FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Third party (United States)
United States of America

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
the United States
Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links US-GreatSeal-Obverse. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential...


Federal government
Constitution
Taxation
President

Vice President
Cabinet This article describes the government of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS)[1] is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ...


Congress
Senate
President pro tem
Party Leaders
House
Speaker
Party Leaders
Congressional districts

Federal courts

Supreme Court
Circuit Courts of Appeal
District Courts Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Party leaders of the United States House of Representatives are elected by their respective parties in... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... The United States federal courts are the system of courts organized under the Constitution and laws of the federal government of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... Map of the boundaries of the United States Courts of Appeals and United States District Courts The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ...

Elections
Presidential elections
Midterm elections
Political Parties
Democratic
Republican
Third parties
State & Local government
Governors
Legislatures (List)
State Courts
Local Government

Other countries · Atlas
 US Government Portal
view  talk  edit

Third parties in the United States are political parties other than the two major parties that participate in national and state elections, although there may actually be more than three parties. Historically, the U.S. has a two-party system. Following Duverger's law, the Electoral College with its "winner take all" award of electors in presidential elections has, over time, created the two-party system. Another contributing factor is the division of the government into three separate branches which differs from the parliamentary system. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      The United States has a federal government, with elected officials at federal (national), state and... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      United States presidential elections determine who serves as president and vice president of the United... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Midterm elections are elections in the United States in which members of Congress, state legislatures, and... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... A state government is the government of a subnational entity in nation-states with federal forms of government, which shares political power with the federal government or national government. ... Local governments are administrative offices that are smaller than a state or province. ... Current party control of Governors offices (2006). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      In the United States of America, a state legislature is a generic term referring to the... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      All United States states are required to possess a legislative branch. ... In the U.S., a state court has jurisdiction over disputes which occur in a state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Local government in the United States (sometimes referred to as municipal government) is generally structured... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... A two-party system is a form of party system where two major political parties dominate the voting in nearly all elections. ... Duvergers Law is a principle which asserts that a first-past-the-post election system or in other words, a Single-member, Simple-plurality system, naturally leads to a two-party system. ... Electoral votes by state/federal district, for the elections of 2004 and 2008 The United States Electoral College is a term used to describe the 538 Presidential Electors who meet quadrennially to cast the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States; their votes represent the most... In the theory of artificial neural networks winner-take-all networks are a case of competitive learning in recurrent neural networks. ... Presidential Electors in the United States are the individuals who actually vote for Presidential candidates in the Electoral College. ... An election is a process in which a vote is held to choose amongst candidates to fill an office, or amongst political parties offering a slate of potential office holders for a house of representatives. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Although third parties rarely win elections, they play an important role in democratic government. Third parties draw attention to issues that may be ignored by the majority parties. If the issue finds resonance with the voters, one or more of the major parties may adopt the issue into its own party platform. Also a third party may be used by the voter to cast a protest vote as if in a referendum on an important issue. Third parties do help voter turnout bringing more people to the polls.[citation needed] Currently 75% of the U.S. electorate consists of registered Democrats (42.5%) and registered Republicans (32.5%), with "independents" and those belonging to other parties consitituting 24.9% of the electorate.[1] For other uses, see Democracy (disambiguation). ... A party platform, also known as an manifesto is a list of the principles which a political party supports in order to appeal to the general public for the purpose of having said partys candidates voted into office. ... A Protest vote is a vote cast in an election to demonstrate the casters unhappiness with the choice of candidates or the current political system. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Voters lining up outside a Baghdad polling station during the 2005 Iraqi election. ...

Contents

Third parties in past presidential elections

1832

The Anti-Masonic Party, seeking the eradication of the Freemasons and other secret societies from the United States, nominated former U.S. Attorney General William Wirt for President. Wirt, a former Mason, received seven U.S. electoral college votes from the state of Vermont, coming in third to President Andrew Jackson and Henry Clay. The Anti-Masonic Party (also known as the Anti-Masonic Movement) was a 19th century minor political party in the United States. ... “Freemasons” redirects here. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... William Wirt (November 8, 1772 – February 18, 1834) was an American author and statesman who is credited with turning the position of United States Attorney General into one of influence. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Henry Clay, Sr. ...


what the heck


patty likes boys


1848

The Free Soil Party, a precursor of the Republicans, nominated former President Martin Van Buren as its presidential candidate, splitting the vote in New York, and causing the election of Zachary Taylor. The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States active in the 1848 and 1852 presidential elections, and in some state elections. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... This article is about the state. ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850)[2] was an American military leader and the twelfth President of the United States. ...


1856

With the Whig party disintegrating, their candidate, former President Millard Filmore, who also had the nomination of the Know Nothing Party, came in third behind Democrat James Buchanan and John C. Fremont of the newly formed Republican party. It is not certain which of Buchanan's opponents was the actual third party candidate. Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the nations highest office. ... A political party by the name of the American Party has existed several times in the United States: The ante-bellum American Party grew out of the Know-Nothing movement and was based on Nativism. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... John C. Frémont John Charles Frémont (January 21, 1813-July 13, 1890), birth name John Charles Fremon [Harvey, p. ...


1860

During the 1850s the two-party system broke down and there were four major candidates, including the breakaway Southern Democratic Party, which nominated Vice President John C. Breckenridge as its candidate, and the Constitutional Union Party, which nominated John Bell. Republican Abraham Lincoln was elected with only 39% of the vote, and wasn't even on the ballot in many states. The Southern Democratic Party (Partito Democratico Meridionale, PDM) is a christian-democratic and centrist Italian political party based in Calabria. ... John Cabell Breckinridge (January 16, 1821–May 17, 1875) was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the fourteenth Vice President of the United States. ... The Constitutional Union Party was a political party in the United States created in 1860. ... John Bell is a common name. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


1892

James Baird Weaver ran as presidential candidate for the Populist Party. The Populist Party won 22 electoral votes and 8.6 percent of the popular vote. The Democratic Party eventually adopted many Populist Party positions after this election, making this contest a prominent example of a delayed vote for change. James Baird Weaver James Baird Weaver (June 12, 1833 – February 6, 1912) was a United States politician and member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Iowa as a member of the Greenback Party. ... The Populist Party (also known as the Peoples Party) was a short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


1912

Republican Theodore Roosevelt ran as the Bull-Moose Party (Progressive Party) nominee in the 1912 election and won more votes than Republican incumbent William Howard Taft, who became the first (and to date, only) incumbent President seeking reelection to finish third. (Former Presidents Martin Van Buren and Millard Fillmore both finished third in the 19th century, but neither was the incumbent President at the time.) The split in the Republican vote gave Democrat Woodrow Wilson victory with 42% of the popular vote, but 435 electoral votes. Socialist Party candidate Eugene Debs won 6% of the vote. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... The United States Progressive Party of 1912 was a political party created by a split in the Republican Party in the presidential election 1912. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... The Socialist Party of America (SPA) is a socialist political party in the United States. ... May refer to the politcal leader Eugene_V._Debs May also be in reference to a a debutante ball, a formal party undertaken by the leaving members of second-level schools in Ireland, most often in the month of August or September. ...


1920

Eugene V. Debs, imprisoned in 1919 for violating the Espionage Act of 1917, won nearly 900,000 votes for President. Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader, one of the founders of the International Labor Union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and five-time Socialist Party of America candidate for President of the United States. ... The Espionage Act was passed by the 65th United States Congress on June 15, 1917, during World War I. This act made it a crime, punishable by a $10,000 fine and 20 years in jail, for a person to convey false reports or false statements with intent to interfere...


1924

Erstwhile Republican Robert M. La Follette ran as a Progressive. He received 17 percent of the popular vote and won his home state of Wisconsin. Robert Marion La Follette, Sr. ... The United States Progressive Party of 1924 was a national ticket created by Robert M. La Follette, Sr. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to 92° 53′ W Population  Ranked...


1936

William Lemke running for the short-lived Union Party received 892,378 votes for 2% of the total vote. William Frederick Lemke (August 13, 1878 – May 30, 1950), was a United States politician. ... The Union Party was a short-lived political party in the United States, formed in 1936 by a coalition of radio priest Father Charles Coughlin, old-age pension advocate Francis Townsend, and Gerald L. K. Smith, who had taken control of Huey Longs Share Our Wealth movement after Long...


1948

Strom Thurmond ran on the segregationist Dixiecrat Party ticket in the 1948 election, splitting the Democratic vote and winning 38 votes in the electoral college from Southern states. Former Vice President and Cabinet Member Henry Wallace also sought Democratic votes by running for the Progressive Party and receiving 2.4% of the popular vote, but no votes in the electoral college. Despite both challenges Democratic incumbent Truman still defeated Republican Dewey in what was widely regarded at the time as an upset. James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People Racial segregation is characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home[1]. Segregation... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888–November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States. ... The United States Progressive Party of 1948 was a political party that ran former Vice President Henry A. Wallace of Iowa for president and U.S. Senator Glen H. Taylor of Idaho for vice president in 1948. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Thomas Edmund Dewey (b. ...


1952

Vincent Hallinan of the Progressive Party received 140,746 votes. Vincent Hallinan was a lawyer from San Francisco, California. ... The United States Progressive Party of 1948 was a political party that ran former Vice President Henry A. Wallace of Iowa for president and U.S. Senator Glen H. Taylor of Idaho for vice president in 1948. ...


1968

Former Democratic Governor of Alabama George Wallace of the American Independent Party ran in the 1968 election. Wallace won 13% of the popular vote, receiving 45 electoral votes in the South and many votes in the North. No other third party candidate has won any states in the Electoral College since. Republican Richard Nixon won the election with 43% of the popular vote and 301 electoral votes. This article is about the U.S. State. ... George Corley Wallace, Jr. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


1972

Republican Roger MacBride cast his electoral vote for John Hospers and Toni Nathan of the newly formed Libertarian Party. This is the first electoral vote received by a woman. John G. Schmitz, the American Independent Party candidate won 1.5% of the vote, or 1.1 million votes. The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Roger MacBride (6 August 1927 - 5 March 1995) was a U.S. lawyer, political figure, and television producer. ... John Hospers (born 9 June 1918) was the first presidential candidate of the United States Libertarian Party, running in the 1972 presidential election. ... Theodora Nathalia Tonie Nathan (born 9 February 1923) is the first woman to have received an electoral vote in a U.S. presidential election. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... John George Schmitz (August 12, 1930–January 10, 2001) was an ultraconservative Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Orange County, California, prominent member of the John Birch Society, and the American Independent Party candidate for President of the United States in 1972. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ...


1976

Eugene McCarthy won 740,460 votes for President as an independent candidate. Roger MacBride ran as Libertarian candidate, winning 173,011 popular votes. Lester Maddox, former governor of Georgia (succeeded by Jimmy Carter), won 170,274 votes as candidate of the American Independent Party. Peter Camejo of the Socialist Workers Party received 90,986 votes. Eugene Joseph Gene McCarthy (March 29, 1916 – December 10, 2005) was an American politician and a longtime member of the U.S. Congress. ... Roger MacBride (6 August 1927 - 5 March 1995) was a U.S. lawyer, political figure, and television producer. ... Lester Garfield Maddox Lester Garfield Maddox (September 30, 1915 – June 25, 2003) was an American Democratic Party politician who was governor of the U.S. state of Georgia from 1967 to 1971. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... Peter Miguel Camejo Peter Miguel Camejo (born December 31, 1939) is an American financier, businessman, political activist, author, and one of the founders of the socially responsible investment movement. ... The Socialist Workers Party is a communist political party in the United States. ...


1980

Congressman John B. Anderson won 5,719,850 votes, nearly 7% of the vote, as an independent candidate for President. Libertarian candidate Ed Clark won 921,128 votes, or 1% of the total. Barry Commoner running on the Citizens Party ticket received 233,052 votes. John Bayard Anderson (born February 15, 1922) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois and presidential candidate in the 1980 election. ... Ed Clark was the Libertarian candidate for President of the United States in the 1980 presidential election. ... Barry Commoner (born May 28, 1917) was an American biologist and college professor. ... The Citizens Party was a short lived United States political party organized by environmental scientist Barry Commoner in approximately 1980. ...


1984

David Bergland and Jim Lewis ran for president and vice president on the Libertarian ticket. They received 228,111 votes. David P. Bergland is an American libertarian activist. ... Jim Lewis, a tarot card reader, was tutored in Astrology in 1971-72 by Andrew Homer who also lived in San Francisco, CA at the time. ...


1988

Ron Paul received 430,000 votes for president on the Libertarian ticket. Lenora Fulani of the New Alliance Party received 217,221 votes. Ronald Ernest Paul (born August 20, 1935) is a 10th-term United States congressman from Lake Jackson, Texas, a member of the Republican Party, a pro-life physician, and a candidate for the Republican nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... Lenora Branch Fulani (b. ... The New Alliance Party was an American political party formed by psychotherapists Fred Newman and Lenora Fulani. ...


1992

Ross Perot, an independent, won almost 19% of the popular vote (but no electoral votes). Andre Marrou received 290,087 votes, running on the Libertarian ticket in all 50 states, and Bo Gritz received 106,152 votes for the Populist Party H. Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... Andre V. Marrou (born 4 December American political figure, affiliated with the United States Libertarian Party. ... Bo Gritz James Bo Gritz (born January 18, 1939 in Enid, Oklahoma) was a highly decorated Green Beret officer during the Vietnam War whose post-war activities—notably attempted POW rescues—have proven controversial. ... The Populist Party (also known as the Peoples Party) was a short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. ...


1996

Ross Perot ran for president again, this time as the candidate of the newly formed Reform Party. He won 8% of the popular vote. Ralph Nader received 685,297 votes on the Green Party ticket. Harry Browne received 485,759 votes on the Libertarian presidential ticket. Howard Phillips received 184,820 votes for the United States Taxpayers Party, and John Hagelin of the Natural Law Party received 113,670 votes. H. Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics – as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues – and... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ... Harry Browne Harry Browne (17 June 1933 – 1 March 2006) was an American libertarian writer, politician, and free-market investment analyst. ... Howard Phillips (born February 6, 1941 in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American conservative political figure. ... The Constitution Party is a conservative third party in the United States, founded as the U.S. Taxpayers Party in 1992. ... Dr. John Hagelin Dr. John Hagelin, scientist, educator, and three-time third-party candidate for President of the United States, is Professor of Physics, Director of the Institute of Science, Technology and Public Policy at Maharishi University of Management, and Minister of Science and Technology of the Global Country of... The Natural Law Party was a United States political party affiliated with the international Natural Law Party. ...


2000

In the 2000 Presidential election, George W. Bush won the deciding state of Florida by fewer than 600 votes. Some Democrats accused Green Party candidate Ralph Nader of having cost them the election, and in discussion of strategies for the U.S. presidential election, 2004 both parties weighed the costs to the Democrats of another Nader presidential run. [1] Nader received 2,883,105 votes for 2.8% of the vote. Pat Buchanan running on the Reform Party line received 449,225 votes. Harry Browne ran again on the Libertarian line, and received 384,431 votes. Howard Phillips of the Constitution Party received 98,022 votes, and John Hagelin representing the Natural Law Party and a faction of the Reform Party received 83,702 votes. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ... Presidential election results map. ... Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938) is an American politician, author, syndicated columnist, and broadcaster. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics – as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues – and... Harry Browne Harry Browne (17 June 1933 – 1 March 2006) was an American libertarian writer, politician, and free-market investment analyst. ... Howard Phillips (born February 6, 1941 in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American conservative political figure. ... The Constitution Party is a conservative United States political party. ... Dr. John Hagelin Dr. John Hagelin, scientist, educator, and three-time third-party candidate for President of the United States, is Professor of Physics, Director of the Institute of Science, Technology and Public Policy at Maharishi University of Management, and Minister of Science and Technology of the Global Country of... The Natural Law Party was a United States political party affiliated with the international Natural Law Party. ...


2004

Ralph Nader ran again this time as an Independent and Reform Party candidate receiving 463,653 votes. Michael Badnarik (397,265 votes) ran for president as a Libertarian, and David Cobb (119,859 votes) ran as a Green Party candidate. Both Badnarik and Cobb were arrested for crossing police lines in an attempt to participate in the presidential debate. [2] Michael Peroutka was the Constitution Party candidate and received 144,498 votes. Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics – as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues – and... Badnarik campaigning in July 2004. ... David Cobb appealing for votes at the annual Fighting Bob Fest in Baraboo, Wisconsin, September 2004 David Keith Cobb (born December 24, 1962 in San Leon, Texas) is an American ex-lawyer and activist, and was the 2004 presidential candidate of the Green Party of the United States (GPUS). ... Michael Peroutka Michael Anthony Peroutka (born 1952) is a Maryland lawyer, the founder of the Institute on the Constitution, cohost of The American View, and once held a position in the United States Department of Health and Human Services. ... The Constitution Party is a conservative United States political party. ...


Winner-take-all vs. proportional representation

In winner-take-all (or plurality-take-all), the candidate with the largest number of votes wins, even if the margin of victory is extremely narrow or the proportion of votes received is not a majority. Unlike in proportional representation, runners-up do not gain any representation in a first-past-the-post system. In the United States, systems of proportional representation are uncommon, especially above the local level, and are entirely absent at the national level. Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ... An example of a plurality ballot. ...


American legislators have traditionally had wide discretion to vote as they or their constituents please. A Democrat representing a rural area can be pro-life and anti-gun control; a Republican representing a suburban district can be pro-choice and pro-environment. Thus, even though there are only two parties represented in most American legislatures, there are different shades of opinion. Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52... This article is about the social movement. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gun politics. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Issues of discussion Pro-choice describes the political and ethical view that a woman should have complete control over her fertility and pregnancy. ...


In America, if an interest group is at odds with its traditional party, it has the option of running sympathetic candidates in primaries. If the candidate fails in the primary and believes he has a chance to win in the general election he may form or join a third party. A primary election is an election in which voters in a jurisdiction select candidates for a subsequent election (nominating primary). ...


Other obstacles to success by third parties in the U.S.

Aside from the mechanics of winner-take-all, the Electoral College, and the use of primaries, third parties are hampered by restrictive ballot access laws that force them to spend the bulk of their resources just to get on the ballot. Such obstacles include the requirement in several states that third party candidates obtain thousands of signatures of registered voters in order to get their candidates listed on the ballot. If they manage to get on the ballot, third party candidates are often not allowed. Socialist Party leader Morris Hillquist said in 1910 that America's presidential system has a role in hurting third party chances even further down the ticket. Ballot access rules regulate the conditions under which a candidate or political party is entitled to appear on voters ballots. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

In the United States the ticket handed to the voter contains the names not only of candidates for state legislature or congress, but also for all local and state officers and even for President of the United States. And since the new party rarely seems to have the chance or prospect of electing its candidate for governor of a state or president of the country, the voter is inclined in advance to consider its entire ticket as hopeless. The fear of 'throwing away' the vote is thus a peculiar product of American politics, and it requires a voter of exceptional strength of conviction to overcome." (Ibid 202)

Because of the difficulties third parties face in gaining any representation, third parties tend to exist to promote a specific issue or personality, often an issue which either or both of the major parties may eventually end up co-opting. As a counterexample, H. Ross Perot eventually founded a third party, the Reform Party, but he apparently intended it to exist solely as a vehicle to support himself and his agenda and never intended it to field any Congressional or Governatorial candidates. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt made a spirited run for the presidency on the Progressive Party ticket, but he never made any efforts to help Progressive congressional candidates in 1914, and in the 1916 election, he supported the Republicans. The next third party candidate to win a major portion of the popular vote was independent Ross Perot, who won 18.87% of the popular vote in the 1992 Presidential election. The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics – as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues – and... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... H. Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


There have been few third party governors in the past few decades. The last was Jesse Ventura, a member of the Reform Party and later the Minnesota Independence Party, who governed Minnesota from 1999-2003. Jesse Ventura (born James George Janos on July 15, 1951), also known as The Body, The Star, Governor Turnbuckle, and The Governing Body, is an American politician, retired professional wrestler, Navy UDT veteran, actor, and former radio and television talk show host. ... The Independence Party of Minnesota (often abbreviated IP or IPM), formerly the Reform Party of Minnesota, is the third largest political party in Minnesota, behind the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) (affiliated with the national Democratic Party) and Republican Party of Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


One way in which third parties can influence elections in certain jurisdictions in the United States (notably New York state) is through electoral fusion. Electoral fusion is an arrangement where two or more political parties support a common candidate, pooling the votes for all those parties. ...


Third parties as tools of major parties

A growing trend in US elections is for a major party and its supporters to help a third party with the idea of taking votes that would otherwise be likely to go to the other major party's candidates. This is the classic "divide and conquer" tactic. The idea is that if a third political party normally pulls far more voters from one major party than the other, the other major party can benefit by the third party doing well in the election. Currently in the US, the Green Party is viewed as pulling more from the Democratic Party than the Republican Party, and the Libertarian Party is viewed as taking more votes from the Republican Party than the Democratic Party.


Some third party advocates object to the notion that third parties "take votes away" from major parties, on the grounds that the major parties were never entitled to anyone's vote to begin with. (See the discussion below, concerning "wasted" votes.)


In 1992 some political observers attributed Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton's defeat of incumbent Republican President George Herbert Walker Bush to Ross Perot's good showing. Others cite evidence that Clinton would still have won in a direct race with Bush. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George H. W. Bush - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... H. Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ...


In 2000, the victory of Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush over incumbent Democratic Vice President Al Gore for the US Presidency was widely attributed to the good showing of Ralph Nader, running on the Green Party ticket. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ...


In 2004, both parties showed strategic interest in Ralph Nader's presidential campaign. Concerned that Nader might "spoil" the election for their candidate John Kerry (by attracting votes that would otherwise go to Kerry), the Democratic Party tried to deny Nader ballot access in many states, with considerable success. Even where the party failed to keep Nader off the ballot, the Nader campaign had to devote resources to ensuring ballot access. It was also reported that the Republican party assisted Nader's efforts to get on the ballot. Ralph Nader ran for the office of U.S. Presidency in the 2004 election, as he also had in several previous elections. ... The spoiler effect is a term to describe the effect a candidate can have on a close election, in which their candidacy results in the election being won by a candidate dissimilar to them, rather than a candidate similar to them. ... Ballot access rules regulate the conditions under which a candidate or political party is entitled to appear on voters ballots. ...


Nader's 2004 run was as an independent candidate; he generally emphasized his independence from any political party. He did, however, accept the nomination of the Reform Party in several states to gain ballot access. In other states, where the laws made forming a new party easier than qualifying as an independent candidate, Nader's campaign revived the Populist Party in order to assure ballot access. In politics, an independent is a politician who is not affiliated with any political party. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics – as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues – and... The Populist Party (also known as the Peoples Party) was a short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. ...


Whether third party voting is a wasted vote

The most common argument against voting for a third party candidate has been that one's vote is "wasted" in that one's vote for a losing candidate won't count for anything, whereas the same vote cast instead for a candidate who is the "lesser of two evils" and who has a chance of winning might help that candidate win the election. In 2000 and 2004, Democratic supporters commonly told potential voters for Ralph Nader that a vote for Ralph Nader was a vote for Republican George W. Bush. Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


There is a great deal of debate whether voters who didn't vote for a third party candidate would have then voted for a major party candidate. It might be just as likely that the voter would not have voted at all if there had not been a third party candidate to vote for. Saying it is true, in this instance, such a vote could be viewed as wasted.


Typically, the more votes a third party receives, the more attention incumbent parties pay to the campaign issues being advocated by that third party. In 1992, Ross Perot's main "gripe" (as he said) was the growing national debt and the budget deficit. After 1992, many political analysts say both incumbent parties paid special attention to this issue and the result was the temporary reduction in and then elimination of deficit spending and actual reductions in the national debt for a brief period. Such a vote for a third party is then viewed as an indictment of both incumbent parties that neither is doing a good job on certain issue(s) to the point where voters reject both and vote for a third party candidate. Given this, a vote for a third party can be viewed as a delayed vote for change, not affecting the immediate outcome of the current election but affecting the incumbent parties after that election as they try to address the reason why voters voted for a third party in the last election, attempting to garner the supporters of third party voters who see this issues being addressed in an attempt to influence these voters to return to or join the major party that did address those issues in the next election. A prominent historical example is the presidential election of 1892, during which the Populist Party (otherwise known as the People's Party) achieved massive success by U.S. third party standards, picking up 22 electoral votes and 8.6 percent of the popular vote. After the 1892 election the Democratic Party adopted many of the Populist Party's positions, so many in fact, that the Populist Party nominated the same candidate as the Democrats in the 1896 presidential election (essentially marking the end of the Populists as a separate party). The Populist Party was able to do this using the process of electoral fusion. In 1992, Ross Perot campaigned telling his supporters to "send a message" to the incumbent parties about the national debt and budget deficit, which apparently was heeded, at least temporarily. If the case for the "delayed vote" can be made to the public by third parties, third parties might be able to change their "spoiler of elections" image to a "force for change" image. H. Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Populist Party was a short-lived political party in late 19th century in the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Populist Party was a short-lived political party in late 19th century in the United States. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Electoral fusion is an arrangement where two or more political parties support a common candidate, pooling the votes for all those parties. ...


Finally, voters in a "safe state" for either major party are unlikely to influence that state's electoral vote. These voters, if they choose to vote for a third party, will be drawing attention to that party, while if they vote for the major party they most closely agree with, they will not change the national contest. A preferential voting or instant run-off voting system could allow for more people to vote for a third party. Preferential voting (or preference voting) is a type of ballot structure used in several electoral systems in which voters rank a list or group of candidates in order of preference. ... When the single transferable vote voting system is applied to a single-winner election it is sometimes called instant-runoff voting (IRV), as it is much like holding a series of runoff elections in which the lowest polling candidate is eliminated in each round until someone receives majority vote. ...


Notable third party presidential candidates

James Baird Weaver James Baird Weaver (June 12, 1833 – February 6, 1912) was a United States politician and member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Iowa as a member of the Greenback Party. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader, one of the founders of the International Labor Union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and five-time Socialist Party of America candidate for President of the United States. ... The Social Democratic Party (SDP) was a short-lived political party in the United States and a predecessor to the Socialist Party of America. ... Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. ... The Socialist Party of America (SPA) is a socialist political party in the United States. ... Summary The election was held on November 8, 1904. ... Major party conventions The 1908 Republican Convention was held in Chicago from 16 June to 19 June. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Robert Marion La Follette, Sr. ... Introduction Incumbent President Coolidge was relatively popular, and the economy was booming. ... John Bayard Anderson (born February 15, 1922) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois and presidential candidate in the 1980 election. ... In politics, an independent is a politician who is not affiliated with any political party. ... H. Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Ralph Nader ran for the office of U.S. Presidency in the 2004 election, as he also had in several previous elections. ... Presidential election results map. ...

Notable 2006 third party/independent candidates

Carole Stewart Keeton was born September 13, 1939 in Austin. ... Israel The power of the Knesset to supervise and review government policies and operations is exercised mainly through the state controller, also known as the ombudsman or ombudswoman (Hebrew: מבקר המדינה Mevaker HaMedina. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... James Richard Perry (b. ... The 2006 Texas gubernatorial election will be held on November 7, 2006 to select the next governor of the state of Texas, who will serve a four year term starting on January 20, 2007. ... Russell H. Russ Diamond (born July 26, 1963) is an entrepreneur, political activist, and politician from the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... Capitol Building The Pennsylvania General Assembly is the U.S. state of Pennsylvanias legislative branch, seated at the states capital, Harrisburg. ... List of Pennsylvania Governors The office of Pennsylvania governor was created by the states Constitution of 1790. ... Bernard Bernie Sanders (born September 8, 1941) is the current big willy floppah junior United States Senator from big blob of brown poo Vermont. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ... Ned Lamont (left) debated Joe Lieberman, pictured here during a July 6 NBC 30 debate, in the August 8 Democratic primary The 2006 election of a United States Senator from the state of Connecticut was held on November 7, 2006. ... Connecticut for Lieberman is the Connecticut political party created by twenty-five supporters of Senator Joe Lieberman, its sole candidate for office. ... A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ... Rich Whitney in 2006 Wikisource has original text related to this article: The_Times_Demand_Change Rich Whitney is an Illinois politician and the Illinois Green Partys candidate for Governor of Illinois in 2006. ... The Illinois Green Party is a statewide political party in Illinois. ... The Governor of Illinois is the chief executive of the State of Illinois and the various agencies and departments over which the officer has jurisdiction, as prescribed in the state constitution. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... Rick Jore, a Montana politician and businessman, was born and raised in Ronan, Montana, and received his associates degree from North Idaho College in 1978 and is currently the owner of Westslope Trout Company and vice-chair of the Constitution Party of Montana. ... The Constitution Party is a conservative United States political party. ... The Montana House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Montana Legislature. ... Frederic A. Eric Eidsness, Jr. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics – as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues – and... The 4th Congressional district of Colorado is located in eastern Colorado, encompassing most of Colorados rural eastern plains, as well as the larger cities of Fort Collins, Greeley, Loveland and Longmont along Colorados Front Range in north-central Colorado. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ...

The 2008 presidential election

Main article: United States third party presidential candidates, 2008
  • While neither has declared candidacy, Michael Bloomberg (Independent Mayor of New York City) and Chuck Hagel (Republican Senator from Nebraska) are both receiving a notable amount of press as to a possible third-party run. [6] [7] [8] [9]
  • Bloomberg has repeatedly denied that he has plans to run; throughout 2007, however, he has been taking on national issues such as illegal guns, the environment, national energy reforms, and immigration.
  • Senator Hagel said on Face The Nation on May 13, 2007: "I am not happy with the Republican party today. It's been hijacked by a group of single-minded almost isolationist, insulationist power-brokers." When asked if he and Bloomberg might run together on the same independent ticket, Hagel said, "We didn't make any deals but I think Mayor Bloomberg is the kind of individual who should seriously think about this." [10]

Third party is a term commonly used in the United States to refer to political parties other than the Republican and Democratic parties. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ... Charles Timothy Chuck Hagel (born October 4, 1946) is the senior United States Senator from Nebraska. ... Gun politics is a set of legal issues surrounding the ownership, use, and control of firearms as well as safety issues related to firearms both through their direct use and through criminal use. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ...

Current largest U.S. third parties

Conservative

The Constitution Party is a conservative United States political party. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The America First Party is a conservative third party in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The American Patriot Party was founded on March 1, 2003 by several U.S. citizens who want to return the United States to their conception of the original intent of the Founding Fathers and within the framework of the original U.S. Constitution. ... The American Party is a conservative party in the United States. ...

Moderate

The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics – as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues – and...

Liberal

This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... The Vermont Progressive Party is perhaps the United States most consistently successful current third party, although it is active in only one state. ... The Working Families Party (WFP) is a left-wing-progressive minor political party in the US state of New York, which has now expanded efforts into a number of other states, including the creation of the Connecticut Working Families Party and organizing projects in a number of other states. ... The Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) is a Marxist-Leninist political party in the United States. ... The Socialist Party USA (SP USA) is one of the heirs to the Socialist Party of America of Eugene V. Debs and Norman Thomas. ... May refer to the politcal leader Eugene_V._Debs May also be in reference to a a debutante ball, a formal party undertaken by the leaving members of second-level schools in Ireland, most often in the month of August or September. ... The Socialist Workers Party is a communist political party in the United States. ... Trotskyism is the theory of Marxism as advocated by Leon Trotsky. ... Workers World Party (WWP) is a communist party in the United States founded in 1959 by Sam Marcy. ...

Libertarian

The Alaskan Independence Party is a political party in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... The Boston Tea Party is an American libertarian political party founded on July 4, 2006. ... This article is about the philosophy of Ayn Rand. ... The Independence Party of Minnesota (often abbreviated MNIP, IP or IPM), formerly the Reform Party of Minnesota, is the third largest political party in Minnesota, behind the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) and Republican Party. ... The Jefferson Republican Party is a minor political party in the United States. ... This article is about the social movement. ... This article is about the philosophy of Ayn Rand. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on Dec. ... Logo The Personal Choice Party (PCP) is a United States political party whose presidential candidate for 2004 qualified for the ballot in the state of Utah. ...

Populist

For the late nineteenth-century political party, see Populist Party (United States). ...

Puerto Rican Independence Movement

Flag of Puerto Rico The political movement for Puerto Rican Independence (Lucha por la Independencia Puertorriqueña) has existed since the mid-19th century and has advocated independence of the island of Puerto Rico, in varying degrees, from Spain (in the 19th century) or the United States (from 1898 to... The Puerto Rican Independence Party (Spanish: Partido Independentista Puertorriqueño, PIP) is a Puerto Rican political party that campaigns for the independence of Puerto Rico from the United States. ...

Other minor third parties

Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present...

Resources

References

  1. '^ Neuhart, P. (22 January, 2004). Why politics is fun from catbirds' seats. USA Today.. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

See also

  • Category:United States Senators of a third party

  Results from FactBites:
 
Third party (United States) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2940 words)
Third parties in the United States are secondary political parties that participate in national and state elections.
And since the new party rarely seems to have the chance or prospect of electing its candidate for governor of a state or president of the country, the voter is inclined in advance to consider its entire ticket as hopeless.
Advocates of third parties generally object to the notion that votes are "taken away" by third parties, because the phrase "taken away" misleadingly suggests that the two major parties have a propriety ownership interest in voters' votes.
Libertarian Party (United States) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3387 words)
Libertarians state that their platform follows from consistent application of the principle of mutual respect for rights, and the liberty of exercise thereof, and thus are deeply interested in the concept of individual liberty as a pre-condition for moral and stable societies.
Badnarik was chosen as the party's presidential nominee on the third ballot after Nolan was eliminated, a comeback many saw as surprising, as Badnarik had not been viewed as a frontrunner for the nomination — many delegates were won over during the convention itself, due to Badnarik's perceived strong performance in a formal candidate debate.
The Libertarian Party claims to be the largest third party in the United States — a nation which is overwhelmingly dominated by two major parties that typically capture more than 95% of the vote in partisan elections.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m