FACTOID # 15: A mere 0.8% of West Virginians were born in a foreign country.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Throne" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Throne
The thrones for The Queen of Canada, and the Duke of Edinburgh (back) in the Canadian Senate, Ottawa are usually occupied by the Governor General and his/her spouse at the annual State Opening of Parliament. The chair in the foreground is for the speaker of the senate.
The thrones for The Queen of Canada, and the Duke of Edinburgh (back) in the Canadian Senate, Ottawa are usually occupied by the Governor General and his/her spouse at the annual State Opening of Parliament. The chair in the foreground is for the speaker of the senate.

A throne is the official chair or seat upon which a monarch is seated on state or ceremonial occasions. "Throne" in an abstract sense can also refer to the monarchy or the Crown itself, an instance of metonymy, and is also used in many terms such as "the power behind the throne". Chairs in the Senate of Canada Kaihsu (Kaihsu Tai) took the photo, 2003-08-12. ... Chairs in the Senate of Canada Kaihsu (Kaihsu Tai) took the photo, 2003-08-12. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Prince Philip redirects here. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada or (masculine) Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share the... For other uses of chair, see chair (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... This article refers to the Commonwealths concept of the monarchys legal authority. ... In rhetoric, metonymy is the substitution of one word for another word with which it is associated. ... The phrase power behind the throne refers to a person or group that informally exercises the real power of an office. ...

Contents

Thrones in ancient cultures

During the Middle Kingdom period, the Dragon Throne of the Emperor of China was erected at the center of the Forbidden City, which was itself regarded as the centre of the world. The series of gates and passages a visitor had to pass through before reaching the emperor was intended to inspire awe.
During the Middle Kingdom period, the Dragon Throne of the Emperor of China was erected at the center of the Forbidden City, which was itself regarded as the centre of the world. The series of gates and passages a visitor had to pass through before reaching the emperor was intended to inspire awe.
Royal thrones in the Residenz of Munich, Bavaria
Royal thrones in the Residenz of Munich, Bavaria


Thrones have been the symbol of monarchs and deities since ancient times. In some cultures, an early form of the throne was used in coronation ceremonies, or to lift the monarch up above all others present. Thrones have ever since been associated with royal power. Inside the Forbidden City. ... Inside the Forbidden City. ... The history of China is told in traditional historical records that refer as far back as the Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors about 5,000 years ago, supplemented by archaeological records dating to the 16th century BC. China is one of the worlds oldest continuous civilizations. ... Dragon Throne could refer to: A historical name ascribed to the Imperial Throne of China. ... For the volcano in Indonesia, see Emperor of China (volcano). ... For other uses, see Forbidden City (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1049x1553, 156 KB) Description: Einer der Thronsaale des Bayerischen Königs, Residenz München. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1049x1553, 156 KB) Description: Einer der Thronsaale des Bayerischen Königs, Residenz München. ... The entrance front The Wurzburg Residenz is a palace in Wurzburg, Germany. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... Look up deity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The span of recorded history is roughly 5,000-5,500 years, with cuneiform possibly being the oldest form of writing. ... A asses is a ceremony marking the investment of a monarch with regal power through, amongst other symbolic acts, the placement of a crown upon his or her head. ...


The Greeks (according to Homer) were known to place additional, empty thrones in the royal palaces and temples so that the gods could be seated when they wished to be. The most famous of these thrones was the throne of Apollo in Amyclae. For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ... // Historical population Amykles or Amikles (Greek: Αμύκλες, older form, polytonic: Ἀμύκλαι, monotonic: Αμύκλαι), older forms: Amyklai, Amykle, Amiklai and Amikle, Latin: Amyclae, is a village and an archaeological site located southwest of Sparta. ...


The Romans also had two types of thrones- one for the Emperor and one for the goddess Roma whose statues were seated upon thrones, which became centers of worship. Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... This coin struck under Philip the Arab to celebrate Saeculum Novum bears, on the reverse, a temple devoted to the goddess Roma In Roman mythology, Roma was a deity personifying the Roman state, or an personification in art of the city of Rome (as seen on the column of Antoninus...


The Hittites considered thrones to be gods themselves. Relief of Suppiluliuma II, last known king of the Hittite Empire The Hittites were an ancient people from Kaneš who spoke an Indo-European language, and established a kingdom centered at Hattusa (Hittite URU) in north-central Anatolia from the 18th century BC. In the 14th century BC, the Hittite...


Thrones and the Bible

The word "throne" appears in the Bible 176 times ("thrones", in the plural, appears 9 times).[1] God is described as seated upon a throne in the manner of kings, as a sign of his sovereignty over creation. This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with create. ...

Fanciful depiction of Solomon on his throne
Fanciful depiction of Solomon on his throne

In the Old Testament, King David and King Solomon (as God's representative on earth) are depicted upon thrones: "Moreover the king made a great throne of ivory, and overlaid it with the best gold" (1 Kings 10:18). Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1566x1710, 179 KB) This image is in the public domain and is freely available at http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1566x1710, 179 KB) This image is in the public domain and is freely available at http://www. ... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ...


Isaiah mentions the same throne: (Isaiah 9:6-7): "For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counselor, the mighty God, the everlasting Father, the Prince of Peace. Of the increase of his government and peace there shall be no end, upon the Throne of David, and upon his kingdom, to order it, and to establish it with judgment and with justice from henceforth even for ever. The zeal of the Lord of hosts will perform this." Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... “Prince of Peace” may refer to Jesus of Nazareth, the central character of Christianity. ... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ...

Vision of John of Patmos from the Book of Revelation (4:4)—four seraphim surround the throne of Christ, twenty-four elders sit on thrones to either side (Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry)
Vision of John of Patmos from the Book of Revelation (4:4)—four seraphim surround the throne of Christ, twenty-four elders sit on thrones to either side (Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry)

In the New Testament, the Angel Gabriel also refers to this throne in the Gospel of Luke (1:32-33): "He will be great, and will be called the Son of the Highest; and the Lord God will give Him the throne of His father David. And He will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and of His kingdom there will be no end." Download high resolution version (941x1420, 274 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (941x1420, 274 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Saint John on Patmos by Hans Baldung Grien, 1511 Saint John of Patmos, by Jean Fouquet John of Patmos is the name given to the author of the Book of Revelation (or Book of the Apocalypse) in the New Testament. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ... 六翼天使 Seraphim(六翼天使) is a Taiwanese symphonic metal band similar to Nightwish and Therion. ... An illuminated page from the Très Riches Heures showing the day for exchanging gifts from the month of January The Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry (or simply the Très Riches Heures) is probably the most important illuminated manuscript of the 15th century, le roi des... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... This article is about the supernatural being. ... This article is about the archangel Gabriel. ... The Gospel of Luke (literally, according to Luke; Greek, Κατά Λουκαν, Kata Loukan) is a synoptic Gospel, and the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament. ... Lordship redirects here. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


Jesus promised his Apostles that they would sit upon "twelve thrones", judging the twelve tribes of Israel (Matthew 19:28). John's Revelation states: "And I saw a great white throne, and him that sat on it, from whose face the earth and the heaven fled away" (Revelation 20:11). This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      For... An Israelite is a member of the Twelve Tribes of Israel, descended from the twelve sons of the Biblical patriarch Jacob who was renamed Israel by God in the book of Genesis, 32:28 The Israelites were a group of Hebrews, as described in the Bible. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Names of John. ... The Revelation of St. ...


The Apostle Paul speaks of "thrones" in Colossians 1:16. Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, in his work, De Coelesti Hierarchia (VI.7) interprets this as referring to one of the ranks of angels (corresponding to the Hebrew Arelim or Ophanim). This concept was expanded upon by Thomas Aquinas in his Summa Theologica (I.108), wherein the thrones are concerned with carrying out divine justice. Paul of Tarsus (b. ... It has been suggested that Ophan be merged into this article or section. ... Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, also known as pseudo-Denys, refers to the anonymous theologian and philosopher of the 5th century whose Corpus Areopagiticum was falsely ascribed to Dionysius the Areopagite of Acts 17:34. ... De Coelesti Hierarchia (Celestial Hierarchy) is a Pseudo-Dionysian work on angelology (dated to ca. ... This article is about the supernatural being. ... An Ophan (plural Ophanin, Ophannin or Ophanim) is one of a class of celestial beings described in the Book of Enoch along side the Cherubim and Seraphim as never sleeping, but watching (or guarding) the throne of God. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P.(also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ... Summa theologiae, Pars secunda, prima pars. ...


In Medieval times the "Throne of Solomon" was associated with the Virgin Mary, who was depicted as the throne upon which Jesus sat. The ivory in the biblical description of the Throne of Solomon was interpreted as representing purity, the gold representing divinity, and the six steps of the throne stood for the six virtues. Psalm 45:9 was also interpreted as referring to the Virgin Mary, the entire Psalm describing a royal throne room. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The term Virgin Mary has several different meanings: Mary, the mother of Jesus, the historical and multi-denominational concept of Mary Blessed Virgin Mary, the Roman Catholic theological and doctrinal concept of Mary Marian apparitions shrines to the Virgin Mary Virgin Mary in Islam, the Islamic theological and doctrinal concept... Virtue (Greek αρετη; Latin virtus) is the habitual, well-established, readiness or diposition of mans powers directing them to some goodness of act. ...


Ecclesiastical thrones

Main article: Cathedra
Throne of the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople in the Phanar, Istanbul. On the diaz the Gospel is enthroned, in front of it, lower down is the patriarch's throne.
Throne of the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople in the Phanar, Istanbul. On the diaz the Gospel is enthroned, in front of it, lower down is the patriarch's throne.

From ancient times, bishops of the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican and other churches where episcopal offices exist, have been formally seated on a throne, called a cathedra (Greek: κάθεδρα, seat). Traditionally located in the sanctuary, the cathedra symbolizes the bishop's authority to teach the faith (hence the expression "ex cathedra") and to govern his flock. The cathedra of the Pope in the apse of St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (675x900, 733 KB) Throne inside the Patriarchade in Istanbul, Turkey File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Metadata This file contains additional information, probably... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (675x900, 733 KB) Throne inside the Patriarchade in Istanbul, Turkey File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Metadata This file contains additional information, probably... Fanar (formerly Phanar) is a neighborhood in Istanbul, Turkey (formerly Constantinople). ... A Gospel Book is a codex or bound volume, containing one or more of the four Gospels of the Christian New Testament. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Ajax prepares to violate the sanctuary of Athena by abducting Cassandra by force: red-figure vase, c. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Papal infallibility. ...


"Ex cathedra" refers to the explicative authority, notably the extremely rarely used procedure required for a papal declaration to be 'infallible' under Roman Catholic Canon law. In several languages the word deriving from cathedra is commonly used for an academic teaching mandate, the professorial chair. In Catholic theology, papal infallibility is the dogma that, by action of the Holy Spirit, the Pope is preserved from even the possibility of error[1] when he solemnly declares or promulgates to the Church a dogmatic teaching on faith or morals as being contained in divine revelation, or at... Canon Law is the ecclesiastical law of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


From the presence of this cathedra (throne), which can be as elaborate and precious as fits a secular prince (even if the prelate is not a prince of the church in the secular sense), a bishop's primary church is called a cathedral. In the Roman Catholic Church, a basilica -from the Greek basilikos 'royal'-, now refers to the presence there of a papal canopy (ombrellino), part of his regalia, and applies mainly to many cathedrals and Catholic churches of similar importance and/or splendor. In Roman Antiquity a basilica was secular public hall. Thus, the term basilica may also refer to a church designed after the manner of the ancient Roman basilica. Many of the churches built by the emperor Constantine the Great and Justinian are of the basilica style. The term Prince of the church is nowadays used nearly exclusively for Roman Catholic Cardinals. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... St. ... Look up Canopy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Coat of arms during the sede vacante - featuring an umbracullum The umbracullum, a Latin word derived from umbra shade for a sun-umbrella, is a historic piece of the papal regalia and insignia, once used on a daily basis to provide shade for the pope. ... The most famous symbol of the Papacy is almost certainly the triregnum (a crown with three levels), also called the tiara or triple crown; recent Popes (since Pope John Paul I) have not, however, worn the triregnum. ... Constantine. ... Justinian may refer to: Justinian I, a Roman Emperor; Justinian II, a Byzantine Emperor; Justinian, a storeship sent to the convict settlement at New South Wales in 1790. ...


Some other prelates besides bishops are permitted the use of thrones. For instance, abbots and abbesses. These are often simpler than the thrones used by bishops and there may be restrictions on the style and ornamentation used on them, according to the regulations and traditions of the particular denomination. A prelate is a member of the clergy having a special canonical jurisdiction over a territory or a group of people; usually, a prelate is a bishop. ... For other uses, see Abbot (disambiguation). ... An Abbess (Latin abbatissa, fem. ...


As a mark of distinction, Roman Catholic bishops and higher prelates have a right to a canopy above their thrones at certain ecclesiastical functions. It is sometimes granted by special privilege to prelates inferior to bishops, but always with limitations as to the days on which it may be used and the character of its ornamentation. The liturgical colour of the canopy should correspond with that of the other vestments. When ruling monarchs attend services, they are also allowed to be seated on a throne that is covered by a canopy, but their seats must be outside the sanctuary. [2] This article is about permission granted by law or other rules. ... Liturgical colours are colours of vestments and paraments within a Christian liturgy. ...


In the Greek Orthodox Church, the bishop's throne will often combine features of the monastic choir stall (kathisma) with appurtenances inherited from the Byzantine court, such as a pair of lions seated at the foot of the throne. Greek Orthodox Church (Greek: Hellēnorthódoxē Ekklēsía) can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches. ... A Kathisma (Greek: καθισμα; Slavonic: каѳисма, kafisma), literally, seat, is a division of the Psalter, used by Eastern Orthodox Christians and Eastern Catholics who follow the Byzantine Rite. ...


The term "throne" is often used in reference to Patriarchs to designate their ecclesiastical authority; for instance, "the Ecumenical Throne" refers to the authority of the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople. See Patriarchs (Bible) for details about Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob of the Book of Genesis in the Hebrew Bible. ... Throne inside the Patriarchade of Constantinople. ...


Western bishops may also use a faldstool to fulfill the liturgical purpose of the cathedra when not in their own cathedral. Faldstool (from the O.H. Ger. ...


Papal Thrones

Cathedra Sancti Petri, behind the high altar of St. Peter's Basilica, Rome
Cathedra Sancti Petri, behind the high altar of St. Peter's Basilica, Rome

In the Roman Catholic Church, the Pope is an elected monarch, both under canon law as supreme head of the church, and under international law as the head of state -styled "sovereign pontiff"- of the Vatican City State (the sovereign state located within the city of Rome established by the Lateran Treaty in 1929. Until 1870 the Pope was the elected monarch of the Papal States, which for centuries constituted one of the largest political powers on the divided Italian peninsula). To this day the Holy See maintains officially-recognized diplomatic status, and papal nuncios and legates are deputed on diplomatic missions throughout the world. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2142x2856, 2557 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Cathedra Chair of Saint Peter Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2142x2856, 2557 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Cathedra Chair of Saint Peter Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... An ancient Roman altar An altar is any structure upon which sacrifices or other offerings are offered for religious purposes. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... An elective monarchy is a monarchy whose reigning king or queen is elected in some form. ... Canon Law is the ecclesiastical law of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Referring to the doctrine of Papal Supremacy the Catechism of the Catholic Church notes in paragraph 882, “the Roman Pontiff, by reason of his office as Vicar of Christ, and as pastor of the entire Church has full, supreme, and universal power over the whole Church, a power which he... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ... The State of the City of the Vatican or the Vatican City (Latin: Status Civitatis Vaticanae, Italian Stato della Città del Vaticano) is the smallest independent state in the world (both in area and in population), a landlocked enclave surrounded by the city of Rome in Italy. ... The Lateran Treaties of February 11, 1929 provided for the mutual recognition of the then Kingdom of Italy and the Vatican City. ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... Karl-Josef Rauber; Nuncio for Belgium Nuncio is an ecclesiastical diplomatic title, derived from the ancient Latin Nuntius, meaning any envoy. ... A papal Legate, from the Decretals of Boniface VIII (1294 to 1303). ... - Seal on the building of German Embassies. ...


The throne upon which the Pope is traditionally seated as Bishop of Rome (the Cathedra Romana), is located in the apse of the Basilica of St. John Lateran, his cathedral. The throne upon which he sits as Pope is in the apse of St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican. Enshrined above this throne is an armchair believed to have been used by Saint Peter, the first pope. This relic is known as the Cathedra Sancti Petri (Chair of Saint Peter). Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Pope. ... This article is about an architectural feature; for the astronomical term see apsis. ... The late Baroque façade of the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano was completed by Alessandro Galilei in 1735 after winning a competition for the design. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... This article is about the famous building in Rome. ... “St Peter” redirects here. ... A relic is an object, especially a piece of the body or a personal item of someone of religious significance, carefully preserved with an air of veneration as a tangible memorial, Relics are an important aspect of Buddhism, some denominations of Christianity, Hinduism, shamanism, and many other personal belief systems. ... Cathedra Petri The chair of a bishop is a cathedra. ...

Pope Pius XII, is carried through St. Peter's Basilica on a sedia gestatoria with papal flabella on either side.
Pope Pius XII, is carried through St. Peter's Basilica on a sedia gestatoria with papal flabella on either side.

In the past, the pope was also carried on occasions in a portable throne, called the sedia gestatoria. Originally, the sedia was used as part of the elaborate, ostentatious pomp surrounding papal ceremonies that was believed to be the most direct heir of pharaonic splendour, and included a pair of flabella (fans made from ostrich feathers) to either side. Pope John Paul I at first abandoned the use of these implements, but later in his brief reign began to use the sedia so that he could be seen more easily by the crowds. However, he did not restore the use of the flabella. The use of the sedia was abandoned by Pope John Paul II in favor of the so-called "popemobile" when outside. Near the end of his pontificate, Pope John Paul II had a specially-constructed throne on wheels that could be used inside. Image File history File links GestatorialChair1. ... Image File history File links GestatorialChair1. ... Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death. ... Error creating thumbnail: convert: unable to open image `/mnt/upload3/wikipedia/en/2/26/A022ht_5_SedeGest. ... A flabellum (plural flabella), in liturgical use, is a fan made of leather, silk, parchment or feathers, intended to keep away insects from the Sacred Species and from the priest. ... Error creating thumbnail: convert: unable to open image `/mnt/upload3/wikipedia/en/2/26/A022ht_5_SedeGest. ... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... Ancient Egyptian flabella (top center) and lotus motifs. ... Pope John Paul I (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo I), born Albino Luciani, (October 17, 1912—September 28, 1978) reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and as Sovereign of Vatican City from August 26, 1978 until his death. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... Pope John Paul II on a popemobile Another popemobile, produced by Fiat Popemobile is an informal name for the specially designed motor vehicle used by the Pope during public appearances. ...


Prior to 1978, at the papal conclave, each cardinal was seated on a throne in the Sistine Chapel during the balloting. Each throne had a canopy over it. After a successful election, once the new pope accepted election and decided by what name he would be known, the cardinals would all lower their canopies, leaving only the canopy over the newly-elected pope. This was the new pope's first throne. This tradition was dramatically portrayed in the 1963 film, The Shoes of the Fisherman. con·clave (knklv, kng-) n. ... A cardinal is an official of the second-highest rank of the Roman Catholic Church, inferior in rank only to the Pope. ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: ) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ... Look up Canopy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Shoes of the Fisherman is a 1963 novel by Morris West, as well as a 1968 film based on the novel. ...


Thrones in feudal times

In European feudal countries, monarchs often were seated on thrones, based in all likelihood on the Roman magisterial chair. These thrones were originally quite simple, especially when compared to their Asian counterparts. One of the grandest and most important was the Throne of Charlemagne in the "Imperial Cathedral" (German: Kaiserdom) at Aachen, the site of the coronation of 30 German kings and emperors of the Holy Roman Empire. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixels Full resolution (1024 × 767 pixel, file size: 224 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) La bildo estas kopiita de wikipedia:de. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixels Full resolution (1024 × 767 pixel, file size: 224 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) La bildo estas kopiita de wikipedia:de. ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ... The Aachen Cathedral, frequently referred to as the Imperial Cathedral (in German: Kaiserdom) is a Roman catholic church in Aachen, western Germany. ... Oche redirects here; in darts the oche is the line from which players must throw. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ...


The Byzantine emperors made use of much more elaborate thrones, often guarded by stone lions. The emperor was initially seen behind a series of silken screens, which would be pulled aside if the foreign visitor was sufficiently important. As the throne was approached mechanical lion would roar and organs would play. On reaching the foot of the throne, the suppicant was forced to prostrate and touch his head to the ground, and the throne would rise into the air, so that when the visitor raised his head from the ground he would be astounded.[3] This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ...


The medieval Russian Tsars also employed Byzantine ceremonial with regard to throne-room etiquette. The most famous throne of Muscovy was the Ivory Throne of Ivan IV "the Terrible". Dating from the mid-XVIth century, it is shaped as a high-backed chair with arm rests, and adorned with ivory and walrus bone plaques intricately carved with mythological, heraldic and life scenes. The plaques carved with scenes from the biblical account of King David’s life are of particular relevance, as David was seen as the ideal for Christian monarchs.[4] Tsar, (Bulgarian цар�, Russian царь; often spelled Czar or Tzar in English), was the title used for the autocratic rulers of the First and Second Bulgarian Empires since 913, in Serbia in the middle of the 14th century, and in Russia from 1547 to 1917. ... It has been suggested that Office etiquette be merged into this article or section. ... Muscovy (Moscow principality (княжество Московское) to Grand Duchy of Moscow (Великое Княжество Московское) to Russian Tsardom (Царство Русское)) is a traditional Western name for the Russian state that existed from the 14th century to the late 17th century. ... Ivan IV (August 25, 1530–March 18, 1584) was the first ruler of Russia to assume the title of tsar. ... This page is about the Biblical king David. ...


In the Indian subcontinent, the term gaddi (pronounced /gəd̪d̪iː/, also called rājgaddī) was reserved for the throne of a Hindu princely state's ruler, while their Muslim colleagues throned on a musnad (pronounced /məsnəd̪/), even though both were in the shape of a divan. In the Mughal times the throne was called Shāhī takht (pronounced /ʃaːhiː t̪əxt̪/), while traditional Sanskrit name for the throne was singhāsana (lit., seat of a lion). A princely state is any state under the reign of a prince and is thus a principality taken in the broad sense. ... This article should be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The Mughal Empire (alternative spelling Mogul, which is the origin of the word Mogul) of India was founded by Babur in 1526, when he defeated Ibrahim Lodi, the last of the Delhi Sultans at the First Battle of Panipat. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ...


In the 'regency' (nominally an Ottoman province, de facto an independent realm) of the Bey of Tunis, the throne was called kursi. Regency may have several meanings: A regency may be a period of time when a regent holds power in the name of the current monarch, or in the name of the Crown itself, if the throne is vacant. ... Bey is originally a Turkish[1][2] word for chieftain, traditionally applied to the leaders of small tribal groups. ...


During the Russian Empire, the throne in St. George's Hall (the "Greater Throne Room") in the Winter Palace was regarded as the throne of Russia. It sits atop a seven-stepped dais with a proscenium arch above and the symbol of the Imperial Family behind (the two-headed eagle). Peter I's Room (the "Smaller Throne Room") is modest in comparison to the former. The throne was made for Empress Anna Ivanovna in London. There is also a throne in the Grand Throne Room of the Peterhof. The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... St. ... Located between the Palace Embankment and the Palace Square, the Winter Palace (Russian: Зимний Дворец) in Saint Petersburg, Russia was built between 1754 and 1762 as the winter residence of the Russian tsars. ... Dais (French dais, estrade, Italian predella), originally a part of the floor at the end of a medieval hall, raised a step above the rest of the building. ... A proscenium arch is a square frame around a raised stage area in traditional theatres. ... == The origins of the symbol == I. The oriental origine of the Two-headed eagle A/ The apparition of the symbol with the Hittites It seems that two-headed symbols are known for long time. ... Peter the Great or Pyotr Alexeyevich Romanov (Russian: Пётр I Алексеевич Pyotr I Alekse`yevich, Пётр Великий Pyotr Veli`kiy) (9 June 1672 – 8 February 1725 [30 May 1672–28 January 1725 O.S.][1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his... Emperor is also a Norwegian black metal band; see Emperor (band). ... The crown of Anna Ioannovna Anna Ivanovna (In Russian: Анна Ивановна) (February 7, 1693 - October 28, 1740) reigned as Duchess of Courland from 1711 to 1730 and as Empress of Russia from 1730 to 1740. ... Peterhof (Russian: , Petergof, originally named Peterhof: Peters Court), is a series of palaces and gardens, laid out on the orders of Peter the Great, and sometimes called the Russian Versailles. It is located about twenty kilometers west and six kilometers south of St. ...


Thrones in modern times

The President of Ireland on the Irish Viceregal throne
President Robinson at her inauguration in 1990.

In some countries today which retain a monarchy, thrones are still used and have important symbolic and ceremonial meaning. However many modern day monarchies have dispensed with the usage of such symbolism as crowns, thrones and coronations. presumably covered by Fair Use and irish legal equivalent. ... presumably covered by Fair Use and irish legal equivalent. ... President Robinson, sitting on the former Viceregal throne, signs her Declaration of Office in 1990. ... For the poet, see Mary Robinson (poet). ... An inauguration is a ceremony of formal investiture whereby an individual assumes an office or position of authority or power. ... A crown is a symbolic form of headgear worn by a monarch or by a god, for whom the crown is traditionally one of the symbols of power and legitimacy (See Regalia for a broader treatment). ... A asses is a ceremony marking the investment of a monarch with regal power through, amongst other symbolic acts, the placement of a crown upon his or her head. ...


Among the most famous thrones still in usage are St Edward's Chair, on which the British monarch is crowned, and the thrones used by monarchs during the state opening of parliaments in the United Kingdom, Denmark, The Netherlands, Canada, Australia, and Japan (see above) among others. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain...


Some republics use distinctive throne-like chairs in some state ceremonial. The President of the United States sits on a distinctive high-backed white-clothed chair in the Oval Office in the White House when meeting distinguished visitors in front of the media.(The visitor sits in a matching chair.) The President of Ireland sits on a former viceregal throne during his or her inauguration ceremony while Lords Mayor of many British and Irish cities often preside over local councils from throne-like chairs. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Oval Office from above in 2003, during the administration of George W. Bush. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Official Seal of the President of Ireland The President of Ireland (Irish: ) [uːəxt̪ˠəɾaːn̪ˠ n̪ˠə heːɼən̪ˠ] is the head of state of the Republic of Ireland. ... Official standard of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (plural: Lords Lieutenant), also known as the Judiciar in the early mediaeval period and as the Lord Deputy as late as the 17th century, was the Kings representative and head of the Irish executive during the... An inauguration is a ceremony of formal investiture whereby an individual assumes an office or position of authority or power. ... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ...


List of named thrones

The Ivory Throne of Tsar Ivan IV of Russia.
The Ivory Throne of Tsar Ivan IV of Russia.
  • The Throne of Solomon

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x1332, 141 KB) Photo of ivory throne of Ivan the Terrible, taken August 2003 by User:Stan Shebs File links The following pages link to this file: Ivan IV of Russia User:Stan Shebs/Gallery/Miscellaneous ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x1332, 141 KB) Photo of ivory throne of Ivan the Terrible, taken August 2003 by User:Stan Shebs File links The following pages link to this file: Ivan IV of Russia User:Stan Shebs/Gallery/Miscellaneous ... Tsar (Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian цар, Russian  , in scientific transliteration respectively car and car ), occasionally spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English, is a Slavonic term designating certain monarchs. ... Ivan IV (August 25, 1530–March 18, 1584) was the first ruler of Russia to assume the title of tsar. ... Image File history File links Peacock_Throne. ... Image File history File links Peacock_Throne. ... The Peacock Throne, called Takht-e-Tavous (Persian: تخت طائوس) in Persian, is the name originally of a Mughal throne, later used to describe the thrones of the Persian emperors from Nader Shah Afshari to Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi. ... A view of the Gulistan Palaces garden from Khalvat e Karimkhani. ...

Europe

// Historical population Amykles or Amikles (Greek: Αμύκλες, older form, polytonic: Ἀμύκλαι, monotonic: Αμύκλαι), older forms: Amyklai, Amykle, Amiklai and Amikle, Latin: Amyclae, is a village and an archaeological site located southwest of Sparta. ... King Edwards Chair, sometimes known as St. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... The Stone of Scone, (pronounced scoon) also commonly known as the Stone of Destiny or the Coronation Stone (though the former name sometimes refers to Lia Fáil) is a block of sandstone historically kept at the now-ruined abbey in Scone, near Perth, Scotland. ... Two different historical stones are each known as the Stone of Destiny. ... This article is about the country. ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ... The Aachen Cathedral, frequently referred to as the Imperial Cathedral (in German: Kaiserdom) is a Roman catholic church in Aachen, western Germany. ... Oche redirects here; in darts the oche is the line from which players must throw. ... Ivan IV (August 25, 1530–March 18, 1584) was the first ruler of Russia to assume the title of tsar. ... Error creating thumbnail: convert: unable to open image `/mnt/upload3/wikipedia/en/2/26/A022ht_5_SedeGest. ...

Africa

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Ashanti (disambiguation). ... An emperorrefers to Nick Herringshaw, a title, empress may only indicate the wife of an emperor (empress consort. ...

Asia

Dragon Throne could refer to: A historical name ascribed to the Imperial Throne of China. ... An emperorrefers to Nick Herringshaw, a title, empress may only indicate the wife of an emperor (empress consort. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Imperial Seal of Japan. ... An emperorrefers to Nick Herringshaw, a title, empress may only indicate the wife of an emperor (empress consort. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... This article is about the Dalai Lama lineage. ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ... , Sikkim (Nepali:  , also Sikhim) is a landlocked Indian state nestled in the Himalayas. ... The Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka (ශ්රී ලංකා in Sinhala / இலங்கை in Tamil) (known as Ceylon before 1972) is a tropical island nation off the southeast coast of the Indian subcontinent. ... Sigiriya is an archeological site in Central Sri Lanka. ... The second most ancient of Sri Lankas kingdoms, Polonnaruwa was first declared the capital city by King Vijayabahu I, who defeated the Chola invaders in 1070 CE to reunite the country once more under a local leader. ... The Peacock Throne, called Takht-e-Tavous (Persian: تخت طائوس) in Persian, is the name originally of a Mughal throne, later used to describe the thrones of the Persian emperors from Nader Shah Afshari to Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi. ... The Mughal Empire (alternative spelling Mogul, which is the origin of the word Mogul) of India was founded by Babur in 1526, when he defeated Ibrahim Lodi, the last of the Delhi Sultans at the First Battle of Panipat. ... An emperorrefers to Nick Herringshaw, a title, empress may only indicate the wife of an emperor (empress consort. ... The Peacock Throne, called Takht-e-Tavous (Persian: تخت طائوس) in Persian, is the name originally of a Mughal throne, later used to describe the thrones of the Persian emperors from Nader Shah Afshari to Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi. ... Persia redirects here. ... Shah or Shahzad is a Persian term for a monarch (ruler) that has been adopted in many other languages. ... The Marble Throne as it appears today. ... Persia redirects here. ... Shah or Shahzad is a Persian term for a monarch (ruler) that has been adopted in many other languages. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... AvA is a film in post-production directed by the rock group Angels and Airwaves. ... , Bikaner is a city in the northwest of the state of Rajasthan in western India. ... Axum, properly Aksum, is a city in northern Ethiopia. ...

Gallery

Thrones of kings and emperors

Thrones of the popes

Other uses

  • In slang, a common sit-down toilet is also called a throne.
  • In music, the stool used to sit behind a drumkit is often called a throne.
  • One of the Angel choirs is an order called Ophanim or 'Thrones', said to carry God's heavenly throne - other choir names expressing power in secular terms include Powers, Principalities, Dominions

For other uses, see Slang (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Toilet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set - the latter an old-fashioned term) is a collection of drums, cymbals and other percussion instruments arranged for convenient playing by a sole percussionist (drummer), usually for jazz, rock, or other types of contemporary music. ... An Ophan (plural Ophanin, Ophannin or Ophanim) is one of a class of celestial beings described in the Book of Enoch along side the Cherubim and Seraphim as never sleeping, but watching (or guarding) the throne of God. ...

Sources and references

  1. ^ Strong, LL.D., S.T.D., James (2001), Strong's Expanded Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible (Red Letter ed.), Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers, ISBN ISBN 0-7852-4539-1
  2. ^ "Canopy". The Catholic Encyclopedia III. (1908). New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved on 2007-07-12. 
  3. ^ Byzantium. Cunnan. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  4. ^ Throne of Ivan IV the Terrible. Regalia of Russian Tsars. The Moscow Kremlin. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Thrones

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

See also

Pope John Paul I s enthronement as Pope on 3rd September 1978. ...

External links

  • RoyalArk- here India

  Results from FactBites:
 
Throne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (893 words)
Thrones for The Queen of Canada, and the Duke of Edinburgh and the Governor General, in the Canadian Senate, Ottawa.
The throne upon which the Pope is traditionally seated is located in the apse of the St.
the Lion Throne of the Dalai Lama of Tibet
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Throne (682 words)
The steps are to be covered by a carpet, the throne itself is to have spread over it a silk cover of the same colour as the bishop's vestments, but not of cloth of gold, unless the bishop should be a cardinal.
Should a cardinal be present, the bishop must yield the throne to the cardinal and use a faldistorium placed on the Gospel side of the altar, that is, a four-legged faldstool with arms.
Thrones belonging to the Middle Ages and the twelfth century are to be found at Canossa, Bari, in the grotto church of Monte Gargano, in St. Emmeram at Ratisbon, in Santa Maria in Cosmedin and in San Clemente at Rome.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m