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Encyclopedia > Thomas Bradwardine

Thomas Bradwardine (c. 1290August 26, 1349), was an English archbishop, often called "the Profound Doctor". He was born either at Hartfield in Sussex or at Chichester. For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (239th in leap years). ... // Events August 24 - Black Death outbreak in Elbing (modern-day Elblag in Poland) October 20 - Pope Clement VI publishes a papal bull that condemns the Flagellants The bubonic plague is spread to Norway when an English ship with everyone dead on board floats to Bergen Births September 9 - Duke Albert... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Travel guide to England from Wikitravel English language English law English (people) List of monarchs of England – Kings of England family tree List of English people Angeln (region in northern Germany, presumably the origin of the Angles for whom England is named) UK... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ... Hartfield Parish Church Hartfield Parish, situated in East Sussex, consists of several villages on the edge of Ashdown Forest. ... Sussex is a traditional county in south-eastern England, corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. ... Chichester Cross, in a circa 1831 illustration. ...


He was educated at Balliol College, Oxford where he took the degree of doctor of divinity, and acquired the reputation of a profound scholar, a skilful mathematician and an able theologian. He subsequently moved to Merton College on a fellowship. He was afterwards raised to the high offices of chancellor of the university and professor of divinity. College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister College St Johns Master Andrew Graham JCR President Jack Hawkins Undergraduates 403 Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Mathematics Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Mathematics Look up Mathematics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Mathematics Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles — A collection of articles on various math topics, with interactive Java... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... Merton College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ...


From being chancellor of the diocese of London, he became chaplain and confessor to Edward III, whom he attended during his wars in France. On his return to England, he was successively appointed prebendary of Lincoln, archdeacon of Lincoln (1347), and in 1349 archbishop of Canterbury. He died of the plague at Lambeth on August 26, 1349, forty days after his consecration. Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the most populous city in the European Union, with an estimated population on 1 January 2005 of 7,500,000 and a metropolitan area population of between 12 and 14 million. ... Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was one of the most successful English kings of medieval times. ... // Events August 24 - Black Death outbreak in Elbing (modern-day Elblag in Poland) October 20 - Pope Clement VI publishes a papal bull that condemns the Flagellants The bubonic plague is spread to Norway when an English ship with everyone dead on board floats to Bergen Births September 9 - Duke Albert... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Lambeth Palaces gatehouse Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury, located in Lambeth, beside the Thames opposite the Palace of Westminster. ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (239th in leap years). ...


Chaucer in his Nun's Priest's Tale ranks Bradwardine with St. Augustine. His great work is a treatise against the Pelagians, entitled De causa Dei contra Pelagium et de virtute causarum, edited by Sir Henry Savile (London, 1618) in which he treated theology mathematically, and which earned for him from the Pope the title of the Profound Doctor. He wrote also De Geometria speculativa (Paris, 5530); De Arithmetica practica (Paris, 1502); De Proportionibus (Paris, ‘495; Venice, 1505); De Quadratura Circuli (Paris, 1495); and an Ars Memorative, Sloane manuscripts. No. 3974 in the British Museum. Chaucer: Illustration from Cassells History of England, circa 1902 Chanticleer the rooster from an outdoor production of Chanticleer and the Fox at Ashby_de_la_Zouch castle Geoffrey Chaucer (ca. ... St. ... Pelagianism is a belief that original sin did not taint human nature (which, being created from God, was divine), and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil with no Divine aid whatesoever. ... The main entrance to the British Museum The British Museum in London is the United Kingdoms - and one of the worlds - largest and most important museums of human history and culture. ...


Bradwardine was one of the Oxford Calculators, of Merton College, Oxford University, studying mechanics with William Heytesbury, Richard Swineshead, and John Dumbleton. The Oxford Calculators distinguished kinematics from dynamics, emphasizing kinematics, and investigating instantaneous velocity. They first formulated the mean speed theorem: a body moving with constant velocity travels distance and time equal to an accelerated body whose velocity is half the final speed of the accelerated body. They also demonstrated this theorem -- essence of "The Law of Falling Bodies" -- long before Galileo is credited with this. In physics, kinematics is the branch of mechanics concerned with the motions of objects without being concerned with the forces that cause the motion. ... The word dynamics can refer to: a branch of mechanics; see dynamics (mechanics) the volume of music; see dynamics (music) DYNAMIC+ This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... On January 7, 1610 Galileo discovered three of Jupiters four largest satellites (moons): Io, Europa, and Callisto. ...


The mathematical physicist and historian of science Clifford Truesdell, wrote: Clifford Ambrose Truesdell III, February 18, 1919 – January 4, 2000 was an American mathematician, physicist, fluid dynamicist, and polemicist. ...

"The now published sources prove to us, beyond contention, that the main kinematical properties of uniformly accelerated motions, still attributed to Galileo by the physics texts, were discovered and proved by scholars of Merton college .... In principle, the qualities of Greek physics were replaced, at least for motions, by the numerical quantities that have ruled Western science ever since. The work was quickly diffused into France, Italy, and other parts of Europe. Almost immediately, Antonio da Casale and Nicole Oreme found how to represent the results by geometrical graphs, introducing the connection between geometry and the physical world that became a second characteristic habit of Western thought ..."

In Tractatus de proportionibus (1328), Thomas Bradwardine extended the theory of proportions of Eudoxus to anticipate the concept of exponential growth, later developed by the Bernoulli and Euler, with compound interest as a special case. Arguments for the mean speed theorem (above) require the modern concept of limit, so Bradwardine had to use arguments of his day. Mathematician and mathematical historian Carl O. Boyer writes, "Bradwardine developed the Boethian theory of double or triple or, more generally, what we would call 'n-tple' proportion". On January 7, 1610 Galileo discovered three of Jupiters four largest satellites (moons): Io, Europa, and Callisto. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, covering around 10,790,000 km² (4,170,000 sq mi) or 2. ... Geometry (Greek γεωμετρία; geo = earth, metria = measure) arose as the field of knowledge dealing with spatial relationships. ... Eudoxus of Cnidus (Greek Εύδοξος) (410 or 408 BC - 355 or 347 BC) was a Greek astronomer, mathematician, physician, scholar and friend of Plato. ... In mathematics, a quantity that grows exponentially is one that grows at a rate proportional to its size. ... Jakob Bernoulli. ... Leonhard Euler aged 49 (oil painting by Emanuel Handmann, 1756) Leonhard Euler (April 15, 1707 - September 18, 1783) (pronounced oiler) was a Swiss mathematician and physicist. ... In finance, interest has three general definitions. ... A limit can be: Limit (mathematics), including: Limit of a function Limit of a sequence Limit point Net (topology) Limit (category theory) A constraint (mathematical, physical, economical, legal, etc. ...


Boyer also writes that "the works of Bradwardine had contained some fundamentals of trigonometry gleaned from Muslim sources". Trigonometry (from the Greek trigonon = three angles and metro = measure) is a branch of mathematics dealing with angles, triangles and trigonometric functions such as sine, cosine and tangent. ... Islām is described as a dīn, meaning way of life and/or guidance. Six articles of belief There are six basic beliefs shared by all Muslims: 1. ...


References

  • A History of Mathematics (288, 302), Carl O. Boyer, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1984.
  • The Science of Mechanics in the Middle Ages, Marshall Claggett, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, 1960.
  • Tractatus de Proportionibus, Its Significance for the Development of Mathematical Physics, H. L. Crosby, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, 1955.
  • Essays in The History of Mechanics, Clifford Truesdell, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1968, QC122.T7.
  • See Quétif-Echard, Script. Praedic. (1719), i. 744; WF Hook, Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury, vol. iv.
  • This article incorporates public domain text from: Cousin, John William (1910). A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature. London, J.M. Dent & sons; New York, E.P. Dutton.

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature is a collection of biographies of writers by John W. Cousin, published around 1910. ...

External link

  • Thomas Bradwardine at The MacTutor History of Mathematics archive
Preceded by:
John de Ufford
Archbishop of Canterbury Followed by:
Simon Islip

  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: Thomas Bradwardine (1834 words)
In Tractatus de proportionibus (1328), Thomas Bradwardine extended the theory of proportions of Eudoxus to anticipate the concept of exponential growth, later developed by the Bernoulli and Euler, with compound interest as a special case.
Bradwardine was also one of the Oxford calculators and studied mechanics with William Heytesbury, Richard Swineshead, and John Dumbleton.
Bradwardine was a noted mathematician as well as theologian and was known as 'the profound doctor'.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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