FACTOID # 15: A mere 0.8% of West Virginians were born in a foreign country.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Thomas R. Marshall
Thomas R. Marshall
Thomas R. Marshall

Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in Leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... 1925 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... A politician is an individual involved in politics. ... Dick Cheney 46th and current Vice President (2001- ) The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Order: 28th President Vice President: Thomas R. Marshall Term of office: March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1921 Preceded by: William Howard Taft Succeeded by: Warren G. Harding Date of birth: December 28, 1856 Place of birth: Staunton, Virginia Date of death: February 3, 1924 Place of death: Washington, D.C... 1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1921 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents


Early life

Marshall was born in North Manchester, Indiana, where he frequently spent time at the courthouse listening to lawyers; Marshall wrote later of listening to future President Benjamin Harrison present a case. Marshall studied law at Wabash College. He was admitted to the bar in 1875 and began his career as a lawyer in Columbia City, Indiana. North Manchester is a town located in Wabash County, Indiana. ... This article is about the President. ... Wabash College Wabash College is a small private liberal arts college for men, located in Crawfordsville, Indiana. ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Columbia City is a city located in Whitley County, Indiana. ...


He served as Governor of Indiana from 1909 to 1913. He was a popular speaker and active in local Democratic Party politics, but was regarded only as a competent small-town lawyer when he was given the nomination as a compromise dark horse candidate. During his term he saw a child labor law and some anti-corruption legislation passed, but was not successful in passing much of his progressive platform through the state legislature, nor in raising a convention to rewrite the state constitution. A governor is also a device that regulates the speed of a machine. ... State nickname: The Hoosier State Other U.S. States Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Governor Mitch Daniels (R) Official languages English Area 94,321 km² (38th)  - Land 92,897 km²  - Water 1,424 km² (1. ... 1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... A dark horse candidate is one who is nominated unexpectedly, without previously having been discussed or considered as a likely choice. ...


Vice Presidency

At the 1912 Democratic convention in Baltimore, Marshall's name was put in as Indiana's choice for President. For a time it looked as if Marshall might actually end up as a compromise nominee, but ultimately William Jennings Bryan agreed to endorse Woodrow Wilson; Indiana's delegates successfully lobbied to have Marshall named Vice President. He was elected on the Wilson ticket in 1912, was reelected in 1916 and served as Vice President until 1921. It is said that Marshall initially turned down the nomination, assuming the job would be boring. Marshall is currently the last governor to serve two full terms as Vice President. 1912 is a leap year starting on Monday. ... Motto: BELIEVE (formerly The City That Reads) Nickname: Charm City Location in Independent city, Maryland Founded  -Incorporated 30 July 1729 1797  County Independent city Mayor Martin J. OMalley (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 349. ... William Jennings Bryan, 1907 William Jennings Bryan, (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) born in Salem, Illinois, was a gifted orator and three-time United States Democratic nominee for President. ... 1912 is a leap year starting on Monday. ... 1916 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... 1921 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Marshall was not particularly fond of Wilson, and though Wilson invited Marshall to cabinet meetings his ideas were rarely considered. In 1913 Wilson took the then unheard of step of meeting personally with members of the Senate in the Capitol building. Before this, Presidents had made a habit of using the Vice President (who serves as President of the Senate) as a go-between with the Senate; Wilson took advantage of the opportunity to show that he had no intention of trusting Marshall with delicate business. Since that time presidents have rarely relied on their VPs in dealing with the Senate. 1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... United States Capitol The Capitol when first occupied by Congress, 1800. ...


As Marshall made little news and was viewed as something of a comic foil in Washington, a number of Democratic party insiders wanted him dumped from the 1916 ticket. Wilson, after deliberating, ultimately decided that it would demonstrate party unity if he kept Marshall on; thus in 1916 Wilson and Marshall became the first President and Vice President team to be re-elected since Monroe and Tompkins in the 1820s. 1916 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Order: 5th President Vice President: Daniel D. Tompkins Term of office: March 4, 1817 – March 4, 1825 Preceded by: James Madison Succeeded by: John Quincy Adams Date of birth: April 28, 1758 Place of birth: Westmoreland County, Virginia Date of death: July 4, 1831 Place of death: New York City... Portrait of U.S. Vice President Daniel D Tompkins Daniel D[ecius?] Tompkins (June 21, 1774–June 11, 1825) was entrepreneur, jurist, Congressman, Governor of New York, and the sixth Vice President of the United States. ...


During his second term, Marshall saw the United States enter World War I. Wilson sent him out on the road, speaking across the country to encourage Americans to buy war bonds and support the war effort. This was a job to which Marshall was well suited; he had been earning extra money as a public speaker while Vice President. Also in his second term Marshall became the first Vice President to conduct cabinet meetings; Wilson left him with this responsibility while travelling in Europe to sign the Versailles treaty and push his League of Nations idea. World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machineguns, and poison gas. ... Categories: Stub ... Public speaking is speaking to a group of people in a structured, deliberate manner. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... World map showing location of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Woodrow Wilson with the American Peace Commissioners The Treaty of Versailles of 1919 is the peace treaty created as a result of six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 which put an official end to World War I between the Allies and Central Powers. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the First World War at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919. ...


After suffering a more mild one the previous month, on October 2, 1919, President Woodrow Wilson suffered a severe stroke that left him partially paralyzed and almost certainly incapacitated. Though Marshall was advised that the President had suffered an infirmity and despite the requests of many to do so, Marshall did not attempt to become the first Acting President of the United States. The process for declaring a President incapacitated was unclear, and Marshall was fearful of the precedent that might be set in establishing one. While Marshall would perform ceremonial functions for the remainder of Wilson's term, he would not have opportunity to meet with Wilson to ascertain his condition until their final day in office. October 2nd is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Order: 28th President Vice President: Thomas R. Marshall Term of office: March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1921 Preceded by: William Howard Taft Succeeded by: Warren G. Harding Date of birth: December 28, 1856 Place of birth: Staunton, Virginia Date of death: February 3, 1924 Place of death: Washington, D.C... A stroke or cerebrovascular accident (CVA) occurs when the blood supply to a part of the brain is suddenly interrupted by occlusion (an ischemic stroke- approximately 90% of strokes), by hemorrhage (a hemorrhagic stroke - less than 10% of strokes) or other causes. ... An acting president is a person who takes the place of the president of an organization for a brief period, due to forced absence, illness or death, and is replaced by the original president or by a new one, as the case requires. ... The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ...


Later years

Marshall returned to Indianapolis after his term as Vice President and resumed his law practice. He also wrote a number of books on the law as well as his Recollections, a memoir. In 1922-23 he served as chair of the Federal Coal Commission. Nickname: Circle City, Indy, Naptown Location in Marion County, Indiana Founded  -Incorporated 1821 {{{incorporated}}}  County Marion County Mayor Bart Peterson Area  - Total  - Water 966. ... 1922 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Marshall died on a visit to Washington, D.C. in 1925 and is interred in Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C., Washington, the Nations Capital, or the District, and historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United States of America, and as such, the word Washington is often used as a... 1925 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Crown Hill Cemetery, located at 700 West 38th Street in Indianapolis, is the third largest cemetery in the United States at 555 acres (2. ... Nickname: Circle City, Indy, Naptown Location in Marion County, Indiana Founded  -Incorporated 1821 {{{incorporated}}}  County Marion County Mayor Bart Peterson Area  - Total  - Water 966. ...


Legacy

Marshall is best known for a phrase he introduced to the American lexicon. During a Senate debate in 1917, a particularly bellicose Senator catalogued what he felt the country needed: "What this country needs is more of this; what this country needs is more of that." Marshall leaned over to a clerk and quipped, "What this country needs is a really good five-cent cigar." 1917 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


The story may be apocryphal, but Marshall was known for having a quick wit. Upon his election as vice president, Marshall sent President-elect Woodrow Wilson a book, inscribed "From your only Vice." He was known to greet citizens walking by his office on the White House tour by asking them to "be kind enough to throw peanuts at me." Upon hearing of his nomination as Vice President (he was not present at the convention), Marshall quipped that he wasn't surprised, as "Indiana is the mother of Vice Presidents, home of more second-class men than any other state."


One of his favorite jokes was about a woman with two sons, one of whom ran away and went to sea and the other was elected Vice President of the United States. Neither was ever heard of again.



Preceded by:
J. Frank Hanly
Governor of Indiana
1909-1913
Succeeded by:
Samuel M. Ralston
Preceded by:
John W. Kern
Democratic Party Vice Presidential candidate
1912 (won), 1916 (won)
Succeeded by:
Franklin D. Roosevelt
Preceded by:
James S. Sherman
Vice President of the United States
March 4, 1913March 4, 1921
Succeeded by:
Calvin Coolidge


James Franklin Hanly (April 4, 1863 - August 1, 1920) was an United States politician who served as the 26th Governor of Indiana from 1905 to 1909. ... List of Indiana Governors Jonathan Jennings Dem. ... John Worth Kern (December 20, 1849 - August 17, 1917) was a U.S. Democratic politician from Indiana. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Electoral College results In 1916, Europe was embroiled in World War I. American sentiment leaned towards the Allied Powers due to the occupation of parts of France and Belgium by the German Empire, but most American voters wanted to avoid involvement in the war, and preferred a policy of strict... Order: 32nd President Vice President: John N. Garner Henry A. Wallace Harry S. Truman Term of office: March 4, 1933 – April 12, 1945 Preceded by: Herbert Hoover Succeeded by: Harry S. Truman Date of birth: January 30, 1882 Place of birth: Hyde Park, New York Date of death: April 12... James Schoolcraft Sherman (October 24, 1855–October 30, 1912) was a Representative from New York and the 27th Vice President of the United States. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, a heartbeat from the presidency. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1921 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Order: 30th President Vice President: Charles G. Dawes Term of office: August 2, 1923 – March 4, 1929 Preceded by: Warren G. Harding Succeeded by: Herbert Hoover Date of birth: July 4, 1872 Place of birth: Plymouth, Vermont Date of death: January 5, 1933 Place of death: Northampton, Massachusetts First Lady...



Vice Presidents of the United States of America Seal of the Vice President of the United States
Adams | Jefferson | Burr | Clinton | Gerry | Tompkins | Calhoun | Van Buren | R. Johnson | Tyler | Dallas | Fillmore | King | Breckinridge | Hamlin | A. Johnson | Colfax | Wilson | Wheeler | Arthur | Hendricks | Morton | Stevenson | Hobart | Roosevelt | Fairbanks | Sherman | Marshall | Coolidge | Dawes | Curtis | Garner | Wallace | Truman | Barkley | Nixon | L. Johnson | Humphrey | Agnew | Ford | Rockefeller | Mondale | Bush | Quayle | Gore | Cheney
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about:
Thomas R. Marshall

  Results from FactBites:
 
Thomas R. Marshall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (906 words)
Marshall was born in North Manchester, Indiana, where he frequently spent time at the courthouse listening to lawyers; Marshall wrote later of listening to future President Benjamin Harrison present a case.
Though Marshall was advised that the President had suffered an infirmity and despite the requests of many to do so, Marshall did not attempt to become the first Acting President of the United States.
Marshall died on a visit to Washington, D.C. in 1925 and is interred in Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana.
Thomas Marshall (5956 words)
Thomas Marshall was appointed colonel in the 3d Virginia infantry of the Continental line, and John's company was reorganized and attached to the 11th regiment of Virginia troops, which was sent to join Washington's army in New Jersey.
Marshall, Thomas, brother of John Marshal, soldier, born in Fauquier county, Virginia, 27 October, 1761; died in Mason county, Kentucky, 19 March, 1817, served in the Revolution, and attained the rank of captain.
Marshall was the commercial agent of New York, Boston, and Charleston in France during the reign of terror, and was employed by Washington as the agent of the United States to negotiate for the release of Lafayette, who was then a prisoner in Austria.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m