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Encyclopedia > Thomas Graham (chemist)

Thomas Graham (December 21, 1805September 16, 1869) was born in Glasgow, Scotland. Graham's father was a successful textile manufacturer, and wished for his son to enter into the Church of Scotland. Instead, defying his father's wishes, Graham became a student at the University of Glasgow in 1819. Here, he developed a strong interest in chemistry, and left the University after receiving his M.A. in 1826. He later became a professor of chemistry at numerous colleges, including the Royal College of Science and Technology and the University of London. Graham also founded the Chemical Society of London in 1841. Graham's final post was that known as the Master of the Mint, where he stayed for 15 years until his death. This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Glasgow (or Glaschu in Gaelic) is Scotlands largest city and unitary council, situated on the River Clyde in the countrys west central lowlands. ... Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in Scotland Abbeys and priories in Scotland... It has been suggested that Textile manufacturing be merged into this article or section. ... Manufacturing is the transformation of raw materials into finished goods for sale, or intermediate processes involving the production or finishing of semi-manufactures. ... The Church of Scotland (C of S, also known informally as The Kirk; until the 17th century officially the Kirk of Scotland) is the Christian national church of Scotland. ... The University of Glasgow is the largest of the three universities in Glasgow, Scotland. ... 1819 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... // Introduction Chemistry is a large field encompassing many subdisciplines that often overlap with significant portions of other sciences. ... 1826 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... A professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) (prof for short) is a senior teacher, lecturer and researcher, usually in a college or university. ... The Royal College of Science and Technology was a predecessor organization of The University of Strathclyde, in Glasgow, Scotland, UK. It was merged with the Scottish College of Commerce to form the University in 1964. ... Senate House, designed by Charles Holden home to the universitys central administration offices and its library The University of London is a federation of colleges which together constitute one of the worlds largest universities. ... take you to calendar). ... Master of the Mint was an important office in the British government between the 16th and 19th centuries. ...


Contributions to the scientific community

Graham's two most known contributions are his studies on the diffusion of gases, known as "Graham's Law". His discovery of the medical method known as dialysis, which is used in many medical faculties today, was the result of some of Graham's study of colloids. This study resulted in his ability to separate colloids and crystalloids using a so-called "dialyzer", the precursor of today's dialysis machine. This study of colloids initiated the scientific branch of research known as colloidal chemistry, of which Graham is credited as the founder. Diffusion, being the spontaneous spreading of matter (particles), heat, or momentum, is one type of transport phenomena. ... Grahams law, also known as Grahams law of effusion, was formulated by Thomas Graham. ... In medicine, renal dialysis is a method for removing waste such as urea from the blood when the kidneys are incapable of this (i. ... A colloid or colloidal dispersion, is a form of matter intermediate between a true solution and a mixture (suspension). ... // General In generic terms, a precursor is something that existed before and was incorporated into something that came later. ... In medicine, renal dialysis is a method for removing waste such as urea from the blood when the kidneys are incapable of this (i. ... A colloid or colloidal dispersion, is a form of matter intermediate between a true solution and a mixture (suspension). ... // Introduction Chemistry is a large field encompassing many subdisciplines that often overlap with significant portions of other sciences. ...


Graham's Law states: "The rate of effusion of a gas is inversely proportional to the square root of its mass."


Honours awarded

  • Royal Medal of the Royal Society (Given in 1837)
  • Copley Medal of the Royal Society (Given in 1862)
  • Prix Jecker of the Paris Academy of Sciences (Given in 1862)
  • Royal Medal of the Royal Society (Given again in 1863)
  • (Unofficial Honour) A statue of Graham given to Glasgow for his works ("Given" in 1872)

The premises of the Royal Society in London. ...

External links

  • Biography
  • Nature 1869

  Results from FactBites:
 
Graham (disambiguation) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (594 words)
Graham is also a first name or surname meaning grey house, grey armour and well health.
Thomas Graham (1748 – December 18, 1843), Whig politician and General in the Peninsular War.
Graham crackers are a kind of pastry, sweeter than most crackers but not within the range of what are in the United States of America generally termed cookies.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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