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Encyclopedia > Thomas Mann
Thomas Mann

Born June 6, 1875(1875-06-06)
Lübeck, Germany
Died August 12, 1955 (aged 80)
Zürich, Switzerland
Occupation Novelist, short story writer, essayist
Genres Bildungsroman, Historical novel, Picaresque
Influences Dostoevsky, Stirner, Fontane, Freud, J.P. Jacobsen, Goethe, Hesse, Hoffmann, Jung, Lessing, Luther, Nietzsche, Poe, Schlegel, Schopenhauer, Wagner, Schoenberg, von Platen, Grimmelshausen, Heinrich Mann, Melville
Influenced Hesse, Lukacs, Adorno, Kafka, Heinrich Mann, Klaus Mann, Frederic Tuten, Orhan Pamuk, Joseph Campbell, Michel Houellebecq, Heinrich Böll

Paul Thomas Mann (June 6, 1875August 12, 1955) was a German novelist, short story writer, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and 1929 Nobel Prize laureate, known for his series of highly symbolic and ironic epic novels and mid-length stories, noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and the intellectual. His analysis and critique of the European and German soul used modernized German and Biblical stories, as well as the ideas of Goethe, Nietzsche, and Schopenhauer. Thomas Mann can refer to Thomas Mann, American reference librarian & author, works for the Main Reading Room of the Library of Congress. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Luebeck. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses of Zurich, see Zurich (disambiguation). ... This article is about work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... This article is in need of attention. ... An essayist is an author who writes compositions which can be about any particular subject. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... A Bildungsroman (IPA: /, German: novel of self-cultivation) is a novelistic form which concentrates on the spiritual, moral, psychological, or social development and growth of the protagonist usually from childhood to maturity. ... A historical novel a novel in which the story is set among historical events, or more generally, in which the time of the action predates the lifetime of the author. ... The picaresque novel (Spanish: picaresco, from pícaro, for rogue or rascal) is a popular style of novel that originated in Spain and flourished in Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries and has continued to influence modern literature. ... Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (Russian: Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский, IPA: , sometimes transliterated Dostoyevsky, Dostoievsky, or Dostoevski  ) (November 11 [O.S. October 30] 1821–February 9 [O.S. January 28] 1881) was a Russian novelist and writer of fiction whose works, including Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, have had a profound and lasting effect... Johann Kaspar Schmidt (October 25, 1806 – June 26, 1856), better known as Max Stirner (the nom de plume he adopted from a schoolyard nickname he had acquired as a child because of his high brow Stirn), was a German philosopher, who ranks as one of the literary grandfathers of nihilism... Theodor Fontane (December 30, 1819 – September 20, 1898) was a 19th-century German novelist and poet. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Jens Peter Jacobsen (7 April 1847 – 30 April 1885) was a Danish novelist, poet, and scientist, in Denmark often just written as J. P. Jacobsen and pronounced I. P. Jacobsen. He began the naturalist movement in Danish literature and was a part of the Modern Break-Through. ... Johann Wolfgang Goethe  , IPA: , later von Goethe, (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German polymath: he was a poet, novelist, dramatist, humanist, scientist, theorist, painter, and for ten years chief minister of state for the duchy of Weimar. ... Hermann Hesse (pronounced ) (2 July 1877 – 9 August 1962) was a German-Swiss poet, novelist, and painter. ... ETA Hoffman Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann (January 24, 1776 - June 25, 1822), was a German romantic and fantasy author and composer. ... Jung redirects here. ... Gotthold Ephraim Lessing (22 January 1729 – 15 February 1781), writer, philosopher, publicist, and art critic, was one of the most outstanding German representatives of the Enlightenment era. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Karl Wilhelm Friedrich von Schlegel (March 10, 1772 - January 11, 1829), German poet, critic and scholar, was the younger brother of August Wilhelm von Schlegel. ... Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher who believed that the will to live is the fundamental reality and that this will, being a constant striving, is insatiable and ultimately yields only suffering. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 Arnold Schoenberg (the anglicized form of Schönberg — Schoenberg changed the spelling officially when he left Germany and re-converted to Judaism in 1933; September 13, 1874 – July 13, 1951) was an Austrian and later American composer. ... August Graf von Platen-Hallermünde (October 24, 1796 - December 5, 1835), German poet and dramatist, was born at Ansbach, the son of the Oberforstmeister in the little principality of that name. ... ... Luiz (Ludwig) Heinrich Mann (March 27, 1871 – March 12, 1950) wrote German novels with social themes whose attacks on the authoritarian and increasingly militaristic nature of post-Weimar German society led to his exile in 1933. ... Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. ... Hermann Hesse (pronounced ) (2 July 1877 – 9 August 1962) was a German-Swiss poet, novelist, and painter. ... Georg Lukács (April 13, 1885 - June 4, 1971) was a Hegelian and Marxist philosopher and literary critic. ... Theodor Ludwig Wiesengrund Adorno (September 11, 1903 – August 6, 1969) was a German sociologist, philosopher, pianist, musicologist, and composer. ... Kafka redirects here. ... Luiz (Ludwig) Heinrich Mann (March 27, 1871 – March 12, 1950) wrote German novels with social themes whose attacks on the authoritarian and increasingly militaristic nature of post-Weimar German society led to his exile in 1933. ... Klaus Mann at 12 years old. ... Frederic Tuten, from the back cover of Tintin in the New World Frederic Tuten is an American novelist whose works are characterized by a highly ingenious and lyrical prose style, which at times is reminiscent of a bygone era. ... Ferit Orhan Pamuk (born on June 7, 1952 in Istanbul) is a Nobel Prize-winning Turkish novelist. ... For other uses, see Joseph Campbell (disambiguation). ... Michel Houellebecq (pronounced ) (real name Michel Thomas), born 26 February 1958, on the French island of Réunion is a controversial, award-winning French novelist. ... A monument of Heinrich Böll in Berlin Heinrich Theodor Böll (December 21, 1917 – July 16, 1985) was one of Germanys foremost post-World War II writers. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... German literature comprises those literary texts originating within Germany proper and written in the German language. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A cultural critic is a critic of a given culture, usually as a whole and typically on a radical basis; a social critic of a given society, but the overlap is large. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... An essayist is an author who writes compositions which can be about any particular subject. ... Ironic redirects here. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... “Literati” redirects here. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... “Goethe” redirects here. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher. ... Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher who believed that the will to live is the fundamental reality and that this will, being a constant striving, is insatiable and ultimately yields only suffering. ...

Contents

Life

Thomas Mann was born in Lübeck, Germany, the second son of Thomas Johann Heinrich Mann (a senator and a grain merchant), and his wife Júlia da Silva Bruhns (a Brazilian who emigrated to Germany when seven years old). His mother was Roman Catholic, but Mann was baptised into his father's Lutheran faith. Mann's father died in 1891, and his trading firm was liquidated. The family subsequently moved to Munich. Mann attended the science division of a Lübeck gymnasium, then spent time at the University of Munich where, in preparation for a journalism career, he studied history, economics, art history, and literature. He lived in Munich from 1891 until 1933, with the exception of a year in Palestrina, Italy, with his novelist elder brother Heinrich. Thomas worked with the South German Fire Insurance Company 189495. His career as a writer began when he wrote for Simplicissimus. Mann's first short story, "Little Herr Friedemann" (Der Kleine Herr Friedemann), was published in 1898. The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Luebeck. ... Júlia da Silva Bruhns was born in August 14, 1851 in Angra dos Reis, Brazil, and deceased March 11, 1923 in Weßling, Germany. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... With approximately 48,000 students, the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (German: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München or LMU) is one of the largest universities in Germany. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Palestrina (disambiguation). ... Luiz (Ludwig) Heinrich Mann (March 27, 1871 – March 12, 1950) wrote German novels with social themes whose attacks on the authoritarian and increasingly militaristic nature of post-Weimar German society led to his exile in 1933. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Simplicissimus was a satirical German weekly magazine started by Albert Langen in April 1896 and published through 1944. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

The summerhouse of Thomas Mann in Nida (German: Nidden)
The summerhouse of Thomas Mann in Nida (German: Nidden)

In 1905, he married Katia Pringsheim, daughter of a prominent, secular Jewish family of intellectuals. They had six children—Erika, Klaus, Golo, Monika, Elisabeth, and Michael — who became literary, artistic figures in their own right. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Nida is a Lithuanian town, located on the Curonian Spit. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ... ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... “Literati” redirects here. ... Erika Mann Erika Julia Hedwig Mann (November 9, 1905 – August 27, 1969) was the eldest daughter of novelist Thomas Mann and Katia Mann. ... Klaus Mann at 12 years old. ... Golo Mann (27 March 1909 - 7 April 1994 Leverkusen), was the third child of the novelist Thomas Mann. ... Monika Mann, a novelist, was born on July 7, 1910 in Munich and died March 17, 1992 in Leverkusen, Germany and is a sister to Klaus, Erika and Golo Mann, and niece of the novelist Heinrich Mann. ... Elisabeth Mann-Borgese is the youngest daughter of Thomas Mann and his wife Katia Pringsheim, sister to Klaus, Erika, Golo and Michael Mann, and niece of the novelist Heinrich Mann. ... Michael Thomas Mann (April 21, 1919 - January 1, 1977) was a German-born musician and professor of German literature. ...


In 1929, Mann had a cottage built in the fishing village of Nidden (Nida, Lithuania) on the Kurische Nehrung (English: Curonian Spit), where there was a German art colony, and where he spent the summers of 1930-32 there, working on Joseph and his Brothers. The cottage now is a cultural center dedicated to him, with a small memorial exhibition. In 1933, after Hitler assumed power, Mann emigrated to Küsnacht, near Zürich, Switzerland, in 1933, but received Czechoslovakian citizenship and a passport in 1936. He then emigrated to the United States in 1939, where he taught at Princeton University. In 1942, the Mann family moved to Pacific Palisades, California, where they lived until after the end of World War II; on June 23, 1944 Thomas Mann was naturalized as a citizen of the United States. In 1952, he returned to Europe, to live in Kilchberg, near Zürich, Switzerland. Nida may have one of the following meanings. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ... Küsnacht is a town near Zürich, Switzerland. ... For other uses of Zurich, see Zurich (disambiguation). ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pacific Palisades is a district within the city of Los Angeles, California located between Brentwood to the east, Malibu to the west, Santa Monica to the southeast, the Santa Monica Bay to the southwest, and the Santa Monica Mountains to the north. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... There are communes and places that have the name Kilchberg: In Switzerland Kilchberg, BL, in the Canton of Basel-Country Kilchberg, ZH, in the Canton of Zürich in Germany Kilchberg, Germany, a part of Tubingen See also: Kirchberg This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists...


He never again lived in Germany, though he regularly traveled there. His most important German visit was in 1949, at the 200th birthday of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, attending celebrations in Frankfurt am Main and Weimar, a statement that German culture extends beyond the new political borders. “Goethe” redirects here. ... Frankfurt am Main [ˈfraŋkfʊrt] is the largest city in the German state of Hessen and the fifth largest city of Germany. ... For other uses, see Weimar (disambiguation). ...


In 1955, he died of atherosclerosis in a hospital in Zürich and was buried in Kilchberg. Many institutions are named in his honour, most famously the Thomas Mann Gymnasium of Budapest. For other uses of Zurich, see Zurich (disambiguation). ... Thomas Mann Gymnasium Thomas Mann Gymnasium is a German Auslandsschule (German independent schools in foreign countries) in Budapest. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ...

Thomas Mann is buried at Kilchberg
Thomas Mann is buried at Kilchberg

Thomas Mann was first translated to English by H. T. Lowe-Porter, whose renditions created Mann's popularity in the English-speaking world. Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 868 KB) Grave in Kilchberg, Zurich The inscriptions read: THOMAS MANN MDCCCLXXV MCMLV KATIA MANN MDCCCLXXXIII MCMLXXX MICHAEL MANN 1919-1977 File links The following pages link to this file: Thomas Mann ... Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 868 KB) Grave in Kilchberg, Zurich The inscriptions read: THOMAS MANN MDCCCLXXV MCMLV KATIA MANN MDCCCLXXXIII MCMLXXX MICHAEL MANN 1919-1977 File links The following pages link to this file: Thomas Mann ... Kilchberg is a municipality in the district of Horgen in the Canton of Zürich in Switzerland. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Political views

During World War I Mann supported Kaiser Wilhelm II's conservatism and attacked liberalism. Yet in Von Deutscher Republik (1923), as a semi-official spokesman for parliamentary democracy, Mann called upon German intellectuals to support the new Weimar Republic. He also gave a lecture at the Beethovensaal in Berlin on October 13, 1922, which appeared in Die neue Rundschau in November 1922, in which he developed his eccentric defence of the Republic, based on extensive close readings of Novalis and Walt Whitman. [1] Hereafter his political views gradually shifted toward liberal and democratic principles. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... William II or Wilhelm II (born Prince Frederick William Albert Victor of Prussia; German: ) (27 January 1859–4 June 1941) was the last German Emperor and King of Prussia (German: Deutscher Kaiser und König von Preußen), ruling both the German Empire and Prussia from 15 June 1888 to... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... A parliamentary system, or parliamentarism, is distinguished by the executive branch of government being dependent on the direct or indirect support of the parliament, often expressed through a vote of confidence. ... Anthem Das Lied der Deutschen Germany during the Weimar period, with the Free State of Prussia (in blue) as the largest state Capital Berlin Language(s) German Government Republic President  - 1918-1925 Friedrich Ebert  - 1925-1933 Paul von Hindenburg Chancellor  - 1919 Philipp Scheidemann(first)  - 1933 Kurt von Schleicher (last) Legislature... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the German rock band, see Novalis (band). ... Walter Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist. ...


In 1930 Mann gave a public address in Berlin titled "An Appeal to Reason," in which he strongly denounced Nazism and encouraged resistance by the working class. This was followed by numerous essays and lectures in which he attacked the Nazis. At the same time, he expressed increasing sympathy for socialism and communism. In 1933 when the Nazis came to power, Mann and his wife were on holiday in Switzerland. Due to his very vociferous denunciations of Nazi policies, his son Klaus advised him not to return. But Thomas Mann's books, in contrast to those of his brother Heinrich and his son Klaus, were not amongst the many burnt publicly by Hitler's regime in May 1933; apparently, since he was the literature Nobel laureate for 1929 (see below), they did not dare that so early. Finally in 1936 the Nazis officially denied his German citizenship. He had by then gone into exile in the United States. Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community[1] for the purposes of increasing social and economic equality and cooperation. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hitler redirects here. ...


However, already in 1933, in a personal letter from Oct. 26, published only recently (see, e.g., the feuilleton of the journal FAZ from Oct. 30, 2007, where the letter is printed), Thomas Mann wrote down views on Nazism, which corresponded to the much later novel Doktor Faustus, where in several places the author makes reference to the historical debts of the German population, leading to World War II with all its cruelties. Doktor Faustus is a German novel written by Thomas Mann, begun in 1943 and published in 1947 as . ...


During the war itself, Mann regularly made anti-Nazi broadcasts from California (transmitted by the BBC to Germany), each broadcast beginning with the words "German listeners!" While not widely listened to, they had a dedicated following.


"Images of Disorder", by social critic Michael Harrington in his collection The Accidental Century, is a highly literate account of Mann's political progression from the right to the left. This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


Work

"Modern Book Printing" from the Walk of Ideas in Berlin, Germany - built in 2006 to commemorate Johannes Gutenberg's invention, c. 1445, of movable printing type.
"Modern Book Printing" from the Walk of Ideas in Berlin, Germany - built in 2006 to commemorate Johannes Gutenberg's invention, c. 1445, of movable printing type.

Mann was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1929, principally in recognition of his popular achievement with the epic Buddenbrooks (1901), The Magic Mountain (Der Zauberberg 1924), and his numerous short stories. (Precisely, due to the personal taste of an influential committee member, only the Buddenbrooks were explicitly cited.)[2] Based on Mann's own family, Buddenbrooks relates the decline of a merchant family in Lübeck over the course of three generations. The Magic Mountain (Der Zauberberg, 1924) follows an engineering student who, planning to visit his tubercular cousin at a Swiss sanatorium for only three weeks, finds his departure from the sanatorium delayed for seven years. During that time, he confronts medicine and the way it looks at the body and encounters a variety of characters who play out ideological conflicts and discontents of contemporary European civilisation. Later, other novels included Lotte in Weimar (1939), in which Mann returned to the world of Goethe's novel The Sorrows of Young Werther (1774); Doktor Faustus (1947), the story of composer Adrian Leverkühn and the corruption of German culture in the years before and during World War II; and Confessions of Felix Krull (Bekenntnisse des Hochstaplers Felix Krull, 1954), which was still unfinished at Mann's death. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (480x640, 43 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Book User:Sadi Carnot Walk of Ideas Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (480x640, 43 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Book User:Sadi Carnot Walk of Ideas Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... The Walk of Ideas is a set of six sculptures made for the 2006 FIFA World Cup football event at Berlin in Germany. ... This article is about the inventor of printing in Europe; for other uses, see Guttenberg (disambiguation) and Gutenberg. ... Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Buddenbrooks [1]was Thomas Manns first novel, published in 1901 when he was twenty-six years old. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... “Magic Mountain” redirects here. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Sanatório Heliantia A sanatorium refers to a medical facility for long-term illness, typically cholera or tuberculosis. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sorrows of Young Werther (originally published as Die Leiden des jungen Werthers) is an epistolary and loosely autobiographical novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, first published in 1774. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... Doktor Faustus is a German novel written by Thomas Mann, begun in 1943 and published in 1947 as . ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... German culture (German: Deutsche Kultur) is a term that refers to the heritage and weltanschauung of the people from the German-speaking world, or Deutschsprechende Welt. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A novel by the German author Thomas Mann. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the Buddenbrooks, at several places he uses the Low German of the northern part of the country. Low German (also called Niederdeutsch, Plattdeutsch or Plattdüütsch) is a name for the regional language varieties of the West Germanic languages spoken mainly in Northern Germany where it is officially called Niederdeutsch (Low German), and in Eastern Netherlands where it is officially called Nedersaksisch (Low Saxon). Low refers to...


To his greatest works belongs the tetralogy Joseph and His Brothers (Joseph und seine Brüder, 193342), a richly imagined retelling of the story of Joseph related in chapters 37-50 of Genesis in the Hebrew Bible. The first volume relates the establishment of the family of Jacob, the father of Joseph. In the second volume the young Joseph, not yet master of considerable gifts, arouses the enmity of his ten older brothers, who then sell him into slavery in Egypt. In the third volume, Joseph becomes the steward of a high court official, Potiphar, but finds himself thrown into prison after rejecting the advances of Potiphar's wife. In the last volume, the mature Joseph rises to become administrator of Egypt's granaries. Famine drives the sons of Jacob to Egypt, where the unrecognized Joseph adroitly orchestrates a scene that discloses his identity, resulting in the brothers' reconciliation and the reunion of the family. Joseph and His Brothers is a four part novel by Thomas Mann, published in over the course of 16 years. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum Hebrew Bible is a term that refers to the common portions of the Jewish canon and the Christian canons. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Potiphar (or Potifar) (Hebrew: פּוֹטִיפַר / פּוֹטִיפָר, Standard  Tiberian  /  ; Egyptian origin:  ; the one whom Ra gave. ...


Mann's diaries, unsealed in 1975, tell of his struggles with his sexuality, which found reflection in his works, most prominently through the obsession of the elderly Aschenbach for the 14-year-old Polish boy Tadzio in the novella Death in Venice (Der Tod in Venedig, 1912). Anthony Heilbut's biography Thomas Mann: Eros and Literature (1997) was widely acclaimed for uncovering the centrality of Mann's sexuality to his oeuvre. Gilbert Adair's work The Real Tadzio describes how, in the summer of 1911, Mann had been staying at the Grand Hôtel des Bains in Venice with his wife and brother when he became enraptured by the angelic figure of Władysław Moes, an 11-year-old Polish boy. Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... The novella Death in Venice was written by the German author Thomas Mann, and was first published in 1912 as Der Tod in Venedig. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Anthony Heilbut is an American writer, and record producer of gospel music. ... Gilbert Adair (born December 29, 1944) is an author, film critic, and journalist who won the Scott Moncrieff Translation Prize for his book A Void which is a translation of the French book La Disparition by Georges Perec. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ...


Considered a classic of homosexual passion (if unconsummated) Death in Venice has been made into a film and an opera. Blamed sarcastically by Mann’s old enemy, Alfred Kerr, to have ‘made pederasty acceptable to the cultivated middle classes’, it has been pivotal to introducing the discourse of same-sex desire to the common culture.[3] Mann himself described his feelings for young violinist and painter Paul Ehrenberg as the "central experience of my heart." Despite homosexual overtones, Mann chose to get married and have children, and there is no evidence to suggest that he didn't find this emotionally and sexually gratifying. His works also present other sexual themes, such as incest in "The Blood of the Walsungs" (Wälsungenblut) and "The Holy Sinner" (Der Erwählte). Alfred Kerr (25 December 1867 – 12 October 1948) was an influential German-Jewish theatre critic and essayist, nicknamed Kulturpapst (culture Pope) . He was born Alfred Kempner into a prosperous family in Breslau (now Wroclaw in Poland), taking the surname Kerr in 1887, and making the change officially in 1909. ... Pederasty or paederasty (literally boy-love, see Etymology below) refers to an intimate or erotic relationship between an adolescent boy and an adult male outside his immediate family. ... Paul Ehrenberg (1876 - 1949) was a German violinist and painter, and brother of Carl Ehrenberg. ... Incest is defined as sexual intercourse between closely related persons. ... The Holy Sinner (in German, Der Erwählte) is a German novel written by Thomas Mann. ...


Nietzsche's influence on Mann runs deep in his work, especially in Nietzsche's views on decay and the proposed fundamental connection between sickness and creativity. Balancing his humanism and appreciation of Western culture was his belief in the power of sickness and decay to destroy the ossifying effects of tradition and civilization. Hence the "heightening" that Mann speaks of in his introduction to The Magic Mountain and the opening of new spiritual possibilities that Hans Castorp experiences in the midst of his sickness. In Death in Venice he makes the identification between beauty and the resistance to natural decay, embodied by Aschenbach as the metaphor for the Nazi vision of purity (akin to Nietzsche's version of the ascetic ideal that denies life and its becoming). He also valued the insight of other cultures, notably adapting a traditional Indian fable in The Transposed Heads. His work is the record of a consciousness of a life of manifold possibilities, and of the tensions inherent in the (more or less enduringly fruitful) responses to those possibilities. In his own summation (upon receiving the Nobel Prize), "The value and significance of my work for posterity may safely be left to the future; for me they are nothing but the personal traces of a life led consciously, that is, conscientiously." See also the specific life stance known as Humanism For the Renaissance liberal arts movement, see Renaissance humanism Humanism is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities... For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ... The novella Death in Venice was written by the German author Thomas Mann, and was first published in 1912 as Der Tod in Venedig. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, are awarded for physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace. ...

Regarded as a whole, Mann's career is a striking example of the "repeated puberty" which Goethe thought characteristic of the genius. In technique as well as in thought, he experienced far more daringly than is generally realized. In Buddenbrooks he wrote one of the last of the great "old-fashioned" novels, a patient, thorough tracing of the fortunes of a family.
—Henry Hatfield in Thomas Mann, 1962.

Cultural References

Mann's 1896 short story "Disillusionment" is the basis for the Leiber and Stoller song "Is That All There Is?", famously recorded in 1969 by Peggy Lee. Jerry Leiber (born April 25, 1933) and Mike Stoller (born March 13, 1933) are among the most important songwriters and music producers in post-World War II popular music. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Peggy Lee (May 26, 1920 – January 21, 2002) was an American jazz and traditional pop singer and songwriter and Oscar-nominated performer. ...


"Magic Mountain" by the band Blonde Redhead, is based on Mann's novel of the same title


Works

  • 1896 "Disillusionment" (Enttäuschung)
  • 1897 "Little Herr Friedemann" ("Der kleine Herr Friedemann")
  • 1897 "The Clown" ("Der Bajazzo")
  • 1897 "The Dilettante"
  • 1897 "Tobias Mindernickel"
  • 1897 "Little Lizzy"
  • 1899 "The Wardrobe"
  • 1900 "The Road to the Churchyard" (Der Weg zum Friedhof)
  • 1901 Buddenbrooks (Buddenbrooks - Verfall einer Familie)
  • 1902 "Gladius Dei"
  • 1902 "Tristan"
  • 1902 "The Hungry"
  • 1903 "Tonio Kröger"
  • 1903 "The Infant Prodigy" ("Das Wunderkind")
  • 1904 Fiorenza (play)
  • 1904 "A Gleam"
  • 1904 "At the Prophet's"
  • 1905 "A Weary Hour"
  • 1905 "The Blood of the Walsungs" ("Wälsungenblut")
  • 1907 "Railway Accident"
  • 1908 "Anekdote"
  • 1909 Royal Highness (Königliche Hoheit)
  • 1911 "The Fight between Jappe and the Do Escobar"
  • 1911 Death in Venice (Der Tod in Venedig)
  • 1915 Frederick and the Great Coalition (Friedrich und die große Koalition)
  • 1918 Reflections of an Unpolitical Man (Betrachtungen eines Unpolitischen)
  • 1918 A Man and His Dog (Herr und Hund; Gesang vom Kindchen: Zwei Idyllen)
  • 1922 The German Republic (Von deutscher Republik)
  • 1924 The Magic Mountain (Der Zauberberg)
  • 1925 "Disorder and Early Sorrow" ("Unordnung und frühes Leid")
  • 1929 "Mario and the Magician" ("Mario und der Zauberer")
  • 1930 A Sketch of My Life (Lebensabriß)
  • 1933–43 Joseph and His Brothers (Joseph und seine Brüder)
    • 1933 The Tales of Jacob (Die Geschichten Jaakobs)
    • 1934 The Young Joseph (Der junge Joseph)
    • 1936 Joseph in Egypt (Joseph in Ägypten)
    • 1943 Joseph the Provider (Joseph, der Ernährer)
  • 1938 This Peace (Dieser Friede)
  • 1937 The Problem of Freedom (Das Problem der Freiheit)
  • 1938 The Coming Victory of Democracy
  • 1939 Lotte in Weimar: The Beloved Returns
  • 1940 The Transposed Heads (Die vertauschten Köpfe - Eine indische Legende)
  • 1943 Listen, Germany! (Deutsche Hörer!)
  • 1947 Doctor Faustus (Doktor Faustus)
  • 1951 The Holy Sinner (Der Erwählte)
  • 1954 The Black Swan (Die Betrogene: Erzählung)
  • 1911/1954 Confessions of Felix Krull, Confidence Man: The Early Years (Bekenntnisse des Hochstaplers Felix Krull. Der Memoiren erster Teil); unfinished

Buddenbrooks [1]was Thomas Manns first novel, published in 1901 when he was twenty-six years old. ... Tristan is a 1903 novella by German writer Thomas Mann. ... Tonio Kröger is one of Thomas Mann’s youthful works, written early in 1901, when Mann was 25, and first published in 1903. ... The novella Death in Venice was written by the German author Thomas Mann, and was first published in 1912 as Der Tod in Venedig. ... “Magic Mountain” redirects here. ... Mario and the Magician is a story of political inclination written by German author Thomas Mann in 1929. ... Joseph and His Brothers is a four part novel by Thomas Mann, published in over the course of 16 years. ... The Coming Victory of Democracy is a book published in 1938 by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. ... Listen, Germany! is the published collection of letters by exiled German author Thomas Mann to his former country during World War II. Originally published in 1943 by Alfred A. Knopf Inc. ... Doktor Faustus is a German novel written by Thomas Mann, begun in 1943 and published in 1947 as . ... The Holy Sinner (in German, Der Erwählte) is a German novel written by Thomas Mann. ...

See also

The Dohm-Mann family tree contains a number of famous writers, musicians and actors. ... Erich Heller (March 27, 1911 — November 5, 1990); British essayist; one of the most important twentieth-century thinkers on the human condition. ... Pederasty or paederasty (literally boy-love, see Etymology below) refers to an intimate or erotic relationship between an adolescent boy and an adult male outside his immediate family. ... T. J. (Terence James) Reed (born in London in 1937) is a prominent British Germanist and an emeritus fellow of the Queen’s College, Oxford; he was formerly Taylor Professor of German in the University of Oxford. ...

Notes

  1. ^ See a recent translation of this lecture by Lawrence Rainey in Modernism/Modernity, 14.1 (January 2007), pp. 99-145.
  2. ^ Nobel Prize website, accessed 11 November 2007
  3. ^ The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Mann, Edited by Ritchie Robertson, p.5[1]

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Thomas Mann
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Thomas Mann
Persondata
NAME Mann, Thomas
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Paul Thomas Mann
SHORT DESCRIPTION German novelist, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and Nobel Prize laureate
DATE OF BIRTH June 6, 1875
PLACE OF BIRTH Lübeck, Germany
DATE OF DEATH August 12, 1955
PLACE OF DEATH Zürich, Switzerland

German literature comprises those literary texts originating within Germany proper and written in the German language. ... A cultural critic is a critic of a given culture, usually as a whole and typically on a radical basis; a social critic of a given society, but the overlap is large. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... An essayist is an author who writes compositions which can be about any particular subject. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Luebeck. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses of Zurich, see Zurich (disambiguation). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Thomas Mann - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1296 words)
Mann was born in Lübeck, Germany, second son of Thomas Johann Heinrich Mann (a senator and grain merchant) and his wife Júlia da Silva Bruhns (who was born in Brazil and came to Germany when she was 7 years old).
Mann was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1929, principally in recognition of his popular achievement with the epic Buddenbrooks (1901), which relates the decline of a merchant family in Lübeck (based on Mann's own family) over the course of three generations.
Mann was a humanist who valued the cumulative achievements of Western culture and believed in the necessity of upholding civilization against the dangers of decay and barbarism.
MSN Encarta - Thomas Mann (893 words)
Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German novelist, essayist, and short-story writer, a Nobel laureate and one of the most prominent and influential European writers of the 20th century.
Mann saw himself and was seen by others as the leading spokesman for German values and the chief representative of German culture from 1900 to his death in 1955.
Mann was born in 1875 in Lübeck, an important trading port on the North Sea, into a prominent and wealthy family of merchants.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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