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Encyclopedia > Third metacarpal bone
Bone: Third metacarpal bone
The third metacarpal. (Left.)
Bones of the left hand. Dorsal surface.
Latin ossa metacarpalia III
Gray's subject #55 228
MeSH Metacarpal+Bones

The third metacarpal bone (metacarpal bone of the middle finger) is a little smaller than the second. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (733x900, 79 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... This article is about the vulgar gesture. ...


The dorsal aspect of its base presents on its radial side a pyramidal eminence, the styloid process, which extends upward behind the capitate; immediately distal to this is a rough surface for the attachment of the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle. In anatomy, the styloid process is any sharp protrusion of a bone. ... The left capitate bone Os capitatum of the left hand, palmar surface Os capitatum of the left hand, dorsal surface The capitate bone (os capitatum; os magnum) is a bone in the human hand. ... The extensor carpi radialis brevis is specific human muscle. ...


The carpal articular facet is concave behind, flat in front, and articulates with the capitate.


On the radial side is a smooth, concave facet for articulation with the second metacarpal, and on the ulnar side two small oval facets for the fourth metacarpal.


See also

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. The metacarpus is the intermediate part of the hand skeleton that is located between the fingers distally and the carpus which forms the connection to the forearm. ... The first metacarpal bone (metacarpal bone of the thumb) which connects to the thumb is shorter and stouter than the others, diverges to a greater degree from the carpus, and its volar surface is directed toward the palm. ... The second metacarpal bone (metacarpal bone of the index finger) is the longest, and its base the largest, after the first metacarpal. ... The fourth metacarpal bone (metacarpal bone of the ring finger) is shorter and smaller than the third. ... The fifth metacarpal bone (metacarpal bone of the little finger) presents on its base one facet on its superior surface, which is concavo-convex and articulates with the hamate, and one on its radial side, which articulates with the fourth metacarpal. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy after Henry Gray, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


 
 

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