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Encyclopedia > Thomas de Quincey
Thomas de Quincey from the frontispiece of Revolt of the Tartars,
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Thomas de Quincey from the frontispiece of Revolt of the Tartars,

Thomas de Quincey (August 15, 1785December 8, 1859) was an English author and intellectual. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1861, 295 KB) Summary Thomas de Quincey from http://www. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1861, 295 KB) Summary Thomas de Quincey from http://www. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents


Life and work

He was born in Manchester. His father was a successful businessman with an interest in literature; he died when Thomas was quite young. Soon after Thomas's birth the family moved to The Farm, and later to Greenhay, a larger country house near Manchester. In 1796 De Quincey's mother, now a widow, moved to Bath and enrolled him at King Edward's School, Bath. This article is about the city in England. ... 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ... The Palladian-style Pulteney Bridge and the weir at Bath Bath is a city in South West England most famous for its baths fed by three hot springs. ... King Edwards School (KES) in Bath, United Kingdom is a Public school providing education for pupils aged 3 - 18. ...


Thomas was a weak and sickly child. His youth was spent in solitude, and when his elder brother, William, came home, he wreaked havoc in the quiet surroundings. De Quincey's mother was a woman of strong character and intelligence, but seems to have inspired more awe than affection in her children. She brought them up very strictly, taking Thomas out of school after three years because she was afraid he would become big-headed, and sending him to an inferior school at Winkfield in Wiltshire. Wiltshire (abbreviated Wilts) is a large southern English county. ...


In 1800, De Quincey, aged fifteen, was ready for the University of Oxford; his scholarship was far in advance of his years. "That boy," his master at Bath School had said, "that boy could harangue an Athenian mob better than you or I could address an English one." He was sent to Manchester Grammar School, in order that after three years' stay he might obtain a scholarship to Brasenose College, Oxford, but he took flight after nineteen months. 1800 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The Manchester Grammar School (MGS) is an independent boys school (ages 11-18) in Manchester, England. ... College name Brasenose College Named after Bronze door knocker Established 1509 Sister College Gonville and Caius College Principal Prof. ...


His first plan had been to reach William Wordsworth, whose Lyrical Ballads (1798) had consoled him in fits of depression and had awakened in him a deep reverence for the poet. But for that De Quincey was too timid, so he made his way to Chester, where his mother dwelt, in the hope of seeing a sister; he was caught by the older members of the family, but, through the efforts of his uncle, Colonel Penson, received the promise of a guinea a week to carry out his later project of a solitary tramp through Wales. From July to November, 1802, De Quincey lived as a wayfarer. He soon lost his guinea by ceasing to keep his family informed of his whereabouts, and had difficulty making ends meet. Still apparently fearing pursuit, he borrowed some money and travelled to London, where he tried to borrow more. Having failed, he lived close to starvation rather than return to his family. William Wordsworth, English poet William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. ... Lyrical Ballads, 1798, was the flame that lit the English Romantic movement, its spark being that of the somewhat earlier William Blake. ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about Chester in England. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English, Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² NUTS 1... --69. ... Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the most populous city in the European Union, with an estimated population on 1 January 2005 of 7. ...


Discovered by chance by his friends, De Quincey was brought home and finally allowed (1803) to go to Worcester College, Oxford, on a reduced income. Here, we are told, "he came to be looked upon as a strange being who associated with no one." During this time he began to take opium. He left, apparently about 1807, without a degree. In the same year he made the acquaintance of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth, having already sought out Charles Lamb in London. His acquaintance with Wordsworth led to his settling in 1809 at Grasmere, in the beautiful English Lake District; his home for ten years was Dove Cottage, which Wordsworth had occupied and which is now a popular tourist attraction. De Quincey was married in 1816, and soon after, having no money left, he took up literary work in earnest. 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Worcester College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge, English poet, 1795 Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and as one of the Lake Poets. ... William Wordsworth, English poet William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. ... Charles Lamb (10 February 1775 –- 27 July 1834) was an English essayist, best known for his Essays of Elia and for the childrens book Tales from Shakespeare, which he produced along with his sister, Mary Lamb. ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Grasmere village and lake as seen from the fell of Stone Arthur This article is about the village in the UK. For the neighborhood in Staten Island, New York, USA, see Grasmere, Staten Island. ... The panorama across Eskdale from Ill Crag. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1821 he went to London to dispose of some translations from German authors, but was persuaded first to write and publish an account of his opium experiences, which that year appeared in the London Magazine. This new sensation eclipsed Lamb's Essays of Elia, which were then appearing in the same periodical. The Confessions of an English Opium-Eater were soon published in book form. De Quincey then made literary acquaintances. Tom Hood found the shrinking author "at home in a German ocean of literature, in a storm, flooding all the floor, the tables, and the chairs--billows of books." Richard Woodhouse speaks of the "depth and reality of his knowledge. ... His conversation appeared like the elaboration of a mine of results. ... Taylor led him into political economy, and the study of classics." 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Opium is a narcotic analgesic drug which is obtained from the unripe seed pods of the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L. or the synonym paeoniflorum). ... Harro5 23:13, Jun 25, 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1822) is an autobiographical novel by Thomas De Quincey first published in 1821 and revised in 1856, about his laudanum (opium and alcohol) addiction and how it affected his life. ... Tom Hood (January 19, 1835 - November 20, 1874), English humorist, son of the poet Thomas Hood, was born at Lake House, Wanstead, Essex. ...


From this time on De Quincey maintained himself by contributing to various magazines. He soon exchanged London and the Lakes for Edinburgh and its suburb, Lasswade, where he spent the remainder of his life. Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine and its rival Tait's Magazine received a large number of contributions. The English Mail-Coach appeared in 1849 in Blackwood. Joan of Arc had already been published (1847) in Tait. De Quincey throughout his life drank laudanum--after 1821, twice in great excess. During his last years he nearly completed a collected edition of his works. Edinburgh (pronounced ), Dùn Èideann () in Scottish Gaelic, is the second-largest city in Scotland and its capital city. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Laudanum is an alcoholic tincture of opium, sometimes sweetened with sugar and also called wine of opium. ... 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Influence

His immediate influence extended to Edgar Allen Poe, Fitz Hugh Ludlow and Charles Baudelaire, but even major 20th century writers such as Jorge Luis Borges admired and claimed to be partly influenced by his work. Berlioz also loosely based his Symphonie Fantastique on Confessions of an English Opium Eater drawing on the theme of the internal struggle with ones self. Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809–October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, editor and critic. ... Fitz Hugh Ludlow, sometimes seen as Fitzhugh Ludlow, (September 11, 1836 – September 12, 1870) was an American author, journalist, and explorer; best-known for his autobiographical book The Hasheesh Eater (1857). ... Charles Baudelaire, photograph taken by Nadar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Jorge Luis Borges (, bôr′hÄ•s) (August 24, 1899 â€“ June 14, 1986) was an Argentine writer who is considered to be one of the foremost writers of the 20th century. ... Portrait of Berlioz by Signol, 1832 Louis Hector Berlioz (December 11, 1803 – March 8, 1869) was a French Romantic composer best known for the Symphonie Fantastique, first performed in 1830, and for his Requiem of 1837, with its tremendous resources that include four antiphonal brass choirs. ... Symphonie Fantastique (Fantastic Symphony) is a symphony written by Hector Berlioz in 1830. ... Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1822) is an autobiographical novel by Thomas De Quincey first published in 1821 in the London Magazine, as a novel in 1822 and revised in 1856, about his laudanum (opium and alcohol) addiction and how it affected his life. ...


Online texts

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Thomas de Quincey
  • Project Gutenberg e-texts of some of Thomas De Quincey's works
  • Wikisource : Les Derniers jours d'Emmanuel Kant, translated in French by Marcel Schwob

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikisource – The Free Library – is a Wikimedia project to build a free, wiki library of primary source texts, along with translations of source-texts into any language and other supporting materials. ... Project Gutenberg (often abbreviated as PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works. ... Wikisource – The Free Library – is a Wikimedia project to build a free, wiki library of primary source texts, along with translations of source-texts into any language and other supporting materials. ...

Bibliography

Selected works:

  • Confessions of an English Opium Eater, 1822
  • On the Knocking at the Gate in Macbeth, 1823
  • Walladmor, 1825
  • Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts, 1827
  • Klosterheim, or The Masque, 1832
  • Lake Reminscences, 1834-40
  • The Logic of the Political Economy, 1844
  • Suspiria de Profundis, 1845
  • The English Mail Coach, 1849
  • Autobiographical Sketches, 1853
  • Selections Grave and Gay, from the Writings, Published and Unpublished, by Thomas De Quincey, 1853-1860 (14 vols.)
  • Collected Writings, 1889
  • Uncollected Writings, 1890
  • The Posthumous Works, 1891-93
  • Memorials, 1891
  • Literary Criticism, 1909
  • The Diary, 1928
  • Selected Writings, 1937
  • Recollections of the Lake Poets, 1948 (written 1830-40)
  • New Essays, 1966
  • Literarische Portraits. Schiller, Herder, Lessing, Goethe, German Translation by Thomas Klandt. revonnah Verlag Hannover. ISBN 3-927715-95-6

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Thomas De Quincey - definition of Thomas De Quincey in Encyclopedia (827 words)
Thomas de Quincey (August 15, 1785 - December 8, 1859) was a British author and intellectual.
De Quincey's mother was a woman of strong character and intelligence, but seems to have inspired more awe than affection in her children.
In 1800, De Quincey, aged fifteen, was ready for the University of Oxford; his scholarship was far in advance of his years.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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