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Encyclopedia > Thor
For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation).
Thor's battle against the giants, by Mårten Eskil Winge, 1872

Thor (Old Norse: Þór, also known as Tor) is the god of thunder and war in Norse Mythology and more generally Germanic mythology (Old English: Þunor, Old Dutch and Old High German: Donar, from Proto-Germanic *Þunraz). Thor may refer to: People Thor, the thunder god in Norse mythology Thor Hushovd, an elite professional cyclist from Norway Thor (Marvel Comics), a Marvel Comics superhero, loosely based on the Norse deity Thor (Comico Comics), a Comico Comics character associated with the Elementals series Thor (Stargate), an extraterrestrial alien... Thors battle against the giants (1872), by Mårten Eskil Winge. ... Thors battle against the giants (1872), by Mårten Eskil Winge. ... MÃ¥rten Eskil Winge (1825-1896) was a Swedish artist especially known for his Norse mythology paintings. ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Thunder is the sound made by lightning. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... Thor, god of thunder, one of the major figures in Germanic mythology. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Penis[1], Englisc by its speakers) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Old Dutch (Also Old West Low Franconian) is a branch of Old Low Franconian spoken and written during the early middle ages (c. ... The (Late Old High) German speaking area of the Holy Roman Empire around 950. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Thor is the son of Odin and Jörd. During Ragnarök, Thor and Jörmungandr kill each other. For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... In Norse mythology, Jord was the goddess of the Earth. ... Oðinn is getting eaten by Fenrir with his spear Gungnir while Surtr brandishes his sword. ... Thor goes fishing for the Midgard Serpent in this picture from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ...

Contents

Characteristics

Thor features strongly in the Prose Edda of Snorri Sturluson, in which Thor's many conflicts with the race of giants are a main source of plots. Thor is the most physically powerful Norse god. He uses his superior physical power to protect Asgard and Midgard. The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ... A statue of Snorri Sturluson by Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland was erected at Reykholt in 1947. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Midgard (disambiguation). ...


Family

Thor is the son of Odin and the giantess Jörd (Jord, the Earth). His wife is called Sif, and little is known of her except that she has golden hair, which was made for her by the dwarves after Loki had cut off her hair. With his mistress, the giantess Járnsaxa, Thor had a son Magni and with Sif he had his daughter Thrud. There is nothing in the myths that states the identity of the mother of his son Modi. The euhemeristic prologue of the Prose Edda also indicates he has a son by Sif named Lóriði, along with an additional 17 generations of descendants but the prologue is apocryphal and was meant to give a plausible explanation on how the Aesir came to be worshipped even though they were not gods in order to appease the church. Thor also has a stepson called Ullr who is a son of Sif. Skáldskaparmál mentions a figure named Hlóra who was Thor's foster mother, corresponding to Lora or Glora from Snorre's prologue, although no additional information concerning her is provided in the book. For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... In Norse mythology, Jord was the goddess of the Earth. ... This early 20th century depiction of Sif shows her with long blond hair. ... In Norse mythology, the dwarves (Old Norse: dvergar, sing. ... It has been suggested that Loki and the dwarfs be merged into this article or section. ... In Norse mythology, Járnsaxa is a giantess. ... In Norse mythology, Magni is the son of Thor and Járnsaxa. ... This early 20th century depiction of Sif shows her with long blond hair. ... Thrud was the daughter of Thor and Sif in Norse mythology. ... In Norse mythology, Móði (often Anglicized Modi), was the son of Thor. ... Euhemerus (flourished around 316 BCE) was a Greek mythographer at the court of Cassander, the king of Macedonia. ... Lóriði is the son of Thor and Sif and forefather of Norse rulers, according to the prologue of the Prose Edda. ... This picture, from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript in the care of the Árni Magnússon Institute, shows Ullr on his skis and with his bow. ... This early 20th century depiction of Sif shows her with long blond hair. ... The second part of the Younger Edda of Snorri Sturluson the Skáldskaparmál or language of poetry is effectively a dialogue between the Norse god of the sea, Ægir and Bragi, the god of poetry, in which both Norse mythology and discourse on the nature of poetry are intertwined. ...


Possessions

Thor, travels in a chariot drawn by the goats Tanngrisnir and Tanngnjóstr and with his servant and messenger Þjálfi and his sister Röskva. The skaldic poem Haustlöng relates that the earth was scorched and the mountains cracked as Thor travelled in his wagon. According to the Prose Edda, when Thor is hungry he can roast the goats for a meal. When he wants to continue his travels, Thor only needs to touch the remains of the goats and they will be instantly restored to full health to resume their duties, assuming that the bones have not been broken. Species See Species and subspecies The goat is a mammal in the genus Capra, which consists of nine species: the Ibex, the West Caucasian Tur, the East Caucasian Tur, the Markhor, and the Wild Goat. ... In Norse mythology, Tanngrisnir (tooth-grinder) and Tanngnjóstr (tooth-gnasher) are a pair of magic goats which draw the chariot of the god Thor. ... Thjálfi (Old Norse) or Thjelvar (Old Gutnish) is a person (or two) from Norse mythology who appear(s) twice in Snorris Edda and once in the Gutasaga. ... Röskva is a person from Norse mythology who appears in Snorris Edda. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with skaldic poetry. ... Loki strikes Þjazi with a rod in this picture from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ...


Thor owns a short-handled hammer, Mjolnir, which, when thrown at a target, returns magically to the owner. His Mjolnir also has the power to throw lightning bolts. To wield Mjolnir, Thor wears the belt Megingjord, which boosts the wearer's strength and a pair of special iron gloves, Jarn Griepr, to lift the hammer. Drawing of an archeological find of a gold plated hammer in silver. ... Megingjord was a belt which gave the wearer a mystical strength, this is what gave Thor the strength to lift Mjolnir. ...


The old Germanic tribes knew Thor as Donner and the German word for thunder is Donnerschlag (i.e. Thor's strike). It is the strike of the hammer that causes thunderclaps; schlagen meaning to hit in German. Mjolnir is also his main weapon when fighting giants. The term Germanic tribes (or Teutonic tribes) applies to the ancient Germanic peoples of Europe. ... Drawing of an archeological find of a gold plated hammer in silver. ...


Thor lives in the palace Bilskirnir in the kingdom Þrúðheimr or Þrúðvangr. Bilskirnir is the hall of the god Thor in Norse Mythology. ... In Norse mythology, Þrúðheimr (anglicized Thrúdheim or Thrudheim), which means World of strength in Old Norse, is the home of Thor according to the Eddic poem Grímnismál (4). ... Þrúðvangr (anglicized Thrúdvang or Thrudvang), which means Fields of Strength, is the name given by Snorri in Gylfaginning to Þrúðheimr, the kingdom of Thor in Asgard where he lives in the hall of Bilskirnir with his wife Sif. ...


Surviving representations

Stories and myths

Most of the surviving myths centre on Thor's exploits, and from this and inscriptions on monuments we can deduce that Thor was the favorite deity of ancient Scandinavians. Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe which includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ...


According to one myth in the Prose Edda, Loki was flying as a hawk one day and was captured by Geirrod. Geirrod, who hated Thor, demanded that Loki bring his enemy (who did not yet have his magic belt and hammer) to Geirrod's castle. Loki agreed to lead Thor to the trap. Grid was a giantess at whose home they stopped on the way to Geirrod's. She waited until Loki left the room then told Thor what was happening and gave him her iron gloves and magical belt and staff. Thor killed Geirrod and all other frost giants he could find (including Geirrod's daughters, Gjálp and Greip). It has been suggested that Loki and the dwarfs be merged into this article or section. ... Genera Accipiter Micronisus Melierax Urotriorchis Erythrotriorchis The term hawk refers to birds of prey in any of three senses: Strictly, to mean any of the species in the bird sub-family Accipitrinae in the genera Accipiter, Micronisus, Melierax, Urotriorchis, and Megatriorchis. ... In Norse mythology, Geirrod was one of the Jotuns and father of Gjalp and Greip. ... In Norse mythology, Gríðr (sometimes Anglicized Grid) was a giantess who, aware of Lokis plans to get Thor killed at the hands of the giant Geirrod, sets out to help him by supplying him with a number of magical gifts. ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... In Norse mythology, Gjálp and Greip were two giantesses. ...


According to Alvíssmál, Thor's daughter was promised to Alvis, a dwarf. Thor devised a plan to stop Alvis from marrying his daughter. He told Alvis that, because of his small height, he had to prove his wisdom. Alvis agreed and Thor made the tests last until after the sun had risen--all dwarves turned to stone when exposed to sunlight, so Alvis was petrified. Alvíssmál is an Eddic poem relating a conversation Þórr had with the dwarf Alvíss (All-knowing). Alvíss comes to Þórr to claim Þórrs daughter as his bride. ... Alvis (All-Wise) in Norse mythology was a dwarf. ...


Thor was once outwitted by a giant king, Útgarða-Loki. The king, using his magic, tricked Thor. The king raced Thought itself against Thor's fast servant, Þjálfi (nothing being faster than thought, which can leap from land to land, and from time to time, in an instant). Then, Loki (who was with Thor) was challenged by Útgarða-Loki to an eating contest with one of his servants, Logi. Loki lost, eventually. The servant even ate up the trough containing the food. The servant was an illusion of "Wild-Fire", no living thing being able to equal the consumption rate of fire. He called Thor weak when he only lifted the paw of a cat, the cat being the illusion of the Midgard Serpent. Thor was challenged to a drinking contest, and could not empty a horn which was filled not with mead but was connected to the ocean. This action started tidal changes. And here, Thor wrestled an old woman, who was Old Age, something no one could beat, to one knee. It was only later that Thor was told that he had in fact performed impressively doing as well as he did with those challenges. Útgarðaloki as depicted in Valhalla, a Danish animated movie from 1986. ... Thjálfi (Old Norse) or Thjelvar (Old Gutnish) is a person (or two) from Norse mythology who appear(s) twice in Snorris Edda and once in the Gutasaga. ... Útgarðaloki as depicted in Valhalla, a Danish animated movie from 1986. ... Thor goes fishing for the Midgard Serpent in this picture from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... A drinking horn was a drinking vessel formerly common in some parts of the world. ...


Þunor gave his name to the Old English day Þunresdæg, meaning the day of Þunor, known in Modern English as Thursday. Þunor is also the source of the modern word thunder. Many writers (Saxo, Adam of Bremen, Snorre Sturlason, Ælfric of Eynsham) identified Thor with Jupiter. The comparison can be borne: both are gods of the sky that control thunder and lightning, are children of the mother Earth and were at some time considered the most powerful of the gods. The oak tree was sacred to both gods and they had mysterious powers. Thor is to kill the Midgard Serpent and Jupiter, the dragon Typhon. Tacitus identified Thor with the Greco-Roman hero-god Hercules because of his force, aspect, weapon and his role as protector of the world. Old English (also called Anglo-Penis[1], Englisc by its speakers) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The god Thor, after whom Thursday is named. ... Thunder is the sound made by lightning. ... Saxo, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857 – 1945) Saxo Grammaticus (estimated. ... Adam of Bremen (also: Adam Bremensis) was one of the most important German medieval chroniclers. ... Snorri Sturlason (1178 – September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. ... Wikisource has original works written by or about: Ælfric of Eynsham Ælfric of Eynsham (the Grammarian) (c. ... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ... Mother Earth is a common metaphorical expression for the Earth and its biosphere as the giver and sustainer of life. ... Thor goes fishing for the Midgard Serpent in this picture from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... Zeus darting his lightning at Typhon, Chalcidian black-figured hydria, ca. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... Hercules and the Nemean Lion (detail), silver plate, 6th century BC (Cabinet des Médailles, Paris). ...


Another noted story of Thor was the time when Thrym, King of the Thurse (Giants), stole his hammer, Mjölnir. Thor went to Loki in hopes to find the culprit responsible for the theft. Loki and Thor went to Freyja for council. She gave Loki the Feather-robe so he could travel to the land of the giants to speak to their king. The king admitted to stealing the hammer and would not give it back unless Freyja gave her hand in marriage.


Freyja refused when she heard the plan so the gods decided to think of a way to trick the King. Heimdall, the fairest of the gods (and possibly one of the prophetic Vanir), suggested dressing up Thor in a bridal gown so he can take Freyja's place. Thor at first refused to do such a thing as it would portray him as a coward and womanish, but Loki insisted that he do so or the Giants would attack Asgard and win it over if he were not to retrieve the hammer in time. Thor reluctantly agreed in the end and took Freyja's place. Vanir is the name of one of the two groups of gods in Norse mythology, the other and more well known being the Æsir. ...


Odin rode Thor to the land of the Giants and a celebration ensued. The king noticed a few odd things that his bride was committing. He noted that she ate and drank more than what he would expect from a bride. Loki, who was in disguise as the false Freyja's servant, commented that she rode for 8 full nights without food eager to take his hand. He then asked why his bride's eyes so terrifying, they seemed to be aglow with fire, again Loki responded with the fact that she did not sleep for 8 full nights eager for his hand. Then the giant commanded that the hammer be brought to his wife and placed on her lap. Once it was in Thor's possession he threw off his disguise and attacked all the giants in the room. Due to this ruse the giants were careful not to make the same mistake again.


Norse literature

The two biggest works are the Elder Edda (or Poetic Edda) and the Younger Edda (also Snorre's Edda, Prose Edda). Thor is a very common figure, probably more common than Odin.


Thor appears as the central figure in the following works of Norse literature:

Thor also appears in: The Thorsdrapa or Þórsdrápa (Hymn to Thor) is a skaldic poem of Norse mythology usually attributed to Eilífr Goðrúnarson (11th century). ... Snorri Sturlason (1178 – September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. ... The second part of the Younger Edda of Snorri Sturluson the Skáldskaparmál or language of poetry is effectively a dialogue between the Norse god of the sea, Ægir and Bragi, the god of poetry, in which both Norse mythology and discourse on the nature of poetry are intertwined. ... The Hárbarðsljóð (Lay of Hárbarðr; the name can be anglicized as Hárbardsljód, Hárbarthsljóth, Hárbardhsljódh, Harbardsljod and variations on this) is one of the poems of the Poetic Edda, found in the Codex Regius and AM 748 I 4to manuscripts. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ...

External links Original text English text Categories: Mythology stubs | Medieval literature | Sagas of Iceland | Norse mythology | Nordic folklore ... Grímnismál (Sayings of Grímnir) is one of the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda. ... Jörmungandr gets himself fished by Thor. ... Thor dresses up as a bride and Loki as a bridesmaid. ... Alvíssmál is an Eddic poem relating a conversation Þórr had with the dwarf Alvíss (All-knowing). Alvíss comes to Þórr to claim Þórrs daughter as his bride. ... Lokasenna (Lokis flyting, Lokis wrangling, Lokis quarrel) is one of the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda. ... Völuspá (The Prophecy of the Seeress) is the first poem in the Poetic Edda. ... Njáls saga (also known as The Story of Burnt Njál) is an epic of Icelandic literature from the 13th century that describes the progress of a 50-year blood feud. ... Gautreks saga (Gautreks Saga) is a Scandinavian legendary saga put to text towards the end of the 13th century which survives only in much later manuscripts. ... Eiríksmál is a skaldic poem composed sometime in 954 or later on the behest of the Norwegian queen Gunnhild in honour of her slain consort Erik Bloodaxe. ... Ragnarsdrápa is a skaldic poem composed to the Scandinavian hero Ragnar Lodbrok. ... The Eyrbyggja saga is one of the Icelandic sagas. ... Thor goes fishing for Jörmungandr in this picture from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... Kjalnesinga saga is one of the sagas of Icelanders. ... Loki strikes Þjazi with a rod in this picture from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... Fóstbrœðra saga or The Saga of the Sworn Brothers is an Icelandic saga telling of the deeds of the sworn brothers Þorgeirr and Þormóðr in early 11th century Iceland and abroad. ... Fljótsdæla saga is one of the Icelandic sagas. ... Hallfreðar saga is one of the Icelanders sagas. ... Heimskringla is the Old Norse name of a collection of sagas recorded in Iceland around 1225 by the poet and historian Snorri Sturluson (1179-1242). ... Landnámabók (the book of settlement), is one of the strangest of the works of Icelandic literature. ... The Flatey Book, (in Icelandic the Flateyjarbók Flat-island book) is one of the most important medieval Icelandic manuscripts. ... Bishop Asgar, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857—1945) Gesta Danorum (Deeds of the Danes) is a work of Danish history, by 12th century author Saxo Grammaticus (Saxo the Grammarian). It is the most ambitious literary undertaking of medieval Denmark. ... The Nordendorf fibula is an early 7th century Alamannic fibula found in Nordendorf near Augsburg (Bavaria). ...

Archaeological finds

A reproduction of a statue of Thor from the 10th century found in Iceland.
A reproduction of a statue of Thor from the 10th century found in Iceland.

A seated bronze statue of Thor (about 2.5 in, 6.4 cm) from about AD 1000 was recovered at a farm near Akureyri, Iceland and is a featured display at the National Museum of Iceland. Thor is holding Mjolnir, sculptured in the typically Icelandic cross-like shape. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Nickname: Location of Akureyri in Iceland Coordinates: , Constituency Northeast Area  - City 125 km²  (48. ... The National Museum of Iceland (Þjóðminjasafn Íslands) was established on 24 February 1863, with Jón Árnason the first curator of the Icelandic collection, previously kept in Danish museums. ... Drawing of an archeological find of a gold plated hammer in silver. ...


Personal names

The name of the god Thor is the first element in many names:

  • American female name: Donara (from the Old High German spelling)
  • Norwegian masculine male names: Tor, Toralv, Torbjørn, Tore, Torfinn, Torgeir, Torgils, Torgny, Torgrim, Torkjell, Torlak, Torleif, Tormod, Torodd, Torolv, Torstein and Torvald.
  • Norwegian female names: Torbjørg, Tordis, Torfrid (Turid), Torgerd, Torgunn, Torhild (Toril), Torlaug, Torunn and Torveig.
  • Icelandic male names: Þór, Þórhallur, Þorbergur, Þorbjörn, Þorfinnur, Þorgeir, Þorgils, Þorgrímur, þorkell, Þorlákur, þorleifur, Þorsteinn, Þorvaldur, Þórarinn, Þórður and Þórólfur
  • Icelandic female names: Þorbjörg, Þorgerður, Þóra, Þórdís, Þórhildur, Þórunn and Þórgunnur
  • Danish male names: Tor, Torben, Torkil/Terkel, Torleif, Torsten, Torvald
  • Danish female names: Tora, Tove
  • Swedish male names: Tor, Torbjörn, Tord, Tore, Torgny, Torkel, Torleif, Torsten, Torvald
  • Swedish female names: Tora, Torunn, Tove
  • Scottish names: Torquil
  • English surnames: Thurkettle
  • German male names: Thorsten/Torsten, Toralf

Misc

  • "Thor's Day" is Þórsdagr in Old Norse, Thursday in English, Donnerstag in German (meaning "Thunder's Day"), Donderdag in Dutch (meaning Thunder day), Torstai in Finnish, and Torsdag in Swedish, Danish, and Norwegian.
  • The nebula NGC2359 is known as Thor's Helmet.
  • "Thor's Oak" was an ancient tree near Fritzlar in northern Hesse (Germany) and one of the most sacred of sites of the old Germans. In 723, St. Boniface cut down the tree to demonstrate the superiority of the Christian god over Thor and the other Germanic/Nordic deities, an event that commonly marks the beginning of the Christianization of the non-Frankish Germans.
  • Thorium was named after the god Thor by Jöns Jakob Berzelius, the chemist who discovered it.
  • THOR is the callsign of the THermal Operations and Resources position of the International Space Station's Mission Control room.

The god Thor, after whom Thursday is named. ... The Triangulum Emission Nebula NGC 604 The Pillars of Creation from the Eagle Nebula For other uses, see Nebula (disambiguation). ... Thors Oak was an ancient tree sacred to the Germanic tribe of the Chatti, ancestors of todays Hessians, and one of the most important sacred sites of the Germans. ... The Cathedral (Dom), with statue of St. ... For the Roman general of this name, see Bonifacius. ... General Name, Symbol, Number thorium, Th, 90 Chemical series Actinides Group, Period, Block n/a, 7, f Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 232. ... Friherre Jöns Jakob Berzelius (August 20, 1779 – August 7, 1848) was a Swedish chemist. ... Flight controller: a space flight control room position at NASAs Mission Control Center. ... “ISS” redirects here. ... Mission Control Center (MCC) is a unit that manages aerospace flights. ...

Homologues

Homologues in related religions

These are homologues that were created in religions of other speakers of Indo-European languages. For other uses, see Indo-European. ...

In Celtic mythology Taranis was a god of thunder worshipped in Gaul and Britain and mentioned, along with Esus and Toutatis, by the Roman poet Lucan in his epic poem Pharsalia. ... For other uses, see Indra (disambiguation). ... Lithuanian Perkūnas, Latvian Pērkons, Prussian Percuns was the common Baltic god of thunder, one of the most important deities in the Baltic pantheon. ... In Slavic mythology, Perun (with many spelling and pronunciation variants among modern Slavic languages) is the highest god of the pantheon and the god of thunder and lightning. ... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) For other uses, see Heracles (disambiguation). ... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ...

Homologues in other religions

  • Tiermes, Tordöm or Torum ("the golden light", Finno-Ugric). Several Finno-Ugric peoples have thunder gods with names similar to Thor, like Finnish Tuuri. Some, like Estonian Taara even retain the connection with Thursday. One theory is that Thor is a loan from Finno-Ugric mythology, although the Hittite Tarhunt and the Vedic Indra seem to be cognates pointing to a basis in a Proto-Indo-European religion, which suggests the opposite; that the god was borrowed from the Proto-Indo-Europeans by Finno-Ugric groups. It may even be seen as representing some common heritage between the two peoples. (The celtic Taranis also seems to be linguistically related.)

Approximate geographical distribution of areas where indigenous Finno-Ugric languages are spoken. ... Tuuri is a village in Töysä, a municipality of Finland. ... Tharapita or Taara is the god of war in Estonian mythology. ... Relief of Suppiluliuma II, last known king of the Hittite Empire The Hittites were an ancient people from KaneÅ¡ who spoke an Indo-European language, and established a kingdom centered at Hattusa (Hittite URU) in north-central Anatolia from the 18th century BC. In the 14th century BC, the Hittite... Teshub was the Hurrian god of sky and storm. ... Veda redirects here. ... For other uses, see Indra (disambiguation). ... Ancient anthropomorphic Ukrainian stone stela (Kernosovka stela), possibly depicting a late Proto-Indo-European god, most likely Dyeus The existence of similarities among the deities and religious practices of the Indo-European peoples allows glimpses of a common Proto-Indo-European religion and mythology. ... In Celtic mythology Taranis was a god of thunder worshipped in Gaul and Britain and mentioned, along with Esus and Toutatis, by the Roman poet Lucan in his epic poem Pharsalia. ...

Modern popular culture

Donner calls upon the storm clouds in this illustration by Arthur Rackham to Wagner's Das Rheingold.
Donner calls upon the storm clouds in this illustration by Arthur Rackham to Wagner's Das Rheingold.

Thor, under the German form of his name, "Donner", appears in Richard Wagner's opera cycle, Der Ring des Nibelungen. This has led to many portrayals based on Wagner's interpretation, although some are closer to pre-Wagner models. Since Wagner's time, Thor has appeared, either as himself or as the namesake of characters, in comic books, on television, in literature and in song lyrics.

THOR is the acronym of the Helicopter in the Movie Blue Thunder and stands for Tactical Helicopter Offensive Response. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (600x851, 102 KB) Subject Donner calls upon the storm clouds. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (600x851, 102 KB) Subject Donner calls upon the storm clouds. ... An illustration from Alices Adventures in Wonderland Arthur Rackham (September 19, 1867 – September 6, 1939) was a prolific English book illustrator. ... For the famous train, see Rheingold Express. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Der Ring des Nibelungen, (The Ring of the Nibelung), is a cycle of four epic music dramas by the German composer Richard Wagner. ... Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a superhero appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Blue Thunder (disambiguation). ...


Thor is also a Supreme commander of the Asgard Fleet on the sci-fi show Stargate SG-1. Thor acts as the human-friendly god during the Middle Ages. Thor is a recurring character in Stargate SG-1. ... The Asgard are a fictional alien race in the television series Stargate SG-1. ... Stargate SG-1 (often abbreviated as SG-1) is a science fiction television series, part of the Stargate franchise. ...


There is currently a feature film based on the Thor character from Marvel Comics in its pre-production stage to be directed by Matthew Vaughn. This article is about the comic book company. ... Matthew Vaughn (born 7 March 1971) is a film producer (Layer Cake, Snatch, Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels among others), director (Layer Cake) and husband of Claudia Schiffer, whom he married in 2002. ...


Modern symbolism

For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... In heraldry, supporters are figures placed on either side of the shield and depicted holding it up. ... The Forge of Vulcan by Diego Velasquez, (1630). ... Heavy industry does not have a single fixed meaning compared to light industry. ...

See also

Hinn almáttki áss (the almighty áss) is an unknown divinity evoked in a legal oath sworn on a temple ring. ... Thor is referred to by many names in Old Norse poetry. ... A Yule Goat from Uppland, Sweden. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Thor's Home Page (289 words)
Thor and the Midgard Serpent from The Prose Edda of Snorri Sturluson.
This mold was used to cast Thor's hammer amulets as well as small ingots of different size and value.
The magic belt in this tale is reminiscent of the Norse god Thor's belt of strength as described in The Prose Edda of Snorri Sturluson.
Thor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1528 words)
Thor is the son of Odin (Wotan or Woden) and the giantess Jörd (Jord).
Thor was challenged to a drinking contest, and could not empty a horn which was filled not with mead but was connected to the ocean.
Thor is to kill the Midgard Serpent and Jupiter, the dragon Typhon.
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