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Encyclopedia > Theta Delta Chi
ΘΔΧ - Theta Delta Chi
The Theta Delta Chi Crest
Founded October 31, 1847 (1847-10-31) (age 159) at Union College
Website www.tdx.org
Founders
Motto Our Hearts are United.
Executive Director William McClung, Iota Deuteron '66
Colors Blue, White, and Black
Flower Red Carnation
Patron Saint Minerva
Principles Improving the Intellectual, Moral, and Social Being Through Friendship

Theta Delta Chi (ΘΔΧ, Theta Delt) is a social fraternity that was founded in 1847 at Union College. While nicknames differ from institution to institution, the most common nicknames for the fraternity are Theta Delt, Thete, TDX, and TDC. Theta Delta Chi brothers refer to their local organization as Charges rather than using the common fraternity nomenclature of chapter. Image File history File links Tdx2. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the Union College in New York. ... Abel Beach Abel Beach (born February 7, 1829 in [[Groton (town), New York Groton, New York]]) was a well-known poet and one of the seven founders of the international fraternity Theta Delta Chi. ... Andrew H. Green (February 5, 1830 - 1918) was one of the founders of Theta Delta Chi fraternity at Union College in Schenectady, NY, along with Abel Beach, Samuel F. Wile, Theodore B. Brown, William Hyslop, and William G. Akin. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... Executive director is a title given to a person who is the head of an executive branch of an organization or company. ... The term blue may refer to any of a number of similar colours. ... White is the combination of all the colors of the visible light spectrum. ... This article is about the color. ... Head of Minerva by Elihu Vedder, 1896 For other uses, see Minerva (disambiguation). ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the Union College in New York. ... This article or section seems to contain too many examples (or of a poor quality) for an encyclopedia entry. ...

Contents

History

Origins and growth

Theta Delta Chi, the eleventh oldest of the college fraternities, was founded in 1847 at Union College in Schenectady, NY by six members of the class of 1849: William G. Akin, Abel Beach, Theodore Brown, Andrew H. Green, William Hyslop, and Samuel F. Wile. In 1849, Green and Akin along with Francis Martindale (the first initiate), organized the Beta Charge (later renamed Beta Proteron) at Ballston Law School. However, two years later the school itself moved and the new Charge was disbanded and the members put on Alpha's rolls. Schenectady is a city located in Schenectady County, New York, of which it is the county seat. ... Abel Beach Abel Beach (born February 7, 1829 in [[Groton (town), New York Groton, New York]]) was a well-known poet and one of the seven founders of the international fraternity Theta Delta Chi. ... Andrew H. Green (February 5, 1830 - 1918) was one of the founders of Theta Delta Chi fraternity at Union College in Schenectady, NY, along with Abel Beach, Samuel F. Wile, Theodore B. Brown, William Hyslop, and William G. Akin. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


During the 1850s Theta Delta Chi spread rapidly, adding Charges at Vermont, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, William and Mary, Virginia, Hobart, Wesleyan, Harvard, Brown, Bowdoin, Kenyon, Tufts, Washington and Jefferson, and North Carolina. Few of these remained active for long, although several were later revived. Kappa at Tufts (1856) presently enjoys the honor of being the oldest active Charge in continuous existence. 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


During the 1860s new Charges, at, among other institutions, Lafayette and Rochester (1867), Hamilton (1868), and Dartmouth (1869), continued to be chartered at a pace that kept slightly ahead of attrition caused by Charges going inactive. The Civil War, however, severely weakened most Charges as men left for military service; many of the earliest Charges went inactive during this period, and expansion in the South ceased for a century. Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...

Beta Charge House at Cornell University
Beta Charge House at Cornell University

Only after 1870 did Theta Delta Chi begin to acquire its present configuration. Westward expansion had traditionally been opposed by a large segment of the Fraternity, which worried that supervision and solidarity would suffer if Theta Delta Chi were to stray far from the East. The rise of the large state universities in the West, particularly in the Big Ten, eventually overcame that resistance and the Universities of Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin welcomed Theta Delta Chi between 1889 and 1895. Further Midwest expansion included Illinois (1908) and Iowa State 1919). Berkeley (1900), Stanford (1903), the University of Washington (1913) and UCLA (1929) brought Theta Delta Chi in strength to the Pacific coast. Image File history File links Beta. ... Image File history File links Beta. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Big Ten Conference is the United States oldest Division I college athletic conference. ...


Expansion in the East during the 1870s, 1880s and 1890s brought Charges to Cornell, Boston University, Wabash, CCNY, Columbia, Lehigh, Amherst, Yale, MIT, Williams, and George Washington. Pennsylvania (1915) was the last Eastern Charge to become active before World War I, although 1904 and 1910 saw the reactivation of the Southern Charges, Epsilon and Nu. “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Theta Delta Chi became an International Fraternity with charterings at McGill (1901) and Toronto (1912).


The Great Depression and the Second World War saw a number of Charges go inactive and brought a halt to expansion. At its Centennial Convention in 1947, Theta Delta Chi stood at 28 Charges, a number that would begin to increase only in the 1950s. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Institutional development

The institutions of the Fraternity slowly took shape during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In 1867 anti-fraternity sentiment at Union led to the disbanding of the Alpha. As the Mother Charge, Alpha had exercised governing power over the Fraternity, but her demise, although temporary, brought about the creation of the Grand Lodge by action of the eight surviving Charges at the Convention of 1868. The Grand Lodge, originally three and now five officers (of whom two are undergraduates) remains the elected governing body of the Fraternity to this day (Alpha was rechartered in 1923, although executive power has remained with the Grand Lodge).

The Badge of Theta Delta Chi.
The Badge of Theta Delta Chi.

The annual Convention has evolved into a major international assembling of Theta Delts at which all Charges are represented by undergraduate and graduate delegates and at which the major business of the Fraternity is transacted. Image File history File linksMetadata Tdxbadge. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Tdxbadge. ...


The 1881 Convention required that the President of the Grand Lodge visit every Charge once a year; Central Fraternity Office staff now performs these duties. In 1869, the first issue of The Shield was produced, qualifying it as the oldest fraternity magazine. Although it lapsed after one issue, The Shield was revived in 1884 and has been published continually since then.


The Central Fraternity Office, or CFO, evolved over many decades from a virtually one-man job, filled by a Grand Lodge member, and housed in the now defunct Theta Delta Chi Club in New York City, to a professional staff consisting of an Executive Director, a Director of Operations, two Charge Consultants (formally called Field Secretaries), and one or more undergraduate interns, referred to as Member Service Coordinators. It currently operates from 214 Lewis Wharf in Boston, Massachusetts.


The financial health of Theta Delta Chi was ensured through the establishment of two entities, the Founders' Corporation in 1910 and the Educational Foundation in 1944. Any Theta Delt may join the Corporation on payment of $250 and thereby vote at its annual meetings. It also receives bequests and holds and invests all funds for the benefit of the Fraternity. The Educational Foundation, a 501 (c)(3) public charity, receives bequests and owns the property occupied by the CFO and other assets. It funds the educational activities of the Fraternity.


Modern expansion

Between 1951 and 1970 the Fraternity added Charges at Northwestern, Penn State, Arizona State, Rhode Island, Michigan State, Santa Barbara, Calgary, Virginia Tech, and Virginia Commonwealth; Bucknell was rechartered also. Several of these charterings brought into being some of the strongest Charges in the Fraternity, but in the increasingly uncertain climate of those times, with anti-fraternity sentiment gaining strength on a number of campuses, a significant number went inactive. The 1992 rechartering at Wabash continues a pattern of reviving inactive Charges; new charterings in the 1990s and 2000 include Northeastern, Nova Southeastern, Greensboro, SUNY Albany and Merrimack. The Fort Lauderdale and Greensboro, NC Charges marked a significant re-entry into the South.


With the start of the new millennium, Theta Delta Chi has worked to revive several of its defunct Charges, while installing Charges on new campuses. The Chi Charge, originally founded in 1867, and active for most of the time since then was re-chartered in the summer of 2002 at the 155th Annual Convention. Following a brief closure, the Epsilon Charge returned to the active ranks in August of 2004. Theta Delta Chi has also worked to increase its presence in the northeast with the installation of the Iota Triton Charge at UMass Dartmouth in 2005, and the creation of the Iota colony at Harvard.

Sigma Deuteron Charge House at the University of Wisconsin.
Sigma Deuteron Charge House at the University of Wisconsin.

Yet the active Charge roll call remains in flux, as the fraternity has lost several Charges, young and old, since 2001; losing Omicron Triton at URI (2001), Psi Deuteron at UCLA (2003), Nu Deuteron at Lehigh (2004), Delta Triton at Northeastern (2005), Eta Triton at Nova Southeastern (2005), and most recently Mu Deuteron at Amherst (2006). While these losses are dishearting, the Grand Lodge and Central Fraternity Office have worked progressively for the betterment of the fraternity, and Theta Delta Chi enters the future with the most stable foundation it has had in nearly a decade. Image File history File linksMetadata Sigma_Deut. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Sigma_Deut. ...


As such, in the fall of 2006, Theta Delta Chi established a colony at Arizona State to revive the Epsilon Triton Charge [1]. The fraternity also established colonies at Binghamton University [1], Marist College [1] and the University of South Carolina during the current academic year. On April 28, 2007, the Grand Lodge chartered the Theta Triton Charge at Binghamton University, adding stability to Theta Delta Chi with the present roll standing at 26 Charges and 4 colonies. Further expansion in the west is planned with an anticipated return to UCLA in 2008. Overlooking center of campus. ...


Finally, in April of 2007, the Grand Lodge hosted the inaugural Preamble Institute [2] for its undergraduate leaders, ever hoping to improve the intellectual, moral and social being of its brotherhood. With other programming initiatives on the horizon, the fraternity seems poised for success in the coming years.


Charges and Colonies

Main article: List of Theta Delta Chi Charges

A list of Charges of the Theta Delta Chi fraternity. ...

Famous alumni

[3]


Arts

  • John Brougham, New York Graduate 1857, 19th Century actor, dramatist, and orator
  • Fitz James O'Brien, New York Graduate 1857, New York Literary Bohemian, science fiction pioneer
  • Robert Frost, Dartmouth 1896, four time Pulitzer Prize winning poet
Robert Frost, Dartmouth 1896.
  • Alexander Woolcott, Hamilton 1896, drama critic NY Times, Herald-Tribune, Sun.
  • Norman Hackett, Michigan 1898, actor
  • Bellamy Partridge, Hobart 1900, author of “County Lawyer”
  • Donald Parson, Havard 1905, author “Portraits of Keats” “Grass Flowers”
  • Arthur Hornblow, Jr., Dartmouth 1915, film producer Paramount and MGM
  • Frank Thomas, Stanford 1933, Thumpers (Bambi) creator
  • George Mosel, Amherst 1944, Pulitzer Prize for “All the Way Home”
  • Gardner McKay, Cornell 1953, actor, drama critic
  • John Nichols, Hamilton 1962, author “the Milagro Bean Field War” “the Sterile Cuckoo”
  • James Woods, MIT 1969, actor
  • Joseph J. Ellis, William and Mary 1965, author "Founding Brothers," "American Sphinx," "His Excellency"
  • Chip Esten, William and Mary 1987, actor/comedian, "Whose Line Is It Anyway?"
  • Sendhil Ramamurthy, Tufts 1996, actor from "Heroes" [1]

John Brougham (May 9, 1814 - June 7, 1880), was an Irish actor and dramatist. ... Fitz James OBrien (December 31, 1828 - April 6, 1862) was an author and is often considered one of the forerunners of todays Science Fiction. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... Image File history File links Young_Frost. ... Image File history File links Young_Frost. ... Alexander Woollcott, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Alexander Humphreys Woollcott (January 19, 1887 – January 23, 1943) was a critic and commentator for The New Yorker magazine, and a member of the Algonquin Round Table. ... Arthur Hornblow, Jr. ... Franklin Thomas (September 5, 1912, Fresno, California - September 8, 2004, Flintridge, California) was one of Walt Disneys team of animators known as the Nine Old Men. ... Gardener McKay ( - Honolulu, Hawaii, November 21, 2001) was a Hollywood heart-throb in the 50s and 60s, with rugged good looks and 6 ft 5 in (1. ... John Nichols is the author of the New Mexico trilogy, a series about the complex relationship between history, race and ethnicity, and land and water rights in the fictional Chamisa County, New Mexico. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Joseph J. Ellis is an American professor, historian and best-selling author of books about the Founding Fathers of the United States, including Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation, which won the Pulitzer Prize for history in 2001, American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson (1997), and His Excellency: George Washington... Charles Chip Esten (born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, September 9, 1965) is an American actor and singer best known for his appearances on the improvisation show Whose Line Is It Anyway?. Educated at the College of William and Mary in Virginia, Esten moved to the United Kingdom to make his... Sendhil Ramamurthy (born May 17, 1974) is an American actor, born in Chicago, Illinois. ...

Journalism

  • Charles Miller (journalist), Dartmouth 1872, Editor-in-Chief NY Times
  • S. Emory Thompson, Michigan 1904, publisher Chicago Times
  • Frazier Hunt, Illinois 1908, writer and war correspondent
  • Richard Wilson, Iowa State 1927, President of the National Press Club
  • Harrison Salisbury, Minnesota 1929, Pulitzer Prize journalist
  • Paul A. Gigot, Dartmouth 1977, Editorial Page Editor, Wall Street Journal

The journalist Richard Lawson Wilson was born September 3, 1905, in Galesburg, Illinois, and was raised in Newton, Iowa. ... Harrison Salisbury, American journalist, was the first regular New York Times correspondent in Moscow after World War II. Vietnam War Opposition During the Vietnam War, Harrison was the first mainstream, well known and respected journalist to oppose the war after visiting Saigon in 1966 (as opposed to the constantly criticized... Paul A. Gigot is a Pulitzer Prize-winning conservative political commentator and the editor of the editorial pages for The Wall Street Journal. ...

Medicine

  • Frank Lahey, Harvard 1904, Founder of Boston’s Lahey Clinic
  • Oliver Beahrs, Berkeley 1937, Head Surgery at the Mayo Clinic
William D. Bloxham, William and Mary 1854, Former Governor of Florida.
  • Park Dietz, Cornell, Renowned Forensic Psychologist

The Lahey Clinic is a teaching hospital founded in 1923 by Dr. Frank Lahey. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (600x751, 59 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (600x751, 59 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Park Dietz (born 1951) is a forensic psychiatrist. ...

Public Life

Jerry Lewis, UCLA '56, US House of Rep. for California.
Jerry Lewis, UCLA '56, US House of Rep. for California.
  • John H. Bartlett, Dartmouth 1894, Governor of New Hampshire
  • Joseph Irwin France, Hamilton 1895, US Senator from Maryland
  • Rollin B. Sanford, Tufts 1897, New York (Rep.)
  • Earle S. Warner, Hobart 1902, New York Supreme Court Justice
  • William F. Love, Rochester 1903, New York Supreme Court Justice
  • Frank Henry Buck, Berkeley 1907, California (Dem.)
  • Hans Schoenfeld, George Washington 1907, US Minister to Finland
  • Maurice E. Crumpacker, Michigan 1909, Oregon (Rep.)
  • Eric Johnston, Washington 1917, US Chamber of Commerce President
  • Irving M. Ives, Hamilton 1919, Senator New York
  • Arthur Kelly, Toronto 1920, Justice of the Supreme Court of Ontario
  • Louis P. Beaubien, McGill 1925, Senator of Canada from Quebec
  • Herman T. Schneebeli, Dartmouth 1930,Pennsylvania (Rep.)
  • Henry P. Smith, Dartmouth 1933, New York (Rep.)
Michael Powell, William and Mary '85, Former Chairman of the FCC.
Michael Powell, William and Mary '85, Former Chairman of the FCC.
  • John W. Tuthill, William and Mary 1932, Ambassador to Brazil
  • Alvin M. Bentley, Michigan 1940, Michigan (Rep.)
  • John W. Brook, Toronto 1946, Justice of the Supreme Court of Ontario
  • Donald R. Steele, Toronto 1946, Justice of the Supreme Court of Ontario
  • Richard Holland, Toronto 1947, Justice of the Supreme Court of Ontario
  • Edward Saunders, Toronto 1949, Justice of the Supreme Court of Ontario
  • Robert L. Leggett, Berkeley 1948, California (Rep.)
  • Thomas R. Pickering, Bowdoin 1953, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations
  • Jerry Lewis, UCLA 1956, California (Rep.)
  • Wesley C. Uhlman, Washington 1956, Mayor of Seattle
  • Michael K. Powell, William and Mary 1985, Chairman of the US Federal Communications Commission

Allen C. Beach was an American politician who served as Lieutenant Governor of New York from 1869 to 1873. ... William Dunnington Bloxham (July 9, 1835 - March 15, 1911) was an American politician. ... Clement Hall Sinnickson (September 16, 1834 - July 24, 1919), served in the United States House of Representatives from March 4, 1875 until March 3, 1879, where he represented New Jerseys 1st congressional district. ... John Milton Hay (October 8, 1838 – July 1, 1905) was an American statesman, diplomat, author, journalist, and private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln. ... Henry Joshua Spooner (August 6, 1839 - February 9, 1918), was a United States Representative from Rhode Island. ... Henry Richard Gibson was an American politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives for the 2nd congressional district of Tennessee. ... Daniel Newton Lockwood (June 1, 1844 -June 1, 1906) was a United States Representative from New York. ... John William Griggs (July 10, 1849–November 28, 1927) was an American politician. ... Nathan Fellows Dixon, III (August 28, 1847 - November 8, 1897) was a United States Representative and Senator from Rhode Island. ... John Dillard Bellamy (24 March 1854 - 25 September 1942) was a Democratic U.S. Congressman from North Carolina between 1899 and 1903. ... Walter Russell Stiness (March 13, 1854 - March 17, 1924) was a U.S. Representative from Rhode Island. ... Thomas Barton Kyle (March 10, 1856 - August 13, 1915) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio. ... Frederick Clement Stevens (January 1, 1861 – July 1, 1923) was a Representative from Minnesota; born in Boston, Massachusetts; moved with his parents to Searsport, Maine; attended the common schools of Rockland; was graduated from Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine in 1881 and from the law department of the University of Iowa... Daniel J. McGillicuddy was a United States Representative from Maine. ... John Alden Dix (December 25, 1860 - April 9, 1928) was Governor of New York from 1911 to 1913. ... Gonzalo de Quesada (December 15, 1868 - January 9, 1915) was a key artitect of the Cuban Independence Movement with José Martí during the late 19th Century. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Jerry_Lewis_(US_Rep). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Jerry_Lewis_(US_Rep). ... Official photo John Henry Bartlett (March 15, 1869–March 19, 1952) was an American teacher, lawyer, and Republican politician from Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ... Joseph France Joseph Irwin France (October 11, 1873 – January 26, 1939) was a Republican member of the United States Senate, representing the State of Maryland from 1917-1923. ... Rollin Brewster Sanford (May 18, 1874 - May 16, 1957) was a U.S. Representative from New York, great-grandson of Jonah Sanford. ... William Franklin Love (March 29, 1850 - October 16, 1898) was a U.S. Representative from Mississippi. ... Frank Henry Buck (September 23, 1887- 1942) near Vacaville, CA and was a American Democratic politician. ... Maurice Edgar Crumpacker (December 19, 1886 – July 24, 1927) was a Republican U.S. congressman from Oregon. ... Eric Johnston (December 21, 1896 – August 22, 1963) was a motion picture association executive. ... Irving McNeil Ives (January 24, 1896 February 24, 1962) was an American politician from the state of New York. ... Arthur Rolland Kelly (July 4, 1878 - March 25, 1959) was an American architect who specialized in residential architecture, primarily in the Los Angeles, California area. ... Louis-Philippe Beaubien (1903-03-03 – 1985-03-28) was a Canadian politician. ... Herman Theodore Schneebeli (July 7, 1907 – May 6, 1982) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. ... Henry P. Smith III (September 29, 1911 - October 1, 1995) was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from New York. ... Description: Photograph of Michael Powell Source: http://www. ... Description: Photograph of Michael Powell Source: http://www. ... Alvin Morell Bentley III (August 30, 1918–April 10, 1969) was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Edward Watts Saunders (October 25, 1860 - December 16, 1921) was born in Franklin County, Virginia. ... Robert Louis Leggett (July 26, 1926 - August 13, 1997) was a U.S. Representative from California. ... Thomas Reeve Tom Pickering (born November 5, 1931), is a retired United States Ambassador. ... Charles Jeremy Jerry Lewis (born October 21, 1934), an American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1979, representing the 41st District of California. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Michael Powell Michael K. Powell (born March 23, 1963) is an American politician and a Republican. ...

Education

  • Elmer H. Capen, Tufts 1860, President of Tufts University
  • Albert W. Smith, Cornell 1878, Dean of Cornell Law School
  • Ernest W. Huffcut, Cornell 1884, Dean of Cornell Law School
  • Frederick C. Ferry, Williams 1891, President of Hamilton College
  • Alexander Meiklejohn, Brown 1893, President of Amherst College
  • Guy S. Ford, Wisconsin 1895, President of University of Minnesota, Phi Beta Kappa
  • Samuel P. Capen, Tufts 1898, President of the University of Buffalo
  • Frank E. Compton, Wisconsin 1898, Creator of Compton's Encyclopedia
  • Winfred F. Smiter, Bowdoin 1899, President of Johns Hopkins University
  • Edmund Ezra Day, Dartmouth 1905, President of Cornell University
  • Chauncy Boucher, Michigan 1909, Chancellor of the University of Nebraska
  • Robert E. Doherty, George Washington 1909, President of Carnegie Institute of Tech
  • Leonard Carmichael, Tufts 1921, President of Tufts University, Secretary of Smithsonian
  • Alvin D. Chandler, William and Mary 1922, President of College of William and Mary
  • Francis H. Horn, Dartmouth 1930, President of the University of Rhode Island
  • Norman Topping, Washington 1930, Chancellor of the University of Southern California
  • Robert V. Schnabel, Bowdoin 1944, President of Valparaiso University
  • Julian Gibbs, Amherst 1946, President of Amherst College
  • W. Lawrence Gulick, Hamilton 1952, President of St. Lawrence College
  • Kenneth Greene, Tufts 1965, Interim Provost of Farleigh Dickinson University, College at Florham

Elmer Hewitt Capen (April 5, 1838 - March 22, 1905) was the third president of Tufts College (now Tufts University), serving from 1875 to 1905. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... 1928 Time cover featuring Meiklejohn Alexander Meiklejohn (February 1, 1872—December 17, 1964) was a philosopher, university administrator, and free-speech advocate. ... Guy Stanton Ford was the sixth president of the University of Minnesota, serving from 1938 to 1941. ... Frank Elbert Compton, born 1874, died 1950, publisher of encyclopedias and other reference works, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. See also Chandler B. Beach, editor of the (New) Students Reference Work, published by F. E. Compton & Co. ... Comptons Encyclopedia and Fact-Index is the title of an encyclopedia published in Chicago, Illinois since the 1920s. ... Edmund Ezra Day (December 7, 1883 - March 23, 1951) was a U.S. educator. ... Leonard Carmichael (1898 — 1973) was a U.S. educator and psychologist. ... Norming Topping (born in 1908 and died November 18, 1997) was the President of the University of Southern California between 1958 and 1970. ... Julian Howard Gibbs (June 24, 1924 - February 20, 1983) was an American educator and the fifteenth President of Amherst College. ... Fairleigh Dickinson University is a private university founded in 1942. ...

Scholarship

  • Stephen M. Babcock, Tufts 1886, inventor of the Babcock Centrifuge (butterfat testing)
  • Herbert E. Bolton, Wisconsin 1895, President of the American Historical Association
  • Carlos Baker, Dartmouth 1932, Hemingway biographer, scholar of Princeton University
Leonard Carmichael, Tufts '21, Former President of Tufts University.
Leonard Carmichael, Tufts '21, Former President of Tufts University.

Stephen Moulton Babcock (1843 - 1931) was a U.S. agricultural chemist. ... Herbert Eugene Bolton, history professor and first Director of the Bancroft Library Herbert Eugene Bolton (July 20, 1870–January 30, 1953) was an American historian and one of the most prominent authorities in Spanish-American history. ... Carlos Baker (May 5, 1909 – April 18, 1987) was the Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature at Princeton University. ... Image File history File linksMetadata LeonardCarmichaelDrawing. ... Image File history File linksMetadata LeonardCarmichaelDrawing. ... Lester Carl Thurow is a former dean of the MIT Sloan School of Management and author of numerous bestsellers on mainstream economics. ... The MIT Sloan School of Management is one of the five schools of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. It is one of the worlds leading business schools, conducting research and teaching in finance, entrepreneurship, marketing, strategic management, economics, organizational behavior, operations management, supply chain...

Military

  • William Lamb, William and Mary 1853, Civil War "Hero of Fort Fisher"
  • Benjamin P. Lamberton, Dickinson 1862, Admiral U.S. Navy
  • Arthur Japy Hepburn, Dickinson 1896, Admiral Commander in Chief of the U.S. Fleet
  • Donald B. MacMillan, Bowdoin 1897, Arctic explorer, Rear Admiral, U.S.N.
  • Raymond W. Bliss, Tufts 1910, former Surgeon General of the U.S. Army
  • Robert W. Manss, Michigan 1930, Judge Advocate General of the U.S. Air Force
  • Robert Lee Scott, Jr., Arizona State 1932, U.S. General
  • Rudolf F. Peskens, Tufts 1966, Brigadier General U.S. Air Force

William Lamb was an officer in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. ... Benjamin P. Lamberton (25 February 1844 - 9 June 1912) was an admiral in the United States Navy who served in the Spanish-American War. ... Arthur Japy Hepburn (October 15, 1877 - May 31, 1964) was an admiral in the United States Navy, whose active-duty career included service in the Spanish-American War, World War I, and World War II. He held a number of high posts in the years between the World Wars, including... Donald Baxter MacMillan (November 10, 1874 - September 7, 1970) was an American explorer, sailor, researcher and lecturer who made over 30 expeditions to the Arctic during his 46-year career. ... Robert Lee Scott Jr. ...

Architecture

John William Merrow (August 15, 1874 – April 11, 1927) was a New York City theater architect. ... Raymond M. Hood (March 29, 1881 - August 14, 1934) was an early-mid twentieth century architect who worked in the Art Deco style. ...

Business

  • James R. Mellon, Washington and Jefferson 1865, President of Ligonier Valley Railroad
  • Eugene Grace, Lehigh 1899, Chairman of the Board of Bethlehem Steel
  • J. Frank Drake, Dartmouth 1902, Chairman of the Board of Gulf Oil Corporation
  • Harvey Dow Gibson, Bowdoin 1902, President of the Manufacturers Trust Co
  • Stanton Griffs, Cornell 1910, Chairman of the Board of Madison Square Garden
  • Willard H. Dow, Williams 1919, President of Dow Chemical Corporation
  • Leo D. Welch, Rochester 1919, Chairman of the Board of Standard Oil
  • Myford Irvine, Stanford 1921, landholder in California, City of Irvine named after him
  • George L. Smith, Columbia 1925, President of Kinney Shoe Company
  • William H. Elliot, William and Mary 1928, President of Border Corporation
  • Charles C. Tillinghast Jr., Brown 1932, President of TWA, Chancellor of Brown University
  • Karl J. Neer, Illinois 1933, President of Neer Oil Company
  • James W. Kerr, Toronto 1937, President of TransCanada Pipelines
  • William Edwards, Michigan 1939, President of Hilton Hotels
  • Edwin A. Gee, George Washington 1941, CEO International Paper
  • Charles K. Fletcher, Jr., Stanford 1950, Chairman of the Home Federal Saving Assoc
  • Mark H. McCormack, William and Mary 1950, CEO International Management Group
  • William J. Henry, William and Mary 1963, President Time Life Books, Inc.
  • John Antonelli, Rochester 1980, Director of Operations of Starbucks
  • Jack D. Furst, Arizona State 1981, Partner of Hicks, Muse, Tate & Furst Inc.
  • Michael J. Saylor, MIT 1987, Founder MicroStrategy
  • Tom First, Brown 1989, Co-founder of Nantucket Nectars
  • Tom Scott, Brown 1989, Co-founder of Nantucket Nectars

Eugene Gifford Grace (August 27, 1876–July 7, 1960) was the president of Bethlehem Steel Corporation from 1916 to 1945, and chairman of the board from 1945 until his retirement in 1957. ... George Luke Smith (December 11, 1837 - July 9, 1884) was a U.S. Representative from Louisiana. ... Charles C. Tillinghast Jr. ... William W. Edwards (about 1790 – 14 August 1813) was an officer in the United States Navy during the War of 1812. ... Home Federal Savings and Loan Association was a federal stock savings and loan association operating in Fayetteville, North Carolina, Lumberton, North Carolina, and Spring Lake, North Carolina with consolidated assets of $155. ... Mark Hume McCormack, (November 6, 1930 - May 16, 2003), was Founder and Chairman of IMG, an international management organization that handles the commercial affairs for sports figures and celebrities. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Michael Jerry Saylor is the very public founder of MicroStrategy. ... Nantucket Nectars is a beverage company created by Tom First and Tom Scott, known as Tom and Tom or The Juice Guys. ... Nantucket Nectars is a beverage company created by Tom First and Tom Scott, known as Tom and Tom or The Juice Guys. ...

Engineering

  • Alexander Lyman Holley, Brown 1853, Bessemer Steel, statue in Washington Square, NYC
  • Dan Geer, MIT 1972, computer security specialist
  • Peter Diamandis, MIT 1983, space flight entrepreneur
  • Jonathan Goldstick, MIT 1980, marine engineer - Halcrow

Alexander Lyman Holley (born 20 July 1832 - died 29 January 1882) was a mechanical engineer and was considered the foremost steel and plant engineer and designer of his time, especially in regard to applying research to modern steel manufacturing processes. ... Dan Geer is a former computer security consultant for @stake, a company cooperating with Microsoft. ... Peter H. Diamandis (born 20 May 1961 in Bronx, New York) is considered a key American figure in the development of the personal spaceflight industry, having created many space-related businesses or organizations. ...

Sport

  • Edward Marsh, Lehigh 1894, gold medalist 1900 Olympics – rowing
  • Walter H. Snell, Brown 1913, player Boston Red Sox
  • Clarence P. Houston, Tufts 1914, President of NCAA
  • Leon Tuck, Dartmouth 1915, silver medalist 1920 Olympics – hockey
  • Stanley Lomax, Cornell 1923, radio sports broadcaster
  • Walter Francis O'Malley, Pennsylvania 1926, owner of Brooklyn/LA Dodgers
  • William F. McAfee, Jr., Michigan 1929, player Chicago White Sox
  • John W. Allyn, Lafayette 1939, owner of Chicago White Sox
  • Donald Canham, Michigan 1941, University of Michigan Athletic Director
  • Harry Dalton, Amherst 1950, Executive VP Milwaukee Brewers
  • William P. Ficker, Berkeley 1950, Winner of America’s Cup Race
  • Benjamin L. Abruzzo, Illinois 1952, Crewmember of “Double Eagle II” (first trans-Atlantic balloon flight)
  • Mark Donahue, Brown 1959, Indianapolis 500 Winner
  • Darrin Nelson, Stanford 1981, Stanford All-American, player Minnesota Vikings
  • Chuck Muncie, Berkeley 1975, player New Orleans Saints and San Diego Chargers
  • James Lofton, Stanford 1978, NFL wide receiver, 2004 NFL Hall of Fame Inductee
  • Garin Veris, Stanford 1985, player New England Patriots and San Francisco 49ers
  • John Brody, Tufts 1995, Major League Baseball Senior VP of Corporate Sales and Marketing
  • Sean Morey, Brown 1999, player New England Patriots, Philadelphia Eagles, Pittsburgh Steelers, Arizona Cardinals 1999-present
  • Chas Gessner, Brown 2003, player New England Patriots, Tampa Bay Buccaneers 2003-present
  • Zak DeOssie, Brown 2007, player 2007 4th round draft pick New York Giants

Edward Marsh (1872-1953) was an English polymath, the sponsor of the Georgian school of poets and a friend to many individuals, including Rupert Brooke and Siegfried Sassoon. ... Ice Hockey was introduced to the Olympic Games in the 1920 Summer Olympics. ... Walter Francis OMalley (October 9, 1903 – August 9, 1979) was an American sports executive who owned the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers team in Major League Baseball from 1950 to 1979. ... Important Managers (years and records, minimum 750 games) Kid Gleason (1919-1923) (392-364) Jimmy Dykes (1934-1946) (899-940) Paul Richards (1951-1954, 1976) (406-392) Al Lopez (1957-1965, 1968-1969) (840-650) Tony La Russa (1979-1986) (522-510) Jerry Manuel (1998-2003) (500-471) Complete List... Don Canham (April 27, 1918-May 3, 2005) served as athletic director at the University of Michigan from 1968 to 1988. ... Harry I. Dalton (July 28, 1928 - October 22, 2005) was a front-office executive in American Major League Baseball. ... 1967 and 1970 Americas Cup champion Intrepid The Intrepid is a 12-metre class yacht which won the Americas Cup in 1967 and again in 1970. ... Benjamin L. Abruzzo (b. ... Mark Donahue, born March 18, 1937 - died August 19, 1975, was an American race car driver. ... Darrin Nelson was a professional football player in the United States. ... Muncie on the January 12, 1981 cover of Sports Illustrated Harry Vance Chuck Muncie (born March 17, 1953 in Uniontown, Pennsylvania) is a former American football running back who played for the New Orleans Saints and San Diego Chargers in the National Football League from 1976 to 1984. ... James David Lofton (Born July 5, 1956, at Fort Ord, Monterey, California) is a former American Football wide receiver who played for the Green Bay Packers (1978-1986), Los Angeles Raiders (1987-1988), the Buffalo Bills (1989-1992), Los Angeles Rams (1993) and Philadelphia Eagles (1993). ... Garin Lee Veris (born February 27, 1963 in Chillicothe, Ohio) was a defensive lineman in the NFL, mainly for the New England Patriots. ... Sean Joseph Morey (born February 26, 1976 in Marshfield, Massachusetts) is an American football wide receiver for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the NFL. He was originally selected with the 35th pick of the seventh round of the 1999 NFL Draft out of Brown University by the New England Patriots. ... Chas Gessner (born August 17, 1981) is an American football player who currently plays on the Tampa Bay Buccaneers pratice squad. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Clergy

The Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina, founded in 1817, roughly corresponds to the segment of North Carolina between I-77 in the west and I-95 in the east, including the most populous area of the state. ... Franklin Clark Fry (1900 - 1968) was a famous U.S. Lutheran clergyman. ... Robert Claflin Rusack (c. ... Seal of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles The Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles is a community of 85,000 Episcopalians in 147 congregations, 39 schools, and 18 major institutions, spanning all of Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara, and Ventura counties, and part of Riverside County. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c (2007) "The Shield of Theta Delta Chi". Retrieved on 2007-04-21. 
  2. ^ The Preamble Institute. Theta Delta Chi. Retrieved on 2007-04-21.
  3. ^ Unless otherwise cited, the referenced alumni can be found in: Ed. McCready, Adam (2004). The Theta Delta Chi Membership Handbook. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge Offset Printing. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • http://www.tdx.org/ - Official site
  • Baird's Manual 1879

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Carthage Chemistry (444 words)
The Theta Chi Delta Honorary Chemistry Fraternity was established at Carthage College in March of 1926.
The objectives of Theta Chi Delta are two fold: 1) to recognize and promote scholarship in the study of chemistry as presented in the college curriculum and 2) to encourage individual participation in all activities, which will contribute to the advancement of the science of chemistry and the advancement of the individual in that field.
The ideals of the Theta Chi Delta Honorary Chemistry fraternity may be illustrated most effectively in the lives of three scientists who have been chosen to represent the Greek letters which constitute the name of this fraternity.
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