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Encyclopedia > Thomas M. Disch
Thomas M. Disch

Thomas Michael Disch (Born February 2, 1940) is an American science fiction author and poet. He has been nominated for the Hugo and Nebula Awards several times. Taken from http://www. ... Taken from http://www. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Note that this partial list contains some authors whose works of fantastic fiction would today be called science fiction, even if they predate, or did not work in that genre. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ...


He was born in Des Moines, Iowa. His work began appearing in the science fiction magazines in the 1960s, and his first novel, The Genocides, appeared in 1965. He soon became known as part of the New Wave, writing for New Worlds and other avant-garde publications. His critically acclaimed novels of that time included Camp Concentration and 334. In the 1980s he moved from science fiction to horror, with a series of books set in Minneapolis: The Businessman, The M.D., The Priest, and The Sub. “Des Moines” redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... The Genocides is a science fiction novel written by Thomas M. Disch. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... New Wave science fiction was characterised by a high degree of experimentation, both in form and in content, and a highbrow and self-consciously literary or artistic sensibility previously comparatively alien to the science fiction aesthetic. ... New Worlds was a British Science Fiction Magazine which was first published professionally in 1946. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... Camp Concentration is a 1968 science fiction novel by Thomas M. Disch. ... 334 is a science fiction novel by Thomas M. Disch, written in 1972. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... The Priest From: The Ex-Communicated List from the Vatican The Priest is a manager who works for Xtreme Wrestling Entertainment. ...


In 1999 he won the Nonfiction Hugo for The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of, a sardonic look at the field, as well as the Michael Braude Award for Light Verse. Among his other nonfiction work, he has written theatre and opera criticism for The New York Times, The Nation, and other periodicals. He has also published several volumes of poetry. This article is about the year. ... The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World (1998, ISBN 0684824051) is a somewhat sardonic overview of the interactions between science fiction and the real world, written by Thomas M. Disch, a noted author in the field. ... The Michael Braude Award for Light Verse is a biennial award given for light verse in the English language, regardless of the authors nationality. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... This article is about Opera, the art form. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Nation logo The Nation is a weekly left-liberal periodical devoted to politics and culture. ...

Contents

Biography

Disch was born in Des Moines, Iowa, on 2 February 1940. Because of a polio epidemic in 1946, his mother Helen home-schooled him for a year. As a result, he skipped from kindergarten to second grade. Disch's first formal education happened at Catholic schools; this experience shows itself in parts of his work, which contain scathing criticisms of the Catholic Church. The family moved in 1953 to the Twin Cities in Minnesota, rejoining both pairs of grandparents. In Minneapolis public schools, Disch discovered his long-term loves of science fiction, drama, and poetry. He describes poetry as his stepping-stone to the literary world. A teacher, Jeannette Cochran, assigned 100 lines of poetry to be memorized. Disch wound up memorizing ten times as much (Heacox). His early fascination continues to influence his work with poetic form and the direction of his criticism. is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Poliomyelitis (polio), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. ... In epidemiology, an epidemic (from [[Latin language] epi- upon + demos people) is a disease that appears as new cases in a given human population, during a given period, at a rate that substantially exceeds what is expected, based on recent experience (the number of new cases in the population during... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Homeschooling – also called home education or home school – is the education of children at home, typically by parents or guardians, rather than in a public or private school. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A map of the Twin Cities metropolitan area. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) is a school district that covers all of the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the art form. ...


After graduating from high school in 1957, he worked a summer job as a trainee steel draftsman - just one of the many jobs on his path to becoming a writer. Saving enough to move to New York City, he found a Manhattan apartment and began to cast his energies in many directions. He worked as a (literal) spear-carrier for the Metropolitan Opera, then at a bookstore, then for the newspaper. Just when he seemed to be getting work closer to his love of language, he turned 18 and enlisted in the army. Disch's incompatibility with the armed forces quickly resulted in a nearly three-month commitment to a mental hospital. After his discharge, he returned to New York and continued to pursue the arts in his own indirect way: a job in a theater cloakroom that let him peer in on Broadway. Eventually, he got another job with an insurance company and went to school. A brief flirtation with architecture school led him to night school at New York University, where classes on novella writing and utopian fiction developed his tastes for some of the common forms and topics of science fiction. In May of 1962, he decided to write a short story instead of study for his midterms. He sold the story, The Double Timer, for $112.50 (Francaville). Having begun his literary career, he did not return to NYU but rather took another series of odd jobs such as bank teller, mortuary assistant, and copy editor - all of which served to fuel what he referred to as his night-time "writing habit". Over the next few years he wrote more science fiction stories, but also branched out into poetry; his first published poem, "Echo and Narcissus", appeared in the Minnesota Review's Summer 1964 issue (Davis). For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Training refers to the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and attitudes as a result of the teaching of vocational or practical skills and knowledge that relates to specific useful skills. ... Technical drawing, also known as drafting, is the practice of creating accurate representations of objects for technical, architectural and engineering needs. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A psychiatric hospital (also called a mental hospital or asylum) is a hospital specializing in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... Storage is the at least semi-permanent holding of an amount of something. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... A novella is a narrative work of prose fiction somewhat longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. ... See Utopia (disambiguation) for other meanings of this word Utopia, in its most common and general meaning, refers to a hypothetical perfect society. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Teller may refer to: an automated teller machine. ... A mortuary is a cold chamber used to keep the deceased from seriously decomposing; this practice exists for the sake of recognition of the deceased and to allow time to prepare for burial. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ...


Writing had become the dominant focus of his life. Disch described his personal transformation from dilettante to "someone who knows what he wants to do and is so busy doing it that he doesn't have much time for anything else." Several books followed, including science fiction novels and stories, gothic works, criticism, plays, a libretto for an opera of Frankenstein, prose and verse children's books such as A Child's Garden of Grammar, and ten poetry collections. His poetry includes experiments within traditional forms, such as a collaborative sonnet cycle Highway Sandwiches and Haikus of an AmPart, while others like The Dark Old House mix stricter and freer form. Like other popular American poets, he often uses humor and irony to power his poems. His two major books of poetry criticism, The Castle of Indolence: On Poetry, Poets, and Poetasters and The Castle of Perseverance: Job Opportunities in Contemporary Poetry focus on what make poetry work, what makes it popular, and how poetry can re-establish a place in modern popular culture. His writing includes substantial freelance work, such as regular book and theater reviews for The Nation, Harper's, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, and Entertainment Weekly. Recognition from his award-winning books led to a year as "artist-in-residence" at William and Mary College. Currently, he writes from his upstate New York home, which he shares with his partner of three decades. Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel was a literary genre that belonged to Romanticism and began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... A critic (derived from the ancient Greek word krites meaning a judge) is a person who offers a value judgement or an interpretation. ... Antonio Ghislanzoni, nineteenth century Italian librettist. ... This article is about Opera, the art form. ... Francesco Petrarca, or Petrarch, one of the best-known early Italian sonnet writers. ... Look up Humour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... “Ironic” redirects here. ... The Nation logo The Nation is a weekly left-liberal periodical devoted to politics and culture. ... An issue of Harpers Magazine from 1905 Another issue, from November 2004 Harpers Magazine (or simply Harpers) is a monthly magazine of politics and culture. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... The Los Angeles Times (also L.A. Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... The College of William and Mary in Virginia is a public, liberal-arts university located in Williamsburg, Virginia. ...


Cultural background

Thomas Disch traveled what now seems like a traditional American path: spending the 1940s and 1950s growing up in the Midwest, he tore away to the Big City as a young adult, entering the 1960s with hungry experimentalism and precocious glee. Disch is widely traveled and has lived in England, Spain, Rome, and Mexico. In spite of this, he has remained a New Yorker for the past twenty years. He admits, "a city like New York, to my mind, is the whole world." Now in his 60s, he has moved upstate, but he still maintains working and cultural ties to the City. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5...


As mentioned, Disch's New York began with a string of blue-collar jobs, working full-time while attending college. While he worked those jobs, he was trying his best to leave behind the influence of his father, a traveling salesman; he dipped into a wide variety of jobs - almost anything that would keep him afloat - while he investigated his many interests. Some of these jobs paid off later - doing grunt-work in New York theater culture allowed him to both pursue his life-long love of drama and led to work as a magazine theater critic. Before his critical and non-fiction work, however, he started with short stories, poetry, and eventually novels.


His first published poems, though reaching print later (the first in 1964, though not collected until 1972), were written alongside the stories and novels which made his name in the 1960s. Although he presented his poetry presented to a different audience than his fiction — even simplifying his by-line from Thomas M. Disch to Tom Disch — both genres emerged from the same expanding mind and changing times. Disch entered the field of science fiction at a turning point, as the pulp adventure stories of its older style began to be challenged by a more serious, adult, and often darker style. This movement, called "New Wave", tried to show that the ideas and themes of science fiction could be developed past the simple desires of an audience of twelve-year-olds. Rather than trying to compete with mainstream writers on the New York literary scene, Disch plunged into the emerging genre of science fiction, and began to work to liberate it from some of its strict formula and narrow conventions. Much of his more literary science fiction was first published in English author Michael Moorcock's New Wave magazine, New Worlds. Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pulp magazines, often called simply the pulps, were inexpensive text fiction magazines widely published in the 1920s through the 1950s. ... New Wave science fiction was characterised by a high degree of experimentation, both in form and in content, and a highbrow and self-consciously literary or artistic sensibility previously comparatively alien to the science fiction aesthetic. ... Michael John Moorcock (born December 18, 1939, in London, England) is a prolific English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels. ...


During his long and varied career, Disch has found his way into other forms and genres. As a fiction writer and a poet, Disch feels typecast by his science fiction roots. "I have a class theory of literature. I come from the wrong neighborhood to sell to The New Yorker. No matter how good I am as an artist, they always can smell where I come from." (Horwitz 2001) Sour grapes or not, he clearly thinks that no matter how far from that genre his writing goes, he has deep cultural roots in science fiction.


In 1987 Disch collaborated with New Jersey software company Cognetics Corp. and games publisher Electronic Arts to create the interactive fiction text adventure Amnesia, which could be played on the Commodore 64, IBM PC or Apple II computers. The title, based on technology pioneered by Cognetics' Charles Kreitzberg, was produced by Don Daglow and programmed by Kevin Bentley. It showcased Disch's vivid writing, a stark contrast to other game-programmer-written text adventures of the time, and his passion for the energy of the city of New York. Although the text adventure format was dying by the time Amnesia was released and it enjoyed limited success, the game pioneered ideas that would later become popular in game design by modeling the entire Manhattan street map south of 110th St. and allowing the player to visit any street corner in that part of the city in their quest to advance the story. Although the limited floppy disk capacity of the 1980s computers caused much of Disch's original text about the city to be cut, many Manhattan sites and people were described with unique loving distortion through the Disch lens. Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... “NJ” redirects here. ... Electronic Arts (EA) (NASDAQ: ERTS) is an American developer, marketer, publisher, and distributor of computer and video games. ... Zork I is one of the first interactive fiction games, as well as being one of the first commercially sold. ... Zork, an early work of interactive fiction, running on a modern interpreter Interactive fiction, often abbreviated as IF, is a simulated environment in which players use text commands to control characters. ... Thomas M. Dischs Amnesia is a text adventure computer game created by Cognetics Corporation, written by award-winning writer Thomas M. Disch, and programmed by Charles Kreitzberg and Kevin Bentley. ... C-64 redirects here. ... IBM PC (IBM 5150) with keyboard and green screen monochrome monitor (IBM 5151), running MS-DOS 5. ... The Apple II was one of the most popular personal computers of the 1980s. ... Don Daglow (born ~1953) is an American computer game and video game designer, programmer and producer. ... A floppy disk is a data storage device that is composed of a disk of thin, flexible (floppy) magnetic storage medium encased in a square or rectangular plastic shell. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ...


Disch's private life remains private, for the most part. He has been publicly gay since 1968; this comes out occasionally in his poetry and particularly in his 1979 novel On Wings of Song. He does not try to write to a particular community: "I'm gay myself, but I don't write 'gay' literature." (Horwitz 2001) This increases his universality though it perhaps deprives him of a loyal fan-base. He rarely mentions his sexuality in interviews, and it does not seem to be part of how his readers regard him. GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... On Wings of Song is a 1979 science fiction novel written by Thomas M. Disch. ...


In America, Disch's poetry remained little known until a 1989 mid-career retrospective collection, titled Yes, Let's. A book of new poetry, Dark Verses & Light, followed in 1991. In 1995 and 2002, Disch published two collections of poetry criticism. He continues to regularly publish poetry in magazines and journals such as Poetry, Light, Paris Review, Partisan Review, and even Theology Today (perhaps an odd choice for a long-lapsed Catholic). Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Selected works

Novels

  • The Genocides, 1965
  • Mankind under the Leash, 1966
  • Echo Round His Bones, 1967
  • Camp Concentration, 1968, ISBN 0-246-97352-8
  • Black Alice (with John Sladek), 1968
  • The Prisoner, 1969
  • 334, 1972, ISBN 0-261-63283-3
  • Clara Reeve (as Leonie Hargrave), 1975, ISBN 0-394-48490-8
  • On Wings of Song 1979, ISBN 0-312-58466-0
  • Neighboring Lives (with Charles Naylor), 1981, ISBN 0-684-16644-5
  • The Businessman: A Tale of Terror, 1984, ISBN 0-06-015292-3
  • The M.D.: A Horror Story, 1991, ISBN 0-394-58662-X
  • The Priest: A Gothic Romance, 1994, ISBN 1-85798-090-5
  • The Sub: A Study in Witchcraft, 1999, ISBN 0-679-44292-8

The Genocides is a science fiction novel written by Thomas M. Disch. ... Camp Concentration is a 1968 science fiction novel by Thomas M. Disch. ... Black Alice is a novel by Thom Demijohn (Thomas M. Disch and John Sladek), written 1968. ... John Thomas Sladek (December 15, 1937 - March 10, 2000) was an American science-fiction author. ... The Prisoner is a 1967 UK allegorical science fiction television series starring Patrick McGoohan. ... 334 is a science fiction novel by Thomas M. Disch, written in 1972. ... On Wings of Song is a 1979 science fiction novel written by Thomas M. Disch. ...

Novellas

The Original Cover of Thomas M. Dischs The Brave Little Toaster The Brave Little Toaster is a novel by Thomas M. Disch intended for children or as put by Disch, A Bedtime Story for Small Appliances. ... F&SF April 1971, special Poul Anderson issue. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The Brave Little Toaster is an animated film from 1987, directed by Jerry Rees, written by Thomas M. Disch, and produced by Hyperion Pictures. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

Story collections

  • 102 H-Bombs, 1966 (British; expanded into White Fang... for the American market)
  • Fun with Your New Head a.k.a. Under Compulsion, 1968
  • The Asian Shore, 1970
  • White Fang Goes Dingo and Other Funny SF Stories, 1971, ISBN 0-09-004840-7
  • Getting into Death, 1973, ISBN 0-246-10614-X
  • Fundamental Disch, 1980, ISBN 0-553-13670-4
  • The Man Who Had No Idea, 1982, IBSN 0-553-22667-3

Poetry collections

  • Highway Sandwiches (with Charles Platt and Marilyn Hacker), 1970
  • The Right Way to Figure Plumbing, 1972, ISBN 0-913560-05-7
  • ABCDEFG HIJKLM NPOQRST UVWXYZ, 1981, ISBN 0-85646-073-7
  • Burn This, 1982, ISBN 0-09-146960-0
  • Orders of the Retina, 1982, ISBN 0-915124-60-2
  • Here I Am, There You Are, Where Were We, 1984, ISBN 0-09-154871-3
  • Yes, Let's: New and Selected Poems, 1989, ISBN 0-8018-3835-5
  • Dark Verses and Light, 1991, ISBN 0-8018-4191-7
  • Haikus of an AmPart, 1991, ISBN 0-918273-68-4
  • The Dark Old House, 1996

Computer game

Thomas M. Dischs Amnesia is a text adventure computer game created by Cognetics Corporation, written by award-winning writer Thomas M. Disch, and programmed by Charles Kreitzberg and Kevin Bentley. ...

Non-fiction

The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World (1998, ISBN 0684824051) is a somewhat sardonic overview of the interactions between science fiction and the real world, written by Thomas M. Disch, a noted author in the field. ...

Audio

  • Mecca|Mettle, 2005. An anthology featuring text and audio by Thomas Disch, BlöödHag, and Tim Kirk.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Thomas M. Disch

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ...

References

  • Davis, Matthew S. S. Schrödinger’s Cake. 28 December. 2001. 9 March 2004. http://www.michaelscycles.freeserve.co.uk/tmd.htm
  • Francavilla, Joeseph. “Disching It Out: An Interview with Thomas Disch.” Science Fiction Studies 37 (1985): 241-251.
  • Gioia, Dana. "Tom Disch," in Can Poetry Matter? Essays on Poetry and American Culture. St. Paul, Minn.: Graywolf Press, 1992, ISBN 1-55597-176-8, pp. 193-196.
  • Heacox, Tom. “The Dish on Tom Disch.” jump! magazine. Fall 1995. The College of William and Mary. 29 February. 2004. http://web.wm.edu/so/jump/fall95/disch.html
  • Preminger, Alex, Terry V.F. Brogan, Frank J. Warnke, eds. The New Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics. New York: Princeton University Press, 1993, ISBN 0-691-03271-8.
  • Walzer, Kevin. "The Sword of Wit: Disch, Feinstein, Gwynn, Martin," in The Ghost of Tradition. Brownsville, Ore.: Story Line Press, 1998, ISBN 1-885266-66-9: pp. 152-184.
  • Yazzi, David. Thomas M., Meet Tom. Parnassus: Poetry in Review, 1995.

is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also


 
 

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