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Encyclopedia > Third Council of Constantinople
Third Council of Constantinople
Date 680-681
Accepted by Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy
Previous council Second Council of Constantinople
Next council Second Council of Nicaea (Catholic), Council in Trullo (Orthodox)
Convoked by Emperor Constantine IV
Presided by Constantine IV
Attendance perhaps 300, signatories to the documents ranged from 43 (first session) to 174 (last session)
Topics of discussion Monothelitism, the human and divine wills of Jesus
Documents and statements condemnation of Monothelitism
Chronological list of Ecumenical councils

The Sixth Ecumenical Council met on November 7, 680 for its first session; it ended its meetings, said to have been eighteen in number, on September 16 of 681. The number of bishops present was under three hundred and the minutes of the last session have only 174 signatures attached to them. Events October 10 - Battle of Kerbela November 12 - The Sixth Ecumenical Council opens in Constantinople The Bulgars subjugate the country of current-day Bulgaria Pippin of Herstal becomes Mayor of the Palace Umayyad caliph Muawiyah I succeeded by Yazid I ibn Muawiyah Erwig deposes Wamba to become king of the... // Events August 9 - The Bulgars win the war with the Byzantine Empire; the latter signs a peace treaty, which is considered as the birth-date of Bulgaria Wilfrid of York is expelled from Northumbria by Ecgfrith and retires into Sussex Births Deaths January 10 - Pope Agatho Ebroin, Mayor of the... This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. ... ... The Fifth Ecumenical Council (the Second Council of Constantinople) was a Christian Ecumenical Council that was held in 553. ... The Second Council of Nicaea was the seventh ecumenical council of Christianity; it met in 787 CE in Nicaea (site of the First Council of Nicaea) to restore the honoring of icons (or, holy images), which had been suppressed by imperial edict inside the Byzantine Empire during the reign of... Both the Fifth Ecumenical Council and the Sixth Ecumenical Council failed to produce disciplinary norms, for which reason the emperor Justinian II convoked an assembly in 692 to meet in Constantinople in the same domed hall where the Sixth Council had been held, called in Trullo (=under the dome). ... Constantine IV on a contemporary coin Constantine IV (649-685) was Byzantine emperor from 668-685. ... Constantine IV on a contemporary coin Constantine IV (649-685) was Byzantine emperor from 668-685. ... Monothelitism was the christological doctrine that Jesus had one will but two natures (divine and human). ... This 11th-century portrait is one of many images of Jesus in which a halo with a cross is used. ... In Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, an ecumenical council is a meeting of the bishops of the whole church convened to discuss and settle matters of Church doctrine and practice. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... Events October 10 - Battle of Kerbela November 12 - The Sixth Ecumenical Council opens in Constantinople The Bulgars subjugate the country of current-day Bulgaria Pippin of Herstal becomes Mayor of the Palace Umayyad caliph Muawiyah I succeeded by Yazid I ibn Muawiyah Erwig deposes Wamba to become king of the... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... // Events August 9 - The Bulgars win the war with the Byzantine Empire; the latter signs a peace treaty, which is considered as the birth-date of Bulgaria Wilfrid of York is expelled from Northumbria by Ecgfrith and retires into Sussex Births Deaths January 10 - Pope Agatho Ebroin, Mayor of the...


The chief doctrinal conclusion of the council is that Jesus has two wills as well as two natures (divine and human), and that those two wills did not conflict with or strive against each other. It thus refuted the heresy of monothelitism, which held that Jesus Christ had only one (divine) will. This 11th-century portrait is one of many images of Jesus in which a halo with a cross is used. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the ‘catholic’ or orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... Monothelitism was the christological doctrine that Jesus had one will but two natures (divine and human). ...


When the Emperor Constantine IV first summoned the council he had no intention that it would be ecumenical. From the Sacras it appears that he had summoned all the Metropolitans and bishops of the jurisdiction of Constantinople, and had also informed the Patriarch of Antioch that he might send Metropolitans and bishops. A long time before he had written to Pope Agatho on the subject. Constantine IV on a contemporary coin Constantine IV (649-685) was Byzantine emperor from 668-685. ... The word ecumenical comes from a Greek word that means pertaining to the whole world. ... Map of Constantinople. ... The Patriarch of Antioch is one of the Eastern Orthodox patriarchs, sometimes called the Greek Patriarch of Antioch to distinguish from the Oriental Orthodox Syrian Patriarch of Antioch. ... Agatho (born 577?, died 10 January 681) was pope from 678 to 681. ...


When the synod assembled however, it assumed at its first session the title "Ecumenical." All five patriarchs were represented, Alexandria and Jerusalem having sent deputies although they were at the time in the hands of the Muslims. Antiquity and modernity stand cheek-by-jowl in Egypts chief Mediterranean seaport For other uses, see Alexandria (disambiguation). ... Jerusalem (31°46′ N 35°14′ E; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם Yerushalayim; Arabic: القدس al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is a believer in or follower of Islam. ...


In this Council the Emperor presided in person surrounded by high court officials. On his right sat George I, Patriarch of Constantinople and Macarius, Patriarch of Antioch and next to them the representative of the Patriarch of Alexandria. On the Emperor's left were seated the representatives of the Pope. In the midst were placed, as usual, the Holy Gospels. After the eleventh session however the Emperor was no longer able to be present, but returned and presided at the closing meeting. Macarius is the name of a number of people: Macarius of Egypt: (300-390) Egyptian monk and hermit. ...


The sessions of the council were held in the domed hall (or possibly chapel) in the imperial palace; which, the Acts tell us, was called Trullo (εν ώ σεκρετω του Θειου παλτιου τη ουτη λεγομενω Τρουλλω).


Of interest are the titles in the Sacras sent to the bishops of Rome and Constantinople, one to "The Most holy and Blessed Archbishop of Old Rome and Ecumenical Pope," and the other to "The Most holy and Blessed Archbishop of Constantinople and Ecumenical Patriarch." Some of the titles used by the signers of the "Prosphoneticus" are interesting: "George, an humble presbyter of the holy Roman Church, and holding the place of the most blessed Agatho, ecumenical Pope of the City of Rome ...," "John, an humble deacon of the holy Roman Church and holding the place of the most blessed Agatho, and ecumenical Pope of the City of Rome," "George, by the mercy of God bishop of Constantinople which is New Rome," "Peter a presbyter and holding the place of the Apostolic See of the great city Alexandria," "George, an humble presbyter of the Holy Resurrection of Christ our God, and holding the place of Theodore the presbyter, beloved of God, who holds the place of the Apostolic See of Jerusalem ...,""John, by the mercy of God bishop of the City of Thessalonica, and legate of the Apostolic See of Rome," "John, the unworthy bishop of Portus, legate of the whole Council of the holy Apostolic See of Rome," "Stephen, by the mercy of God, bishop of Corinth, and legate of the Apostolic See of Old Rome." New Rome is a term that can be applied to a city or a country. ...


Original text taken from the Christian Classics Ethereal Library at http://www.ccel.org, which is in the public domain


See also:


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