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Encyclopedia > Thomas Friedman
Thomas L. Friedman

Born July 20, 1953 (1953-07-20) (age 54)
St. Louis Park, Minnesota, USA
Occupation Journalist, author, columnist
Spouse Ann Bucksbaum
Website
thomaslfriedman.com

Thomas Lauren Friedman, OBE (born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist. He is an op-ed contributor to The New York Times, whose column appears twice weekly and mainly addresses topics on foreign affairs. Friedman is known for supporting a compromise resolution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, modernization of the Arab world, environmentalism and globalization. He is considered to be a pluralist and most of his commentary is left leaning. He is an outspoken critic of the Bush administration and in particular the Iraq War. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2048 × 3072 pixel, file size: 2 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Thomas Friedman ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location in Hennepin County Coordinates: Country United States State Minnesota County Hennepin County Founded 1852 Incorporated November 19, 1886 Government  - Mayor Jeff Jacobs (DFL) Area  - City  10. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... Obe can mean: Obe, in Afghanistan Ebenezer Obe, a Nigerian musician. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... An Op-Ed is a piece of writing expressing an opinion. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... This article is about a journal. ... Israel, with the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is an ongoing dispute between the State of Israel and Arab Palestinians. ... Arab States redirects here. ... The historic Blue Marble photograph, which helped bring environmentalism to the public eye. ... Puxi side of Shanghai, China. ...

Contents

Early life

Thomas Friedman was born in St. Louis Park, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis. He attended St. Louis Park HS graduating in 1971. As a child, he once attended a Jewish summer camp where Abe Foxman was a counselor. In high school, he wrote articles for his school's newspaper,[1] including one for which he interviewed Ariel Sharon, an Israeli general who later became Prime Minister of Israel. Location in Hennepin County Coordinates: Country United States State Minnesota County Hennepin County Founded 1852 Incorporated November 19, 1886 Government  - Mayor Jeff Jacobs (DFL) Area  - City  10. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... Minneapolis redirects here. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Summer camp is a supervised program for children and/or teenagers conducted (usually) during the summer months in some countries. ... Abraham H. Foxman (b. ...   (Hebrew: , also known by his diminutive Arik אָרִיק) (born February 27, 1928) is a former Israeli politician and general. ... The Prime Minister of Israel (Hebrew: ראש הממשלה, Rosh HaMemshala, lit. ...


In the summer of 1970, at age 17, Friedman was Chi Chi Rodríguez's caddy during the US Open at Hazeltine National Golf Club.[2] Juan Antonio Chi-Chi Rodríguez (born October 23, 1935) is a Puerto Rican professional golfer. ... In golf, a caddy (or caddie) is the person who carries a players bag, and gives insightful advice and moral support. ... The United States Open Championship, commonly known as the U.S. Open, is the annual open golf tournament of the United States. ... Hazeltine National Golf Club is a golf course located in Chaska, Minnesotas Carver County. ...


In 1975, Friedman received a bachelor of arts in Mediterranean studies from Brandeis University, where he first arrived as a transfer student in 1973. He then attended St Antony's College at the University of Oxford on a Marshall scholarship, earning an M.Phil. in Middle Eastern studies. He names Professor Albert Hourani among his important academic influences. A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ... College name St Antonys College Named after Established 1950 Warden Professor Roger Goodman (acting) Graduates 300 Homepage St Antonys College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The official logo of the Marshall Scholarship is a blended image of the US and UK flags. ... In the usage of the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, New Zealand and some other countries, the Master of Philosophy (M.Phil. ... Albert Habib Hourani (Arabic: ألبرت حبيب حوراني) (March 31, 1915 – January 17, 1993) was a prominent scholar of Middle Eastern history through much of the 20th century. ...


Career

Upon graduating, Friedman joined the London bureau of United Press International. He was dispatched a year later to Beirut, where he stayed until 1981. He was then hired by The New York Times as a reporter, and was redispatched to Beirut at the start of the 1982 Israeli invasion of Lebanon. Friedman's coverage of the war, particularly the Sabra and Shatila massacre,[3] won him the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting. With David K. Shipler, he also won the 1982 George Polk Award for Foreign Reporting. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C. “UPI” redirects here. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... Combatants Israel South Lebanon Army LF (nominally neutral) PLO Syria Amal (switched sides) LCP Commanders Menachem Begin (Prime Minister) Ariel Sharon, (Ministry of Defence) Rafael Eitan, (CoS) Yasser Arafat Strength Israel: 76,000 troops 800 tanks 1,500 APCs 634 aircraft Syria: 22,000 troops 352 tanks 300 APCs 450... The Sabra and Shatila massacre (or Sabra and Chatila massacre; Arabic: مذبحة صبرا وشاتيلا) was an attack carried out in September 1982 by a Lebanese Forces militia group against Palestinian refugee camps in Beirut. ... The Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting has been awarded since 1948 for a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs, including United Nations correspondence. ... The George Polk Awards is an American journalism award. ...


He was assigned to Jerusalem from 1984 to 1988, and received a second Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of the First Palestinian Intifada. Afterwards he wrote a book, From Beirut to Jerusalem, describing his experiences in the Middle East. For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Combatants  Israel Unified National Leadership ot the Uprising Commanders Yitzhak Shamir Yasser Arafat Casualties 160 (5 children) 1,162 (241 children) The First Intifada (1987 - 1993) (also intifada and war of the stones) was a mass Palestinian uprising against Israeli rule[1] that began in Jabalia refugee camp and quickly... From Beirut to Jerusalem is a book written by Thomas L. Friedman chronicling his days as a reporter in Beirut during the Lebanese Civil War and his journey in 1984 from Beirut to Jerusalem to cover unfolding events. ...


Friedman covered Secretary of State James Baker during the administration of United States President George H. W. Bush. Following the election of Bill Clinton in 1992, he became the White House correspondent for the Times. In 1994, he began to write more about foreign policy and economics, and moved to the op-ed page of The New York Times the following year as a foreign affairs columnist. The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... James Addison Baker III (born April 28, 1930) served as the Chief of Staff in President Ronald Reagans first administration, Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in the second Reagan administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H. W. Bush. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States of America. ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... An Op-Ed is a piece of writing expressing an opinion. ...


Friedman is the recipient of the 2004 Overseas Press Club Award for lifetime achievement, and has been named to the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II.[4][5][6][7][8][9]-1... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ...


Opinion and stances

Globalization

Further information: The Lexus and the Olive Tree, The World is Flat and Longitudes and Attitudes

Friedman first discussed his views on globalization in the 1999 book, The Lexus and the Olive Tree. In 2004, a visit to Bangalore and Shanghai gave Friedman new insights into the continuing trends of globalization and the forces behind the process, leading him to write a follow-up analysis, The World Is Flat. The Lexus and the Olive Tree is a 1999 book by Thomas L. Friedman that posits that the world is currently undergoing two struggles: the drive for prosperity and development (symbolized by the Lexus), and the desire to retain identity and traditions (symbolized by the olive tree). ... For other uses, see The World Is Flat (disambiguation). ... Longitudes and Attitudes is the third book by New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman. ... The Lexus and the Olive Tree is a 1999 book by Thomas L. Friedman that posits that the world is currently undergoing two struggles: the drive for prosperity and development (symbolized by the Lexus), and the desire to retain identity and traditions (symbolized by the olive tree). ... , For other uses, see Bangalore (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The World Is Flat (disambiguation). ...


One of Friedman's theses is that individual countries must sacrifice some degree of economic sovereignty to global institutions (such as capital markets and multinational corporations), a situation he has termed the "golden straightjacket". The capital market is the market for long-term loans and equity capital. ... multinational corporation (or transnational corporation) (MNC/TNC) is a corporation or enterprise that manages production establishments or delivers services in at least two countries. ...


While Friedman is an advocate of globalization, he also points out (in The Lexus and the Olive Tree) the need for a country to preserve its local traditions, a process he termed "glocalization", although the term was already in use by most social anthropology theorists.


Friedman expresses a strong stance on America's need to become more energy independent and to lead in technologies concerning environmental compatibility. He believes this will cause the authoritarian rulers in the Middle East to be coerced out of power, as their petrodollar reserves are depleted, by a growing population of young people. He also believes this is the best way to spread stability and modernization in an autocratic and theocratic region. Friedman also argues that energy independence will strengthen America's economy by basing its energy infrastructure on domestic products (such as E85 and biodiesel), and ease the world tensions caused by burgeoning energy demand, exacerbated by emerging economies such as those of India and China. Logo used in the United States for E85 fuel Not to be confused with European route E85, a motorway in Europe. ... This article is about transesterified lipids. ...


David Sirota of the San Francisco Chronicle described Friedman as the "high priest" of free trade fundamentalism, in an article arguing for stronger trade barriers for the USA. The article quotes him as saying "I wrote a column supporting CAFTA. I didn't even know what was in it. I just knew two words: free trade."[10] David J. Sirota (b. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... The Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) is a free trade agreement between the United States and the Central American countries of Guatemala, Honduras, and Canada, and Mexico. ...


Opponents of free trade charge that Friedman does not consider the purchasing power of domestic labor as a key driver in economic output. However, Friedman argues that by exporting low-skill and low-wage jobs to foreign countries, more advanced and higher-skilled jobs will be freed up and made available for those displaced by the outsourcing. He theorizes that as long as those whose jobs are outsourced continue to further their education and specialize in their field, they will find better-paying and higher-skilled jobs.


He also views American immigration laws as too restrictive and damaging to economic output:

"It is pure idiocy that Congress will not open our borders -- as wide as possible -- to attract and keep the world's first-round intellectual draft choices in an age when everyone increasingly has the same innovation tools and the key differentiator is human talent."

Terrorism

After the September 11, 2001 attacks, Friedman's writing focused more on the threat of terrorism and the Middle East. He was awarded the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary "for his clarity of vision, based on extensive reporting, in commenting on the worldwide impact of the terrorist threat". These columns were collected and published in the book Longitudes and Attitudes. For a while, his reportings on post-9/11 topics led him to diverge from his prior interests on technological advances and globalization, until he began to research into The World Is Flat. A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Terrorist redirects here. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Commentary has been awarded since 1970. ... Longitudes and Attitudes is the third book by New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman. ... For other uses, see The World Is Flat (disambiguation). ...


After the 7 July 2005 London bombings, Friedman called for the U.S. State Department to "shine a spotlight on hate speech wherever it appears," create a quarterly "War of Ideas Report, which would focus on those religious leaders and writers who are inciting violence against others." Friedman said the governmental speech monitoring should go beyond those who actually advocate violence, and also include what former State Department spokesperson Jamie Rubin calls "excuse makers." In his 25 July column, Friedman wrote against the "excuses" made by terrorists or apologists who blame their actions on third-party influences or pressures. The 7 July 2005 London bombings (also called the 7/7 bombings) were a series of coordinated terrorist bomb blasts that hit Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... James Philip Jamie Rubin (born 1960 in New York City), is a former assistant to President Bill Clinton and a television news journalist and commentator. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

After every major terrorist incident, the excuse makers come out to tell us...why the terrorists acted. These excuse makers are just one notch less despicable than the terrorists and also deserve to be exposed. When you live in an open society like London, where anyone with a grievance can publish an article, run for office or start a political movement, the notion that blowing up a busload of innocent civilians in response to Iraq is somehow "understandable" is outrageous. "It erases the distinction between legitimate dissent and terrorism" Mr. Rubin said, "and an open society needs to maintain a clear wall between them."

In his September 30, 2007 column, Friedman declared that the era of "9/11 is over." Using the Giuliani campaign as a contrast, Friedman stated that he would support a candidate who was in tune with the post-9/11 world.

We can’t afford to keep being this stupid! We have got to get our groove back. We need a president who will unite us around a common purpose, not a common enemy. Al Qaeda is about 9/11. We are about 9/12, we are about the Fourth of July — which is why I hope that anyone who runs on the 9/11 platform gets trounced.

Kosovo War

During the 1999 NATO bombing in Yugoslavia, Friedman wrote the following in The New York Times: Combatants NATO Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Various militias and paramilitaries, as well as international volunteers [1] Commanders Wesley Clark (SACEUR) Javier Solana (Secretary General of NATO) Slobodan Milošević (Supreme Commander of the Army of Yugoslavia) Dragoljub Ojdanić (Chief of Staff) Svetozar Marjanović (Deputy Chief of Staff) Casualties 2 confirmed...

"Like it or not, we are at war with the Serbian nation (the Serbs certainly think so), and the stakes have to be very clear: Every week you ravage Kosovo is another decade we will set your country back by pulverizing you. You want 1950? We can do 1950. You want 1389? We can do 1389 too."[11]

These statements were criticized by British media analysts David Edwards and David Cromwell, who wrote "The thrill of this for Friedman lies in discussing the devastation of a nation as if he were a salesman offering a range of services."[12] Journalist Chris Floyd described the comments as "giddy cheerleading" and a "bone-chilling warning to the people of Serbia".[13] David Edwards (born 1962) is a British political writer who specializes in the analysis of corporate media. ... Dr. David Cromwell is a Scottish oceanographer, writer and activist. ... Chris Floyd Chris Floyd (1958, Watertown, Tennessee, United States) is an American journalist and author and a critic of George W. Bush. ...


War in Iraq

Friedman supported the 2003 invasion of Iraq, writing that the establishment of a democratic state in the Middle East would force other countries in the region to liberalize and modernize. In his February 9, 2003 column for The New York Times, Friedman also pointed to the lack of compliance with the United Nations Security Council Resolution regarding Iraq's weapons of mass destruction: This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... A United Nations Security Council Resolution is voted on by the fifteen members of the United Nations Security Council, the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... For the Xzibit album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ...

The French position is utterly incoherent. The inspections have not worked yet, says Mr. de Villepin, because Saddam has not fully cooperated, and, therefore, we should triple the number of inspectors. But the inspections have failed not because of a shortage of inspectors. They have failed because of a shortage of compliance on Saddam's part, as the French know. The way you get that compliance out of a thug like Saddam is not by tripling the inspectors, but by tripling the threat that if he does not comply he will be faced with a U.N.-approved war.[14]

In an interview with Charlie Rose in 2003, Friedman said: This article is about the American journalist. ...

What they needed to see was American boys and girls going house to house, from Basra to Baghdad, um and basically saying, "Which part of this sentence don't you understand?" You don't think, you know, we care about our open society, you think this bubble fantasy, we're just gonna to let it grow? Well, Suck. On. This.[15][16][17]

Since the invasion, Friedman has expressed alarm over the post-invasion conduct of the war by the George W. Bush administration. Nevertheless, until his piece dated August 4, 2006 (see below), his columns remained hopeful to the possibility of a positive conclusion to the Iraq conflict (although his optimism appeared to steadily diminish as the conflict continued). George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


In January 2004, he participated in a forum on Slate.com called "Liberal Hawks Reconsider the Iraq War", in which he dismisses the justification for war based on Iraq's lack of compliance with the U.N. Resolutions: Categories: Magazines stubs | Microsoft subsidiaries | Websites | The Washington Post ... The term liberal hawk refers to an individual generally described as politically liberal who supports a hawkish foreign policy. ...

The stated reason for the war was that Saddam Hussein had developed weapons of mass destruction that posed a long-term threat to America. I never bought this argument... The WMD argument was hyped by George Bush and Tony Blair to try to turn a war of choice into a war of necessity.[18]

Friedman wrote that regime change was the proper justification for the war:

The right reason for this war, as I argued before it started, was to oust Saddam's regime and partner with the Iraqi people to try to implement the Arab Human Development report's prescriptions in the heart of the Arab world. That report said the Arab world is falling off the globe because of a lack of freedom, women's empowerment, and modern education. The right reason for this war was to partner with Arab moderates in a long-term strategy of dehumiliation and redignification.[18]

In his New York Times , September 29, 2005 column, Friedman entertained the idea of supporting the Kurds and Shias in a civil war against the Sunnis: The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

If they [the Sunnis] won't [come around], we should arm the Shiites and Kurds and leave the Sunnis of Iraq to reap the wind.[19]

In his August 4, 2006 column for The New York Times, Friedman finally stated that the effort to transform Iraq by military invasion had failed, and that it was time for the United States to admit failure and disengage: is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Whether for Bush reasons or Arab reasons, democracy is not emerging in Iraq, and we can't throw more good lives after good lives.[20]

As of August 16, 2007, Friedman supports setting a date for withdrawal of U.S. troops.[21] is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Controversies and Criticisms

Edward Herman complains that Friedman uses denigrating remarks against Arabs and the Arab world: For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ...

[Thomas Friedman is]...regularly denigrating Arabs for their qualities of emotionalism, unreason, and hostility to democracy and modernization. His classic remark, in the same interview in which he lauds the proxy terrorism model, was that we mustn't go too far in forcing Palestinian concessions because, "I believe that as soon as Ahmed has a seat in the bus, he will limit his demands." Modernization (also Modernisation) is a concept in the sphere of social sciences that refers to process in which society goes through industrialization, urbanization and other social changes that completely transforms the lives of individuals. ...

Chris Fortney, top level business consultant said:

Friedman's view on globalization although interesting are completely fabricated. He is just marketing the idea of globalization to U.S. consumers, so they are more willing to see our trade deficit go up. Not only does he have no collected data to support his theories and "Laws", but he views the world as if it were 50 years in the future. Speculating about the future is one thing, when you say you know what is going to happen is another. Friedman is not the all knowing global events person, he and many others believe him to be.

Bill Bonner, the author of Empire of Debt, has said: Bold textBill Bonner is an author of books and articles on economic and financial subjects. ... Empire of Debt is a book written by Bill Bonner and Addison Wiggin, subtitled The Rise of an Epic Financial Crisis. The main subject of the book is the United Statess alleged transformation from republic to empire, although it also discusses such varied themes as the wisdom of the...

The man has a plan for everything. That is what makes reading him so funny. He cannot seem to appreciate that the world is a product of many thousands of generations' worth of evolutionary adjustments, compromises, and innovations that he could not possibly hope to know about...nor can he imagine that there is any situation - no matter how remote or complex - that his own little mind cannot improve. Thus does he urge America's voters to insist upon a "Green Election" in 2008.

Some of Friedman's critics have claimed that he is biased in reporting facts:

As Noam Chomsky has noted, the NYT refused to publish a word about Arafat's offer, but there can be no question that Friedman knew the facts (even if the NYT suppressed this information for its readers) and that he ignored them in favor of the oft-repeated lie of the time (and Times), that Israel couldn't find a negotiating partner (see Chomsky's Necessary Illusions and Pirates and Emperors for more on this case and on Friedman's bias). Avram Noam Chomsky (born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher, political activist, author, and lecturer. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004...

[22]


He is also accused of inconsistency (note: Friedman Unit): One Friedman Unit equals six months. ...

Writing recently on Iraq, Friedman has outdone himself in ennobling the invasion-occupation. We came there "with the sole intention of liberating its people" and we are fighting for Iraq's "sovereignty" ("Worried Optimism On Iraq," NYT, September 21, 2003).

In an interview with C-Span, journalist Alexander Cockburn described Friedman as "one of the most pompous people on the planet who has got, what...three Pulitzer Prizes? I mean, what a disgrace to the profession, if you can call it that, that we should decorate this nitwit with three Pulitzers." This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Alexander Claud Cockburn (pronounced , co-burn), born June 6, 1941, is a self-described radical Irish journalist who has lived and worked in the United States since 1973. ...


On April 22, 2008, two students of Brown University threw green colored pies at him as he began a lecture entitled, Hot, Flat and Crowded. One student was apprehended.[23] Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... This article is about the baked good, for other uses see Pie (disambiguation). ...


"The next six months"

Critics of Friedman's position on the Iraq War have noted his recurrent assertion that "the next six months" will prove critical in determining the outcome of the conflict. A study by Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting first pointed out this phenomenon in May 2006, citing 14 examples of Friedman declaring the next "few months" or "six months" as a decisive or critical period, dating from in November 2003, describing it as "a long series of similar do-or-die dates that never seem to get any closer."[24][25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37] Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting (FAIR), is a media criticism organization based in New York, New York, founded in 1986. ... May 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → May 1, 2006 (Monday) Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association outraged Vatican by planning to ordain another bishop, Liu Xinhong in Anhui Province. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ...


In a live television interview aired June 11, 2006 on CNN, Howard Kurtz asked Friedman himself about the concept: "Now, I want to understand how a columnist's mind works when you take positions, because you [Tom Friedman] were chided recently for writing several times on different occasions: 'the next six months are crucial in Iraq,' 'the next six months.'" Friedman responded, "the fact is that the outcome there is unclear, and I reflected that in my column. And I will continue to reflect."[38] is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Howard Alan Kurtz (born 1953, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American journalist, blogger, author and media critic. ...


The blogger Atrios coined the neologism "Friedman Unit" to refer to this unit of time in relation to Iraq, noting its use as a supposedly critical window of opportunity. Duncan Bowen Black (born February 18, 1972), better known by his pseudonym Atrios (IPA pronunciation: ), is an American liberal blogger living in Philadelphia. ... A neologism is a word, term, or phrase which has been recently created (or coined), often to apply to new concepts, to synthesize pre-existing concepts, or to make older terminology sound more contemporary. ... One Friedman Unit equals six months. ...


Not everyone agrees with Friedman's vision that innovation is the path to climate and energy salvation. Just seconds into his speech, he was interrupted by two environmental activists, who stormed the stage shortly after Friedman stepped up to the microphone, tossing two paper plates loaded with shamrock-colored whipped cream at him during a speech about energy at Brown University April 2008.


Personal life

Friedman's wife, Ann, is a graduate of Stanford University.[39] Her father, Matthew Bucksbaum, is the chairman of the board of General Growth Properties, the real estate development group that he co-founded with his brother in 1954. The Bucksbaums helped pioneer the development of shopping centers in the United States.[40] As of 2007, Forbes estimated the Bucksbaum family's assets at $4.1 billion, including about 18.6 million square meters of mall space.[41] General Growth Properties NYSE: GGP is a publicly-traded real estate investment trust in the United States. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ...


Ann and Thomas Friedman live in Bethesda, Maryland, a suburb of Washington, D.C. The July 2006 issue of Washingtonian reported that they own "a palatial 11,400-square-foot house, currently valued at $9.3 million, on a 7½-acre parcel just blocks from I-495 and Bethesda Country Club." They have two daughters: Orly Friedman (b. 1985), who attends Yale University; and Natalie Friedman (b. 1988), who attends Williams College. Both were born in Israel while Friedman served as a correspondent for The New York Times.[42] Friedman has dedicated many of his published works to his daughters. Bethesda is an urbanized, but unincorporated, area in southern Montgomery County, Maryland, near Washington, D.C. It takes its name from a church located there, the Bethesda Presbyterian Church, built in 1820 and rebuilt in 1850, which in turn took its name from Jerusalems Pool of Bethesda. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Early elections in November are announced in the Netherlands. ... The Washingtonian is a monthly magazine distrubuted in the Washington DC area. ... Yale redirects here. ... Williams College is a highly selective [1] private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ...


Published works

Friedman's books have seen considerable commercial success. His latest book, The World Is Flat, was on the New York Times Best Seller list from its publication in April 2005 until May 2007. Since July 2006, the book has sold more than two million copies. The New York Times Best Seller List is a weekly chart in The New York Times newspaper that keeps track of the best-selling books of the week. ...


Bibliography

From Beirut to Jerusalem is a book written by Thomas L. Friedman chronicling his days as a reporter in Beirut during the Lebanese Civil War and his journey in 1984 from Beirut to Jerusalem to cover unfolding events. ... The Lexus and the Olive Tree is a 1999 book by Thomas L. Friedman that posits that the world is currently undergoing two struggles: the drive for prosperity and development (symbolized by the Lexus), and the desire to retain identity and traditions (symbolized by the olive tree). ... Longitudes and Attitudes is the third book by New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman. ... For other uses, see The World Is Flat (disambiguation). ...

Documentaries

Friedman has also hosted several documentaries for the Discovery Channel from several locations around the world. In "Straddling the Fence" (2003), he visited the West Bank and spoke to Israelis and Palestinians about the Israeli West Bank barrier and its impact on their lives. Also in 2003, "Thomas L. Friedman Reporting: Searching for the Roots of 9/11" aired on the Discovery Times Channel. This program investigated the reason for Muslim hatred of the United States, and how the Sept. 11th attacks in New York, Pennsylvania, and the Pentagon were viewed in the Muslim world. Discovery Channel is a cable and satellite TV channel founded by John Hendricks which is distributed by Discovery Communications. ... The barrier route as of July 2006. ... Searching for the Roots of 9/11 is a documentary which aired on the Discovery Channel in 2003. ...


In "The Other Side of Outsourcing" (2004), he visited a call center in Bangalore, interviewing the young Indians working there, and then traveled to an impoverished rural part of India, where he debated the pros and cons of globalization with locals (this trip spawned his eventual bestselling book "The World is Flat"). , For other uses, see Bangalore (disambiguation). ...


In "Does Europe Hate Us?" (2005), Friedman traveled through Britain, France and Germany, talking with academics, journalists, Marshall and Rhodes scholars, young Muslims and others about the nature of the strained relationship between Europe and the United States. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent...


"Addicted to Oil" (2006) premiered at the Silverdocs Film Festival at 5:30 PM on June 16, 2006, and aired on June 24, 2006, at 10 p.m. ET on the Discovery Times Channel. In it he examined the geopolitical, economic, and environmental consequences of petroleum use and ways that green technologies such as alternative fuels and energy, efficiency, and conservation can reduce oil dependence. is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In "Green: The New, Red, White and Blue" (2007) Friedman elaborates on the green technologies and efforts touched on in "Addicted to Oil" and in doing so attempts to redefine green energy as "geostrategic, geoeconomic, capitalistic and patriotic". He explores efforts by companies and individuals to reduce their carbon footprint and save money with conservation, efficiency, and technologies such as solar, wind, biomass, nuclear, and clean coal.


References

  1. ^ The Echo
  2. ^ Why the World Is Flat.
  3. ^ New York Times article by Thomas Friedman on Beirut massacre
  4. ^ Official website
  5. ^ Columns for The New York Times
  6. ^ Thomas Friedman at NNDB
  7. ^ Washington Week biography
  8. ^ Friedman's 2002 Pulitzer Prize-winning works
  9. ^ Interview with Oliver Burkeman of The Guardian, 2003
  10. ^ Sirota, David. "Where Economics Meets Religious Fundamentalism", San Francisco Chronicle, Hearst Communications, 2006-08-11, p. B6. 
  11. ^ CPJ Declares Open Season on Thomas Friedman FAIR
  12. ^ David Edwards and David Cromwell. Guardians of Power. p53
  13. ^ Floyd.shtml Hideous Kinky: The Genocidal Fury of Thomas Friedman. Chris Floyd. Baltimore Chronicle and Sentinel
  14. ^ Vote France Off the Island
  15. ^ Is Tom Friedman a Bad Person?
  16. ^ Deep Thoughts From Tom Friedman 27 May 2007
  17. ^ Tom Friedman: “Suck on this, Iraq” September 13, 2007
  18. ^ a b Friedman, Thomas (January 12, 2004). Liberal Hawks Reconsider the Iraq War: Four Reasons To Invade Iraq. Slate.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-07.
  19. ^ The Endgame in Iraq 29 Sep. 2005
  20. ^ Time for Plan B August 4, 2006. NYTimes.com
  21. ^ Video: A conversation with Thomas L. Friedman Charlie Rose, Aug. 16, 2007
  22. ^ The NYT's Thomas Friedman The Geraldo Rivera of the NYT November 2003
  23. ^ http://www.beloblog.com/ProJo_Blogs/newsblog/archives/2008/04/student_identif.html
  24. ^ Tom Friedman's Flexible Deadlines: Iraq's 'decisive' six months have lasted two and a half years May 16, 2006
  25. ^ Amazon.com interview on The World is Flat, 2005
  26. ^ Slate forum: Liberal Hawks Reconsider the Iraq War
  27. ^ "Thomas Friedman: What makes the Timesman a great columnist? Not that peace proposal" by David Plotz, 2002
  28. ^ "The Quest for Symbols" by Said Shirazi - criticism of Friedman's writing, 2002
  29. ^ "Back at the Wheel: Thomas Friedman just loves to grind the gears" A critique of Thomas Friedman's writing style by Matt Taibbi, 2003
  30. ^ "The Geraldo Rivera of the New York Times" - criticism by Edward S. Herman, Z Magazine, November 2003
  31. ^ "Missing the Bus to Bangladesh", a parody of Friedman's writing style, 2005
  32. ^ "The Strategic Class", by Ari Berman, 2005
  33. ^ "Flathead: The peculiar genius of Thomas L. Friedman", review of The World is Flat by Matt Taibbi, 2005
  34. ^ "Billionaire Scion Tom Friedman" by David Sirota, 2006
  35. ^ Tom Friedman's Flexible Deadlines A review of Friedman's punditry with respect to Iraq by FAIR
  36. ^ Not Since Nixon--Friedman in China, Sells Tom's World, The New York Observer
  37. ^ Daily Recoking, Daily Reconing, UK
  38. ^ White House Mounts Media Blitz After Killing of Zarqawi June 11, 2006
  39. ^ College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Iowa State University
  40. ^ Generalgrowth.com
  41. ^ Bloomberg.com, Forbes.com
  42. ^ College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Iowa State University, Notable Names DataBase
  43. ^ http://media.www.browndailyherald.com/media/storage/paper472/news/2008/04/23/CampusNews/Despite.Protest.Friedman.Delivers.Green.Message-3343491.shtml

For other uses, see Guardian. ... David J. Sirota (b. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... The Hearst Corporation is a large privately-held media conglomerate based in New York City. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... David Plotz is an American journalist who serves as deputy editor for Slate. ... Matthew C. Taibbi (born February 3, 1970), an American journalist and political writer. ... Edward S. Herman is an economist and media analyst with a specialty in corporate and regulatory issues as well as political economy and the media. ... Matthew C. Taibbi (born February 3, 1970), an American journalist and political writer. ... David J. Sirota (b. ...

External links

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Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

Videos

This article is about the American journalist. ... For other uses, see The World Is Flat (disambiguation). ... Robert Kagan (born September 26, 1958) is an American neoconservative scholar and political commentator. ... The Endowments headquarters at 1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is a private nonprofit organization promoting international cooperation and active international engagement by the United States of America. ... C-SPAN (the Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network) is an American cable television network dedicated to airing non-stop coverage of government proceedings and public affairs programming. ... Presented by The International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, the Webby Awards are a set of awards presented to the worlds best websites. The awards have been given out since 1996. ... MIT OpenCourseWare (MIT OCW) is an initiative of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to put all of the educational materials from MITs undergraduate- and graduate-level courses online, free and openly available to anyone, anywhere, by the year 2007. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Washington Week . Thomas Friedman | PBS (526 words)
Thomas Friedman was born in Minneapolis on July 20, 1953.
Friedman was transferred from Beirut to Jerusalem, where he served as the Times' Israel bureau chief until February 1988, when he was awarded a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship to write a book about his reflections on the Middle East.
Friedman shifted to domestic politics and was appointed chief White House correspondent.
Thomas Friedman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2412 words)
Thomas Loren Friedman, OBE (born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist, columnist, author and three-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, currently working as an op-ed contributor for The New York Times.
Friedman is known for supporting a compromise peace between Israel and the Palestinians, modernization of the Arab world, environmental issues and globalization, while sometimes remarking on their potential pitfalls to the United States economy and society.
In November 1978, Friedman married economist Ann Bucksbaum, a native of Des Moines and a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Stanford University.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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