FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Thomas Becket
Saint Thomas Becket

Thirteenth century manuscript illumination, an early depiction of Becket's assassination
Title Archbishop of Canterbury
Consecrated 1162
Ended December 29, 1170
Predecessor Theobald of Bec
Successor Richard of Dover
Born c. 1118
Cheapside, London
Died December 29, 1170 (aged 52)
Canterbury
Buried Canterbury Cathedral

Sainthood Image File history File links Thomas_Becket_Murder. ... An illuminated manuscript is a manuscript, often of a religious nature, in which the text is supplemented by the addition of colourful ornamentation, such as decorated initials, borders and the like. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 29: Assassination of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Theobald (Tedbald) (died April 18, 1161) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1138 to 1161. ... Richard (d. ... This article is about the street in London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 29: Assassination of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. ...

'Archbishop and Martyr'
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church, Anglican Communion
Beatified February 21, 1173
Major shrine Canterbury Cathedral
Commemorated December 29
Attributes Sword, Martyrdom, dressed in chancellor's robe and neck chain
Patronage Exeter College, Oxford; Portsmouth; Arbroath Abbey; secular clergy
Controversy argumentative
Saints Portal

Saint Thomas Becket, St. Thomas of Canterbury, (c. 1118December 29, 1170) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 to 1170. He is venerated as a saint and martyr by both the Roman Catholic Church and the Anglican Church. Veneration is a religious symbolic act giving honor to someone by honoring an image of that person, particularly applied to saints. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Canonization of Saint Thomas à Becket, buried at Canterbury Castle at Abergavenny was seized by the Welsh. ... Shrine is also used as a conventional translation of the Japanese Jinja. ... Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint symbology was important to people who couldnt read because they can figure out what symbols mean. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... and of the Exeter College College name Exeter College Latin name Collegium Exoniense Named after Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter Established 1314 Sister college Emmanuel College, Cambridge Rector Ms Frances Cairncross JCR president Edward Moores Undergraduates 299 MCR president Sara Adams Graduates 150 Location of Exeter College within central... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... Arbroath Abbey, showing distinctive sandstone colouring. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... Events Knights Templar founded Baldwin of Le Bourg succeeds his cousin Baldwin I as king of Jerusalem John II Comnenus succeeds Alexius I as Byzantine emperor Gelasius II succeeds Paschal II as pope Births November 28 - Manuel I Comnenus, Byzantine Emperor (died 1180) Andronicus I Comnenus, Byzantine Emperor (died 1185... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 29: Assassination of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Saints redirects here. ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ...


He engaged in conflict with King Henry II over the rights and privileges of the Church and was assassinated by followers of the king in Canterbury Cathedral. He is also commonly known as Thomas à Becket, although this form may not have been contemporaneous. The "à" is now believed to be a complete error. Historian John Strype wrote in his Memorials of Thomas Cranmer (1694): "It is a small error, but being so oft repeated deserveth to be observed into corrected. The name of that archbishop was Thomas Becket. If the vulgar did formerly, as it doth now, call him 'Thomas à Becket' their mistake is not to be followed by learned men." Henry II of England (called Curtmantle; 25 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... This is an incomplete list of persons that were assassinated for political and other reasons, and who have individual entries. ... Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. ... John Strype (November 1, 1643 - December 11, 1737) was an English historian and biographer. ... Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books of Common Prayer which established the basic structure of Anglican liturgy for centuries and...


Notwithstanding, the Oxford Dictionary of English, the New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors and Chambers Biographical Dictionary all prefer St. Thomas à Becket. A copy of the 2001 issue of the NODE The Oxford Dictionary of English (formerly The New Oxford Dictionary of English, often abbreviated to NODE) is a single-volume English language dictionary first published in 1998 by the Oxford University Press. ...

Contents

Early life

Thomas Becket was born around 1118 in Cheapside, London, to Gilbert of Thierceville, Normandy, and Matilda (with a familiar name of Roheise or Rosea) of Caen.[1] His parents were of the upper-middle class near Rouen, and were buried in Old St. Paul's Cathedral. There is a story that Thomas' mother had been a Saracen princess who had met and fallen in love with his English father whilst he was on Crusade or pilgrimage in the Holy Land, followed him home, was baptised and then married him. This story has no truth in it,[2] and its origin is unknown. This article is about the street in London. ... For other uses, see Normandy (disambiguation). ... , Caen (pronounced ) is a commune of northwestern France. ... , Rouen (pronounced in French) is the historical capital city of Normandy, in northwestern France on the River Seine, and currently the capital of the Haute-Normandie (Upper Normandy) région. ... Old St. ... Saracens was a term used in the Middle Ages for those who professed the religion of Islam. ...


One of Thomas' father's rich friends, Richer de L'Aigle, was attracted to Thomas' sisters. He often invited Thomas to his estates in Sussex. There, Thomas learned to ride a horse, hunt, behave like a gentleman, and engage in popular sports such as jousting. Beginning when he was 10, Becket received an excellent education in civil and canon law at Merton Priory in England, and then overseas at Paris, Bologna, and Auxerre. Richer was later a signatory at the Constitutions of Clarendon against Thomas. This article refers to the historic county in England. ... Joust redirects here. ... Merton Priory was founded in 1114 by Gilbert a sheriff of Henry I. By 1117 the foundation was colonised by canons from the Augustinian priory at Huntingdon and re-sited close to the River Wandle. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For the food product, see Bologna sausage. ... Coordinates Administration Country France Region Bourgogne Department Yonne (Prefecture) Arrondissement Auxerre Canton Chief town of 5 cantons Intercommunality Communauté de Communes de lAuxerrois Mayor Guy Ferez (2001-2008) Statistics Altitude 93 m–217 m (avg. ... The Constitutions of Clarendon were a set of legislative procedures passed by Henry II of England in 1164. ...


Upon returning to the Kingdom of England, he attracted the notice of Theobald, Archbishop of Canterbury, who entrusted him with several important missions to Rome and finally made him Archdeacon of Canterbury and Provost of Beverley. He so distinguished himself by his zeal and efficiency that Theobald recommended him to King Henry II when the important office of Lord Chancellor was vacant. Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Theobald (Tedbald) (died April 18, 1161) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1138 to 1161. ... Arms of Beverley For other uses, see Beverley (disambiguation). ... Henry II of England (called Curtmantle; 25 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ...


Henry, like all the Norman kings, desired to be absolute ruler of his dominions, both Church and State, and could find precedents in the traditions of the throne when he planned to do away with the special privileges of the English clergy, which he regarded as fetters on his authority. As Chancellor, Becket enforced the king’s traditional medieval land tax that was exacted from all landowners, including churches and bishoprics. This created both a hardship and a resentment of Becket among the English Churchmen. To further implicate Becket as a secular man, he became an accomplished and extravagant courtier and a cheerful companion to the king's pleasures. Thomas was devoted to Henry's interests with such a firm and yet diplomatic thoroughness that scarcely anyone, except perhaps John of Salisbury, doubted his allegiance to English royalty. The Norman dynasty is a series of four monarchs, who ruled England from the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066, until 1154. ... A courtier is a person who attends upon, and thus receives a privileged position from, a powerful person, usually a head of state. ... John of Salisbury (c. ...


King Henry even sent his son Henry to live in Becket's household, it being the custom then for noble children to be fostered out to other noble houses. The younger Henry was reported to have said Becket showed him more fatherly love in a day than his father did for his entire life. An emotional attachment to Becket as a foster-father may have been one of the reasons the younger Henry would turn against his father. Henry, the Young King Henry the Young King (February 28, 1155–June 11, 1183) was the second of five sons of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. ...


Primacy

Thomas achieved his final position of power as the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1162, several months after the death of Theobald. Henry intended to further his influence by directing the actions of Thomas, his loyal appointee, and diminish the independence and affluence of the Church in England. The famous transformation of Becket into an ascetic occurred at this time. The hagiographers of the Saint portray his virtuous behaviour variously as (a) already part of his daily life (e.g. hair shirts worn under his courtier clothes) or (b) driven to devotion by Henry's lustful design or (c) motivated by self-interest and his own power grab. Most accounts of Thomas's early days as Archbishop were written after his death and were likely influenced by the political environment that existed then. The implications of Thomas's canonisation for the Pope as well as the King translated to real political gain or loss for each. The word ascetic derives from the ancient Greek term askesis (practice, training or exercise). ... Hagiography is the study of saints. ...


A rift grew between Henry and Thomas as the new Archbishop dropped his Chancellorship and consolidated the landed revenues of Canterbury under his control. So began a series of legal conflicts, such as the jurisdiction of secular courts over English clergy, which accelerated antipathy between the two great offices. Attempts by King Henry to foment the opinion and influence of the other Bishoprics against Thomas began in Westminster in October 1163, where the King sought approval of stated royal privileges. This led to Clarendon, where Thomas was officially asked to sign off on the King’s rights or face political repercussions. The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ...


The Constitutions of Clarendon

For more details on this topic, see Constitutions of Clarendon.
Depiction of Thomas Becket's assassination and funeral, from a French casket made about 1180 for Prior Benedict — a witness to the murder — to take some of the saint's relics to Peterborough Abbey when he became Abbot there
Depiction of Thomas Becket's assassination and funeral, from a French casket made about 1180 for Prior Benedict — a witness to the murder — to take some of the saint's relics to Peterborough Abbey when he became Abbot there

King Henry II presided over the assemblys at Clarendon Palace on January 30, 1164. In sixteen constitutions, he sought less clerical independence and a weaker connection with Rome. He employed all his skills to induce their consent and was apparently successful with all but the Primate. The Constitutions of Clarendon were a set of legislative procedures passed by Henry II of England in 1164. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2000x2000, 2712 KB) Description Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Thomas Becket Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2000x2000, 2712 KB) Description Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Thomas Becket Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... For other uses, see Relic (disambiguation). ... Peterborough Cathedral Plan Peterborough Cathedral is dedicated to Saint Peter, Saint Paul and Saint Andrew, and is very unusual amongst mediæval cathedrals in Britain because of its triple front (dominated by the statues of the three saints) and overall asymmetrical appearance. ... The ruins of Clarendon Palace Clarendon Palace is an ancient ruin in Wiltshire, England. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Count Henry I of Champagne marries Marie de Champagne. ... Primate (from the Latin Primus, first) is a title or rank bestowed on some bishops in certain Christian churches. ...


Finally even Becket expressed his willingness to agree to the substance of the Constitutions of Clarendon; but he still refused to formally sign the documents. This meant war between the two powers. Henry summoned Becket to appear before a great council at Northampton Castle on October 8, 1164, to answer allegations of contempt of royal authority and malfeasance in the Lord Chancellor's office. Convicted on the charges, Becket stormed out of the trial and fled to Europe. The Constitutions of Clarendon were a set of legislative procedures passed by Henry II of England in 1164. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Count Henry I of Champagne marries Marie de Champagne. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ...


Henry pursued the fugitive archbishop with a series of edicts, aimed at all his friends and supporters as well as Becket himself; but Louis VII of France received him with respect and offered him protection. He spent nearly two years in the Cistercian abbey of Pontigny, until Henry's threats against the order obliged him to move to Sens again. Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... The Order of Cistercians (OCist) (Latin Cistercenses), otherwise Gimey or White Monks (from the colour of the habit, over which is worn a black scapular or apron) are a Catholic order of monks. ... Choir of the abbey church of Pontigny Ground plan of the abbey church of Pontigny Pontigny Abbey, founded in 1114 as the second of the four great daughter houses of Cîteaux Abbey, was situated on the River Serein, in the present diocese of Sens and département of Yonne...


Becket sought to exercise the prerogatives of the Church, particularly the weapons of excommunication and interdict. But Pope Alexander III, though sympathising with him in theory, favoured a more diplomatic approach. Differences thus arose between Pope and Archbishop, which became even more bitter when legates were sent in 1167 with authority to act as arbitrators. Disregarding this limitation on his jurisdiction, Becket continued to reject any limitations on the rights of his order. Excommunication is a religious censure used to deprive or suspend membership in a religious community. ... For other meanings see Interdict The word interdict usually refers to an ecclesiastical penalty in the Roman Catholic Church. ... Pope Alexander III (c. ...


His firmness seemed about to meet with its reward when in 1170 the Pope was on the point of fulfilling his threats and excommunicating the entire population of England. At that point Henry, alarmed by the prospect, held out hopes of an agreement that would allow Thomas to return to England and resume his place. Even though both men met at a wooded area outside of Paris and negotiated with an apparent reconciliation Becket refused to compromise on any issue whatsoever and thus even re-affirmed the Church's authority with even more stridency and obstinacy on his return to England, through excommunicating those who had stood with Henry. Soon word of this reached Henry who was in Normandy at the time.


Assassination

A Seal of the Abbot of Arbroath, depicting the murder of St. Thomas. Arbroath Abbey was founded 8 years after the death of St. Thomas and dedicated to him; it became the wealthiest abbey in Scotland.
A Seal of the Abbot of Arbroath, depicting the murder of St. Thomas. Arbroath Abbey was founded 8 years after the death of St. Thomas and dedicated to him; it became the wealthiest abbey in Scotland.

After these latest venomous reports of Becket's activities, Henry is reported to have raised his head from his sickbed and roared a lament of frustration. What the King's exact words were are in doubt, and several versions have been reported: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (744x616, 84 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arbroath Abbey Thomas Becket Abbot of Arbroath ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (744x616, 84 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arbroath Abbey Thomas Becket Abbot of Arbroath ... This article is about the authentication means. ... Abbey seal, depicting murder of St Thomas. ... , Arbroath or Aberbrothock (Scottish Gaelic: Obair Bhrothaig which translates literally as at the mouth of the Brothock[1]) is a former royal burgh and the largest town in the council area of Angus in Scotland, and has a population of 22,785. ... Arbroath Abbey, showing distinctive sandstone colouring. ...

  • "Who will rid me of this troublesome priest?"
  • "Who will rid me of this turbulent priest?"
  • "Will no one rid me of this turbulent priest?"
  • "Will no one revenge me of the injuries I have sustained from one turbulent priest?"
  • "Will none of the knaves eating my bread rid me of this turbulent priest?"
  • "What a band of loathsome vipers I have nursed in my bosom who will let their lord be insulted by this low-born cleric!"
  • "What miserable drones and traitors have I nourished and brought up in my household, who let their Lord be treated with such shameful contempt by a low-born cleric?" [3]

Whatever the King said, it was interpreted as a royal command, and four knights —

— set out to consult the Archbishop of Canterbury. On December 29, 1170, they arrived at Canterbury and immediately left their armor and weapons under a tree, this shows they had no intention to kill Becket. The knights informed Becket he was to go to Winchester to give an account of his actions, to which Becket refused. Becket then proceeded to the main hall for vespers, when the four knights, carrying naked swords, caught up with him in a spot near a door to the monastic cloister, the stairs into the crypt, and the stairs leading up into the quire of the cathedral, where the monks were chanting vespers. Several contemporary accounts of what happened next exist; of particular note is that of Edward Grim, who was himself wounded in the attack. Contemporary drawing portraying the murder of Becket Reginald Fitzurse was one of the four knights who murdered Thomas Becket. ... 13th century depiction of Thomas Beckets murder; Hugh de Morvile was among the assassins Hugh de Morville (died c. ... Sir William de Tracy (Traci) was born after 1135, and died about 1190. ... Contemporary drawing portraying the murder of Becket Richard le Breton was one of the four knights who murdered Thomas Becket. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 29: Assassination of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Winchester is a historic city in southern England, with a population of around 40,000 within a 3 mile radius of its centre. ... The choir stalls in the quire of Bristol Cathedral, Bristol, England A quire is the area of a church where the choir sits, also known as the choir. ... Vespers is the evening prayer service in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox liturgies of the canonical hours. ... Edward Grim was a clerk from Cambridge who was visiting Canterbury Cathedral on Tuesday 29 December 1170 when Thomas Becket was murdered. ...

The burial of Becket
The burial of Becket

This is part of the written account from Edward Grim: Image File history File links Burialbecket. ... Image File history File links Burialbecket. ... Edward Grim was a clerk from Cambridge who was visiting Canterbury Cathedral on Tuesday 29 December 1170 when Thomas Becket was murdered. ...

...The wicked knight leapt suddenly upon him, cutting off the top of the crown which the unction of sacred chrism had dedicated to God. Next he received a second blow on the head, but still he stood firm and immovable. At the third blow he fell on his knees and elbows, offering himself a living sacrifice, and saying in a low voice, 'For the name of Jesus and the protection of the Church, I am ready to embrace death.' But the third knight inflicted a terrible wound as he lay prostrate. By this stroke, the crown of his head was separated from the head in such a way that the blood white with the brain, and the brain no less red from the blood, dyed the floor of the cathedral. The same clerk who had entered with the knights placed his foot on the neck of the holy priest and precious martyr, and, horrible to relate, scattered the brains and blood about the pavements, crying to the others, 'Let us away, knights; this fellow will arise no more.' This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...

Following his death, the monks prepared his body for burial. It was discovered that Becket had worn a hairshirt under his archbishop's garments. Soon after, the faithful throughout Europe began venerating Becket as a martyr, and in 1173 — barely three years after his death — he was canonised by Pope Alexander in St. Peter's Church in Segni. On July 12, 1174, in the midst of the Revolt of 1173–1174, Henry humbled himself with public penance at Becket's tomb (see also St. Dunstan's, Canterbury), which became one of the most popular pilgrimage sites in England. In 1220, Becket's remains were relocated from this first tomb to a shrine in the recently completed Trinity Chapel where it stood until it was destroyed in 1538, around the time of the Dissolution of the Monasteries, on orders from King Henry VIII. The king also destroyed Becket's bones and ordered that all mention of his name be obliterated.[4] The pavement where the shrine stood is today marked by a lit candle. Modern day archbishops celebrate the Eucharist at this place to commemorate Becket's martyrdom and the translation of his body from his first burial place to the new shrine. It has been suggested that hairshirt be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... This article discusses the process of declaring saints. ... Pope Alexander III (c. ... Segni, in the Latin language called Signinsis, is an Italian city located in the Province of Rome. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Vietnam is given the official name of Annam by China. ... The Revolt of 1173–1174 was a rebellion against Henry II of England by three of his sons, his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine and rebel supporters. ... For other uses, see Penance (disambiguation). ... Church dedicated to St. ... This article is about the religious or spiritual journey. ... Shrine is also used as a conventional translation of the Japanese Jinja. ... For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ...


Aftermath and cultural references

Stained glass window of Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral.

Local legends regarding Becket arose after his canonisation. Though they are typical hagiographical stories, they also display Becket’s particular gruffness. Becket's Well, in Otford, Kent, is said to have been created after Becket had become displeased with the taste of the local water. Two springs of clear water are said to have bubbled up after he struck the ground with his crozier. The absence of nightingales in Otford is also ascribed to Becket, who is said to have been so disturbed in his devotions by the song of a nightingale that he commanded that none should sing in the town ever again. In the town of Strood, also in Kent, Becket is said to have caused the inhabitants of the town and their descendants to be born with tails. The men of Strood had sided with the king in his struggles against the archbishop, and to demonstrate their support, had cut off the tail of Becket’s horse as he passed through the town. Hagiography is the study of saints. ... Otford is a village and civil parish in the Sevenoaks District of Kent. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... A crosier (crozier, pastoral staff) is the stylized staff of office carried by high-ranking Catholic prelates. ... Binomial name Luscinia megarhynchos (Brehm, 1831) This article is about the bird. ... Statistics Population: 33182 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TQ725695 Administration District: Medway Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Kent Historic county: Kent Services Police force: Kent Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South East Coast Post office and telephone Post town: ROCHESTER...

Candle marking the former spot of the shrine of Thomas Becket, at Canterbury Cathedral
Candle marking the former spot of the shrine of Thomas Becket, at Canterbury Cathedral
  • In The Black Adder, King Richard IV of England is telling the tale of the words spoken by Henry II, and a pair of knights act under his interpreted order to kill Prince Edmund, who was Archbishop of Canterbury at the time.
  • In the nineteenth century, Conrad Ferdinand Meyer wrote the novella Der Heilige (The Saint) about Thomas Becket.
  • Ken Follett's historical novel The Pillars of the Earth, which is mostly an account of the building of a Gothic architecture cathedral, also depicts the struggles between the Church, the gentry, and the monarchy, culminating in the assassination and martyrdom of Becket by Henry's men. This fictionalised account is considered largely historically accurate, but adds one of the book's fictional villains as the fifth attacker.
  • An episode of History Bites is set in the aftermath of Becket's assassination.
  • Masonic scholars, seeking to establish the origin of the third degree ritual of the death of Hiram Abif, have suggested (among many other theories) that it was a re-telling of the murder of Becket.[5][6] This theory included reference to a company of masons in the City of London making a procession to St. Thomas's Chapel on his saint's day. The theory suggests that there may have been an emblematic performance concerning the death of Thomas on that day.
  • The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, a nonprofit, nonpartisan, interfaith, legal and educational institute dedicated to protecting the free expression of all religious traditions, took its inspiration and namesake from Thomas Becket.[7]
  • In 2006, in a poll carried out by the BBC, Becket was chosen from 10 historical figures as the second "worst" Briton in history, behind only Jack the Ripper.[8]

Chaucer redirects here. ... For other uses, see The Canterbury Tales (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Southwark (disambiguation). ... Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. ... The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) in London is the worlds largest and finest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... Becket in a window in Canterbury Cathedral Murder in the Cathedral is a poetic drama by T. S. Eliot that portrays the assassination of Archbishop Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral in 1170. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Becket or the Honor of God is a Tony Award-winning play written in French by Jean Anouilh. ... Becket is a 1964 film adaptation of the play Becket or the Honour of God by Jean Anouilh made by Hal Wallis Productions and released by Paramount Pictures. ... Four Nights in Knaresborough is a play written by Paul Corcoran (now known as Paul Webb) and first performed at the Tricycle Theatre, London in 1999. ... Laurence Olivier, as photographed in 1939 by Carl Van Vechten Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (May 22, 1907 – July 11, 1989) was an English actor and director, esteemed by many as the greatest actor of the 20th century. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Becket or the Honor of God is a Tony Award-winning play written in French by Jean Anouilh. ... For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... Becket is a 1964 film adaptation of the play Becket or the Honour of God by Jean Anouilh made by Hal Wallis Productions and released by Paramount Pictures. ... Ildebrando Pizzetti (1880–1968) was an Italian composer of classical music. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, by night. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... Vienna State Opera (German: Wiener Staatsoper), located in Vienna, Austria, is one of the most important opera companies in Europe. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hans Hotter (January 19, 1909 – December 8, 2003) was a German operatic bass-baritone, admired internationally after World War II for the power, beauty and intelligence of his singing, especially in Wagners masterpieces. ... Deutsche Grammophon is a German classical record label. ... Herbert von Karajan (April 5, 1908 – July 16, 1989) was an Austrian conductor. ... Image File history File linksMetadata ThomasBecketcandle. ... Image File history File linksMetadata ThomasBecketcandle. ... Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. ... The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... King Richard IV of England was a fictional character in the first series of the BBC comedy series The Black Adder, played by Brian Blessed. ... Prince Edmund, The Black Adder Spoiler warning: Prince Edmund Plantagenet of York (August/ September, 1461 - December, 1498) (Later King Edmund of England - for about 30 seconds) was a fictional character in the first series of the popular BBC sitcom The Black Adder. ... Conrad Ferdinand Meyer (October 11, 1825 - November 28, 1898), a poet and, as he was born in Zürich, is a fellow-townsman of Gottfried Keller. ... A novella is a narrative work of prose fiction somewhat longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. ... Ken Follett (born June 5, 1949) is a British author of thrillers and historical novels. ... The cover art of Pillars of the Earth, US edition The Pillars of the Earth is a historical novel by Ken Follett about the building of a cathedral in Kingsbridge (an ancient town located between Plymouth, Torbay, and Dartmoor in Southern England). ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... Historically, a martyr is a person who dies for his or her religious faith. ... History Bites was a television series on the History Television network that ran from 1998-2003. ... Freemasons redirects here. ... According to Masonic legend, Hiram Abif (or Abiff) was the master of the construction of King Solomons Temple. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, interfaith, legal and educational institute dedicated to protecting the free expression of all religious traditions. ... Jack the Ripper is the pseudonym given to an unidentified serial killer active in the largely impoverished Whitechapel area of London, England in the second half of 1888. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Barlow, Frank (2004). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press.
  2. ^ Thomas Becket: Playing a role
  3. ^ Simon Schama's A History of Britain, Episode 3, "Dynasty"
  4. ^ The Martyrdom of Saint Thomas Becket, Getty Museum
  5. ^ Madhavan, Chakravarthy Sampath (2003-05-26). The Hiramic Legend: Whence & Wherefore. Pietre-Stones Review Of Freemasonry. Retrieved on 2008-05-02.
  6. ^ Heywood, H. L. (1909). Supplement to Mackey's Encyclopedia of Freemasonry Vol Three. Chicago: The Masonic History Company, p1262. 
  7. ^ Becket Fund
  8. ^ Weaver, Matthew (2006-01-31). "Asking silly questions". The Guardian. Retrieved on 2008-05-02. 
  • Sudeley, The Rt. Hon. The Lord, Becket's Murderer - William de Tracy, in Family History magazine, Canterbury, August 1983, vol.13, no.97, pps: 3 - 36. Becket was a saint
  • Staunton, Michael (2006). Thomas Becket and his Biographers. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press. ISBN 1-84383-271-2. 

Simon Schama Simon Michael Schama, CBE (born 13 February 1945) is a professor of history and art history at Columbia University. ... There have been many books called A History of Britain. ... View of a building at the Getty Center, from the Central Garden. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Duggan, Anne (2005). [/ncb/history/archbishop/google.com/htp Thomas Becket—Reputations]. London: Hodder Arnold, (5). ISBN 0 340 74138 4. 

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:


The Internet History Sourcebooks Project is located at the Fordham University Center for Medieval Studies and is part of the Online Reference Book for Medieval Studies (ORB). ... The story of St George and the dragon is one of many stories of the saints preserved in the Golden Legend. ... Jacobus de Voragine (c. ... “Caxton” redirects here. ...

Political offices
Preceded by
Robert of Ghent
Lord Chancellor
1155–1162
Succeeded by
Geoffrey Ridel
Roman Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Theobald of Bec
Archbishop of Canterbury
1162–1170
Succeeded by
Richard of Dover
in 1174
Persondata
NAME Thomas Becket
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Thomas à Becket, St Thomas Becket, St Thomas of Canterbury
SHORT DESCRIPTION Chancellor of England, Archbishop of Canterbury, Saint
DATE OF BIRTH about 1118
PLACE OF BIRTH Cheapside, London
DATE OF DEATH February 21, 1173
PLACE OF DEATH Canterbury, Kent

  Results from FactBites:
 
Thomas à Becket - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1736 words)
Becket denied the right of the assembly to judge him, appealed to the Pope, and, feeling that his life was too valuable to the Church to be risked, went into voluntary exile on November 2, embarking in a fishing-boat which landed him in France.
The absence of nightingales in Otford is also ascribed to Becket, who is said to have been so disturbed in his devotions by the song of a nightingale that he commanded that none should sing in the town ever again.
In the town of Strood, also in Kent, Becket is said to have caused that the inhabitants of the town –and their descendants- be born with tails.
Thomas a Becket, Saint. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (935 words)
Becket himself, foreseeing the conflict that lay ahead, was reluctant to accept, but the king insisted, and, in 1162, Becket was ordained priest and consecrated archbishop of Canterbury.
Becket rejected this claim and also persuaded the other bishops to attach the qualification “saving our order” to their assent to the king’s demand that they swear obedience to the (unspecified) “ancient customs” of the realm.
In exile for the next six years, Becket did not receive the active support from Pope Alexander III for which he had hoped; the pope was too enmeshed in difficulties of his own to alienate the English king further.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m