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Encyclopedia > Thomas Pynchon
Thomas Pynchon

Thomas Pynchon in 1957, one of the few photographs of him ever to be published
Born May 8, 1937 (1937-05-08) (age 70)
Glen Cove, New York
Occupation Short story writer and novelist
Nationality American

Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Jr. (born May 8, 1937) is an American writer based in New York City, noted for his dense and complex works of fiction. Hailing from Long Island, Pynchon spent two years in the United States Navy and earned an English degree from Cornell University. After publishing several short stories in the late 1950s and early 1960s, he began composing the novels for which he is best known today: V. (1963), The Crying of Lot 49 (1966), Gravity's Rainbow (1973), Vineland (1990), Mason & Dixon (1997), and Against the Day (2006). Image File history File linksMetadata Pynchon. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Glen Cove is a city in Nassau County, New York on the North Shore of Long Island. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about work. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... USN redirects here. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... Cornell redirects here. ... This article is in need of attention. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... book cover V. is the debut novel of Thomas Pynchon published in 1963, concerning the journey of discharged U.S. Navy sailor Benny Profane through a decadent group of artists in 1956, along with the attempt of an aging traveller named Herbert Stencil to locate the mysterious woman he knows... The Crying of Lot 49 (1966) is a novel by the author Thomas Pynchon. ... Gravitys Rainbow is an epic postmodern novel written by Thomas Pynchon and first published on February 28, 1973. ... For other uses, see Vineland (disambiguation). ... Mason & Dixon book cover Mason & Dixon, a post-modern novel by Thomas Pynchon first published in 1997, centers on the collaboration of the historical Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in their astronomical and surveying exploits in Cape Colony, Saint Helena, Great Britain and along the Mason-Dixon line in British... Against the Day, a novel by Thomas Pynchon, first appeared in the United States on November 21, 2006. ...


Pynchon (pronounced /ˈpɪntʃɒn/, with /ˈpɪntʃən/ a common mispronunciation) is regarded by many readers and critics as one of the finest contemporary authors. He is a MacArthur Fellow and a recipient of the National Book Award, and is regularly cited as a contender for the Nobel Prize in Literature. Both his fiction and non-fiction writings encompass a vast array of subject matter, styles and themes, including (but not limited to) the fields of history, science and mathematics. Pynchon is also known for his avoidance of personal publicity: very few photographs of him have ever been published, and rumours about his location and identity have been circulated since the 1960s. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... In literature, a theme is a broad idea in a story, or a message or lesson conveyed by a work. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up publicity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In information security and privacy, personally identifiable information or personally identifying information (PII) is any piece of information which can potentially be used to uniquely identify, contact, or locate a single person. ...

Contents

Biography

Thomas Pynchon was born in 1937 in Glen Cove, Long Island, New York, one of three children of Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Sr. (1907 – 1995) and Katherine Frances Bennett (1909 – 1996). His earliest American ancestor, William Pynchon, emigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony with the Winthrop Fleet in 1630, and thereafter a long line of Pynchon descendants found wealth and repute on American soil. Pynchon's family background and aspects of his ancestry have provided source material for his fictions, particularly in the Slothrop family histories related in "The Secret Integration" (1964) and Gravity's Rainbow (1973). Glen Cove is a city in Nassau County, New York on the North Shore of Long Island. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... This article is about the state. ... William Pynchon (October 11, 1590 – October 29, 1662) was a Colonial Assistant, Treasurer, and original Patentee of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... The Winthrop Fleet of 1630 was the largest fleet ever assembled to carry Englishmen overseas to a new homeland. ... Gravitys Rainbow is an epic postmodern novel written by Thomas Pynchon and first published on February 28, 1973. ...


Childhood and education

Pynchon attended Oyster Bay High School, where he was awarded "student of the year" and contributed short fictional pieces to his school newspaper (Pynchon 1952-3). These juvenilia incorporated some of the literary motifs and recurring subject matter he would use throughout his career: oddball names, sophomoric humour, illicit drug use and paranoia. This does not cite its references or sources. ...


After graduating from high school in 1953 at the age of 16, Pynchon studied engineering physics at Cornell University, but left at the end of his second year to serve in the U.S. Navy. In 1957, he returned to Cornell to pursue a degree in English. His first published story, "The Small Rain", appeared in the Cornell Writer in May 1959, and narrates an actual experience of a friend who had served in the army; subsequently, however, episodes and characters throughout Pynchon's fiction draw freely upon his own experiences in the navy. Engineering physics (EP) is an academic degree, usually at the level of Bachelor of Science. ... Cornell redirects here. ... USN redirects here. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ...


While at Cornell, Pynchon started his life-long friendship with Richard Fariña; Pynchon would go on to dedicate "Gravity's Rainbow" to Fariña, as well as serve as his best man and as his pallbearer. Together the two briefly led what Pynchon has called a "micro-cult" around Oakley Hall's 1958 novel Warlock. (He later reminisced about his college days in the introduction he wrote in 1983 for Fariña's novel Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me, first published in 1966.) Pynchon also reportedly attended lectures given by Vladimir Nabokov, who then taught literature at Cornell. While Nabokov later said that he had no memory of Pynchon (although Nabokov's wife, Véra, who graded her husband's class papers, commented that she remembered his distinctive handwriting - comprised of a mixture of printed and cursive letters), other teachers at Cornell, such as the novelist James McConkey, recall him as being a gifted and exceptional student. In 1958, Pynchon and Cornell classmate Kirkpatrick Sale wrote part or all of a science-fiction musical, Minstral Island, which portrayed a dystopian future in which IBM rules the world (Gibbs 1994). Pynchon received his BA in June 1959. Richard George Fariña ( March 8, 1937 – April 30, 1966 ) was an American writer and folksinger. ... Oakley Hall (born 1920) is an American novelist. ... ). Categories: Stub ... Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me is a novel by Richard Fariña. ... This page is about the novelist. ... Cursive is any style of handwriting which is designed for writing down notes and letters by hand. ... Kirkpatrick Sale is an author, technology critic (neo-luddite) and tax resister. ... For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ...


Early career

V.

Main article: V.

After leaving Cornell, Pynchon began to work on his first novel. From February 1960 to September 1962, he was employed as a technical writer at Boeing in Seattle, where he compiled safety articles for the Bomarc Service News (see Wisnicki 2000-1), a support newsletter for the BOMARC surface-to-air missile deployed by the U.S. Air Force. Pynchon's experiences at Boeing inspired his depictions of the "Yoyodyne" corporation in V. and The Crying of Lot 49, and both his background in physics and the technical journalism he undertook at Boeing provided much raw material for Gravity's Rainbow. When it was published in 1963, Pynchon's novel V. won a William Faulkner Foundation Award for best first novel of the year. book cover V. is the debut novel of Thomas Pynchon published in 1963, concerning the journey of discharged U.S. Navy sailor Benny Profane through a decadent group of artists in 1956, along with the attempt of an aging traveller named Herbert Stencil to locate the mysterious woman he knows... The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA, TYO: 7661) is a major aerospace and defense corporation, originally founded by William Edward Boeing. ... Seattle redirects here. ... Bomarc missile launch The Bomarc Missile Program was a joint United States of America-Canada effort between 1957 and 1971 to protect against the USSR bomber threat. ... Seal of the Air Force. ... Yoyodyne is a fictional defense contractor introduced in Thomas Pynchons V. (1961) and featured prominently in his novel The Crying of Lot 49 (1965). ... book cover V. is the debut novel of Thomas Pynchon published in 1963, concerning the journey of discharged U.S. Navy sailor Benny Profane through a decadent group of artists in 1956, along with the attempt of an aging traveller named Herbert Stencil to locate the mysterious woman he knows... The Crying of Lot 49 (1966) is a novel by the author Thomas Pynchon. ... Gravitys Rainbow is an epic postmodern novel written by Thomas Pynchon and first published on February 28, 1973. ... See also: 1962 in literature, other events of 1963, 1964 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction is awarded annually by the PEN/Faulkner Foundation to the author of the best American work of fiction that year. ...


After resigning from Boeing, Pynchon spent time in New York and Mexico before moving to California, where he was reportedly based for much of the 1960s and early 1970s, most notably in an apartment in Manhattan Beach (see Frost 2003), as he was composing his most highly regarded work, Gravity's Rainbow. Pynchon during this time flirted with the lifestyle and some of the habits of the hippie counterculture (see, for example, Gordon 1994); however, his retrospective assessment of the motives, values and achievements of the student and youth milieux of the period, in his 1984 'Introduction' to the Slow Learner collection of early stories and the novel Vineland (1990) in particular, is equivocal at best. Location of Manhattan Beach in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Incorporated (city) 1912-12-12 [2] Government  - Mayor Jim Aldinger [1] Area  - Total 10. ... For the British TV show, see Hippies (TV series). ... Counterculture (also counter-culture) is a sociological word used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day,[1] the cultural equivalent of political opposition. ... Slow Learner is the 1984 published collection of six early short stories by the American novelist Thomas Pynchon. ... For other uses, see Vineland (disambiguation). ...


In 1964, an application to study mathematics as a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley, was turned down (Royster 2005). In 1966, Pynchon wrote a first-hand report on the aftermath and legacy of the Watts riots in Los Angeles. Entitled "A Journey Into the Mind of Watts," the article was published in the New York Times Magazine (Pynchon 1966). Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The term Watts Riots refers to a large-scale riot which lasted six days in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, in August 1965. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


From the mid-1960s Pynchon has also regularly provided blurbs and introductions for a wide range of novels and non-fiction works. One of the first of these pieces was a brief review of Hall's Warlock which appeared, along with comments by seven other writers on "neglected books", as part of a feature entitled "A Gift of Books" in the December 1965 issue of Holiday. A blurb is a short summary or some words of praise accompanying a creative work, usually referring to the words on the back of the book but also commonly seen on DVD and Video cases, Web portals and news websites. ...


The Crying of Lot 49

Main article: The Crying of Lot 49
Pynchon created the "muted post horn" as a symbol for the secret "Trystero" society in The Crying of Lot 49.
Pynchon created the "muted post horn" as a symbol for the secret "Trystero" society in The Crying of Lot 49.

In an April 1964 letter to his agent, Candida Donadio, Pynchon wrote that he was facing a creative crisis, with four novels in progress, announcing: "If they come out on paper anything like they are inside my head then it will be the literary event of the millennium." (see Gussow 1998) In December 1965, Pynchon politely turned down an invitation from Stanley Edgar Hyman to teach literature at Bennington College, writing that he had resolved, two or three years earlier, to write three novels at once. Pynchon described the decision as "a moment of temporary insanity," but noted that he was "too stubborn to let any of them go, let alone all of them." (see McLemee 2006) The Crying of Lot 49 (1966) is a novel by the author Thomas Pynchon. ... Image File history File links MutedPosthorn. ... Image File history File links MutedPosthorn. ... Stanley Edgar Hyman was a literary critic who wrote primarily about critical methods: the distinct strategies critics use in approaching literary texts. ...


Pynchon's second novel, The Crying of Lot 49, was published a few months later in 1966. Whether it was one of the three or four novels Pynchon had in progress is unknown, but in a 1965 letter to Donadio, Pynchon had written that he was in the middle of writing a book that he called a "potboiler." When the book grew to 155 pages, he called it, "a short story, but with gland trouble," and hoped that Donadio could "unload it on some poor sucker." (Gussow 1998)


The Crying of Lot 49 won the Richard and Hilda Rosenthal Foundation Award shortly after publication. Although more concise and linear in its structure than Pynchon's other novels, its labyrinthine plot features an ancient, underground mail service known as "The Tristero" or "Trystero," a parody of a Jacobean revenge drama entitled "The Courier's Tragedy," and a corporate conspiracy involving the bones of World War II American GIs being used as charcoal cigarette filters. It proposes a series of seemingly incredible interconnections between these and other similarly bizarre revelations that confront the novel's protagonist, Oedipa Maas. Like V., the novel contains a wealth of references to science and technology and to obscure historical events, and both books dwell upon the detritus of American society and culture. The Crying of Lot 49 also continues Pynchon's habit of composing parodic song lyrics and punning names, and referencing aspects of popular culture within his prose narrative. In particular, it incorporates a very direct allusion to the protagonist of Nabokov's Lolita within the lyric of a love lament sung by a member of 'The Paranoids', a teenage band who deliberately sing their songs with British accents. Title page of the Quarto edition of The Spanish Tragedy(1615) The revenge play or revenge tragedy is a form of tragedy which was extremely popular in the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... GI or G.I. is a term describing a US soldier or an item of their equipment. ... A cigarette filter has the purpose of reducing the amount of smoke, tar, and fine particles as combustion products from a cigarette, being inhaled. ... Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ... The Crying of Lot 49 (1966) is a novel by the author Thomas Pynchon. ... This article is about the novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ...


In 1968, Pynchon was one of 447 signatories to the "Writers and Editors War Tax Protest." Full-page advertisements in The New York Post and The New York Review of Books listed the names of those who had pledged not to pay "the proposed 10% income tax surcharge or any war-designated tax increase," and stated their belief "that American involvement in Vietnam is morally wrong" (New York Review of Books 1968:9). The first edition of The New York Post of July 6, 2004 incorrectly declared that U.S. presidential candidate John Kerry would choose U.S. Representative Dick Gephardt to be his vice-presidential running mate that day (in reality, Kerry chose John Edwards). ... This article is about the literary magazine. ...


Gravity's Rainbow

Main article: Gravity's Rainbow

Pynchon's most celebrated novel is his third, Gravity's Rainbow, published in 1973. An intricate and allusive fiction that combines and elaborates on many of the themes of his earlier work, including preterition, paranoia, racism, colonialism, conspiracy, synchronicity, and entropy, the novel has spawned a wealth of commentary and critical material, including two reader's guides (Fowler 1980; Weisenburger 1988), books and scholarly articles, online concordances and discussions, and art works, and is regarded as one of the archetypal texts of American literary postmodernism. The major portion of Gravity's Rainbow takes place in London and Europe in the final months of the Second World War and the weeks immediately following VE Day, and is narrated for the most part from within the historical moment in which it is set. In this way, Pynchon's text enacts a type of dramatic irony whereby neither the characters nor the various narrative voices are aware of specific historical circumstances, such as the Holocaust, which are, however, very much to the forefront of the reader's understanding of this time in history. Such an approach generates dynamic tension and moments of acute self-consciousness, as both reader and author seem drawn ever deeper into the "plot", in various senses of that term. Gravitys Rainbow is an epic postmodern novel written by Thomas Pynchon and first published on February 28, 1973. ... Gravitys Rainbow is an epic postmodern novel written by Thomas Pynchon and first published on February 28, 1973. ... See also: 1972 in literature, other events of 1973, 1974 in literature, list of years in literature. ... A Calvinist doctrine claiming that God chose not to designate those who would be damned, positively determining only the elect. ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... It has been suggested that Benign colonialism be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Conspiracy theory (disambiguation). ... Synchronicity is the experience of two or more events which occur in a meaningful manner, but which are causally inexplicable to the person or persons experiencing them. ... For other uses, see: information entropy (in information theory) and entropy (disambiguation). ... The term Postmodern literature is used to describe certain tendencies in post-World War II literature. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Churchill waves to crowds in Whitehall on the day he broadcast to the nation that the war with Germany had been won, 8 May 1945. ... Ironic redirects here. ... The Narrator is the entity within a story that tells the story to the reader. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... In literature, a plot is all the events in a story particularly rendered towards the achievement of some particular artistic or emotional effect. ...

Quotation
"If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about answers."
Gravity's Rainbow

Encyclopedic in scope and often playfully self-conscious in style, the novel displays impressive erudition in its treatment of an array of material drawn from the fields of psychology, chemistry, mathematics, history, religion, music, literature and film. Perhaps appropriately for a book so suffused with engineering knowledge, Pynchon wrote the first draft of Gravity's Rainbow in "neat, tiny script on engineer's quadrille paper" (Weisenburger 1988). Pynchon worked on the novel throughout the 1960s and early 1970s while he was living in California and Mexico City, and was evidently making changes and additions to the manuscript right up to the date of printing. Psychological science redirects here. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... Graph paper or quad-ruled paper is writing paper that is printed with fine lines making up a regular grid. ...


Gravity's Rainbow was a joint winner of the 1974 National Book Award for Fiction, along with Isaac Bashevis Singer's A Crown of Feathers and Other Stories. In the same year, the fiction jury unanimously recommended Gravity's Rainbow for the Pulitzer Prize; however, the Pulitzer board vetoed the jury's recommendation, describing the novel as "unreadable", "turgid", "overwritten", and in parts "obscene", and no prize was awarded (Kihss 1974). In 1975, Pynchon declined the William Dean Howells Medal of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The William Dean Howells Medal is awarded by the American Academy of Arts and Letters. ...


Post-Gravity's Rainbow

A collection of Pynchon's early short stories, entitled Slow Learner, was published in 1984, with a lengthy autobiographical introduction. In October of the same year, an article entitled "Is It O.K. to Be a Luddite?" was published in the New York Times Book Review. In April 1988, Pynchon contributed an extensive review of Gabriel García Marquéz's novel, Love in the Time of Cholera, to the New York Times, under the title "The Heart's Eternal Vow". Another article, entitled "Nearer, My Couch, to Thee", was published in June 1993 in the New York Times Book Review, as one in a series of articles in which various writers reflected on each of the Seven Deadly Sins. Pynchon's subject was "Sloth". Slow Learner is the 1984 published collection of six early short stories by the American novelist Thomas Pynchon. ... See also: 1983 in literature, other events of 1984, 1985 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Gabriel Garcia Marquez Gabriel García Márquez (born March 6, 1928) is a Colombian novelist, journalist, publisher, and political activist. ... Love in the Time of Cholera (El amor en los tiempos del cólera, 1985) is a novel by Gabriel García Márquez about a fifty-year love triangle between Fermina Daza, Florentino Ariza and Doctor Juvenal Urbino set in the late 19th century and the first decades of... For other uses, see Cardinal sin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cardinal sin (disambiguation). ...


Vineland

Main article: Vineland

Pynchon's fourth novel, Vineland, was published in 1990, and was panned by a majority of readers and critics. The novel is set in California in the 1980s and 1960s, and describes the relationship between an FBI COINTELPRO agent and a female radical filmmaker. Its strong socio-political undercurrents detail the constant battle between authoritarianism and communalism, and the nexus between resistance and complicity, but with a typically Pynchonian sense of humor. For other uses, see Vineland (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Vineland (disambiguation). ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... COINTELPRO (an acronym for Counter Intelligence Program) was a series of covert and illegal projects conducted by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation aimed at investigating and disrupting dissident political organizations within the United States. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This article applies to political and organizational ideologies. ... In many parts of the world, communalism is a modern term that describes a broad range of social movements and social theories which are in some way centered upon the community. ... A resistance movement is a group or collection of individual groups, dedicated to fighting an invader in an occupied country or the government of a sovereign nation through either the use of physical force, or nonviolence. ...


In 1988, he received a MacArthur Fellowship and, since the early 1990s at least, many observers have mentioned Pynchon as a Nobel Prize contender (see, for example, Grimes 1993; CNN Book News 1999; Ervin 2000). Renowned American literary critic Harold Bloom named him as one of the four major American novelists of his time, along with Don DeLillo, Philip Roth, and Cormac McCarthy. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Harold Bloom (born July 11, 1930) is an American professor and prominent literary and cultural critic. ... Don DeLillo (born November 20, 1936) is an American author best known for his novels, which paint detailed portraits of American life in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. ... Philip Milton Roth (born March 19, 1933, Newark, New Jersey[1]) is a famous American novelist. ... For the musician, see Cormac McCarthy (musician). ...


Mason & Dixon

Main article: Mason & Dixon

Pynchon's fifth novel, Mason & Dixon, was published in 1997, though it had been a work in progress from at least January 1975 (Ulin 1997; see also Gussow 1998). The meticulously-researched novel is a sprawling postmodernist saga recounting the lives and careers of the English astronomer, Charles Mason, and his partner, the surveyor Jeremiah Dixon, the surveyors of the Mason-Dixon line, during the birth of the American Republic. While it received some negative reviews, the great majority of commentators acknowledged it as a welcome return to form, and some have hailed it as Pynchon's greatest work. Mason & Dixon book cover Mason & Dixon, a post-modern novel by Thomas Pynchon first published in 1997, centers on the collaboration of the historical Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in their astronomical and surveying exploits in Cape Colony, Saint Helena, Great Britain and along the Mason-Dixon line in British... Mason & Dixon book cover Mason & Dixon, a post-modern novel by Thomas Pynchon first published in 1997, centers on the collaboration of the historical Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in their astronomical and surveying exploits in Cape Colony, Saint Helena, Great Britain and along the Mason-Dixon line in British... The term Postmodern literature is used to describe certain tendencies in post-World War II literature. ... Charles Mason (1730–1787) was an English astronomer. ... Jeremiah Dixon (July 27, 1733 – January 22, 1779) was an English surveyor and astronomer who is perhaps best known for his work with Charles Mason, from 1763 to 1767, in determining what was later called the Mason-Dixon line. ... For the fictional character, see Mason Dixon (Rocky Balboa character). ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen...


Against the Day

Main article: Against the Day

A variety of rumors pertaining to the subject matter of Pynchon's next book circulated over a number of years. Most specific of these were comments made by the former German minister of culture, Michael Naumann, who stated that he assisted Pynchon in his research about "a Russian mathematician [who] studied for David Hilbert in Göttingen", and that the new novel would trace the life and loves of Sofia Kovalevskaya. Against the Day, a novel by Thomas Pynchon, first appeared in the United States on November 21, 2006. ... Against the Day, a novel by Thomas Pynchon, first appeared in the United States on November 21, 2006. ... Michael Naumann (born 1941) was the German minister of culture in 1998. ... | name = David Hilbert | image = Hilbert1912. ... Göttingen marketplace with old city hall, Gänseliesel fountain and pedestrian zone Göttingen ( ) is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... Sofia Vasilyevna Kovalevskaya (Russian Софья Васильевна Ковалевская), also known as Sonya Kovalevsky (January 15, 1850-February 10, 1891), was the first major Russian female mathematician, and also the first woman who was appointed to a full professorship in Europe 1889 (Sweden). ...


In July 2006, a new untitled novel by Pynchon was announced along with a synopsis written by Pynchon himself, which appeared on Amazon.com, it stated that the novel's action takes place between the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and the time immediately following World War I. "With a worldwide disaster looming just a few years ahead," Pynchon wrote in his book description, "it is a time of unrestrained corporate greed, false religiosity, moronic fecklessness, and evil intent in high places. No reference to the present day is intended or should be inferred." He promised cameos by Nikola Tesla, Bela Lugosi and Groucho Marx, as well as "stupid songs" and "strange sexual practices". Subsequently, the title of the new book was reported to be Against the Day and a Penguin spokesperson confirmed that the synopsis was Pynchon's (Pynchon 2006a; Patterson 2006ab; Italie 2006). Amazon. ... One-third scale replica of Daniel Chester Frenchs Republic, which stood in the great basin at the exposition, Chicago, 2004 The Worlds Columbian Exposition (also called The Chicago Worlds Fair), a Worlds Fair, was held in Chicago in 1893, to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Look up blurb in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nikola Tesla (Serbian Cyrillic: ) (10 July 1856 – 7 January 1943) was a inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer, and electrical engineer. ... Bela Lugosi as Dracula United States stamp. ... Groucho redirects here. ... Against the Day, a novel by Thomas Pynchon, first appeared in the United States on November 21, 2006. ...


Against the Day was released November 21, 2006 and is 1,085 pages long in the first edition hardcover. The book was given almost no promotion by Penguin and professional book reviewers were given little time in advance to review the book, presumably in accord with Pynchon's wishes. An edited version of Pynchon's synopsis was used as the jacket flap copy and Kovalevskaya does appear, although as only one of over a hundred characters. Against the Day, a novel by Thomas Pynchon, first appeared in the United States on November 21, 2006. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Comprised predominantly of a series of interwoven pastiches of popular fiction genres from the era in which it is set, there was a mixed reaction from critics and reviewers upon the novel's release, though many acknowledge that it is by turns brilliant and exhausting (Complete Review 2006). An Against the Day wiki was launched on the same day the novel was published to help readers keep track of the numerous characters, events and themes.


Themes

Along with its emphasis on loftier themes such as racism, imperialism and religion, and its cognizance and appropriation of many elements of traditional high culture and literary form, Pynchon's work also demonstrates a strong affinity with the practitioners and artifacts of low culture, including comic books and cartoons, pulp fiction, popular films, television programs, cookery, urban myths, conspiracy theories, and folk art. This blurring of the conventional boundary between "High" and "low" culture, sometimes interpreted as a "deconstruction", is seen as one of the defining characteristics of postmodernism. Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... Cecil Rhodes: Cape-Cairo railway project. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... Low culture is a derogatory term for some forms of popular culture. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... An animated cartoon is a short, hand-drawn (or made with computers to look similar to something hand-drawn) film for the cinema, television or computer screen, featuring some kind of story or plot (even if it is a very short one). ... This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... TV redirects here. ... Cooking is the act of preparing food for consumption. ... Urban Legend is also the name of a 1998 movie. ... A conspiracy theory is a theory that defies common historical or current understanding of events, under the claim that those events are the result of manipulations by two or more individuals or various secretive powers or conspiracies. ... Island of Salvation Botanica, Piety Street, Bywater neighborhood, New Orleans Folk art describes a wide range of objects that reflect the craft traditions and traditional social values of various social groups. ... Deconstruction is a term in contemporary philosophy, literary criticism, and the social sciences, denoting a process by which the texts and languages of Western philosophy (in particular) appear to shift and complicate in meaning when read in light of the assumptions and absences they reveal within themselves. ...


In particular, Pynchon has revealed himself in his fiction and non-fiction as an aficionado of popular music. Song lyrics and mock musical numbers appear in each of his novels, and, in his autobiographical introduction to the Slow Learner collection of early stories, he reveals a fondness for both jazz and rock and roll. The character McClintic Sphere in V. is a fictional composite of jazz musicians such as Ornette Coleman, Charlie Parker and Thelonious Monk. In The Crying of Lot 49, the lead singer of "The Paranoids" sports "a Beatle haircut" and sings with an English accent. In the closing pages of Gravity's Rainbow, there is an apocryphal report that Tyrone Slothrop, the novel's protagonist, played kazoo and harmonica as a guest musician on a record released by The Fool in the 1960s (having magically recovered the latter instrument, his "harp", in a German stream in 1945, after losing it down the toilet in 1939 at the Roseland Ballroom in Roxbury, Boston, to the strains of the jazz standard 'Cherokee', upon which tune Charlie Parker was simultaneously inventing bebop in New York, as Pynchon describes). In Vineland, both Zoyd Wheeler and Isaiah Two Four are also musicians: Zoyd played keyboards in a '60s surf band called "The Corvairs", while Isaiah played in a punk band called "Billy Barf and the Vomitones". In Mason & Dixon, one of the characters plays on the "Clavier" the varsity drinking song which will later become "The Star-Spangled Banner"; whilst in another episode a character remarks tangentially "Sometimes, it's hard to be a woman". For the music genre, see Pop music. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Slow Learner is the 1984 published collection of six early short stories by the American novelist Thomas Pynchon. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Ornette Coleman (born March 9, 1930) is an American saxophonist, violinist, trumpeter and composer. ... For other persons of the same name, see Charles Parker. ... Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917 – February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... For the visual effects technology, see ZOO Digital Group. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... The cover of The 5000 spirits or the layers of the onion, designed by The Fool The Fool were a Dutch design collective who were influential in the psychedelic style of art in British popular music at the end of the 1960s. ... Magic realism (or magical realism) is an artistic genre in which magical elements or illogical scenarios appear in an otherwise realistic or even normal setting. ... Harp Attack! blues harp album cover Blues harp or cross harp is a technique of playing an ordinary harmonica which originated in the blues, not a type of harp or harmonica. ... Roxbury is a neighborhood within Boston, Massachusetts USA. It was one of the first towns founded in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630 and became a city in 1846 until it was annexed to Boston on January 5, 1868. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the genre of music, for the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles character see Bebop and Rocksteady. ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture, particularly Orange County and other areas of Southern California. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... The Star-Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States. ... For the song Stand by Your Man by LL Cool J, see 14 Shots to the Dome. ...


In his Slow Learner introduction, Pynchon acknowledges a debt to the anarchic bandleader Spike Jones, and in 1994, he penned a 3000-word set of liner notes for the album Spiked!, a collection of Jones's recordings released on the short-lived BMG Catalyst label. Pynchon also wrote the liner notes for Nobody's Cool, the second album of indie rock band Lotion, in which he states that "rock and roll remains one of the last honorable callings, and a working band is a miracle of everyday life. Which is basically what these guys do." He is also known to be a fan of Roky Erickson. Slow Learner is the 1984 published collection of six early short stories by the American novelist Thomas Pynchon. ... Spike Jones For the music video and film director, see Spike Jonze. ... Liner notes are the booklets which come inserted into the compact disc jewel case or any sound recording container. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Lotion was a manhattan quartet started in 1991 by brothers Bill and Jim Ferguson, Tony Zajkowski, and Rob Youngberg. ... Roky Erickson (born Roger Kynard Erickson on July 15, 1947) is an American singer, songwriter, harmonica player and guitarist from Texas. ...


Investigations and digressions into the realms of human sexuality, psychology, sociology, mathematics, science, and technology recur throughout Pynchon's works. One of his earliest short stories, "Low-lands" (1960), features a meditation on Heisenberg's uncertainty principle as a metaphor for telling stories about one's own experiences. His next published work, "Entropy" (1960), introduced the concept which was to become synonymous with Pynchon's name (though Pynchon later admitted the "shallowness of [his] understanding" of the subject, and noted that choosing an abstract concept first and trying to construct a narrative around it was "a lousy way to go about writing a story"). Another early story, "Under the Rose" (1961), includes amongst its cast of characters a cyborg set anachronistically in Victorian-era Egypt (a type of writing now called steampunk). This story, significantly reworked by Pynchon, appears as Chapter 3 of V. "The Secret Integration" (1964), Pynchon's last published short story, is a sensitively-handled coming-of-age tale in which a group of young boys face the consequences of the American policy of racial integration. At one point in the story, the boys attempt to understand the new policy by way of the mathematical operation, the only sense of the word with which they are familiar. This article is about human sexual perceptions. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the systematic and scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social action, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... Werner Karl Heisenberg (December 5, 1901 – February 1, 1976) was a celebrated German physicist and Nobel laureate, one of the founders of quantum mechanics and acknowledged to be one of the most important physicists of the twentieth century. ... In quantum physics, the outcome of even an ideal measurement of a system is not deterministic, but instead is characterized by a probability distribution, and the larger the associated standard deviation is, the more uncertain we might say that that characteristic is for the system. ... For other uses, see: information entropy (in information theory) and entropy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cyborg (disambiguation). ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... For the comic book, see Steampunk (comics). ... For other uses, see Coming of Age (disambiguation). ... Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation... In calculus, an antiderivative, primitive or indefinite integral of a function f is a function F whose derivative is equal to f, i. ...


The Crying of Lot 49 also alludes to entropy and communication theory, and contains scenes and descriptions which parody or appropriate calculus, Zeno's paradoxes, and the thought experiment known as Maxwell's demon. At the same time, the novel also investigates homosexuality, celibacy and both medically-sanctioned and illicit psychedelic drug use. Gravity's Rainbow describes many varieties of sexual fetishism (including sado-masochism, coprophilia and a borderline case of tentacle rape), and features numerous episodes of drug use, most notably marijuana but also cocaine, naturally occurring hallucinogens, and the mushroom Amanita muscaria. Gravity's Rainbow also derives much from Pynchon's background in mathematics: at one point, the geometry of garter belts is compared with that of cathedral spires, both described as mathematical singularities. Mason & Dixon explores the scientific, theological, and socio-cultural foundations of the Age of Reason whilst also depicting the relationships between actual historical figures and fictional characters in intricate detail and, like Gravity's Rainbow, is an archetypal example of the genre of historiographic metafiction. There is much discussion in the academic world of communication as to what actually constitutes communication. ... For other uses, see Calculus (disambiguation). ... “Arrow paradox” redirects here. ... In philosophy, physics, and other fields, a thought experiment (from the German Gedankenexperiment) is an attempt to solve a problem using the power of human imagination. ... Maxwells demon is an 1867 thought experiment by the Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell, meant to raise questions about the possibility of violating the second law of thermodynamics. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Celibacy refers either to being unmarried or to sexual abstinence. ... A fractal pattern similar to the spiral patterns that may be seen as the result of some psychedelic drug experiences. ... Two women in handcuffs and latex miniskirts and tops - Latex and PVC fetishism Wikinews has related news: Dr. Joseph Merlino on sexuality, insanity, Freud, fetishes and apathy Sexual fetishism is the sexual attraction for material and terrestrial objects while in reality the essence of the object is inanimate and sexless. ... Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ... Look up coprophilia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Dream of the Fisherman’s Wife, an 1820 Hokusai woodcut depicting a woman engaging in sex with a pair of octopodes. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ... For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ... Hallucinogenic drug - drugs that can alter sensory perceptions. ... Binomial name (L.:Fr. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... In mathematics, a singularity is in general a point at which a given mathematical object is not defined, or a point of an exceptional set where it fails to be well-behaved in some particular way, such as differentiability. ... The Age of Enlightenment (French: ; Italian: ; German: ; Spanish: ; Swedish: ; Polish: ; Portuguese: ) was an eighteenth-century movement in Western philosophy. ... Originally coined by Linda Hutcheon. ...


Influence

An eclectic catalogue of Pynchonian precursors has been proposed by readers and critics. Beside overt references in the novels to writers as disparate as Henry Adams, Giorgio de Chirico, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Emily Dickinson, William March, Rainer Maria Rilke, Jorge Luis Borges, Ishmael Reed, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Patrick O'Brian, and Umberto Eco and to an eclectic mix of iconic religious and philosophical sources, credible comparisons with works by Rabelais, Cervantes, Laurence Sterne, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Charles Dickens, Joseph Conrad, Thomas Mann, William Burroughs, Ralph Ellison, Patrick White, and Toni Morrison have been made. Some commentators have detected similarities with those writers in the Modernist tradition who wrote extremely long novels dealing with large metaphysical or political issues. Examples of such works might include Ulysses by James Joyce, A Passage to India by E.M. Forster, The Castle by Franz Kafka, The Apes of God by Wyndham Lewis, The Man Without Qualities by Robert Musil, and U.S.A. by John Dos Passos. In his 'Introduction' to Slow Learner, Pynchon explicitly acknowledges his debt to Beat Generation writers, and expresses his admiration for Jack Kerouac's On the Road in particular; he also reveals his familiarity with literary works by T. S. Eliot, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller, Saul Bellow, Herbert Gold, Philip Roth and Norman Mailer, and non-fiction works by Helen Waddell, Norbert Wiener and Isaac Asimov. Other contemporary American authors whose fiction is often categorized alongside Pynchon's include John Hawkes, Kurt Vonnegut, Joseph Heller, Donald Barthelme, John Barth, William Gaddis, Don DeLillo, and Joseph McElroy. Henry Adams Henry Brooks Adams (February 16, 1838 – March 27, 1918) was an American historian, journalist and novelist. ... Giorgio de Chirico (July 10, 1888 – November 20, 1978) was an influential pre-Surrealist Greek-Italian painter born in Volos, Greece, to a Genovese mother and a Sicilian father. ... Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein (IPA: ) (April 26, 1889 in Vienna, Austria – April 29, 1951 in Cambridge, England) was an Austrian philosopher who contributed several ground-breaking ideas to philosophy, primarily in the foundations of logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of language, and the philosophy of mind. ... From the daguerreotype taken at Mount Holyoke, December 1846 or early 1847. ... William March (born William Edward Campbell September 18, 1893 in Mobile, Alabama) was an American World War I soldier, short-story writer and novelist cited as being the unrecognized genius of our time. His innovative writing style is characterized by a deep compassion and understanding of suffering. ... Rainer Maria Rilke (4 December 1875 – 29 December 1926) is considered one of the German languages greatest 20th century poets. ... Borges redirects here. ... Ishmael Scott Reed (b. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... Patrick OBrian (12 December 1914 – 2 January 2000; born as Richard Patrick Russ) was an English novelist and translator, best known for his Aubrey–Maturin series of novels set in the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars and centered on the friendship of Captain Jack Aubrey and the Irish... Umberto Eco (born January 5, 1932) is an Italian medievalist, semiotician, philosopher and novelist, best known for his novel The Name of the Rose (Il nome della rosa) and his many essays. ... François Rabelais (ca. ... Cervantes can refer to: Miguel de Cervantes, author of Don Quixote Francisco Cervantes de Salazar, 16th-century man of letters Cervantes, Ilocos Sur, a municipality in the Philippines Cervantes, a town in Western Australia Cervantes de Leon, a character in the Soul Calibur series of fighting games This is a... Laurence Sterne Laurence Sterne (November 24, 1713 – March 18, 1768) was an Irish-born English novelist and an Anglican clergyman. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. ... Dickens redirects here. ... // Joseph Conrad (born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski; 3 December 1857 – 3 August 1924) was a Polish-born English novelist. ... For other persons named Thomas Mann, see Thomas Mann (disambiguation). ... William S. Burroughs. ... Ralph Ellison (March 1, 1913[1] – April 16, 1994) was a scholar and writer. ... For the football player, see Patrick White (football player). ... For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ... This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ... Plato (Left) and Aristotle (right), by Raphael (Stanza della Segnatura, Rome) Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy concerned with explaining the ultimate nature of reality, being, and the world. ... Politics is the process by which decisions are made within groups. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... This article is about the writer and poet. ... A Passage to India (1924) is a novel by E. M. Forster set against the backdrop of the British Raj and the the Indian independence movement in the 1920s. ... Edward Morgan Forster (January 1, 1879 - June 7, 1970) was an English novelist. ... It has been suggested that The Castle, Critical Edition, Underwood Translation be merged into this article or section. ... Kafka redirects here. ... The Apes of God is a novel by the British artist and writer Wyndham Lewis which was published in 1930. ... This article is about the Vorticist painter and author. ... The Man without Qualities (German original title: Der Mann ohne Eigenschaften) is a novel in three books by the Austrian novelist and essayist Robert Musil. ... Robert Musil (November 6, 1880, Klagenfurt, Austria – April 15, 1942, Geneva, Switzerland) was an Austrian writer. ... The U.S.A. Trilogy is the major work of American writer John Dos Passos. ... John Roderigo Dos Passos (January 14, 1896 — September 28, 1970) was an American novelist and artist. ... Beats redirects here. ... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist from Lowell, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the novel On the Road. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 — July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Henry Miller photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1940 Henry Valentine Miller (December 26, 1891 – June 7, 1980) was an American writer and, to a lesser extent, painter. ... Saul Bellow, born Solomon Bellows, (Lachine, Quebec, Canada, June 10, 1915 – April 5, 2005 in Brookline, Massachusetts) was an acclaimed Canadian-born American writer. ... Herbert Gold (born March 9, 1924 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an author of several novels. ... Philip Milton Roth (born March 19, 1933, Newark, New Jersey[1]) is a famous American novelist. ... Norman Kingsley Mailer (January 31, 1923 – November 10, 2007) was an American novelist, journalist, playwright, screenwriter, and film director. ... Helen Waddell (1889 - 1965) was an Irish poet, translator and playwright. ... Norbert Wiener Norbert Wiener (November 26, 1894, Columbia, Missouri – March 18, 1964, Stockholm Sweden) was an American theoretical and applied mathematician. ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), pronounced , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов [1], was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... John Hawkes (born John Clendennin Talbot Burne Hawkes, Jr. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... Joseph Heller (May 1, 1923 – December 12, 1999) was an American satirical novelist and playwright. ... Donald Barthelme (April 7, 1931 - July 23, 1989) was an American author of short fiction and novels. ... John Simmons Barth (born May 27, 1930) is an American novelist and short-story writer, known for the postmodernist and metafictive quality of his work. ... William Gaddis (December 29, 1922 - December 16, 1998) was an American novelist. ... Don DeLillo (born November 20, 1936) is an American author best known for his novels, which paint detailed portraits of American life in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. ... Joseph McElroy (born 1930 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American American fantasy and science fiction writer. ...


The wildly eccentric characters, frenzied action, frequent digressions, and imposing lengths of Pynchon's novels have led critic James Wood to classify Pynchon's work as hysterical realism. Other writers whose work has been labeled as hysterical realism include Salman Rushdie, Steve Erickson, Neal Stephenson, and Zadie Smith. Younger contemporary writers who have been touted as heirs apparent to Pynchon include David Foster Wallace, William Vollmann, Richard Powers, Steve Erickson, David Mitchell, Neal Stephenson, Dave Eggers, and Tommaso Pincio whose pseudonym is an Italian rendering of Pynchon's name. James Wood (born 1965 in Durham, United Kingdom) is a literary critic and novelist. ... Hysterical realism, also called recherché postmodernism or maximalism, is a literary genre typified by a strong contrast between elaborately absurd prose, plotting, or characterization and careful detailed investigations of real specific social phenomena. ... Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie (born June 19, 1947) is an Indian-British novelist and essayist. ... Steve Erickson Stephen Michael Erickson (born April 20, 1950) is an American novelist, essayist and critic. ... Neal Town Stephenson (born October 31, 1959) is an American writer, known primarily for his science fiction works in the postcyberpunk genre with a penchant for explorations of society, mathematics, currency, and the history of science. ... Zadie Smith (born October 27, 1975) is an English novelist. ... David Foster Wallace (born February 21, 1962) is an American novelist, essayist, and short story writer, and a professor at Pomona College in Claremont, California. ... William T. Vollmann is an American novelist, journalist, short story writer and essayist. ... Richard Powers (born June 18, 1957) is a novelist whose works explore the effects of modern science and technology. ... Steve Erickson Stephen Michael Erickson (born April 20, 1950) is an American novelist, essayist and critic. ... David Mitchell in Poland, Warsaw, April 7, 2006 David Mitchell (born January, 1969) is an English novelist. ... Neal Town Stephenson (born October 31, 1959) is an American writer, known primarily for his science fiction works in the postcyberpunk genre with a penchant for explorations of society, mathematics, currency, and the history of science. ... Dave Eggers at the 2005 Hay Festival Dave Eggers (born March 12, 1970) is an American writer, editor, and publisher. ... Tommaso Pincio, pseudonym of an Italian writer author of four novels, including Love-shaped story, the only one translated in English so far. ...


Pynchon's work has been cited as an influence and inspiration by many writers and artists, including T. Coraghessan Boyle, Alan Cabal, Don DeLillo, Ian Rankin, William Gibson, Elfriede Jelinek, Rick Moody, Alan Moore, Arturo Pérez-Reverte, Richard Powers, Salman Rushdie, Neal Stephenson, Bruce Sterling, Jan Wildt, Laurie Anderson, Zak Smith, David Cronenberg, and Adam Rapp. Thanks to his influence on Gibson and Stephenson in particular, Pynchon became one of the progenitors of cyberpunk fiction. Though the term "cyberpunk" did not become prevalent until the early 1980s, many readers retroactively include Gravity's Rainbow in the genre, along with other works — e.g., Samuel R. Delany's Dhalgren and many works of Philip K. Dick — which seem, after the fact, to anticipate cyberpunk styles and themes. The encyclopedic nature of Pynchon's novels also led to some attempts to link his work with the short-lived hypertext fiction movement of the 1990s (Page 2002; Krämer 2005). T. Coraghessan Boyle (also known as T.C. Boyle, born Thomas John Boyle on December 2, 1948) is a U.S. novelist and short story writer. ... Alan Cabal is an American journalist. ... Don DeLillo (born November 20, 1936) is an American author best known for his novels, which paint detailed portraits of American life in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. ... Ian Rankin OBE, DL. (born April 28, 1960, in Cardenden, Fife, Scotland, UK) is one of the best-selling crime writers in the United Kingdom. ... For other persons named William Gibson, see William Gibson (disambiguation). ... Elfriede Jelinek (born 20 October 1946) is an Austrian feminist playwright and novelist. ... Rick Moody (born Hiram Frederick Moody III October 18, 1961 in New York City), is an American novelist and short story writer best known for The Ice Storm (1994), a chronicle of the dissolution of two suburban Connecticut families over Thanksgiving weekend in 1973. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Spanish stamp (2002) tribute to Captain Alatriste, Pérez-Revertes most famous character. ... Richard Powers (born June 18, 1957) is a novelist whose works explore the effects of modern science and technology. ... Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie (born June 19, 1947) is an Indian-British novelist and essayist. ... Neal Town Stephenson (born October 31, 1959) is an American writer, known primarily for his science fiction works in the postcyberpunk genre with a penchant for explorations of society, mathematics, currency, and the history of science. ... For other persons named Bruce Sterling, see Bruce Sterling (disambiguation). ... For the author, see Laurie Halse Anderson. ... Artist Zak Smith was born in Syracuse, N.Y., in 1976, and grew up in Washington, D.C. After receiving a BFA from Cooper Union in 1998, he studied at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and went on to receive an MFA from Yale University in 2001. ... David Paul Cronenberg OC, FRSC (born March 15, 1943[2]) is a Canadian film director and occasional actor. ... Adam Rapp (born in Chicago, Illinois) is a novelist and playwright. ... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... Samuel Ray Delany, Jr. ... Dhalgren is a science fiction novel by Samuel R. Delany. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... Cyclopedia redirects here. ... Hypertext fiction is a genre of electronic literature, characterized by the use of hypertext links which provides a new context for non-linearity in literature and reader interaction. ...


Media scrutiny

Relatively little is known about Thomas Pynchon's private life; he has carefully avoided contact with journalists for more than forty years. Only a few photos of him are known to exist, nearly all from his high school and college days, and his whereabouts have often remained undisclosed.


A review of V. in the New York Times Book Review described Pynchon as "a recluse" living in Mexico, thereby introducing the media label which has pursued Pynchon throughout his career (Plimpton 1963: 5). Nonetheless, Pynchon's absence from the public spotlight is one of the notable features of his life, and it has generated many rumors and apocryphal anecdotes. The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


1970s and 1980s

After the publication and success of Gravity's Rainbow, interest mounted in finding out more about the identity of the author. At the 1974 National Book Award ceremony, the president of Viking Press, Tom Guinzberg, arranged for double-talking comedian "Professor" Irwin Corey to accept the prize on Pynchon's behalf (Royster 2005). Many of the assembled guests had no idea who Corey was, and, having never seen the author, they assumed that it was Pynchon himself on the stage delivering Corey's trademark torrent of rambling, pseudo-scholarly verbiage (Corey 1974). Towards the end of Corey's address a streaker ran through the hall, adding further to the confusion. The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... Viking Press was founded on March 1, 1925, in New York City, by Harold K. Guinzburg and George S. Oppenheim. ... Professor Irwin Corey is an American comic and film actor whose slogan is The Worlds Foremost Authority. He accepted the National Book Award Fiction Citation on behalf of Thomas Pynchon for Gravitys Rainbow in 1974. ...


An article published in the Soho Weekly News claimed that Pynchon was in fact J. D. Salinger (Batchelor 1976). Pynchon's written response to this theory (reported in Tanner 1982) was simple: "Not bad. Keep trying." Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) (pronounced ) is an American author best known for his 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye and his reclusive nature. ...


Thereafter, the first piece to provide substantial information about Pynchon's personal life was a biographical account written by a former Cornell University friend, Jules Siegel, and published in Playboy magazine. In his article, Siegel reveals that Pynchon had a complex about his teeth and underwent extensive and painful reconstructive surgery, was nicknamed "Tom" at Cornell and attended Mass diligently, acted as best man at Siegel's wedding, and that he later also had an affair with Siegel's wife. Siegel recalls Pynchon saying he did attend some of Vladimir Nabokov's lectures at Cornell but that he could hardly make out what Nabokov was saying because of his thick Russian accent. Siegel also records Pynchon's comment that "[e]very weirdo in the world is on my wavelength", an observation borne out by the crankiness and zealotry which has attached itself to his name and work in subsequent years, particularly across the Internet (Siegel 1977). This article needs to be wikified. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... In psychology a complex is generally an important group of unconscious associations, or a strong unconscious impulse lying behind an individuals otherwise mysterious condition: the detail varies widely from theory to theory. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This page is about the novelist. ... Crank is a pejorative term for a person who holds some belief which the vast majority of his contemporaries would consider false, clings to this belief in the face of all counterarguments or evidence presented to him. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Zealotry. ...


In the late 1980s, author Robert Clark Young prevailed upon his father, an employee of the California Department of Motor Vehicles, to look up Pynchon's driving record, using Pynchon's full name and known birth date. The results showed that Pynchon was living at the time in Aptos, California, and was driving a Datsun (Young 1992). The improperly-obtained cancelled license subsequently found its way into the hands of at least two academics publishing scholarly work on Pynchon. Robert Clark Young (born 1960) is an American author of novels, essays, and short stories. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Aptos is a census-designated place (CDP) in Santa Cruz County, California, United States. ... The Datsun is a car you own if you want no performance or speed wat so ever. ...


1990s

Pynchon's avoidance of celebrity and public appearances caused journalists to continue to speculate about his identity and activities, and reinforced his reputation within the media as "reclusive". More astute readers and critics recognized that there were and are perhaps aesthetic (and ideological) motivations behind his choice to remain aloof from public life. For example, the protagonist in Janette Turner Hospital's short story, "For Mr. Voss or Occupant" (publ. 1991), explains to her daughter that she is writing For other uses, see Celebrity (disambiguation). ... Janette Turner Hospital (née Turner) (born 1942) is an Australian novelist and short story writer. ...

a study of authors who become reclusive. Patrick White, Emily Dickinson, J. D. Salinger, Thomas Pynchon. The way they create solitary characters and personae and then disappear into their fictions. (Hospital 1995: 361-2)

More recently, book critic Arthur Salm has written that For the football player, see Patrick White (football player). ... From the daguerreotype taken at Mount Holyoke, December 1846 or early 1847. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) (pronounced ) is an American author best known for his 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye and his reclusive nature. ... Persona literally means mask , although it does not usually refer to a literal mask but to the social masks all humans supposedly wear. ...

the man simply chooses not to be a public figure, an attitude that resonates on a frequency so out of phase with that of the prevailing culture that if Pynchon and Paris Hilton were ever to meet — the circumstances, I admit, are beyond imagining — the resulting matter/antimatter explosion would vaporize everything from here to Tau Ceti IV. (Salm 2004)

Belying this reputation somewhat, Pynchon has published a number of articles and reviews in the mainstream American media, including words of support for Salman Rushdie and his then-wife, Marianne Wiggins, after the fatwa was pronounced against Rushdie by the Iranian leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini (Pynchon 1989). In the following year, Rushdie's enthusiastic review of Pynchon's Vineland prompted Pynchon to send him another message hinting that if Rushdie were ever in New York, the two should arrange a meeting. Eventually, the two did meet, and Rushdie found himself surprised by how much Pynchon resembled the mental image Rushdie had formed beforehand (Hitchens 1997). Paris Whitney Hilton (born February 17, 1981) is an American celebrity and socialite. ... For other senses of this term, see antimatter (disambiguation). ... Tau Ceti (Ï„ Cet / Ï„ Ceti) is a star commonly mentioned by science fiction authors since it is similar to the Sun in mass and spectral type in addition to being relatively close to us. ... Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie (born June 19, 1947) is an Indian-British novelist and essayist. ... A fatwā (Arabic: ; plural fatāwā Arabic: ), is a considered opinion in Islam made by a mufti, a scholar capable of issuing judgments on Sharia (Islamic law). ... Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie (born June 19, 1947) is an Indian-British novelist and essayist. ... Ayatollah Khomeini founded the first modern Islamic republic Ayatollah Seyyed Ruhollah Khomeini (آیت‌الله روح‌الله خمینی in Persian) (May 17, 1900 – June 3, 1989) was an Iranian Shia cleric and the political and spiritual leader of the 1979 revolution that overthrew Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the then Shah of Iran. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


In the early 1990s, Pynchon married his literary agent, Melanie Jackson — a great-granddaughter of Theodore Roosevelt — and fathered a son, Jackson, in 1991. The disclosure of Pynchon's location in New York, after many years in which he was believed to be dividing his time between Mexico and northern California, led some journalists and photographers to try to track him down. Shortly before the publication of Mason & Dixon in 1997, a CNN camera crew filmed him in Manhattan. Angered by this invasion of his privacy, he rang CNN asking that he not be identified in the footage of the street scenes near his home. When asked about his reclusive nature, he remarked, "My belief is that 'recluse' is a code word generated by journalists ... meaning, 'doesn't like to talk to reporters'." CNN also quoted him as saying, "Let me be unambiguous. I prefer not to be photographed." (CNN 1997) The next year, a reporter for the Sunday Times managed to snap a photo of him as he was walking with his son (Bone 1998). The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... ...


After several references to Pynchon's work and reputation were made on NBC's The John Larroquette Show, Pynchon (through his agent) reportedly contacted the show's producers to offer suggestions and corrections. When a local Pynchon sighting became a major plot point in a 1994 episode of the show, Pynchon was sent the script for his approval; as well as providing the title of a fictitious work to be used in one episode ("Pandemonium of the Sun"), the novelist apparently vetoed a final scene that called for an extra playing him to be filmed from behind, walking away from shot (CNN 1997; Glenn 2003). Also during the 1990s, Pynchon apparently befriended members of the band Lotion and attended a number of their shows, culminating in the liner notes he contributed for the band's 1995 album Nobody's Cool. The novelist then conducted an interview with the band ("Lunch With Lotion") for Esquire in June 1996 in the lead-up to the publication of Mason & Dixon. More recently, Pynchon provided faxed answers to questions submitted by author David Hajdu and permitted excerpts from his personal correspondence to be quoted in Hajdu's 2001 book, Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Fariña and Richard Fariña (Warner 2001). This article is about the television network. ... The John Larroquette Show is a situation comedy that ran on the NBC network from 1993 - 1996. ... Lotion was a manhattan quartet started in 1991 by brothers Bill and Jim Ferguson, Tony Zajkowski, and Rob Youngberg. ... For other uses, see Fax (disambiguation). ...


Pynchon's attempt to maintain his personal privacy and have his work speak for itself has resulted in a number of outlandish rumors and hoaxes over the years. Indeed, claims that Pynchon was the Unabomber or a sympathizer with the Waco Branch Davidians after the 1993 siege were upstaged in the mid-1990s by the invention of an elaborate rumor insinuating that Pynchon and one "Wanda Tinasky" were the same person. A spate of letters authored under that name had appeared in the late 1980s in the Anderson Valley Advertiser in Anderson Valley, California. The style and content of those letters were said to resemble Pynchon's, and Pynchon's Vineland, published in 1990, also takes place in northern California, so it was suggested that Pynchon may have been in the area at that time, conducting research. A collection of the Tinasky letters was eventually published as a paperback book in 1996; however, Pynchon himself denied having written the letters, and no direct attribution of the letters to Pynchon was ever made. "Literary detective" Donald Foster subsequently showed that the Letters were in fact written by an obscure Beat writer called Tom Hawkins, who had murdered his wife and then committed suicide in 1988. Foster's evidence was conclusive, including finding the typewriter on which the "Tinasky" letters had been written (Foster 2000). Privacy is the ability of an individual or group to control the flow of information about themselves and thereby reveal themselves selectively. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... The Branch Davidians are a religious group originating from the Seventh_day Adventist church. ... Wanda Tinasky, ostensibly a bag lady living under a bridge in the Mendocino County area of Northern California, was the pseudonymous author of a series of playful, comic and erudite letters sent to the Mendocino Commentary and Anderson Valley Advertiser between 1983 and 1988. ... The Anderson Valley Advertiser is a small but well known newspaper. ... Anderson Valley is a sparsely populated region in western Mendocino County in northern California. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Donald W. Foster, born 1950, is a professor of English at Vassar College in New York. ... Beats redirects here. ...


In 1998, over 120 letters that Pynchon had written to his longtime agent, Candida Donadio, were donated by the family of private collector, Carter Burden, to the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York City. The letters ranged from 1963 to 1982, thus covering some of the author's most creative and prolific years. Although the Morgan Library originally intended to allow scholars to view the letters, at Pynchon’s request the Burden family and Morgan Library agreed to seal these letters until after Pynchon's death (see Gussow 1998).


2000s

After 9/11, a supposed "interview" with Pynchon appeared in an issue of Playboy Japan. Published under the heading "Most News is Propaganda. Bin Laden May Not Exist", it purported to be a talk with Pynchon on the events of 9/11 and Osama Bin Laden. Its authenticity is highly dubious and it has never been republished in the American media.

Pynchon depicted in The Simpsons episode "Diatribe of a Mad Housewife". His Simpsons appearances are the only times that Pynchon's voice has been broadcast in the media.
Pynchon depicted in The Simpsons episode "Diatribe of a Mad Housewife". His Simpsons appearances are the only times that Pynchon's voice has been broadcast in the media.

Responding ironically to the image which has been manufactured in the media over the years, during 2004, Pynchon made two cameo appearances on the animated television series The Simpsons. The first occurs in the episode "Diatribe of a Mad Housewife", in which Marge Simpson becomes a novelist. He plays himself, with a paper bag over his head, and provides a blurb for the back cover of Marge's book, speaking in a broad Long Island accent: "Here's your quote: Thomas Pynchon loved this book, almost as much as he loves cameras!" He then starts yelling at passing cars: "Hey, over here, have your picture taken with a reclusive author! Today only, we'll throw in a free autograph! But, wait! There's more!" The second appearance occurs in "All's Fair in Oven War," which was the sixteenth-season premiere. In this appearance, Pynchon's dialogue consists entirely of puns on his novel titles ("These wings are 'V'-licious! I'll put this recipe in 'The Gravity's Rainbow Cookbook', right next to 'The Frying of Latke 49'."). The cartoon representation of Pynchon reappears in a third, non-speaking cameo, as a guest at the fictional WordLoaf convention depicted in the 18th season (2006) episode, "Moe'N'a Lisa." The episode first aired on November 19, 2006, the Sunday before Pynchon's sixth novel, Against the Day, was released, perhaps as part of an increasingly unusual publicity campaign. Image File history File links Pynchon-Simpsons-001. ... Image File history File links Pynchon-Simpsons-001. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Diatribe of a Mad Housewife is the tenth episode of The Simpsons fifteenth season, which originally aired January 25, 2004. ... Marjorie Marge Simpson (née Bouvier) is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons and is voiced by Julie Kavner. ... Alls Fair in Oven War is the second episode of The Simpsons sixteenth season. ... For other uses, see Pun (disambiguation). ... Potato pancakes or latkes (sometimes spelled latkas) are a dish made predominantly of grated potatoes fried in oil. ... MoeNa Lisa is an episode from the eighteenth season of The Simpsons. ... Against the Day, a novel by Thomas Pynchon, first appeared in the United States on November 21, 2006. ...


In July of 2006, Amazon.com created a page showing an upcoming 992-page, untitled, Thomas Pynchon novel. A description of the soon-to-be published novel appeared on Amazon purporting to be written by Pynchon himself. The description was taken down, prompting speculation over its authenticity, but the blurb was soon back up along with the title of Pynchon's new novel, Against the Day. Amazon. ...


Shortly before Against the Day was published, Pynchon's prose appeared in the program for "The Daily Show: Ten [email protected]#ing Years (The Concert)", a retrospective on Jon Stewart's comedy-news broadcast The Daily Show.


On the 6 December 2006, Pynchon joined a campaign by many other major authors to clear Ian McEwan of plagiarism charges by sending a typed letter to his British publisher, which was published in the Daily Telegraph newspaper (Pynchon 2006b). Ian McEwan CBE (born June 21, 1948) is a British novelist. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ...


Works

As well as fictional works, Pynchon has written essays, introductions, and reviews addressing subjects as diverse as missile security, the Watts Riots, Luddism and the work of Donald Barthelme. Some of his non-fiction pieces have appeared in the New York Times Book Review and The New York Review of Books, and he has contributed blurbs for books and records. His 1984 Introduction to the Slow Learner collection of early stories is significant for its autobiographical candour. He has written introductions to at least three books, including the 1992 collection of Donald Barthelme's stories, The Teachings of Don B. and, more recently, the Penguin Centenary Edition of George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, which was published in 2003, and the Penguin Classics edition of Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me written by Pynchon's close friend, Richard Fariña, and first published in 1966. book cover V. is the debut novel of Thomas Pynchon published in 1963, concerning the journey of discharged U.S. Navy sailor Benny Profane through a decadent group of artists in 1956, along with the attempt of an aging traveller named Herbert Stencil to locate the mysterious woman he knows... The PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction is awarded annually by the PEN/Faulkner Foundation to the author of the best American work of fiction that year. ... The Crying of Lot 49 (1966) is a novel by the author Thomas Pynchon. ... Gravitys Rainbow is an epic postmodern novel written by Thomas Pynchon and first published on February 28, 1973. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Slow Learner is the 1984 published collection of six early short stories by the American novelist Thomas Pynchon. ... For other uses, see Vineland (disambiguation). ... Mason & Dixon book cover Mason & Dixon, a post-modern novel by Thomas Pynchon first published in 1997, centers on the collaboration of the historical Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in their astronomical and surveying exploits in Cape Colony, Saint Helena, Great Britain and along the Mason-Dixon line in British... Against the Day, a novel by Thomas Pynchon, first appeared in the United States on November 21, 2006. ... For other uses, see Essay (disambiguation). ... Look up Review in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term Watts Riots refers to a large-scale riot which lasted six days in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, in August 1965. ... The Luddites were a group of English workers in the early 1800s who protested – often by destroying machines – against the changes produced by the Industrial Revolution that they felt threatened their jobs. ... Donald Barthelme (April 7, 1931 - July 23, 1989) was an American author of short fiction and novels. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... This article is about the literary magazine. ... Look up blurb in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Slow Learner is the 1984 published collection of six early short stories by the American novelist Thomas Pynchon. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... Donald Barthelme (April 7, 1931 - July 23, 1989) was an American author of short fiction and novels. ... It has been suggested that Penguin Modern Poets, Penguin Great Ideas be merged into this article or section. ... George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950) who was an English writer and journalist well-noted as a novelist, critic, and commentator on politics and culture. ... This article is about the Orwell novel. ... Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me is a novel by Richard Fariña. ... Richard George Fariña ( March 8, 1937 – April 30, 1966 ) was an American writer and folksinger. ...


References

  • Batchelor, J.C. "Thomas Pynchon is not Thomas Pynchon, or, This is End of the Plot Which Has No Name". Soho Weekly News, 22 April 1976. (back)
  • Bone, James. "Who the hell is he?" Sunday Times (South Africa), 7 June 1998. (back)
  • CNN. "Where's Thomas Pynchon?" 5 June 1997. (back)
  • CNN Book News. "Early Nobel announcement prompts speculation". 29 September 1999. (back)
  • The Complete Review. "Against the Day by Thomas Pynchon" 2006. (back)
  • Corey, Irwin. "Transcript of National Book Award acceptance speech", delivered 18 April 1974. (back)
  • Ervin, Andrew. "Nobel Oblige". Philadelphia City Paper 14 – 21 September 2000. (back)
  • Foster, Don. Author Unknown: On the Trail of Anonymous. Henry Holt, New York, 2000. (back)
  • Fowler, Douglas. A Reader's Guide to Gravity's Rainbow. Ardis Press, 1980. (back)
  • Frost, Garrison. "Thomas Pynchon and the South Bay". The Aesthetic, 2003. (back)
  • Getlin, Josh. "Pynchon Novel Out in December". LA Times, 22 June 2006. (back)
  • Gibbs, Rodney. "A Portrait of the Luddite as a Young Man". Denver Quarterly 39.1, 2004. (back)
  • Glenn, Joshua. "Pynchon and Homer". Boston Globe, 19 October 2003. (back)
  • Gordon, Andrew. "Smoking Dope with Thomas Pynchon: A Sixties Memoir". The Vineland Papers: Critical Takes on Pynchon's Novel. (back)
  • Grimes, William. "Toni Morrison Is '93 Winner Of Nobel Prize in Literature". New York Times Book Review, 8 October 1993. (back)
  • Gussow, Mel. "Pynchon's Letters Nudge His Mask". New York Times, 4 March 1998. (back)
  • Hitchens, Christopher. "Salman Rushdie: Even this colossal threat did not work. Life goes on." The Progressive, October 1997. (back)
  • Hospital, Janette Turner. Collected Stories 1970 – 1995. University of Queensland Press, 1995. (back)
  • Italie, Hillel. "New Thomas Pynchon Novel is on the way" Associated Press, 20 July 2006. (back)
  • Kihss, Peter. "Pulitzer Jurors; His Third Novel". The New York Times, 8 May 1974, p. 38. (back)
  • Klepper, Martin Pynchon, Auster, DeLillo. Die amerikanische Postmoderne zwischen Spiel und Rekonstruktion. Campus, Frankfurt am Main u.a. 1996. (= Nordamerikastudien; 3) ISBN 3-593-35618-X
  • Krämer, Oliver. "Interview mit John M. Krafft, Herausgeber der 'Pynchon Notes'". Sic et Non.
  • McLemee, Scott. You Hide, They Seek Inside Higher Ed, 15 November 2006. (back)
  • New York Review of Books. "Writers and Editors War Tax Protest" (advertisement). Vol. 10, No. 3, 15 February 1968, p. 9. (back)
  • Page, Adrian. "Towards a poetics of hypertext fiction". In The Question of Literature: The Place on the Literary in Contemporary Theory, edited by Elizabeth B Bissell. Manchester University Press, 2002. ISBN 0-7190-5744-2.
  • Patterson, Troy (a). "Did the master make an appearance on his Amazon page?" Slate, 20 July 2006. (back)
  • Patterson, Troy (b). "Mystery solved" Slate, 20 July 2006. (back)
  • Plimpton, George. "Mata Hari with a Clockwork Eye, Alligators in the Sewer". Rev. of V. New York Times Book Review, 21 April 1963, p. 5. (back)
  • Pynchon, Thomas. "Voice of the Hamster", "The Boys", "Ye Legend of Sir Stupid and the Purple Knight". Oyster Bay High School Purple and Gold, 1952 – 53. (back)
  • Pynchon, Thomas. "A Journey into the Mind of Watts". New York Times Magazine, 12 June 1966, pp. 34 – 35, 78, 80 – 82, 84. (back)
  • Pynchon, Thomas. "Words for Salman Rushdie". New York Times Book Review, 12 March 1989, p. 29. (back)
  • Pynchon, Thomas (a). Editorial review on Untitled Thomas Pynchon, Amazon.com 14 July 2006. (back)
  • Pynchon, Thomas (b). Letter to the Daily Telegraph newspaper, 6 December 2006. (back)
  • Roeder, Bill. "After the Rainbow". Newsweek 92, 7 August 1978. (back)
  • Royster, Paul. "Thomas Pynchon: A Brief Chronology". Faculty Publications, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2005. (back)
  • Salm, Arthur. "A screaming comes across the sky (but not a photo)". San Diego Union-Tribune, 8 February 2004. (back)
  • Siegel, Jules. "Who is Thomas Pynchon, and why did he take off with my wife?" Playboy, March 1977. The article appears in full in Siegel's book, Lineland, Mortality and Mercy on the Internet's [email protected] Discussion List. (back)
  • Tanner, Tony. Thomas Pynchon. Methuen & Co., 1982. (back)
  • Ulin, David. "Gravity's End". Salon, 25 April 1997. (back)
  • Warner, Simon. "A king, a queen and two knaves?: An Interview with David Hajdu". Pop Matters, 2 August 2001. (back)
  • Weisenburger, Steven C. A Gravity's Rainbow Companion: Sources and Contexts for Pynchon's Novel. University of Georgia Press, 1988. (back)
  • Wisnicki, Adrian. "A Trove of New Works by Thomas Pynchon? Bomarc Service News Rediscovered." Pynchon Notes 46 – 49 (2000 – 1), pp. 9 – 34. (back)
  • Young, Robert Clark. "One Writer’s Big Innings". Black Warrior Review, Fall 1992. (back)
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  • "Thomas Pynchon and the myth of invisibility": a review of Against the Day in the TLS, December 1st, 2006.
  • The Thomas Pynchon Wiki
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  • The Ancestry of Novelist Thomas Pynchon
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  • Prüfstand 7 Information about the movie featuring scenes from Gravity's Rainbow
  • (German) Pynchon Index
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  • Daily Telegraph article with Pynchon letter
  • Pynchon Notes, a journal operated by Miami University in Oxford, Ohio
  • pynchonoid.blogspot.com
  • San Narciso Pynchon Page, hosted in Claremont, California, "a town that looks a lot, in fact, like San Narciso"
  • Spermatikos Logos
  • (Polish) Tęcza Grawitacji ('Gravity's Rainbow'), a Polish Pynchon site
  • Pynchonesque, art inspired by Thomas Pynchon
  • Thomas Pynchon's Family Tree, Thomas Pynchon's Family Tree
Persondata
NAME Pynchon, Thomas Ruggles
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American short story writer and novelist
DATE OF BIRTH May 8, 1937
PLACE OF BIRTH Glen Cove, New York
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
Image File history File links Thomas_Pynchon_(Part_1). ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... Location of Oxford in Butler County, Ohio Oxford is a college town located in the southwestern portion of the U.S. state of Ohio in northwestern Butler County in Oxford Township, originally called the College Township. ... Claremont is a city in eastern Los Angeles County, California, USA, about 30 miles (45 km) east of downtown Los Angeles at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains in the Pomona Valley. ... The Crying of Lot 49 (1966) is a novel by the author Thomas Pynchon. ... book cover V. is the debut novel of Thomas Pynchon published in 1963, concerning the journey of discharged U.S. Navy sailor Benny Profane through a decadent group of artists in 1956, along with the attempt of an aging traveller named Herbert Stencil to locate the mysterious woman he knows... The Crying of Lot 49 (1966) is a novel by the author Thomas Pynchon. ... Gravitys Rainbow is an epic postmodern novel written by Thomas Pynchon and first published on February 28, 1973. ... For other uses, see Vineland (disambiguation). ... Mason & Dixon book cover Mason & Dixon, a post-modern novel by Thomas Pynchon first published in 1997, centers on the collaboration of the historical Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in their astronomical and surveying exploits in Cape Colony, Saint Helena, Great Britain and along the Mason-Dixon line in British... Against the Day, a novel by Thomas Pynchon, first appeared in the United States on November 21, 2006. ... Slow Learner is the 1984 published collection of six early short stories by the American novelist Thomas Pynchon. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Glen Cove is a city in Nassau County, New York on the North Shore of Long Island. ... This article is about the state. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Thomas Pynchon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4990 words)
Pynchon is also known for his avoidance of personal publicity: very few photographs of him have ever been published, and rumors about his location and identity have been circulated since the 1960s.
Thomas Pynchon was born in 1937 in Glen Cove, Long Island, New York, one of three children of Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Sr.
Indeed, claims that Pynchon was the Unabomber or a sympathizer with the Waco Branch Davidians after the 1993 siege were upstaged in the mid-1990s by the invention of an elaborate rumor insinuating that Pynchon and one "Wanda Tinasky" were the same person.
Thomas Pynchon - MSN Encarta (297 words)
Thomas Pynchon, born in 1937, American novelist, known for his experimental writing techniques that involve extremely complicated plots and themes.
Pynchon’s books generally portray a vast social network made up of the industrial, military, mass-communication, and entertainment systems that developed during World War II (1939-1945).
Pynchon’s novels are broad in scope and use scientific theories, historical facts, and details of popular culture with great accuracy.
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