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Encyclopedia > Thurlow Weed
Thurlow Weed
Thurlow Weed

Thurlow Weed (November 15, 1797-November 22, 1882), was a New York political boss. While he never held national office himself, he was instrumental in the presidential nominations of William Henry Harrison (1840), Henry Clay (1844), Zachary Taylor (1848), Winfield Scott (1852), and John Charles Frémont (1856). Thurlow Weed From An Iron Will, by Orison Swett Marden Project Gutenberg EBook 13160 http://www. ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... 1797 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1882 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Rodham Clinton (D) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Order: 9th President Vice President: John Tyler Term of office: March 4, 1841 – April 4, 1841 Preceded by: Martin Van Buren Succeeded by: John Tyler Date of birth: February 9, 1773 Place of birth: Berkeley, Virginia Date of death: April 4, 1841 Place of death: Washington D.C. First Lady... Henry Clay Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was an American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850), also known as Old Rough and Ready, was the twelfth President of the United States, serving from 1849 to 1850. ... Winfield Scott Winfield Scott (June 13, 1786 – May 29, 1866) was a United States lieutenant general, diplomat, and presidential candidate. ... John C. Frémont John Charles Frémont (January 21, 1813–July 13, 1890), born John Charles Fremon, was an American military officer, explorer, the first candidate of the United States Republican Party for the office of President of the United States, and the first Presidential candidate of a major...

Contents


Early life

He was born into a family of farmers in Cairo, Greene County, New York, and received little formal schooling. He spent much of his youth working on boats on the Hudson River. He served in the War of 1812, though he was quite young at the time; after the war he ran the printing presses for the Albany Register. Greene County is a county located in the state of New York. ... The War of 1812 was a conflict fought on land in North America and at sea around the world between the United States and United Kingdom from 1812 to 1815. ... Location in New York Founded  -Incorporated 1614 1686  County Albany County Mayor Gerald D. Jennings Area  - Total  - Water 56. ...


Weed became interested in politics while working with the newspaper, and was an early supporter of DeWitt Clinton. In 1824 he was a strong supporter of the presidential bid of John Quincy Adams, and was able to use his influence to ensure Adams' victory in New York. Weed himself also sought and won election that year, to the New York State Assembly; while in the assembly he met and befriended William H. Seward. DeWitt Clinton Clinton Memorial at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn NY DeWitt Clinton (March 2, 1769 – February 11, 1828) was an early American politician. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Bold text John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was the sixth (1825-1829) President of the United States. ... William H. Seward William Henry Seward (May 16, 1801–October 10, 1872) was United States Secretary of State under Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson. ...


Weed was a vocal member of the Anti-Masonic movement; in 1825 he bought the Rochester Telegraph, but was forced out in 1828 by Masonic interests. Subsequently, he founded the Antimasonic Enquirer, which became the voice of the Antimasonic movement in New York. That year, Weed again supported John Quincy Adams and worked to align the strong anti-Masonic movement in New York with the national Adams organization. Adams' political supporters were key players in the development of the Whig Party, and that party soon absorbed the Anti-masonic movement in New York, giving Weed a new home in a more mainstream and larger political organization. Anti-Masonry is a term used to describe critical objection to the existence of the system of Freemasonic fraternities, their practices, and their philosophies. ... 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... A portion of Rochesters skyline, looking north along the Genesee River from the Ford Street Bridge City nickname: The Flour City, The Flower City Location Location of Rochester in New York State Government Mayor Physical characteristics Area      Land      Water 96. ... This article is about the British Whig party. ...


Election

In 1829 Weed was re-elected to the state Assembly, and also started production of the Albany Evening Journal, a pro-Whig partisan newspaper. As the Evening Journal 's editor, proof reader, political manager, and main reporter, he was a vocal advocate for economic development, supporting new banking measures, internal improvements such as roads and railroads, and the rest of Henry Clay's American System. 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Clay Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was an American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... The American System can mean one of the following: American system of manufacturing American System (economics) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Weed skilfully blamed the Panic of 1837 on Martin van Buren and the Democrats, and in 1838, he pushed his friend and fellow Whig Seward for the governor's race, and was largely credited with Seward's victory. Seward thus owed Weed favors throughout his governorship, which only increased Weed's power in the state. Weed then put the power of the New York Whig party behind William Henry Harrison's presidential bid in 1840. By this time, Weed had the power to bend the Whig party to his will. The Panic of 1837 was an economic depression, one of the sharpest financial crises in the history of the United States. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Order: 9th President Vice President: John Tyler Term of office: March 4, 1841 – April 4, 1841 Preceded by: Martin Van Buren Succeeded by: John Tyler Date of birth: February 9, 1773 Place of birth: Berkeley, Virginia Date of death: April 4, 1841 Place of death: Washington D.C. First Lady... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Organiser

Weed was a masterful political organizer. He controlled the Whig Party totally, giving the New York Whigs a degree of discipline that was then the hallmark of the Democrats under leaders like Andrew Jackson while remaining a popular and likeable fellow. He knew well how to manipulate the press--a task made easier by remaining an active newspaper editor even while in the state Assembly--and readily used patronage and political favors to keep order in the party. Under Weed's leadership, the Whig Party became the dominant force in New York state politics for several years, and Weed as leader of the state Assembly and close friend of Seward became arguably the most powerful man in New York for at least a decade. Weed was also a strong pragmatist; while he shared the idealist views of most of his fellow Whigs, he never strongly supported any controversial Whig positions lest they prove upsetting to the voters on election day. Weed was, however, strongly opposed to slavery, and did not shy from anti-slavery proclamations; however, he also discounted the views of the more radical abolitionists. Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767–June 8, 1845), one of the founders of the Democratic Party, was the seventh President of the United States, serving from 1829 to 1837. ...


Weed was disappointed in John Tyler's actions as president after the death of Harrison, and throughout much of the 1840s felt stymied in his attempts to bend national politics to his will. After the Mexican War, however, Weed became enamored with Zachary Taylor and supported his successful bid for the White House. Once again, however, a Whig general proved unable to survive a presidential term and the presidency of Millard Fillmore and passage of the Compromise of 1850 convinced him that the Whig party was on its last legs. In 1852, he took an extended trip to Europe, visiting England, France, and Germany among other places and remaining abroad for over a year. John Tyler (March 29, 1790 - January 18, 1862), of Virginia, was the tenth (1841) Vice President of the United States, and the tenth (1841-1845) President of the United States. ... The Mexican-American War was a war fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850), also known as Old Rough and Ready, was the twelfth President of the United States, serving from 1849 to 1850. ... Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth (1850–1853) President of the United States and the second President to succeed to the office from the Vice Presidency on the death of the predecessor. ... Henry Clay takes the floor of the Old Senate Chamber; Millard Fillmore presides as Calhoun and Webster look on. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ...


Trip to Europe

Before his departure for Europe, Weed played a leading role in the passage of the Consolidation Act through the state legislature; the Act created the New York Central Railroad, at the time the largest corporation in the United States. Weed did this largely as a favor to his friend Erastus Corning, though Corning was a Democrat and had not supported Seward's gubernatorial bid or Taylor's quest for the presidency. The New York Central Railroad, known simply as the New York Central in its publicity and with the AAR reporting mark of NYC, was a railroad operating in the North-Eastern United States. ... A corporation is a legal entity (distinct from a natural person) that often has similar rights in law to those of a Civil law systems may refer to corporations as moral persons; they may also go by the name AS (anonymous society) or something similar, depending on language (see below). ... Erastus Corning (December 14, 1794 – April 9, 1872), American businessman and politician, was born in Norwich, Connecticut. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


Republican Party

When Weed returned to the United States, he found that the Republican Party had been formed largely in opposition to the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and that his friend William Seward had already joined. Weed soon became an influential member of the party and pushed Seward's name for the 1860 Presidential nomination of the party. However, Weed's reputation as a strong-arm political boss and his staunch opposition to Democrats in his earlier years caused the Republican delegates in Chicago--some of whom were former Democrats--to distrust him; Weed's support may have ultimately cost Seward the nomination. Nonetheless, Weed the abolitionist was a strong supporter of nominee Abraham Lincoln in the 1860 election and throughout his administration. During the Civil War, Weed served as an unofficial envoy to France and Britain. The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Kansas–Nebraska Act was an Act of Congress in 1854 organizing the remaining territory within the Louisiana Purchase for settlement before its admission to the Union. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy...


In 1863, Weed came out against the Emancipation Proclamation on the grounds that emancipation should be more gradual. He soon lost favor with the administration. Then he threw in with Andrew Johnson and his Reconstruction policies, which essentially ended Weed's political career in the Republican Party. He retired from public life not long after the Civil War and moved to New York City in 1867. There he briefly edited a newspaper, but while he remained engaged in politics he never sought or held another office and never exerted the sort of influence he'd had in the past. He died in New York in 1882. 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Emancipation Proclamation The Emancipation Proclamation was a declaration by United States President Abraham Lincoln announcing that all slaves in Confederate territory still in rebellion were freed. ... Order: 17th President Vice President: none Term of office: April 15, 1865 – March 4, 1869 Preceded by: Abraham Lincoln Succeeded by: Ulysses S. Grant Date of birth: December 29, 1808 Place of birth: Raleigh, North Carolina Date of death: July 31, 1875 Place of death: near Elizabethton, Tennessee First Lady... In the history of the United States, Reconstruction was the period after the American Civil War when the southern states of the breakaway Confederacy were reintegrated into the United States of America. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Thurlow Weed - LoveToKnow 1911 (325 words)
THURLOW WEED (1797-1882), American journalist and politician, was born in Cairo, Greene county, New York, on the 15th of November 1797.
Entering politics as an opponent of the Democratic machine, which he termed the Albany Regency, Weed was in 1824 elected to the Assembly on the John Quincy Adams ticket, serving for a single session (1825).
Supporting the Whigs and later the Republicans, it was one of the most influential anti-slavery papers in the north - east; and Thurlow Weed himself became a considerable force in politics.
Thurlow Weed - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1085 words)
Weed skilfully blamed the Panic of 1837 on Martin van Buren and the Democrats, and in 1838, he pushed his friend and fellow Whig Seward for the governor's race, and was largely credited with Seward's victory.
Weed was disappointed in John Tyler's actions as president after the death of Harrison, and throughout much of the 1840s felt stymied in his attempts to bend national politics to his will.
Weed did this largely as a favor to his friend Erastus Corning, though Corning was a Democrat and had not supported Seward's gubernatorial bid or Taylor's quest for the presidency.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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