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Encyclopedia > Thrombosis
Thrombosis
Classification & external resources
ICD-10 I80.-I82.
ICD-9 437.6, 453, 671.5, 671.9
MeSH D013927

Thrombosis is the formation of a clot or thrombus inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system. Thromboembolism is a general term describing both thrombosis and its main complication which is embolisation. The term was coined in 1848 by Reginald VelJohnson.[1] The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). ... // I00-I99 - Diseases of the circulatory system (I00-I02) Acute rheumatic fever (I00) Rheumatic fever without mention of heart involvement (I01) Rheumatic fever with heart involvement (I02) Rheumatic chorea (I05-I09) Chronic rheumatic heart diseases (I05) Rheumatic mitral valve diseases (I050) Mitral stenosis (I051) Rheumatic mitral insufficiency (I06) Rheumatic aortic... // I00-I99 - Diseases of the circulatory system (I00-I02) Acute rheumatic fever (I00) Rheumatic fever without mention of heart involvement (I01) Rheumatic fever with heart involvement (I02) Rheumatic chorea (I05-I09) Chronic rheumatic heart diseases (I05) Rheumatic mitral valve diseases (I050) Mitral stenosis (I051) Rheumatic mitral insufficiency (I06) Rheumatic aortic... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... Coagulation is the thickening or congealing of any liquid into solid clots. ... For Trombe wall (used in solar homes), see Trombe wall. ... f you all The blood vessels are part of the circulatory system and function to transport blood throughout the body. ... Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... For transport in plants, see Vascular tissue. ... An embolism occurs when an object (the embolus, plural emboli) migrates from one part of the body (through circulation) and cause(s) a blockage (occlusion) of a blood vessel in another part of the body. ...

Contents

Causes

Classically, thrombosis is caused by abnormalities in one or more of the following (Virchow's quadrad): Dr. R.L.K. Virchow Rudolf Ludwig Karl Virchow (October 13, 1821, Schivelbein (Pomerania) - September 5, 1902, Berlin) was a German doctor, anthropologist, public health activist, pathologist, prehistorian, biologist and politician. ...

  • The composition of the blood (hypercoagulability)
  • Quality of the vessel wall (endothelial cell injury)
  • Nature of the blood flow (hemostasis)
  • Slow nerve action

The formation of a thrombus is usually caused by the top three causes, known as Virchow's triad. To elaborate, the pathogenesis includes: an injury to the vessel's wall (such as by trauma, infection, or turbulent flow at bifurcations); by the slowing or stagnation of blood flow past the point of injury (which may occur after long periods of sendentary behavior - for example, sitting on a long airplane flight; by a blood state of hypercoagulability (caused for example, by genetic deficiencies or autoimmune disorders).


High altitude has also been known to induce thrombosis [1][2]. Occasionally, abnormalities in coagulation are to blame. Intravascular coagulation follows, forming a structureless mass of red blood cells, leukocytes, and fibrin. This article is about the clotting of blood. ... This article is about the clotting of blood. ... “Red cell” redirects here. ... White Blood Cells is also the name of a White Stripes album. ... Fibrin is a protein involved in the clotting of blood. ...


Classification

There are two distinct forms of thrombosis:


Venous thrombosis

Main article: Venous thrombosis

A venous thrombosis is a blood clot that forms within a vein. ... It has been suggested that Deep Vein Thrombosis be merged into this article or section. ... Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is the formation of a clot or thrombus obstructing the renal vein, leading to a reduction in drainage of the kidney. ... In medicine (gastroenterology and hepatology), Budd-Chiari syndrome is the clinical picture caused by occlusion of the hepatic vein. ... Paget-Schroetter disease (also Paget-von Schrötter disease) refers to deep vein thrombosis of an upper extremity vein, including the axillary vein or subclavian vein. ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of thrombosis (a blood clot) affecting the dural venous sinuses which drain blood from the brain. ... Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) consists of a group of distinct disorders that affect the nerves in the brachial plexus (nerves that pass into the arms from the neck) and various nerves and blood vessels between the base of the neck and axilla (armpit). ...

Arterial thrombosis

For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... Heart attack redirects here. ... Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) consists of a group of distinct disorders that affect the nerves in the brachial plexus (nerves that pass into the arms from the neck) and various nerves and blood vessels between the base of the neck and axilla (armpit). ...

Embolisation

If a bacterial infection is present at the site of thrombosis, the thrombus may break down, spreading particles of infected material throughout the circulatory system (pyemia, septic embolus) and setting up metastatic abscesses wherever they come to rest. Without an infection, the thrombus may become detached and enter circulation as an embolus, finally lodging in and completely obstructing a blood vessel (an infarction). The effects of an infarction depend on where it occurs. For transport in plants, see Vascular tissue. ... Blood poisoning, also known as septicaemia, is a bacterial infection that occurs when bacteria get into the bloodstream and multiply rapidly. ... In medicine, an embolism occurs when an object (the embolus, plural emboli) migrates from one part of the body (through the circulation) and cause(s) a blockage (occlusion) of a blood vessel in another part of the body. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Most thrombi, however, become organized into fibrous tissue, and the thrombosed vessel is gradually recanalized. Fibrinolysis is the process where a fibrin clot, the product of coagulation, is broken down. ...


See also

An anticoagulant is a substance that prevents coagulation; that is, it stops blood from clotting. ...

References

  1. ^ Hellemans, Alexander; Bryan Bunch (1988). The Timetables of Science. New York, New York: Simon and Schuster, 317. ISBN 0671621300. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Thrombosis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (272 words)
Thrombosis is the formation of a clot or thrombus inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system.
Thromboembolism is a general term describing both thrombosis and its main complication: dislodgement of a clot and embolisation.
The formation of a thrombus is usually caused by an injury to the vessel's wall, either by trauma or infection, and by the slowing or stagnation of blood flow past the point of injury.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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