s) Ahmose-Meritamon Issue Amenemhat (died young), possibly Ahmes Father Ahmose I Mother Ahmose-Nefertari... Location of the valley in the Theban Hills, West of the Nile, October 1988 (red arrow shows location) The Valley of the Kings (Arabic: وادي الملوك Wadi Biban el-Muluk; Gates of the King)[1] is a valley in Egypt where for a period of nearly 500 years from the 16th to... Aakheperenre Great is the manefestation of Re Nomen Thutmose Thoth is born Horus name Ka Nekhet User Pekhet The strong bull, the great one of power Nebty name Neter Nesyt Divine of kingship Golden Horus Sekhem Kheperu Powerful of Forms Consort(s) Hatshepsut, Iset Issue Thutmose III, Neferure Father Thutmose... Maatkare[1] Truth is the Ka of Re Nomen Khnumt-Amun Hatshepsut[1] Joined with Amun, Foremost of Noble Ladies Horus name Wesretkau [1] Mighty of Kas Nebty name Wadjrenput[1] Flourishing of years Golden Horus Netjeretkhau[1] Divine of appearance Consort(s) Thutmose II Issue Neferure Father Thutmose I... Aakheperkare Great is the Soul of Re[1] Nomen Thutmose Thoth is born Horus name Kanekhet meri maat Mighty Bull, Beloved of Maat Nebty name Kham neseret aa pehet Crowned with the royal serpent, Great of power Golden Horus Nefer Reneput Sankhibu Good of Years, Making Hearts to Live Consort... BCE is a TLA that may stand for: Before the Common Era, date notation equivalent to BC (e. ...

Contents

Family

Thutmose's father was a unknown military man, his mother's name, Senseneb, was recorded, and she is believed to have been a commoner.[2] Queen Ahmose, his great wife, was probably the daughter of Ahmose I and the sister of Amenhotep I;[2] however, she was never called "king's daughter," so some have expressed doubt and believe she was Thutmose's own sister.[3] Assuming she was related to Amenhotep, it would appear at face value that she was married to him in order to guarantee succession, but this is known to be not the case for two reasons. First, Amenhotep's alabaster bark built at Karnak associates Amenhotep's name with Thutmose's name well before Amenhotep's death.[4] Second, Thutmose's firstborn son with Ahmose, Amenmose, was apparently born long before Thutmose's coronation. He can be seen on a stela from Thutmose's fourth regnal year hunting near Memphis, and he became the "great army-commander of his father" sometime before his death, which was no later than Thutmose's own death in his 12th regnal year.[5] Thutmose had another son, Wadjmose, and two daughters, Hatshepsut and Nefrubity, by Ahmose. Wadjmose died before his father, and Nefrubity probably did as well.[6] Thutmose had one son remaining by another wife, Mutnofret. This son succeeded him as Thutmose II, whom Thutmose I married to his fully royally born daughter, Hatshepsut.[6] It was later recorded that Thutmose willed the kingship to both Thutmose II and Hatshepsut, however this was certainly Hatshepsut's propaganda to solidify her claim when she usurped the throne.[7] Semiseneb was the mother of Egyptian Pharaoh Thutmosis I. She is thought to have been a commoner. ... Queen Ahmose was the mother of Hatshepsut of Egypt. ... Nebpehtire[4] The Lord of Strength is Re Nomen Ahmose[3] The Moon is Born Horus name Aakheperu[5] Great of Developments[6] Nebty name Tutmesut[5] Perfect of Birth[6] Golden Horus Tjestawy[5] He who Knots Together the Two Lands[6] Consort(s) Ahmose-Nefertari Gods Wife... Djeserkare Holy is the Soul of Re[1] Nomen Amenhotep Amun is Satisfied Horus name Kanaftau Bull who subdues the lands Nebty name Aaneru Who inspires great fear Golden Horus Uahrenput Enduring of years Consort(s) Ahmose-Meritamon Issue Amenemhat (died young), possibly Ahmes Father Ahmose I Mother Ahmose-Nefertari... This article is about the Karnak temple complex in Egypt. ... Queen Ahmose was the mother of Hatshepsut of Egypt. ... Maatkare[1] Truth is the Ka of Re Nomen Khnumt-Amun Hatshepsut[1] Joined with Amun, Foremost of Noble Ladies Horus name Wesretkau [1] Mighty of Kas Nebty name Wadjrenput[1] Flourishing of years Golden Horus Netjeretkhau[1] Divine of appearance Consort(s) Thutmose II Issue Neferure Father Thutmose I... Queen Ahmose was the mother of Hatshepsut of Egypt. ... Aakheperenre Great is the manefestation of Re Nomen Thutmose Thoth is born Horus name Ka Nekhet User Pekhet The strong bull, the great one of power Nebty name Neter Nesyt Divine of kingship Golden Horus Sekhem Kheperu Powerful of Forms Consort(s) Hatshepsut, Iset Issue Thutmose III, Neferure Father Thutmose... Maatkare[1] Truth is the Ka of Re Nomen Khnumt-Amun Hatshepsut[1] Joined with Amun, Foremost of Noble Ladies Horus name Wesretkau [1] Mighty of Kas Nebty name Wadjrenput[1] Flourishing of years Golden Horus Netjeretkhau[1] Divine of appearance Consort(s) Thutmose II Issue Neferure Father Thutmose I...


Dates and length of reign

A heliacal rising of Sothis was recorded in the reign of Thutmose's predecessor, Amenhotep I, which has been dated to 1517 BC, assuming the observation was made at either Heliopolis or Memphis.[8] The year of Amenhotep's death and Thutmose's subsequent coronation can be accordingly derived, and is dated to 1506 BC by most modern scholars. However, if the observation were made at Thebes, as a minority of scholars promote, Thutmose would have been crowned in 1526 BC[9] Manetho records that Thutmose I's reign lasted 12 Years and 9 Months (or 13 Years) as a certain Mephres in his Epitome.[10] This data is supported by 2 dated inscriptions from Years 8 and 9 of his reign bearing his cartouche found inscribed on a stone block in Karnak.[11] Accordingly, Thutmose is usually given a reign from 1506 BC to 1493 BC in the low chronology, but a minority of scholars would date him from 1526 BC to 1513 BC[8] The heliacal rising of a star (or other body such as the moon or a planet) occurs when it first becomes visible above the eastern horizon at dawn, after a period where it was hidden below the horizon or when it was just above the horizon but hidden by the... Sothis is the Greek name of a starn that the Egyptians considered unusually significant. ... (Redirected from 1517 BC) Centuries: 17th century BC - 16th century BC - 15th century BC Decades: 1560s BC 1550s BC 1540s BC 1530s BC 1520s BC - 1510s BC - 1500s BC 1490s BC 1480s BC 1470s BC 1460s BC Events and Trends 1512 BC (approx. ... For other uses, see Heliopolis. ... For other uses, see Memphis. ... (Redirected from 1506 BC) Centuries: 17th century BC - 16th century BC - 15th century BC Decades: 1550s BC 1540s BC 1530s BC 1520s BC 1510s BC - 1500s BC - 1490s BC 1480s BC 1470s BC 1460s BC 1450s BC Events and Trends Stonehenge built in Wiltshire, England The element Mercury has been... Thebes Thebes (, Thēbai) is the Greek designation of the ancient Egyptian niwt (The) City and niwt-rst (The) Southern City. It is located about 800 km south of the Mediterranean, on the east bank of the river Nile (). Thebes was the capital of Waset, the fourth Upper Egyptian nome... (Redirected from 1526 BC) Centuries: 17th century BC - 16th century BC - 15th century BC Decades: 1570s BC 1560s BC 1550s BC 1540s BC 1530s BC - 1520s BC - 1510s BC 1500s BC 1490s BC 1480s BC 1470s BC Events and Trends 1523 - Traditional date for the beginning of the Shang Dynasty... (Redirected from 1506 BC) Centuries: 17th century BC - 16th century BC - 15th century BC Decades: 1550s BC 1540s BC 1530s BC 1520s BC 1510s BC - 1500s BC - 1490s BC 1480s BC 1470s BC 1460s BC 1450s BC Events and Trends Stonehenge built in Wiltshire, England The element Mercury has been... (Redirected from 1493 BC) Centuries: 16th century BC - 15th century BC - 14th century BC Decades: 1540s BC 1530s BC 1520s BC 1510s BC 1500s BC - 1490s BC - 1480s BC 1470s BC 1460s BC 1450s BC 1440s BC Events and Trends Egypt conquers Nubia and the Levant (1504 BC - 1492 BC). ... (Redirected from 1526 BC) Centuries: 17th century BC - 16th century BC - 15th century BC Decades: 1570s BC 1560s BC 1550s BC 1540s BC 1530s BC - 1520s BC - 1510s BC 1500s BC 1490s BC 1480s BC 1470s BC Events and Trends 1523 - Traditional date for the beginning of the Shang Dynasty... (Redirected from 1513 BC) Centuries: 17th century BC - 16th century BC - 15th century BC Decades: 1560s BC 1550s BC 1540s BC 1530s BC 1520s BC - 1510s BC - 1500s BC 1490s BC 1480s BC 1470s BC 1460s BC Events and Trends 1512 BC (approx. ...


Military achievements

The maximum territorial extent of Egypt (XVth century BC)

Upon Thutmose's coronation, Nubia rebelled against Egyptian rule. According to the tomb autobiography of Ahmose, son of Ebana, Thutmose traveled down the Nile and fought in the battle, personally killing the Nubian king.[12] Upon victory, he had the Nubian king's body hung from the prow of his ship, before he returned to Thebes.[12] After that campaign, he led a second expedition against Nubia in his third year in the course of which he ordered the canal at the first cataract--which had been built under Sesostris III of the 12th Dynasty--to be dredged in order to facilitate easier travel upstream from Egypt to Nubia. This would help to integrate Nubia into the Egyptian empire.[6] This expedition is mentioned in two separate inscriptions by the king's son Thure:[13] Ahmose, son of Ebana served in the Egyptian military under the pharaohs Tao II Seqenenre, Ahmose I, Amenhotep I, and Thutmose I. His autobiography has survived intact on the wall of his tomb and has proven a valuable source of information on the late 17th Dynasty and the early 18th... For the ancient capital of Boeotia, see Thebes, Greece. ... nomen or birth name Senusret III was a pharaoh of Egypt. ... // For other uses, see Dredge (disambiguation). ...

Year 3, first month of the third season, day 22, under the majesty of the King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Aakheperre who is given life. His Majesty commanded to dig this canal after he found it stopped up with stones [so that] no [ship sailed upon it];

Year 3, first month of the third season, day 22. His Majesty sailed this canal in victory and in the power of his return from overthrowing the wretched Kush.[14] This article is about the Nubian civilization. ...

In the second year of Thutmose's reign, the king cut a stele at Tombos, which records that he built a fortress at Tombos, near the third cataract, thus permanently extending the Egyptian military presence, which had previously stopped at Buhen, at the second cataract.[15] This indicates that he already fought a campaign in Syria; hence, his Syrian campaign may perhaps be placed in the beginning of his second regnal year.[16] This second campaign was the farthest north any Egyptian had ever campaigned. Although it has not been found in modern times, he apparently set up a stele when he crossed the Euphrates River.[17] During this campaign, the Syrian princes declared alliegence to Thutmose. However, after he returned, they discontinued tribute and began fortifying against future incursions.[6] Thutmose celebrated his victories with an elephant hunt in the area of Niy, near Apamea in Syria,[5] and returned to Egypt with strange tales of the Euphrates, "that inverted water which flows upstream when it ought to be flowing downstream."[6] The Euphrates was the first major river which the Egyptians had ever encountered which flowed from the north, which was downstream on the Nile, to the south, which was upstream on the Nile. Thus the river became known in Egypt as simply, "inverted water."[6] This article is about the stone structure. ... Buhen was an ancient Egyptian settlement situated below the Second Cataract. ... The Euphrates (the traditional Greek name for the river, which is in Old Persian Ufrat, Aramaic Prâth/Frot, in Arabic الفرات, in Turkish Fırat and in ancient Assyrian language Pu-rat-tu) is the westernmost of the two great rivers that define Mesopotamia (Bethnahrin in Aramaic), the other being the... Niya, Niye, and also Niy of Thutmose Is Ancient Egypt, also Nii of the Amarna letters, and Nihe, etc. ... For alternative meanings of Nile, see Nile (disambiguation) The Nile in Egypt Length 6 695 km Elevation of the source 1 134 m Average discharge 2 830 m³/s Area watershed 3 400 000 km² Origin Africa Mouth the Mediterranean Basin countries Uganda - Sudan - Egypt The Nile (Arabic: النيل an...


Thutmose had to face one more military threat, another rebellion by Nubia in his fourth year.[16] His influence accordingly expanded even farther south, as an inscription dated to his reign has been found as far south as Kurgus, south of the fourth cataract.[17] During his reign, he initiated a number of projects which effectively ended Nubian independence for the next 500 years. He enlarged a temple to Sesostris III and Khnum, opposite the Nile from Semna.[18] There are also records of specific religious rites which the viceroy of El-Kab was to have performed in the temples in Nubia in proxy for the king.[19] Most effective of all his acts, however, he appointed a man called Turi to the position of viceroy of Cush, also known as the "King's Son of Cush."[20] With a civilian representative of the king permanently established in Nubia itself, Nubia did not dare to revolt nearly as often, and was easlily maintained by future kings.[16] Semna can refer to: Semna, a city in ancient Nubia above the second cataract Semna, one of the 12 members of the Circle of the Codex This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Building projects

Stela of Thutmose I in the Cairo Museum

Thutmose I organized great building projects during his reign, including many temples and tombs, but his greatest projects were at the Temple of Karnak under the supervision of the architect Ineni.[21]. Previous to Thutmose, Karnak probably consisted only of a long road to a central platform, with a number of shrines for the solar bark along the side of the road.[22] Thutmose was the first king to drastically enlarge the temple. Thutmose had the fifth pylon built along the temple's main road, along with a wall to run around the inner sanctuary and two flagpoles to flank the gateway.[22] Outside of this, he built a fourth pylon and another enclosure wall.[22] Between pylons four and five, he had a hypostyle hall constructed, with columns made of cedar wood. This type of structure was common in ancient Egyptian temples, and supposedly represents a papyrus marsh, an Egyptian symbol of creation.[23] Along the edge of this room he built colossal statues, each one alternating wearing the crown of Upper Egypt and the crown of Lower Egypt.[22] Finally, outside of the fourth pylon, he erected four more flagpoles[22] and two obelisks, although one of them, which now has fallen, was not inscribed until Thutmose III inscribed it about 50 years later.[21] The cedar columns in Thutmose I's hypostyle hall were replaced with stone columns by Thutmose III, however at least the northernmost two were replaced by Thutmose I himself.[21] Hatshepsut also erected two of her own obelisks inside of Thutmose I's hypostyle hall.[22] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1629 KB) Summary Stela of Tuthmosis I in Cairo Museum Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1629 KB) Summary Stela of Tuthmosis I in Cairo Museum Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Karnak is a village in Egypt that was once part of the ancient capital of Egypt, Thebes. ... Ineofficial of the 18th Dynasty, responsible for major constructions un Egypt| Thutmose II]], Hatshepsut, and Thutmose III. Ineni came from an aristocratic family and likely began his career as an architect under Amenhotep I. Amenhotep I commissioned Ineni to expand the Temple of Karnak. ... In architecture, a hypostyle hall has a flat ceiling which is supported by columns, as in the Hall of Columns at Karnak. ... For other uses, see Cedar (disambiguation). ... Menkheperre Lasting is the Manifestation of Re[1] Nomen Thutmose Neferkheperu Thoth is born, beautiful of forms Horus name Kanakht Khaemwaset Mighty Bull, Arising in Thebes Nebty name Wahnesytmireempet Enduring in kingship like Re in heaven Golden Horus Sekhempahtydsejerkhaw Powerful of strength, holy of diadems Consort(s) Hatshepsut-Meryetre, Nebtu...


In addition to Karnak, Thutmose I also built statues of the Ennead at Abydos, buildings at Armant, Ombos, el-Hiba, Memphis, and Edfu, as well as minor expansions to buildings in Nubia, at Semna, Buhen, Aniba, and Quban.[24] The Ennead (a word derived from Greek, meaning the nine) is a grouping of nine deities, most often used in the context of Egyptian mythology. ... Abydos (Arabic: أبيدوس, Greek Αβυδος), one of the most ancient cities of Upper Egypt, is about 11 km (6 miles) west of the Nile at latitude 26° 10 N. The Egyptian name was Abdju (technically, 3bdw, hieroglyphs shown to the right), the hill of the symbol or reliquary, in which the sacred... al-Hibah (alt. ...


Thutmose I was the first king who definitely was buried in the Valley of the Kings.[17] Ineni was commissioned to dig this tomb, and presumably to build his mortuary temple.[5] His mortuary temple has not been found, quite possibly because it was incorporated into or demolished by the construction of Hatshepsut's mortuary temple at Deir el-Bahri.[25] His tomb, however, has been identified as KV32. In it was found a yellow quartzite sarcophagus bearing the name of Thutmose I.[2] His body, however, may have been moved by Thutmose III into the tomb of Hatshepsut, KV20, which also contains a sarcophagus with the name of Thutmose I on it.[17] Location of the valley in the Theban Hills, West of the Nile, October 1988 (red arrow shows location) The Valley of the Kings (Arabic: وادي الملوك Wadi Biban el-Muluk; Gates of the King)[1] is a valley in Egypt where for a period of nearly 500 years from the 16th to... Djeser-Djeseru – the focal point of the complex Deir el-Bahri (Arabic دير البحري dayr al-baḥrī, literally meaning, “The Northern Monastery”) is a complex of mortuary temples and tombs located on the west bank of the Nile, opposite the city of Luxor, Egypt. ... Tomb KV32, located in the Valley of the Kings, in Egypt was used for the burial of Tiaa, the wife of Amenhotep II and the mother of Thutmose IV. Categories: Ancient Egypt stubs | Valley of the Kings ... Tomb KV20 in Egypts Valley of the Kings was possibly the first tomb to be constructed in the valley. ...


Death & burial

Thutmose I's mummy was discovered in the Deir el-Bahri Cache above the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, revealed in 1881. He was interred along with those of other 18th and 19th dynasty leaders Ahmose I, Amenhotep I, Thutmose II, Thutmose III, Ramesses I, Seti I, Ramesses II, and Ramesses IX, as well as the 21st dynasty pharaohs Pinedjem I, Pinedjem II, and Siamun. Djeser-Djeseru – the focal point of the complex Deir el-Bahri (Arabic دير البحري dayr al-baḥrī, literally meaning, “The Northern Monastery”) is a complex of mortuary temples and tombs located on the west bank of the Nile, opposite the city of Luxor, Egypt. ... Tomb DB320 is located next to Deir el-Bahri, in the Theban Necropolis, opposite modern Luxor contained an extraordinary cache of mummified remains and funeral equipment of more than 50 kings, queens, royals and various nobility. ... Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut Mortuary temples (or memorial temples) were temples constructed adjacent to, or in the vicinity of, royal tombs in the Middle Kingdom and New Kingdom periods of Ancient Egypt. ... Nebpehtire[4] The Lord of Strength is Re Nomen Ahmose[3] The Moon is Born Horus name Aakheperu[5] Great of Developments[6] Nebty name Tutmesut[5] Perfect of Birth[6] Golden Horus Tjestawy[5] He who Knots Together the Two Lands[6] Consort(s) Ahmose-Nefertari Gods Wife... Djeserkare Holy is the Soul of Re[1] Nomen Amenhotep Amun is Satisfied Horus name Kanaftau Bull who subdues the lands Nebty name Aaneru Who inspires great fear Golden Horus Uahrenput Enduring of years Consort(s) Ahmose-Meritamon Issue Amenemhat (died young), possibly Ahmes Father Ahmose I Mother Ahmose-Nefertari... Aakheperenre Great is the manefestation of Re Nomen Thutmose Thoth is born Horus name Ka Nekhet User Pekhet The strong bull, the great one of power Nebty name Neter Nesyt Divine of kingship Golden Horus Sekhem Kheperu Powerful of Forms Consort(s) Hatshepsut, Iset Issue Thutmose III, Neferure Father Thutmose... Menkheperre Lasting is the Manifestation of Re[1] Nomen Thutmose Neferkheperu Thoth is born, beautiful of forms Horus name Kanakht Khaemwaset Mighty Bull, Arising in Thebes Nebty name Wahnesytmireempet Enduring in kingship like Re in heaven Golden Horus Sekhempahtydsejerkhaw Powerful of strength, holy of diadems Consort(s) Hatshepsut-Meryetre, Nebtu... Menpehtyre Eternal is the Strength of Re[2] Nomen Ra-messes Re has fashioned him[1] Consort(s) Queen Sitre Issue Seti I Died 1290 BC Burial KV16 Menpehtyre Ramesses I (traditional English: Ramesses or Rameses ) was the founding Pharaoh of Ancient Egypts 19th dynasty. ... Menmaatre Eternal is the Strength of Re[1] Nomen Seti Merenptah He of the god Seth, beloved of Ptah[2] Horus name Kanakht Khaemwaset-Seankhtawy Nebty name Wehemmesut Sekhemkhepesh Derpedjetpesdjet Golden Horus Wehemkhau Weserpedjutemtawnebu[3] Consort(s) Queen Tuya Issue Tia, Amennefernebes, Ramesses II, Henutmire (?) Father Ramesses I Mother Sitre... Usermaatre-setepenre The Justice of Re is Powerful, Chosen of Re Nomen Ramesses (meryamun) Born of Re, (Beloved of Amun) Horus name [2] Kanakht Merymaa Golden Horus [2] Userrenput-aanehktu[1] Consort(s) Henutmire, Isetnofret, Nefertari Maathorneferure Issue Bintanath, Khaemweset, Merneptah, Amun-her-khepsef, Meritamen see also: List of children... Tomb Interior of Ramesses IX Neferkare Ramesses IX (also written Ramses and Rameses) (1124 BC – 1106 BC) was the eighth king of the Twentieth dynasty of Egypt. ... Pinedjem I was the high priest of Amun at Thebes in Ancient Egypt 1070 BC to 1032 and de facto ruler of the south of the country. ... Pinedjem II (also Pinudjem II) was a High Priest of Amun at Thebes in Ancient Egypt from 990 BC to 969 BC and was the de facto ruler of the south of the country. ... Neterkheperre-setepenamun Siamun was the Sixth pharaoh of Egypt during the Twenty-first dynasty. ...


The original coffin of Thutmose I was taken over and re-used by a later pharaoh of the 21st dynasty. Originally the mummy of Thutmose I was thought to be lost, but Egyptologist Gaston Maspero, largely on the strength of familial resemblance to the mummies of Thutmose II and Thutmose III, believed he had found his mummy in the otherwise unlabelled mummy #5283.[26] This identification has been supported by subsequent examinations, revealing that the embalming techniques used came from the appropriate period of time, almost certainly after that of Ahmose I and made during the course of the Eighteenth dynasty. [27] Gaston Camille Charles Maspero (June 23, 1846 - June 30, 1916), French Egyptologist, was born in Paris, his parents being of Lombard origin. ...


Gaston Maspero described the mummy in the following manner:

The king was already advanced in age at the time of his death, being over fifty years old, to judge by the incisor teeth, which are worn and corroded by the impurities of which the Egyptian bread was full. The body, though small and emaciated, shows evidence of unusual muscular strength; the head is bald, the features are refined, and the mouth still bears an expression characteristic of shrewdness and cunning.[26]

His mummy can be viewed today in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Main entrance of the Egyptian Museum The Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, known commonly as the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo, Egypt, is home to the most extensive collection of pharaonic antiquities in the world. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ...


In 2007 Dr. Zahi Hawass announced that the mummy previously thought to be Thutmose I was a thirty year old man who died as a result of an arrow wound to the chest. Because of the young age of the mummy and the cause of death it was determined that the mummy was not that of King Thutmose I. Dr. Zahi Hawass signs an autograph (Aug. ...


See also

Archaeological evidence indicates that a distinct culture was developing in the Nile valley from before 5000 BC. What is now called the Pharaonic Period is dated from around 3100 BC, when Egypt became a unified state, until its survival as an independent state ceased in 332 BC, with its conquest... The Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt family tree is complex and unclear, especially at its end. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Clayton, Peter. Chronicle of the Pharaohs, Thames and Hudson Ltd, paperback 2006, p.100
  2. ^ a b c Gardiner (1964) p.176
  3. ^ Bleiberg (2000) p.400
  4. ^ Grimal (1988) p.203
  5. ^ a b c Gardiner (1964) p.179
  6. ^ a b c d e f Steindorff (1942) p.36
  7. ^ Erman (1894) p.43
  8. ^ a b Grimal (1988) p.202
  9. ^ Helk (1983) pp.47-9
  10. ^ Manetho's Kings. Retrieved on 2006-12-30.
  11. ^ Jürgen von Beckerath (1997), p.120
  12. ^ a b Steindorff and Seele (1942) p.34
  13. ^ Lorna Oakes, Pyramids, Temples and Tombs of Ancient Egypt, Hermes House, 2003. p.207
  14. ^ Oakes, op. cit., p.207
  15. ^ Breasted (1906) p.28
  16. ^ a b c Steindorff and Seele (1942) p.35
  17. ^ a b c d Shaw and Nicholson (1995) p.289
  18. ^ Erman (1894) p.503
  19. ^ Breasted (1906) p.25
  20. ^ Breasted (1906) p.27
  21. ^ a b c Breasted (1906) p.41
  22. ^ a b c d e f Grimal (1988) p.300
  23. ^ Shaw (2003) p.168
  24. ^ Thutmosis I. touregypt.net. Retrieved on 2006-08-02.
  25. ^ Gardiner (1964) p.170
  26. ^ a b Maspero, Gaston. History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 4 (of 12), Project Gutenberg EBook, Release Date: December 16, 2005. EBook #17324. http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/1/7/3/2/17324/17324-h/v4c.htm#image-0047
  27. ^ Smith (2000) p.25-28

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Jürgen von Beckerath (1997). Chronologie des Pharaonischen Ägypten. Verlag Philipp von Zabern.. 
  • Bleiberg, Edward (2001). "Thutmose I," The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt. Ed. Donald Redford. Vol. 3. Oxford University Press. 
  • Breasted, James Henry (1906). Ancient Records of Egypt, Vol. II. University of Chicago Press, Chicago. 
  • Erman, Adolf (1894). Life in Ancient Egypt. Macmilian and Company, London. 
  • Gardiner, Alan (1964). Egypt of the Pharaohs. Oxford University Press. 
  • Grimal, Nicolas (1988). A History of Ancient Egypt. Librairie Arthéme Fayard. 
  • Helk, Wolfgang (1983). Schwachstellen der Chronologie-Diskussion. Göttinger Miszellen, Göttingen. 
  • Maspero, Gaston. History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 4 (of 12), Project Gutenberg EBook, Release Date: December 16, 2005. EBook #17324. http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/1/7/3/2/17324/17324-h/v4c.htm#image-0047. 
  • Shaw, Ian; and Nicholson, Paul (1995). The Dictionary of Ancient Egypt. The British Museum Press. 
  • Shaw, Ian (2003). Exploring Ancient Egypt. Oxford University Press. 
  • Smith, G Elliot (2000). The Royal Mummies (reprint). Duckworth. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Thutmose - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (179 words)
Thutmose (also rendered Thutmosis, Tuthmose, Tutmosis, Thothmes, Tuthmosis, Djhutmose, etc.) is the name conventionally given to several Egyptian pharaohs of the 18th Dynasty, an Anglicisation of the Egyptian name "Djehuty-mes", usually translated as "Born of the god Thoth":
Although Egyptologists preferred the Greek Manethonian spelling "Thutmosis" at an earlier time in the history of the discipline, more recent usage has tended towards the 'compromise' spelling of "Thutmose", as used in this article.
A relatively common name at this period, Thutmose is also the name of several prominent non-royal ancient Egyptians, including Akhenaten's court sculptor at Amarna, to whom is attributed the famous Berlin bust of Nefertiti.
Egyptian Pharaohs : New Kingdom : Dynasty 18 : Thutmose I (429 words)
Thutmose is normally considered to be the military commander for Amenhotep I, who took the throne after the death of the pharaoh.
Thutmose was married to Ahmose, who was a sister to Amenhotep I and daughter of Ahmose the pharaoh.
Internally, Thutmose was a prolific and visible builder, relying on his architect Ineni to add extensively to the temple at Karnak, where he added the fourth and fifth pylons, added a cedar hypostyle hall and expanded the treasury, in addition to adding the largest standing obelisk in the temple courtyard.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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