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Encyclopedia > Thriller (genre)

The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. It includes numerous, often overlapping sub-genres. Look up genre in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... A genre is any of the traditional divisions of art forms from a single field of activity into various kinds according to criteria particular to that form. ...


Thrillers are characterized by fast pacing, frequent action, and resourceful heroes who must thwart the plans of more-powerful and better-equipped villains. Literary devices such as suspense, red herrings, and cliffhangers are used extensively. “Heroine” redirects here. ... For other uses of the term, see Villain (disambiguation). ... Suspense or tension is the feeling of uncertainty and interest about the outcome of certain actions an audience perceives in a dramatic work. ... In literature, a red herring is a plot device intended to distract the reader from a more important event in the plot, usually a twist ending. ... For other uses, see Cliffhanger (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Characteristics

Thrillers often take place wholly or partly in exotic settings such as foreign cities, deserts, polar regions, or high seas. The heroes in most thrillers are frequently "hard men" accustomed to danger: law enforcement officers, spies, soldiers, seamen, or pilots. However, they may also be ordinary citizens drawn into danger by accident. While such heroes have traditionally been men, women have become increasingly common.


Thrillers often overlap with mystery stories, but are distinguished by the structure of their plots. In a thriller, the hero must thwart the plans of an enemy, rather than uncover a crime that has already happened. Thrillers also occur on a much grander scale: the crimes that must be prevented are serial or mass murder, terrorism, assassination, or the overthrow of governments. Jeopardy and violent confrontations are standard plot elements. While a mystery climaxes when the mystery is solved; a thriller climaxes when the hero finally defeats the villain, saving his own life and often the lives of others. In thrillers influenced by film noir and tragedy, the compromised hero is often killed in the process. Mystery fiction is a distinct subgenre of detective fiction that entails the occurrence of an unknown event which requires the protagonist to make known (or solve). ... “Heroine” redirects here. ... For other uses of the term, see Villain (disambiguation). ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ... In general usage a tragedy is a play, movie or sometimes a real world event with a sad outcome. ... “Heroine” redirects here. ...


In recent years, when thrillers have been increasingly influenced by horror or psychological-horror exposure in pop culture, an ominous or monstrous element has become common to heighten tension. The monster could be anything, even an inferior physical force made superior only by their intellect ( as in the Saw movies), a supernatural entity (Dracula, Christine books, The Amityville Horror, Ringu films), aliens (H. P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu mythos books), serial killers (Halloween film series, Friday the 13th, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre films), or even microbes or chemical agents (Cabin Fever, Richard Matheson's The Last Man On Earth, 28 days later). Some authors have made their mark by incorporating all of these elements (Richard Laymon, F. Paul Wilson) throughout their bibliographies. Promotional poster for Saw III. The Saw film series is a popular horror film franchise created by James Wan and Leigh Whannell. ... Dracula is an 1897 novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. ... Christine is a horror novel by Stephen King, published in 1983. ... The Amityville Horror is a best-selling book by the author Jay Anson which was published in September 1977. ... Ringu (リング, the Ring) is a 1998 Japanese horror mystery film from director Hideo Nakata, adapted from a novel by Koji Suzuki of the same name. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction. ... Cthulhu and Rlyeh Cthulhu Mythos is the term coined by the writer August Derleth to describe the shared elements, characters, settings, and themes in the works of H. P. Lovecraft and associated horror fiction writers. ... Halloween (also known as John Carpenters Halloween) is a 1978 American independent horror film set in the fictional Midwest town of Haddonfield, Illinois on Halloween. ... A Friday occurring on the 13th day of any month is considered to be a day of bad luck in English, German, Polish and Portuguese-speaking cultures around the globe. ... The Texas Chainsaw Massacre horror films began with The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1973) by Tobe Hooper. ... Cabin Fever (2003) is American horror film about a group of college graduates who rent a cabin in the woods and begin to fall victim to a horrifying flesh-eating virus. ... The Last Man on Earth (originally titled LUltimo uomo della Terra) is a 1964 film based upon the Richard Matheson novel I Am Legend. ... 28 Days Later is a 2002 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film directed by Danny Boyle and starring Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris and Christopher Eccleston. ... Richard Carl Laymon (January 14, 1947 - February 14, 2001[1]) was an American horror writer. ... Francis Paul Wilson (b. ...


Similar distinctions separate the thriller from other overlapping genres: adventure, spy, legal, war, maritime fiction, and so on. Thrillers are defined not by their subject matter but by their approach to it. Many thrillers involve spies and espionage, but not all spy stories are thrillers. The spy novels of John LeCarre, for example, explicitly and intentionally reject the conventions of the thriller. Conversely, many thrillers cross over to genres that traditionally have had few or no thriller elements. Alistair MacLean, Hammond Innes, and Brian Callison are best known for their thrillers, but are also accomplished writers of man-against-nature sea stories. ... Alistair Stuart MacLean (April 28, 1922 - February 2, 1987) was a Scottish novelist who wrote successful thrillers or adventure stories, the best known of which are perhaps The Guns of Navarone and Where Eagles Dare. ... Hammond Innes (July 15, 1914 – June 10, 1998) was an English author who wrote over thirty novels, as well as childrens and travel books. ... Brian Callison (b. ...


Thrillers may be defined by the primary mood that they exhibit: excitement. In short, if it thrills, it is a thriller.


Sub-genres

The thriller genre can include the following sub-genres, which may include elements of other genres:

  • Spy thrillers (also a subgenre of spy fiction), in which the hero is generally a government agent who must take violent action against agents of a rival government or (in recent years) terrorists. Examples include From Russia with Love by Ian Fleming, The Bourne Identity by Robert Ludlum, and television series such as Mission: Impossible and 24 (the second demonstrating a break from the norm by Robert Ludlum, as it is as much a psychological thriller as a spy thriller.)
  • Political thrillers, in which the hero must ensure the stability of the government that employs him. The success of Seven Days in May (1962) by Fletcher Knebel and The Day of the Jackal (1971) by Frederick Forsyth established this subgenre.
  • Military Thrillers, in which the hero is typically a uniformed military officer operating behind enemy lines alone or as part of a small team of specialists. The Guns of Navarone by Alistair MacLean is a well-known example of the type, as are films such as Solo Voyage, The Dirty Dozen and Rambo.
  • Conspiracy thrillers, in which the hero confronts a large, powerful group of enemies whose true extent only he recognizes. The work of Robert Ludlum, for example The Chancellor Manuscript and The Aquitane Progression, falls into this category, as do films such as Three Days of the Condor and JFK.
  • Technothrillers, in which technology is prominently described and made essential to the reader's understanding of the plot. Michael Crichton and Tom Clancy are both considered to be the "Fathers of the Technothriller."
  • Eco-thrillers, an emerging sub-genre[citation needed] in which the protagonist must avert or rectify an environmental or biological calamity - often in addition to dealing with the usual types of enemies or obstacles present in other thriller genres. This environmental component often forms a central message or theme of the story. Examples include Nicholas Evans' The Loop, C. George Muller's Echoes in the Blue, and Wilbur Smith's Elephant Song, all of which highlight real-life environmental issues.
  • Erotic Thrillers, a sub-genre which combines the erotic elements in a standard thriller.
  • Legal Thrillers, in which the lawyer-heroes confront enemies outside, as well as inside, the courtroom and are in danger of losing not only their cases but their lives. The Pelican Brief by John Grisham is a well known example of the type.
  • Forensic Thrillers , in which the heroes are forensic experts whose involvement with an unsolved crime puts their lives at risk. Balefire by Ken Goddard and Red Dragon by Thomas Harris are examples, as is Harris's later The Silence of the Lambs.
  • Psychological thrillers, in which (until the often violent resolution) conflict between the main characters is mental and emotional rather than physical. The Alfred Hitchcock films Suspicion, Shadow of a Doubt, and Strangers on a Train and David Lynch's bizarre and influential Blue Velvet are notable examples of the type, as is The Sixth Sense by M. Night Shyamalan and The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith (who also wrote Strangers).
  • Horror thriller, in which conflict between the main characters is mental, emotional, and physical. Two recent examples of this include the Saw series of films and the Danny Boyle film 28 Days Later. What sets the Horror Thriller apart is the main element of fear throughout the story. The main characters are not only up against a superior force in the form of a monster or monsters, but they are or will soon become the victims themselves and directly feel the fear that comes by attracting the monster's attention.
  • Disaster thriller, in which the main conflict is due to some sort of natural or artificial disaster such as floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, volcanoes etc., or nuclear disasters as an artificial disaster. Examples include Stormy Weather by Carl Hiaasen, Earthquake (1974 film), Tremor by Winston Graham.
  • Serial killer thrillers
  • Romantic thrillers
  • Supernatural thrillers, in which the conflict is between main characters, usually one of which has supernatural powers. Carrie by Stephen King and Unbreakable by M. Night Shyamalan are notable examples of this genre. This type of thriller combines tension of the regular thriller with such basic horror oriented ingredients as ghosts, the occult and psychic phenomenon, the supernatural thriller combines these with a frightening but often restrained film. They also generally eschew the more graphic elements of the horror film in favor of sustaining a mood of menace and unpredictability, supernatural thrillers often find the protagonists either battling a malevolent paranormal force or trapped in a situation seemingly influenced or controlled by an otherworldly entity beyond their comprehension.
  • Action thrillers, which often feature a race against the clock, lots of violence and an obvious antagonist. These films usually contain a large amount of guns, explosions, and large elaborate set pieces for the action to take place. These films often have elements of mystery films and crime films, but these elements take a backseat to action.
  • Crime thrillers are a hybrid type of both crime films and thrillers that offer a suspenseful account of a successful or failed crime or crimes. These films often focus on the criminal(s) rather than a policeman. Crime thrillers usually emphasize action over psychological aspects. Central topics of these films include murders, robberies, chases, shootouts and double-crosses are central ingredients. Some examples include The Killing, Seven, Reservoir Dogs, and The Asphalt Jungle.
  • Most thrillers are formed in some combination of the above, with horror, conspiracy and psychological tricks used most commonly to heighten tension. Combinations are highly diverse, including:

The genre of spy fiction — sometimes called political thriller or spy thriller or sometimes shortened simply to Spy-fi — arose before World War I at about the same time that the first modern intelligence agencies were formed. ... The genre of spy fiction — sometimes called political thriller or spy thriller or sometimes shortened simply to Spy-fi — arose before World War I at about the same time that the first modern intelligence agencies were formed. ... A 2002 Penguin Books paperback edition From Russia with Love, published in 1957, is the fifth James Bond novel written by Ian Fleming. ... Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908 – August 12, 1964) was a British author, journalist and Second World War Naval Officer. ... The Bourne Identity is a 1980 spy fiction thriller by Robert Ludlum about an amnesiac who must discover who he is and why several different groups, including an assassin and the CIA, are trying to kill him. ... The Scarlatti Inheritance, Ludlums first book, published 1971. ... Mission: Impossible is the name of an American television series which aired on the CBS network from September 1966 to September 1973. ... 24 is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning American television series created by Joel Surnow and Robert Cochran, and produced by Imagine Television. ... The Scarlatti Inheritance, Ludlums first book, published 1971. ... A political thriller is a thriller that is set against the backdrop of political power struggle. ... Seven Days in May is a political thriller novel published by Harper & Row, New York in 1962(current hardcover edition: ISBN 0-06-012436-9) written by Fletcher Knebel and Charles W. Bailey. ... Fletcher Knebel (1911-1993) was an American author of several popular works of political fiction. ... The Day of the Jackal is a thriller novel by Frederick Forsyth, first published in 1971, about a professional assassin who is contracted by the OAS, a French terrorist group of the early 1960s, to kill Charles de Gaulle. ... Frederick Forsyth. ... For other uses, see The Guns of Navarone. ... Alistair Stuart MacLean (April 28, 1922 - February 2, 1987) was a Scottish novelist who wrote successful thrillers or adventure stories, the best known of which are perhaps The Guns of Navarone and Where Eagles Dare. ... Cover of the Movie Solo Voyage (Одиночное Плавание), 1985, is a Soviet military thriller, directed by Mickail Tumanishvili upon a story of Evgeny Mesyatsev. ... For the rap group, see D12. ... Rambo is a saga of popular action films starring Sylvester Stallone, based on the characters created by David Morrell in his novel First Blood. ... Particularly since the 1960s, conspiracy theory has been a popular subject of fiction. ... The Scarlatti Inheritance, Ludlums first book, published 1971. ... The Chancellor Manuscript will be a film starring Leonardo DiCaprio. ... Three Days of the Condor is a United States motion picture made in 1975. ... JFK is an American film directed by Oliver Stone, first released on December 20, 1991. ... Techno-thrillers are a hybrid genre, drawing subject matter generally from spy thrillers, war novels, and science fiction. ... Michael Crichton (born October 23, 1942, pronounced [1]) is an American author, film producer, film director, and television producer. ... Thomas Leo Clancy Jr. ... The erotic thriller is a film genre which consists of erotica and thriller and had become popular since the 1980s and the rise of VCR market penetration. ... Erotica (from the Greek language Eros - love) — refers to works of art, including literature, photography, film, sculpture and painting, that deal substantively with erotically stimulating or arousing descriptions. ... The legal thriller is a sub-genre of the detective story in which the major characters are lawyers and their employees. ... The Pelican Brief is a legal/suspense thriller written by John Grisham in 1992. ... John Ray Grisham Jr. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Thomas Harris. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Psychological thriller is a specific sub-genre of the wide-ranging thriller genre. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was a highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Suspicion DVD cover Suspicion (1941) is a film noir directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine as a married couple. ... For other uses, see Shadow of a Doubt (disambiguation). ... Strangers on a Train is a thriller novel by Patricia Highsmith, who also wrote The Talented Mr. ... David Keith Lynch (born January 20, 1946, in Missoula, Montana) is an American filmmaker. ... It has been suggested that Blue Velvet in popular culture be merged into this article or section. ... The Sixth Sense is a 1999 Academy Award-nominated psychological thriller film written and directed by M. Night Shyamalan that tells the story of Cole, a troubled, isolated boy (played by Haley Joel Osment) who claims to be able to see and talk to the dead, and an equally troubled... Manoj Nelliattu Shyamalan (born August 6, 1970), known professionally as M. Night Shyamalan , // (SHAH-ma-lawn), is an American actor, Academy Award-nominated film writer, and director. ... The Talented Mr. ... 1962 publicity photo of Patricia Highsmith Patricia Highsmith (January 19, 1921 - February 4, 1995) was an American novelist who is known mainly for her psychological crime thrillers which have led to more than two dozen film adaptations. ... 1922s Nosferatu Horror films are films of the horror genre that are designed to elicit fright, fear, terror, disgust or horror from viewers. ... Promotional poster for Saw III. The Saw film series is a popular horror film franchise created by James Wan and Leigh Whannell. ... 28 Days Later is a 2002 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film directed by Danny Boyle and starring Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris and Christopher Eccleston. ... DVD cover showing horror characters as depicted by Universal Studios. ... Stormy Weather is a 1933 song written by Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler. ... Photo of Carl Hiaasen by Robert Birnbaum Carl Hiaasen (IPA pronunciation: ) (born March 12, 1953) is an American journalist and novelist. ... Earthquake is a 1974 disaster film that was among several box-office successful disaster films of the 1970s that places a recognizable all-star cast in life and death situations. ... A blonde haired, very skilled worker with a 70s look. ... Winston Graham (June 30, 1908-July 10, 2003) was an English novelist, best known for the Poldark series of historical novels. ... Look up Carrie in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of over 200 stories including over 50 bestselling horror novels. ... This page refers to the film Unbreakable For other uses, see Unbreakable (disambiguation). ... Manoj Nelliattu Shyamalan (born August 6, 1970), known professionally as M. Night Shyamalan , // (SHAH-ma-lawn), is an American actor, Academy Award-nominated film writer, and director. ... This article is about the paranormal. ... The word occult comes from the Latin occultus (clandestine, hidden, secret), referring to knowledge of the hidden.[1] In the medical sense it is used commonly to refer to a structure or process that is hidden, e. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Killing (1956) is a film by Stanley Kubrick based on the novel Clean Break by Lionel White. ... Se7en redirects here. ... Reservoir Dogs is the 1992 debut feature film of director Quentin Tarantino. ... The Asphalt Jungle is a 1950 film noir directed by John Huston. ... Jurassic Park is a techno-thriller novel written by Michael Crichton that was published in 1990. ... Aliens vs. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... RoboCop is a 1987 cyberpunk, action movie and satire of business-driven capitalism, directed by Paul Verhoeven. ... Stephen Michael Stirling is a Canadian-American science fiction and fantasy author. ... The Domination is a dystopian alternate history series of four novels written by S. M. Stirling. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 7 (seven) is the natural number following 6 and preceding 8. ...

Examples

Fiction and literature

Homer's Odyssey is one of the oldest stories in the Western world and is regarded as an early prototype of the thriller.[citation needed] The hero Odysseus makes a perilous voyage home after the Trojan War, battling extraordinary hardships in order to be reunited with his wife Penelope. He has to contend with villains such as the Cyclops, a one-eyed giant, and the Sirens, whose sweet singing lures sailors to their doom. In most cases, Odysseus uses cunning instead of brute force to overcome his adversaries. Beginning of the Odyssey The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the Ionian poet Homer. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... Penelope represented as a statue in the Vatican, Rome For other uses, see Penelope (disambiguation). ...


The Count of Monte Cristo is a swashbuckling revenge thriller about a man named Edmond Dantès who is betrayed by his friends and sent to languish in the notorious Château d'If. His only companion is an old man who teaches him everything from philosophy to mathematics to swordplay. Just before the old man dies, he reveals to Dantès the secret location of a great treasure. Shortly after, Dantès engineers a daring escape and uses the treasure to reinvent himself as the Count of Monte Cristo. Thirsting for vengeance, he sets out to punish those who destroyed his life. The Count of Monte Cristo (French: Le Comte de Monte-Cristo) is an adventure novel by Alexandre Dumas, père. ... The Château dIf is a stable (later a prison) located on the island of If, the smallest island in the Frioul Archipelago situated in the Mediterranean Sea about a mile offshore in the Bay of Marseille in southeastern France. ...


Dracula is a gothic supernatural thriller told in the first person (diaries, letters, newspaper clippings). A young Englishman named Jonathan Harker travels to the Carpathian Mountains to meet a client named Count Dracula. But when the Count shows his horrifying true colours, Harker barely escapes with his life. The Count soon arrives in England, bringing with him death and menace. Harker and his terrified friends are forced to turn to Dr. Van Helsing, who uses modern science to battle ancient superstition. Dracula is an 1897 novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. ...


The Thirty-Nine Steps is an early thriller by John Buchan, in which an innocent man becomes the prime suspect in a murder case and finds himself on the run from both the police and enemy spies. The Thirty-nine Steps is an adventure novel by the Scottish author John Buchan, first published in 1915 by William Blackwood and Sons, Edinburgh. ... John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir (August 26, 1875 - February 11, 1940), was a Scottish novelist and politician who served as Governor General of Canada. ...


Heart of Darkness is a first-person within a first-person account about a man named Marlowe who travels up the Congo River in search of an enigmatic Belgian trader named Kurtz. Layer by layer, the atrocities of the human soul and man's inhumanity to man are peeled away. Marlowe finds it increasingly difficult to tell where civilization ends and where barbarism begins. Heart of Darkness is a novella by Joseph Conrad. ... The Congo River (for a time known as Zaire River) is the largest river in Western Central Africa. ...


The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John Le Carre is set in the world of Cold War espionage and helped to usher in an era of more realistic thriller fiction, based around professional spies and the battle of wits between rival spymasters. The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is an espionage novel by John le Carré, which tells the story of Alec Lemas, a British spy, who resigns from the Circus (as the British Secret Service is known in John le Carrés books) and defects to East Germany. ... John le Carré is the pseudonym of David John Moore Cornwell (born October 19, 1931) in Poole, Dorset, England. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


The Bourne Identity is one of the first thrillers to be written in the modern style that we know today. A man with gunshot wounds is found floating unconscious in the Mediterranean Sea. Brought ashore and nursed back to health, he wakes up with amnesia. Fiercely determined to uncover the secrets of his past, he embarks on a quest that sends him spiraling into a web of violence and deceit. He is astounded to learn that knowledge of hand-to-hand combat, firearms, and tradecraft seem to come naturally to him. The Bourne Identity is a 1980 spy fiction thriller by Robert Ludlum about an amnesiac who must discover who he is and why several different groups, including an assassin and the CIA, are trying to kill him. ... Amnesia or amnæsia (from Greek ) (see spelling differences) is a condition in which memory is disturbed. ...


First Blood is widely considered to be the father of the modern action novel. A young Vietnam veteran, suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, encounters an older sheriff who is a Korean War veteran. When the sheriff tries to drive him out of town, a version of the Vietnam War erupts in the woods, hills, and caves of rural Kentucky. This becomes not only a clash of generations, but also a clash between conventional and guerrilla warfare. First Blood is the first film featuring the character of troubled Vietnam War veteran John Rambo. ... Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a term for certain severe psychological consequences of exposure to, or confrontation with, stressful events that the person experiences as highly traumatic. ...


Novelists closely associated with the genre include Robert Ludlum, Eric Ambler, David Morrell, Frederick Forsyth, Dan Brown, James Phelan, Tom Clancy, Michael Crichton, Ian Fleming, Ken Follett and Alistair MacLean. The Scarlatti Inheritance, Ludlums first book, published 1971. ... Eric Ambler (28 June 1909 - 22 October 1998) was an influential English writer of spy novels who brought a level of realism to the field that had generally been absent in earlier works. ... David Morrell (born 1943 in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada) is the award-winning author of First Blood, the novel in which Rambo was created. ... Frederick Forsyth. ... Dan Brown (born June 22, 1964) is an American author of thriller fiction, best known for the controversial 2003 bestselling novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... There are several prominent people named James Phelan, including three American politicians: James Phelan, Sr. ... Thomas Leo Clancy Jr. ... Michael Crichton (born October 23, 1942, pronounced [1]) is an American author, film producer, film director, and television producer. ... Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908 – August 12, 1964) was a British author, journalist and Second World War Naval Officer. ... Ken Follett (born June 5, 1949) is a British author of thrillers and historical novels. ... Alistair Stuart MacLean (April 28, 1922 - February 2, 1987) was a Scottish novelist who wrote successful thrillers or adventure stories, the best known of which are perhaps The Guns of Navarone and Where Eagles Dare. ...


Film

The Bourne Identity was adapted to a movie starring Matt Damon which used many of the thriller conventions of the plot. Though its sequels, The Bourne Supremacy and The Bourne Ultimatum, depart significantly from Ludlum's storyline, the conspiracy-thriller genre is still well-preserved. For the 1988 film starring Richard Chamberlain, see The Bourne Identity (1988 film). ... Matthew Paige Matt Damon (born October 8, 1970) is an American screenwriter and actor. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... For the 1990 novel by Robert Ludlum, see The Bourne Ultimatum (novel). ...


The Manchurian Candidate is a classic of Cold War paranoia. A squad of American soldiers are kidnapped and brainwashed by Communists. False memories are implanted, along with a subconscious trigger that turns them into assassins at a moment's notice. They are soon reintegrated into American society as sleeper agents. One of them, Major Bennett Marco, senses that not all is right, setting him on a collision course with his former comrade, Sergeant Raymond Shaw, who is close to being activated as an assassin. The Manchurian Candidate is a film adapted from the 1959 thriller novel written by Richard Condon. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... Brainwashing controversies According to research and forensic psychologist Dick Anthony, the CIA invented the brainwashing ideology as a propaganda strategy to undercut communist claims that American POWs in Korean communist camps had voluntarily expressed sympathy for communism and that definitive research demonstrated that collaboration by western POWs had been caused... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... A false memory is a memory of an event that did not happen or is a distortion of an event, as determined by externally corroborated facts of the event. ... Jack Ruby murdered the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, in a very public manner. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Phone Booth is a thriller about a selfish man trapped in a phone booth by a deranged sniper. Framed for the murder of a pimp, he finds himself surrounded by police who have no idea of the sniper's presence. Movie poster of Phone Booth Phone Booth is a 2002 movie about a man who is trapped in a telephone booth by a sniper. ...


Ronin is a suspenseful tale of conflicting loyalties. A team of post-Cold War mercenaries gather in France to carry out an ambush and steal a mysterious suitcase. The mission goes awry when the group turn on each other. The contents of the suitcase are never revealed but it is something worth killing for. DVD cover Ronin is a 1998 film which tells the story of a group of former intelligence agents who team up to steal a mysterious metal case. ...


Other examples of the thriller in movies include: Red Eye, Psycho, North by Northwest, In the Line of Fire, The Fugitive, Solo Voyage, The 4th floor and Marathon Man. Red Eye is a 2005 drama/thriller film, directed by Wes Craven and written by Carl Ellsworth. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano about a psychotic killer. ... North by Northwest is a 1959 MGM comic thriller by Alfred Hitchcock and is generally considered one of his best works. ... In the Line of Fire is a 1993 film about a psychopath who attempts to assassinate the President of the United States. ... The Fugitive is a 1993 Academy Award and Golden Globe Award winning feature film, based on the television series The Fugitive, starring Harrison Ford as Dr. Richard Kimble, and Tommy Lee Jones as Deputy United States Marshal Samuel Gerard. ... Cover of the Movie Solo Voyage (Одиночное Плавание), 1985, is a Soviet military thriller, directed by Mickail Tumanishvili upon a story of Evgeny Mesyatsev. ... The 4th floor is a 1999 film , written and directed by Josh Klausner. ... Marathon Man is a 1974 paranoid thriller novel by William Goldman that was made into a 1976 film directed by John Schlesinger. ...


Notable thrillers that have made an impact both as novels and as films include Frederick Forsyth's The Day of the Jackal, Tom Clancy's The Hunt for Red October and successive Jack Ryan stories, Thomas Harris' The Silence of the Lambs and related novels, Michael Crichton's Jurassic Park and Congo, and Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code. Frederick Forsyth. ... The Day of the Jackal is a thriller novel by Frederick Forsyth, first published in 1971, about a professional assassin who is contracted by the OAS, a French terrorist group of the early 1960s, to kill Charles de Gaulle. ... Thomas Leo Clancy Jr. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... The name Jack Ryan can refer to: Jack Ryan (Senate candidate), former candidate for U.S. Senate from Illinois and ex-husband of actress Jeri Ryan Jack Ryan (designer) created the Barbie doll. ... Thomas Harris. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Michael Crichton (born October 23, 1942, pronounced [1]) is an American author, film producer, film director, and television producer. ... Jurassic Park is a techno-thriller novel written by Michael Crichton that was published in 1990. ... Dan Brown (born June 22, 1964) is an American author of thriller fiction, best known for the controversial 2003 bestselling novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... This article is about the novel. ...


Television

There have been at least two television series called simply Thriller, one made in the US in the 1960s and one made in the UK in the 1970s. Although in no way linked, both series consisted of one-off dramas, each utilising the familiar motifs of the genre. Thriller was, along with The Twilight Zone, The Outer Limits, and Alfred Hitchcock Presents, one of the great anthology television series of the 1960s, running from 1960-1962 on NBC-TV. The show featured host Boris Karloff introducing an entertaining mix of macabre horror tales and suspense thrillers. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979. ... In literature, a motif is any recurring element that has symbolic significance. ...


24 is a fast-paced television series with a premise inspired by the War on Terror. Each season takes place over the course of twenty-four hours, with each episode happening in "real time". Featuring a split-screen technique and a ticking onscreen clock, 24 follows the exploits of Federal agent Jack Bauer as he races to foil terrorist threats. 24 (twenty four) is a current U.S. television action/drama series, produced by the Fox Network and syndicated worldwide. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terror) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies to destroy groups deemed to be terrorist (primarily radical Islamist organizations such as al-Qaeda... This article or section on a Television-related subject may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. ...


Lost, which deals with the survivors of a plane crash, sees the castaways on the island forced to deal with a monstrous being that appears as a cloud of black smoke, a conspiracy of "Others" who have kidnapped or killed their fellow castaways at various points, a shadowy past of the island itself that they are trying to understand, polar bears, and the fight against the elements as they struggle simply to stay alive. Lost is a popular American serial drama television series that follows the lives of plane crash survivors on a tropical island, after a passenger jet flying between Australia and the United States crashes somewhere in the South Pacific. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The name Polar Bear is also a tradename for a type of scuba divers warm undersuit to be worn under a drysuit. ...


Prison Break follows Michael Scofield, an engineer who has himself incarcerated in a maximum-security prison in order to break out his brother, who is on death row for a crime he didn't commit. In the first season Michael must deal with the hazards of prison life, the other inmates and prison staff, and executing his elaborate escape plan, while outside the prison Michael's allies investigate the conspiracy that led to Lincoln being framed. In the second season, Michael, his brother and several other inmates escape the prison and must evade the nationwide manhunt for their re-capture, as well as those who want them dead. Prison Break is an American serial drama television series that premiered on the Fox Network on August 29, 2005. ... Michael Scofield is the protagonist in the American television series, Prison Break. ...


Thrillers have also made the leap from television to film, including the Mission: Impossible franchise. Mission: Impossible is the name of an American television series which aired on the CBS network from September 1966 to September 1973. ...


See also

DVD cover showing horror characters as depicted by Universal Studios. ... This is a list of thriller or suspense novelists. ... It has been suggested that List of psychological thriller films be merged into this article or section. ... The conspiracy thriller (or paranoid thriller) is a subgenre of the thriller which flourished in the 1970s in the US (and was echoed in other parts of the world) in the wake of a number of high-profile scandals and controversies (most notably Vietnam, the assassination of President Kennedy, Chappaquiddick... Techno-thrillers are a hybrid genre, drawing subject matter generally from spy thrillers, war novels, and science fiction. ... The genre of spy fiction — sometimes called political thriller or spy thriller or sometimes shortened simply to Spy-fi — arose before World War I at about the same time that the first modern intelligence agencies were formed. ... International Thriller Writers, Inc. ...

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