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Encyclopedia > Thornton Wilder
Image:Thorntonwilderteeth.jpg
Thornton Wilder as Mr. Antrobus in The Skin of Our Teeth, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, August 18, 1948.

Thornton Wilder (April 17, 1897 – December 7, 1975) was an American playwright and novelist. Photographic self-portrait by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Template:Unsourced A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is someone who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ...

Contents

Life

Family

Thornton Niven Wilder was born in Madison, Wisconsin, the son of Amos Parker Wilder, a U.S. diplomat, and the former Isabella Niven. All of the Wilder children spent part of their childhood in China due to their father's work. Nickname: Mad Town or Mad City Location of Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin Municipality City Incorporated 1848 Mayor Dave Cieslewicz Area    - City 136. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Wilder's older brother, Amos Niven Wilder, was Hollis Professor of Divinity at the Harvard Divinity School and a noted poet. His younger sister, Isabel Wilder, was an accomplished writer. Both of his other sisters, Charlotte Wilder (a noted poet) and Janet Wilder Dakin (a zoologist), attended Mount Holyoke College and were excellent students. Thornton Wilder also had a twin brother who died at birth. Harvard Divinity School Harvard Divinity School is one of the constituent schools of Harvard University, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the United States. ... Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980) was an American poet and the eldest sister of author Thornton Wilder and Janet Wilder Dakin. ... Janet Wilder Dakin (June 3, 1910 - October 7, 1994), was a philanthropist, zoologist and a younger sister of author Thornton Wilder and poet Charlotte Wilder. ... Mount Holyoke College, (founded as Mount Holyoke Female Seminary 8 November 1837), is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ...


Education

Wilder began writing plays while at The Thacher School in Ojai, California, where he did not fit in and was teased by classmates as overly intellectual. According to a classmate, “We left him alone, just left him alone. And he would retire to the library, his hideaway, learning to distance himself from humiliation and indifference.” His family lived for a time in Berkeley, California where his sister Janet was born in 1910. Thornton attended Emerson Elementary School in Berkeley, and graduated from Berkeley High School in 1915. Thacher School Study Hall The Thacher School (also called Casa de Piedra) is a co-educational independent boarding school located on 420 acres (1. ... Downtown Ojai Ojai (pronounced ) is a city in Ventura County, California, United States. ... An intellectual is a person who uses his or her intellect to work, study, reflect, speculate on, or ask and answer questions with regard to a variety of different ideas. ... Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in northern California, in the United States. ... Berkeley High School is the only public high school in Berkeley, California. ...


After serving in the United States Coast Guard during World War I, he attended Oberlin College before earning his B.A. at Yale University in 1920, where he refined his writing skills as a member of the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity, a literary society. He earned his M.A. in French from Princeton University in 1926. The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States armed forces involved in maritime law enforcement, mariner assistance, search and rescue, and national defense, among other duties of coast guards elsewhere. ... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Franz... Oberlin College is a small, selective liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio, in the United States. ... Yale redirects here. ... Alpha Delta Phi (ΑΔΦ) is a Greek-letter fraternity in the United States and Canada. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey in the United States of America. ...


Career

In 1926 Wilder's first novel The Cabala was published. In 1927, The Bridge of San Luis Rey brought him commercial success and his first Pulitzer Prize in 1928. From 1930 to 1937 he taught at the University of Chicago. In 1938 and 1943 he won the Pulitzer Prize for drama for his plays Our Town and The Skin of Our Teeth. World War II saw him rise to the rank of lieutenant colonel in the Army Air Force and receive several awards. He went on to be a visiting professor at the University of Hawaii and to teach poetry at Harvard. Though he considered himself a teacher first and a writer second, he continued to write all his life, receiving the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade in 1957 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963. In 1967 he won the National Book Award for his novel The Eighth Day. The Bridge of San Luis Rey is a 1927 novel by American author Thornton Wilder. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom France Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Charles de Gaulle Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was a part of the U.S. Army during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ... This article is about the University of Hawaii system. ... The Peace Prize of the German Book Trade (German: Friedenspreis des Deutschen Buchhandels) is a peace prize given yearly at the Frankfurt Book Fair in the Paulskirche in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States, considered the equivalent of the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor. ... The National Book Award is one of the most important literary prizes in the United States, presented annually for the best books by living U.S. citizens published in the U.S. The awards have been presented since 1950 in at least one category, and are presently awarded in each...


He died in his sleep, December 7, 1975 in Hamden, Connecticut, aged 78, where he had been living with his sister, Isabel, for many years. December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Hamden is a town located in New Haven County, Connecticut. ...


Wilder had a wide circle of friends and enjoyed mingling with other famous people, including Ernest Hemingway, Willa Cather, Montgomery Clift and Gertrude Stein. Although he never discussed his homosexuality publicly or in his writings, his close friend Samuel M. Steward is generally acknowledged to have been his lover.[1] Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Willa Cather photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1936 Wilella Sibert Cather (December 7, 1873 – April 24, 1947) is among the most eminent American authors. ... Edward Montgomery Clift (October 17, 1920 - July 23, 1966) was an American actor known by the stage name of Montgomery Clift. ... Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946) was an American writer and catalyst in the development of modern art and literature, who spent most of her life in France. ...


Works

Wilder translated and wrote the libretti to two operas. Also Alfred Hitchcock, whom he admired, asked him to write the screenplay to his thriller, Shadow of a Doubt. Libretto can also refer to a sub-notebook PC manufactured by Toshiba. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock, KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was a highly influential film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Shadow of a Doubt is a 1943 film noir which tells the story of a young woman who thinks that her uncle might be a serial killer. ...


The Bridge of San Luis Rey (1927) tells the story of several unrelated people who happen to be on a bridge in Peru when it collapses, killing them. Philosophically, the book explores the problem of evil, or the question of why unfortunate events occur to people who seem "innocent" or "undeserving". The Bridge of San Luis Rey is a 1927 novel by American author Thornton Wilder. ...


It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1928, and in 1998 it was selected by the editorial board of the American Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of the twentieth century. The book was quoted by British Prime Minister Tony Blair during the memorial service for victims of the September 11 attacks in 2001. Since then its popularity has grown enormously. The book is the progenitor of the modern disaster epic in literature and film-making, where a single disaster intertwines the victims, whose lives are then explored by means of flashbacks to events before the disaster. In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and Member of the UK Parliament... This article is about the date September 11 in general. ...


Wilder was the author of Our Town, a popular play (and later film) set in fictional Grover's Corners, New Hampshire. It was inspired by his friend Gertrude Stein's novel The Making of Americans, and many elements of Stein's deconstructive style can be found throughout the work. Our Town employs a choric narrator called the "Stage Manager" and a minimalist set to underscore the universality of human experience. (Wilder himself played the Stage Manager on Broadway for two weeks and later in summer stock productions.) The play won the 1938 Pulitzer Prize. Wilder suffered from severe writer's block while writing the final act. That same year Max Reinhardt directed a Broadway production of The Merchant of Yonkers, which Wilder had adapted from Austrian playwright Johann Nestroy's Einen Jux will er sich machen (1842). It was a dismal failure. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Stage management is a sub-discipline of stagecraft. ... For other uses, see Minimalism (disambiguation). ... Broadway theatre[1] is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... See also: 1937 in literature, other events of 1938, 1939 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Writers block is a phenomenon involving temporary loss of ability to continue writing, usually due to lack of inspiration or creativity. ... There are two Max Reinhardts: Max Reinhardt (theatre director) Max Reinhardt (publisher) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The Merchant of Yonkers is a 1938 play by Thornton Wilder. ... Johann Nepomuk Eduard Ambrosius Nestroy (born December 7, 1801 at Vienna, Austria; died May 25, 1862 at Graz, Austria) was an opera singer, actor and, primarily, a playwright. ... Einen Jux will er sich machen is a play by Austrian playwright Johann Nestroy. ...


His play The Skin of Our Teeth opened in New York on November 18, 1942 with Fredric March and Tallulah Bankhead in the lead roles. Again, the themes are familiar--the timeless human condition; history as progressive, cyclical, or entropic; literature, philosophy, and religion as the touchstones of civilization. Three acts dramatize the travails of the Antrobus family, allegorizing the alternate history of mankind. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... Fredric March photograph by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Fredric March (August 31, 1897 – April 14, 1975) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 - December 12, 1968) was an American actress, talk-show host and bonne vivante. ... Alternative history or alternate history can be: A History told from an alternative viewpoint, rather than from the view of imperialist, conqueror, or explorer. ...


In 1955, Tyrone Guthrie encouraged Wilder to rework The Merchant of Yonkers into The Matchmaker, which enjoyed a healthy Broadway run with Ruth Gordon in the title role. It later became the basis for the hit 1964 musical Hello, Dolly!, with a book by Michael Stewart and score by Jerry Herman. 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir William Tyrone Guthrie (2 July 1900 - 15 May 1971) was a British theatrical director instrumental in the founding of the Stratford Festival of Canada and the Guthrie Theatre in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The Matchmaker is a play by Thornton Wilder based on an 1842 play by the Austrian playwright Johann Nestroy titled Einen Jux will er sich machen. ... Ruth Gordon (October 30, 1896 – August 28, 1985) was an American actress and screenwriter who was perhaps best known for her role as the oversolicitous neighbor in Roman Polanskis adaptation of Ira Levins novel Rosemarys Baby, for which she won the 1968 Academy Award for Best Supporting... 1994 Cast Recording Hello, Dolly! is one of the most popular Broadway musicals ever written. ... Michael Stewart (1924 New York City- 1987), Jewish-American playwright and librettist. ... Jerry Herman Jerry Herman (born Gerald Herman on July 10, 1933 in New York City) is an American composer/lyricist of the Broadway musical theater. ...


His last novel, Theophilus North, was published in 1973.


Novels by Thornton Wilder

The Bridge of San Luis Rey is a 1927 novel by American author Thornton Wilder. ... Ides of March is an epistolatory novel by Thornton Wilder. ...

Plays

  • The Trumpet Shall Sound (1926)
  • An Angel That Troubled the Waters and Other Plays (1928)
  • The Long Christmas Dinner and Other Plays in One Act (1931) which includes
    • The Long Christmas Dinner
    • Queens of France
    • Pullman Car Hiawatha
    • Love and How to Cure It
    • Such Things Only Happen in Books
    • The Happy Journey to Trenton and Camden
  • Our Town (1938)
  • The Merchant of Yonkers (1938)
  • The Skin of Our Teeth (1942)
  • The Matchmaker (1954) (revised from The Merchant of Yonkers)
  • Childhood (1960)
  • Infancy (1960)
  • Plays for Bleecker Street (1962)
  • The Alcestiad: Or, A Life In The Sun (1977)
  • The Collected Short Plays of Thornton Wilder Volume I (1997) which includes
    • The Long Christmas Dinner
    • Queens of France
    • Pullman Car Hiawatha
    • Love and How to Cure It
    • Such Things Only Happen in Books
    • The Happy Journey to Trenton and Camden
    • The Drunken Sisters
    • Bernice
    • The Wreck on the Five-Twenty-Five
    • A Ringing of Doorbells
    • In Shakespeare and the Bible
    • Someone from Assisi
    • Cement Hands
    • Infancy
    • Childhood
    • Youth
    • The Rivers Under the Earth

The Long Christmas Dinner is a play in one act written by American novelist and playwright Thornton Wilder in 1931. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Merchant of Yonkers is a 1938 play by Thornton Wilder. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Matchmaker is a play by Thornton Wilder based on an 1842 play by the Austrian playwright Johann Nestroy titled Einen Jux will er sich machen. ... The Long Christmas Dinner is a play in one act written by American novelist and playwright Thornton Wilder in 1931. ... Bernice may refer to: Bernice, Oklahoma Bernice, Louisiana This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A human infant The word Infant derives from the Latin in-fans, meaning unable to speak. ... Childhood (song) Childhood is a broad term usually applied to the phase of development in humans between infancy and adulthood. ... Popular use of the word youth refers to a person who is neither an adult nor a child, but somewhere in between, scientifically referred to as an adolescent and, in most English speaking countries, commonly referred to as a teen or teenager. ...

References

  1. ^ The Gay Bears Collection. Gay Bears: The Hidden History of the Berkeley Campus: Thornton Wilder. University Library, University of California at Berkeley. Retrieved on 2006-07-20.

2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Thornton Wilder

  Results from FactBites:
 
Thornton Wilder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1025 words)
Born Thornton Niven Wilder in Madison, Wisconsin, he was the son of Amos Parker Wilder a U.S. diplomat, and Isabella Niven Wilder.
Wilder's older brother, Amos Niven Wilder was Hollis Professor of Divinity at the Harvard Divinity School and a noted poet.
Wilder began writing plays while at The Thacher School in Ojai, California, where he did not fit in and was teased by classmates as overly intellectual.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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