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Encyclopedia > Thessaloniki
Thessaloniki  (Θεσσαλονίκη)
The White Tower of Thessaloniki was used as a prison during the era of the Ottoman Empire. Today it is a museum and the landmark of the city.
The White Tower of Thessaloniki was used as a prison during the era of the Ottoman Empire. Today it is a museum and the landmark of the city.
Location
Coordinates 40°38′N 22°57′E / 40.633, 22.95Coordinates: 40°38′N 22°57′E / 40.633, 22.95
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Elevation (min-max): 0 - 20 m (0 - 66 ft)
Government
Country: Greece
Periphery: Central Macedonia
Prefecture: Thessaloniki
Districts: 16
Mayor: Vassilios Papageorgopoulos  (ND)
(since: January 1, 1999)
Population statistics (as of 2001)
City Proper
 - Population: 363,987
 - Area:[25] 17.8 km² (7 sq mi)
 - Density: 20,449 /km² (52,962 /sq mi)
Metropolitan
 - Population: 1,057,825
 - Area: 108.088 km² (42 sq mi)
 - Density: 9,787 /km² (25,347 /sq mi)
Codes
Postal codes: 53x xx, 54x xx, 55x xx, 56x xx
Area codes: 2310
License plate codes: Ν
Website
www.thessalonikicity.gr

Thessaloniki or Salonica (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη) is Greece's second-largest city and the capital of Macedonia, the largest Region of Greece. The Thessaloniki Urban Area extends around the Thermaic Gulf for approximately 17 km and comprises 16 municipalities. According to the 2001 census, the municipality of Thessaloniki had a population of 363,987, while the metropolitan population approximates one million inhabitants. Image File history File links Thessaloniki_White_tower. ... The White Tower of Thessaloniki The White Tower of Thessaloniki (in Greek, Λευκός Πύργος, Lefkos Pyrgos, Macedonian: Бела Кула, Bela Kula) is a monument and museum on the waterfront of the city of Thessaloniki, capital of the region of Macedonia in northern Greece. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Seal of Thessaloniki, Greece. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 685 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 700 pixel, file size: 27 KB, MIME type: image/png) Other versions Adapted from Image:Greece outline map. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving Eastern European Time (EET) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Summer Time (EEST) is one of the names of UTC+3 time zone, 3 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... The peripheries (περιφέρειες) are the subnational divisions of Greece. ... Central Macedonia is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, being the central part of Greek Macedonia. ... Greece consists of 13 administrative regions known as Peripheries of Greece, which are further subdivided into 51 prefectures (nomoi, singular - nomos, Greek: νομοί, νομός)): See also List of the prefectures of Greece by area List of the prefectures of Greece by population density List of the prefectures of Greece by population External... Thessaloniki (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη) is a nomos (prefecture) in Greece, containing Thessaloniki, Lagana and the northern portion of the Chalcidicean peninsula. ... Districts are a form of local government in several countries. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Vasileios Papageorgopoulos (born 27 June 1947 in Thessaloniki, Greece) is a Greek politician and retired sprinter who won two medals at the European Indoor Championships as well as the bronze medal in 100 metres at the 1971 European Championships in Athletics. ... Party logo New Democracy (ND, Greek: Νέα Δημοκρατία, Nea Dhimokratia), founded in 1974, is the main center-right liberal-conservative political party in Greece. ... This is an alphabetical list of municipalities and communities in Greece. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Here are list of postal codes in Greece. ... This is a list of dialing codes in Greece. ... Greek car number plates are composed of three letters and four digits per plate (e. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Thessaloniki Urban Area consists of thirteen municipalities and one community. ... The Thermaic Gulf (Greek Θερμαϊκός Κόλπος, Macedonian / Slavonic : Солунски Залив / Solunski Zaliv) is a gulf of the Aegean Sea located immediately south of Thessaloniki, east of Pieria and Imathia, and west of Chalkidiki (prefectures of Greece). ...


Thessaloniki is Greece's second major economic, industrial, commercial and political centre. It is a major transportation hub for rest of southeastern Europe. Its commercial port is of a great importance for Greece and its southeast European hinterland. The Prime Minister gives his annual governmental speech outlining plans for the year to come from Thessaloniki. Note on Greek names: There is no firm convention for the rendering of Greek personal names into English. ...


Thessaloniki retains several Ottoman, and Jewish structures, as well as a large number of Byzantine architectural monuments. The city hosts an annual International Trade Fair, the Thessaloniki International Film Festival, and the largest bi-annual meeting of the Greek diaspora. Ottoman redirects here. ... Languages Hebrew, Ladino, Judæo-Portuguese, Catalanic, Shuadit, local languages Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Ashkenazi Jews, Mizrahi Jews, other Jewish ethnic divisions, Spaniards, Portuguese. ... Byzantine architecture is the architecture of the Byzantine Empire. ... Thessaloníki or Salonica (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη) is the second-largest city of Greece and is the principal, the largest city, and the capital of the Greek region of Macedonia. ... Greek diaspora (Greek: ) is a term used to refer to the communities of Greek people living outside of the traditional Greek homelands of modern Greece,and Cyprus. ...

Contents

Name

The alternative name Salonica, formerly the common name used in some western European languages, is derived from a variant form Σαλονίκη (Saloníki) in popular Greek speech. The city's name is also rendered Thessaloníki or Saloníki with a dark l typical of Macedonian Greek .[1][2] Names in other languages prominent in the city's history include سلانيك in Ottoman Turkish and Selânik in modern Turkish, Solun (Cyrillic: Солун) in the Slavic languages of the region, Sãrunã in Aromanian, and Selanik in Ladino (see other names). A current understanding of Western Europe. ... The velarized alveolar lateral approximant, which may actually be uvularized or pharyngealized, also known as dark l, is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... Ottoman Turkish (Turkish: or , Ottoman Turkish: ‎ ) was the variant of the Turkish language that was used as the administrative and literary language of the Ottoman Empire. ... Turkish (, ) is a language spoken by 65–73 million people worldwide, predominantly in Turkey, with smaller communities of speakers in Cyprus, Greece and Eastern Europe, as well as by several million immigrants in Western Europe, particularly Germany, making it the most commonly spoken of the Turkic languages. ... The Cyrillic alphabet (or azbuka, from the old name of the first two letters) is an alphabet used for several East and South Slavic languages; (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Rusyn, Serbian, and Ukrainian) and many other languages of the former Soviet Union, Asia and Eastern Europe. ... The Slavic languages of Macedonia, Greece can refer to three mutually intelligible Slavic languages: Bulgarian language Macedonian language (also known as Macedonian Slavic, Slavic Macedonian, Macedonian (Slavonic), FYRO Macedonian and Macedonian (FYROM), Slavomacedonian, or Skopian, see Macedonian language naming dispute) Slavic language (Greece) All three are included in the South... Aromanian (also known as Macedo-Romanian, Arumanian or Vlach in most other countries; in Aromanian: limba armãneascã, armãneshce or armãneashti) is an Eastern Romance language spoken in Southeastern Europe. ... Not to be confused with Ladin. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Thessaloniki is commonly called the 'Συμπρωτεύουσα' 'Symprotevousa' (lit. co-capital) of Greece since the National Schism, in much the same way as it was called the 'συμβασιλεύουσα' 'symbasileousa' (co-queen) of the Byzantine Empire. The National Schism (Greek: , Ethnikos Dikhasmos, sometimes called The Great Division) is a historical event involving the disagreement between King Constantine and Prime Minister Eleftherios Venizelos over whether Greece should enter World War I. During the war Greece was of strategic importance due to its position in the link between... Byzantine redirects here. ...


History

Hellenistic era

Further information: Hellenistic Greece and Ancient Greece
The statue of Alexander the Great (Alexander III of Macedon)
The statue of Alexander the Great (Alexander III of Macedon)

The city was founded circa 315 BC by the king Cassander of Macedon (Μακεδονία), on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma and twenty six other local villages. He named it after his wife Thessaloniki, a half-sister of Alexander the Great. She gained her name from her father, Philip II, to commemorate her birth on the day of his gaining a victory (Gr. Nike, pronounced Niki) over the Phocians, who were defeated with the help of Thessalian horsemen, the best in Greece at that time. Thessaloniki means the "victory of Thessalians". Thessaloniki developed rapidly and as early as the 2nd century BC the first walls were built, forming a large square. It was an autonomous part of the Kingdom of Macedon, with its own parliament where the King was represented and could interfere in the city's domestic affairs. The Hellenistic period of Greek history was the period between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the annexation of the Greek peninsula and islands by Rome in 146 BC. Although the establishment of Roman rule did not break the continuity of Hellenistic society and culture, which... The term ancient Greece refers to the period of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 237 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Alexander the Great ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 237 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Alexander the Great ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC - 310s BC - 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 320 BC 319 BC 318 BC 317 BC 316 BC - 315 BC - 314 BC 313 BC 312...  Kingdom of Cassander Other diadochi  Kingdom of Seleucus  Kingdom of Lysimachus  Kingdom of Ptolemy  Epirus Other  Carthage  Rome  Greek colonies Cassander (in Greek, Κάσσανδρος — Kassandros, ca. ... Therma (Therme) was a town in ancient Mygdonia (which was later incorporated into Macedon), situated at the northeastern extremity of a great gulf of the Aegean Sea, the Thermaic Gulf. ... Thessalonice or Thessalonike (in Greek Θεσσαλονικη), a Macedonian princess, was a daughter of king Philip II of Macedon, by his wife or concubine, Nicesipolis of Pherae. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Philip II of Macedon: victory medal (niketerion) struck in Tarsus, 2nd c. ... Phocis (Greek, Modern: Φωκίδα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -s, also Phokida, Phokis) is an ancient district of central Greece. ... Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 2nd century BC started on January 1, 200 BC and ended on December 31, 101 BC. // Coin of Antiochus IV. Reverse shows Apollo seated on an omphalos. ...


Roman era

Further information: Roman Greece
The Roman Forum in central Thessaloniki
The Roman Forum in central Thessaloniki

After the fall of the kingdom of Macedon in 168 BC, Thessalonica became a city of the Roman Republic. It grew to be an important trade-hub located on the Via Egnatia, a Roman road that connected Byzantium (later Constantinople), with Dyrrhachium (now Durrës in Albania), facilitating trade between Europe and Asia. The city became the capital of one of the four Roman districts of Macedonia. It kept its privileges but was ruled by a praetor and had a Roman garrison. For a short time in the 1st century BC, all the Greek provinces came under Thessalonica (the Latin form of the name). Due to the city's key commercial importance, a spacious harbour was built by the Romans, the famous Burrow Harbour (Σκαπτός Λιμήν) that accommodated the town's trade up to the eighteenth century; later, with the help of silt deposits from the river Axios, it was reclaimed as land and the port built beyond it. Remnants of the old harbour's docks can be found nowadays under Odos Frangon Street, near the Catholic Church. Roman Greece is the period of Greek history following the Roman victory over the Corinthians at the Battle of Corinth in 146 BC until the reestablishment of the city of Byzantium and the naming of the city by Emperor Constantine I as the capital of the Roman Empire (as Nova... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1500 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1500 pixel, file size: 1. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC - 160s BC - 150s BC140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC Years: 173 BC 172 BC 171 BC 170 BC 169 BC - 168 BC - 167 BC 166 BC 165... This article refers to the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For alternate meanings, see Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... Ancient Via Egnatia route Via Egnatia (Greek: Εγνατία Οδός) was a road constructed by the Romans around 146 BC. It was named after Gnaeus Egnatius, proconsul of Macedonia, who ordered its construction. ... Not to be confused with Romans road. ... Byzantium (Greek: Βυζάντιον) was an ancient Greek city, which, according to legend, was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named after their king Byzas or Byzantas (Βύζας or Βύζαντας in Greek). ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... The Greek city of Epidamnos (Strabo Geography vi. ... View of Durrës Durrës (Greek: Δυρράχιον dyrakhion, Επίδαμνος epidamnos, Latin: Dyrrhachium, Italian: Durazzo, Turkish: Dıraç, Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian: Драч) is the most ancient and one of the most economically important cities of Albania. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law Praetor was a title granted by the government of Ancient Rome to men acting in one of two official capacities: the commander of an army, either before it was mustered or more typically in the field, or an elected... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ... Vardar in Skopje Axios redirects here. ...


Thessaloniki's acropolis, located in the northern hills, was built in 55 BC after Thracian raids in the city's outskirts, for security reasons. Acropolis (Gr. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 60 BC 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56 BC 55 BC 54 BC 53 BC 52... The Thracians were an Indo-European people, inhabitants of Thrace and adjacent lands (present-day Bulgaria, Romania, northeastern Greece, European Turkey and northwestern asiatic Turkey, eastern Serbia and parts of Republic of Macedonia). ...


It had a Jewish colony, established during the first century, and was an early center of Christianity. On his second missionary journey, Paul of Tarsus preached in the city's synagogue, the chief synagogue of the Jews in that part of Thessaloniki, and laid the foundations of a church. Opposition against him from the Jews drove him from the city, and he fled to Veroia. Paul wrote two of his epistles to the Christian community at Thessalonica, the First Epistle to the Thessalonians and the Second Epistle to the Thessalonians. For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... The 1st century was that century that lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... St. ... 68. ... Veria is also a settlement in the prefecture of Laconia, see Veria (Laconia), Greece Veria (Greek: Βέρροια) , also called Veroia or Verroia, Latin: Berroea, has a population of about 35,000. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The First Epistle to the Thessalonians, also known as the First Letter to the Thessalonians, is a book from the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... The Second Epistle to the Thessalonians, also known as the Second Letter to the Thessalonians, is a book from the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ...


Thessaloníki acquired a patron saint, St. Demetrius, in 306. He is credited with a number of miracles that saved the city. He was the Roman Proconsul of Greece under the anti-Christian emperor Maximian and was martyred at a Roman prison, where today lays the Church of St. Demetrius, first built by the Roman sub-prefect of Illyricum Leontios in 463. Other important remains from this period include the Arch and Tomb of Galerius, located near the center of the modern city. 12th-century mosaic depicting St Demetrios, from the Golden-Roofed Monastery in Kiev. ... For the Miocene ape, see Proconsul (genus) Under the Roman Empire a proconsul was a promagistrate filling the office of a consul. ... Maximian Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Herculius (c. ... St Demetrios with children: one of several Byzantine mosaics that escaped destruction from the hands of the Iconoclasts. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Arch of Galerius (Greek: τόξο του Γαλερίου or Aψίδα του Γαλερίου) and the Tomb of Galerius (Τάφος το&#965...


Byzantine era

Further information: Byzantine Greece and Medieval Thessalonica
The Church of Hagios Demetrios, Patron Saint of the city, in central Thessaloniki.
The Church of Hagios Demetrios, Patron Saint of the city, in central Thessaloniki.
The Metropolitan Church of Thessaloniki, Saint Gregory Palamas.
The Metropolitan Church of Thessaloniki, Saint Gregory Palamas.
The Church of Holy Wisdom (Αγία Σοφία - Hagia Sophia) in central Thessaloniki.
A seventh-century mosaic from Hagios Demetrios representing St. Demetrius with children.

When in 379 the Roman Prefecture of Illyricum was divided between East and WestRoman Empires, Thessaloníki became the capital of the new Prefecture of Illyricum (now reduced in size). Its importance was second only to Constantinople itself. In 390 it was the location of a revolt against the emperor Theodosius I and his Gothic mercenaries. Botheric, their general, together with several of his high officials, were killed in an uprising triggered by the imprisoning of a favorite local charioteer for pederasty with one of Botheric's slave boys.[3] 7,000 - 15,000 of the citizens were massacred in the city's hippodrome in revenge – an act which earned Theodosius a temporary excommunication. Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βυζαντινή Αυτοκρατορία) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Thessalonica in the Middle Ages Political History After the Fourth Crusade Thessalonica (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη, ThessalonikÄ“) became the capital of the Kingdom of Thessalonica created for Boniface of Montferrat. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1125 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1125 pixel, file size: 1. ... St Demetrios with children: one of several Byzantine mosaics that escaped destruction from the hands of the Iconoclasts. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 778 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1556 × 1200 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 778 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1556 × 1200 pixel, file size: 1. ... Gregory Palamas Gregory Palamas (Γρηγόριος Παλαμάς) (1296 - 1359) was a monk of Mount Athos in Greece and later Archbishop of Thessalonica known as a preeminent theologian of Hesychasm. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 705 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 705 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Hagia Sophia (Greek: ; Holy Wisdom) in Thessaloniki, Greece, is one of the oldest churches in that city still standing today. ... Image File history File links Dimamosaic. ... Image File history File links Dimamosaic. ... St Demetrios with children: one of several Byzantine mosaics that escaped destruction from the hands of the Iconoclasts. ... An engraving depicting what Theodosius may have looked like, ca. ... The term pederasty or paederasty can refer to a wide range of erotic practices, generally between adult and adolescent males. ...


The quiet era followed until repeated barbarian invasions after the fall of the Roman Empire, while a catastrophic earthquake severely damaged the city in 620 resulting in the destruction of the Roman Forum and several other public buildings. Thessaloníki itself came under attack from Slavs in the seventh century; however, they failed to capture the city. Byzantine brothers Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius were born in Thessaloníki and the Byzantine Emperor Michael III encouraged them to visit the northern regions as missionaries; they adopted the South Slavonic speech as the basis for the Old Church Slavonic language. In the ninth century, the Byzantines decided to move the market for Bulgarian goods from Constantinople to Thessaloníki. Tsar Simeon I of Bulgaria invaded Thrace, defeated a Byzantine army and forced the empire to move the market back to Constantinople. In 904, Saracens based at Crete managed to seize the city and after a ten day depredation, left with much loot and 22,000 slaves, mostly young people. The Roman Empire is not the Holy Roman Empire (843-1806). ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Saint Cyril (Greek: Κύριλλος , Church Slavonic: Кирилъ) (827 - February 14, 869) was a Byzantine Greek monk, scholar, theologian, and linguist. ... Saint Methodius (Greek: Μεθόδιος; Church Slavonic Мефодии) (b. ... This is a list of the Emperors of the late Eastern Roman Empire, called Byzantine by modern historians. ... This coin struck during the regency of Theodora shows how Michael was less prominent than his mother, who is represented as ruler alone on the obverse, and even than his sister Thecla, who is depicted together with the young Michael on the reverse of this coin. ... Old Church Slavonic (also called Old Church Slavic or Old Bulgarian, incorrectly Old Slavic ) is the first literary Slavic language, developed from the Slavic dialect of Solun (Thessaloniki) by 9th century Byzantine missionaries, Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius. ... As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was the century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... Tsar Simeon the Great (ruled 893-May 27, 927) was 27 when he took the throne of Bulgaria from his brother Vladimir, the son of Prince Boris, who was deposed and blinded by his own father after his attempt to return Bulgaria to paganism. ... The Byzantine Army was the primary military body of the Byzantine armed forces, serving alongside the Byzantine Navy. ... For the rugby club Saracens see Saracens (rugby club) The term Saracen comes from Greek sarakenoi. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ...


The city recovered, and the gradual restoration of Byzantine power during the tenth, eleventh and twelfth centuries brought peace to the area. The population of the city expanded, and according to Benjamin of Tudela, the city even had a Jewish community some 500 strong by the twelfth century. It also hosted the fair of Saint Demetrius every October, which was held just outside the city walls and lasted six days. Map of the route Benjamin of Tudela (flourished 12th century) was a medieval Spanish Jewish Rabbi, traveler and explorer. ... A kehilla or kehillah (קהלה, Hebrew: community) is a Jewish community. ... 12th-century mosaic depicting St Demetrios, from the Golden-Roofed Monastery in Kiev. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Separation barrier. ...


The economic expansion of the city continued through the twelfth century as the rule of the Komnenoi emperors expanded Byzantine control into Serbia and Hungary, to the north. The city is known to have housed an imperial mint at this time. However, after the death of the emperor Manuel I Komnenos in 1180, the fortunes of the Byzantine Empire began to decline, and in 1185 the Norman rulers of Sicily, under the leadership of Count Baldwin and Riccardo d'Acerra attacked and occupied the city, resulting in considerable destruction. Nevertheless, their rule lasted less that a year, since they were defeated in two battles later that year by the Byzantine army and forced to evacuate the city. Byzantine emperor Alexius I Comnenus The Comnenus or Komnenos family was an important dynasty in the history of the Byzantine Empire. ... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... For the eldest son of Andronikos I Komnenos and father of Alexios I of Trebizond, see Manuel Komnenos (born 1145). ... Norman conquests in red. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ...


Thessaloniki passed out of Byzantine hands in 1204, when Constantinople was captured by the Fourth Crusade. Thessaloníki and its surrounding territory—the Kingdom of Thessalonica—became the largest fief of the Latin Empire, covering most of north and central Greece. It was given by the emperor Baldwin I to his rival Boniface of Montferrat but in 1224 it was seized by Theodore Komnenos Doukas, the Greek ruler of Epirus. The city was recovered by the Byzantine Empire in 1246 for the rulers of Thessaloníki in the Middle Ages. The Entry of the Crusaders into Constantinople (Eugène Delacroix, 1840). ... The Kingdom of Thessalonica was a short-lived Crusader State founded after the Fourth Crusade over the conquered Greek lands. ... The Latin Empire, Empire of Nicaea, Empire of Trebizond and the Despotate of Epirus. ... Baldwin I (July 1172 – 1205, Bulgaria), the first emperor of the Latin Empire of Constantinople, as Baldwin IX Count of Flanders and as Baldwin VI Count of Hainaut, was one of the most prominent leaders of the Fourth Crusade, which resulted in the capture of Constantinople, the conquest of the... Boniface of Montferrat (c. ... Theodore Komnenos Doukas or Theodore Comnenus Ducas (Greek: Θεόδωρος Κομνηνός Δούκας, Theodōros KomnÄ“nos Doukas), ruler of Epirus from 1215 to 1230 and of Thessalonica from 1224 to 1230, died c. ... The Despotate of Epirus was one of the medieval Greek successor states of the Byzantine Empire, founded in the aftermath of the Fourth Crusade in 1204. ... Thessalonica in the Middle Ages Political History After the Fourth Crusade Thessalonica (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη, ThessalonikÄ“) became the capital of the Kingdom of Thessalonica created for Boniface of Montferrat. ...


At that time, despite the various invasions, Thessaloniki had a large population and flourishing commerce. That resulted in intellectual and artistic endeavors that can be traced in the numerous churches and their frescoes of that era and also by the scholars that taught there[4] Examples of Byzantine art survive in the city, particularly the mosaics in some of its historic churches, including the basilica of Hagia Sophia of Thessalonki, and the church of St George. The most famous of the surviving Byzantine mosaics of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople - the image of Christ Pantocrator on the walls of the upper southern gallery. ... The Hagia Sophia (Greek: ; Holy Wisdom) in Thessaloniki, Greece, is one of the oldest churches in that city still standing today. ... For alternate uses, see Saint George (disambiguation) Saint George on horseback rides alongside a wounded dragon being led by a princess, late 19th century engraving. ...


In the 14th century though, the city was appalled by the Zelotes social movement (1342-1349). It began as a religious conflict between bishop Gregorios Palamas, who supported conservative ideas and the monk Barlaam, who introduced progressive social ones. Quickly, it turned into a political commotion, leading to the prevalence of the Zelotes, who for a while ruled the city, applying progressive social policies. This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Zealots was an anti-aristocratic political group with social demands in 1342 that dominated political developments in Thessalonica until 1350. ... American Civil Rights Movement is one of the most famous social movements of the 20th century. ... Gregory Palamas Gregory Palamas (Γρηγόριος Παλαμάς) (1296 - 1359) was a monk of Mount Athos in Greece and later Archbishop of Thessalonica known as a preeminent theologian of Hesychasm. ... Barlaam of Calabria (ca. ...


Ottoman era

Further information: Ottoman Greece
The winding Ottoman-period streets of Ano Poli.
The winding Ottoman-period streets of Ano Poli.

The Byzantine Empire, unable to hold the city against the Ottoman Empire's advance, sold it in 1423 to Venice. Venice held the city until it was captured after a three-day-long siege by the Ottoman Sultan Murad II on 29 March 1430. The Ottomans had previously captured Thessaloniki in 1387, but lost it in the aftermath of their defeat in the Battle of Ankara against Tamerlane in 1402, when the weakened Ottomans were forced to hand back a number of territories to the Byzantines. Greece was part of the Ottoman Empire from the 14th century until its declaration of independence in 1821. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (472x623, 321 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Thessaloniki Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (472x623, 321 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Thessaloniki Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Byzantine redirects here. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... The Ottoman Dynasty (or the Imperial House of Osman) ruled the Ottoman Empire from 1281 to 1923, beginning with Osman I (not counting his father, ErtuÄŸrul), though the dynasty was not proclaimed until 1383 when Murad I declared himself sultan. ... Murad II (June 1404, Amasya – February 3, 1451, Edirne) (Ottoman Turkish: مراد ثانى Murād-ı sānÄ«, Turkish:) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1421 to 1451 (except for a period from 1444 to 1446). ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events May 23 - Joan of Arc is captured by the Burgundians while leading an army to relieve Compiègne The Ottoman Empire captures Thessalonica from the Venetians First use of optical methods in the creation of Art A map of Europe in 1430. ... // Combatants Timurid Empire Ottoman Empire Commanders Timur Beyazid I Strength 140,000 men 85,000 men [1] Casualties 15,000-25,000 killed and wounded[] 15,000-40,000 killed and wounded[] The Battle of Ankara or Battle of Angora, fought on July 20, 1402, took place at the field... For the chess engine Tamerlane, see Tamerlane. ...


During Ottoman times, the city received an influx of Muslims and Jews. By 1478, Thessaloniki had a population of 4,320 Muslims and 6,094 Greek Orthodox, as well as some Catholics, but no Jews. By ca. 1500, the numbers had grown to 7,986 Greeks and 8,575 Muslims, briefly making the latter the majority. Around the same time, Jews began arriving from Spain, fleeing persecution. In ca. 1500, there were only 3,770 Jews, but by 1519, there were 15,715, 54% of the city's population. The invitation of the Sephardic Jews that had been expelled from Spain by Ferdinand and Isabella, was an Ottoman demographic strategy aiming to prevent the Greek element from dominating the city.[5] The Sephardic Jews, Muslims and Greek Orthodox remained the principal groups in the city for the next 4 centuries.[5] In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the... Ferdinand on the left with Isabella on the right Coffins of the Catholic Monarchs at the Granada Cathedral The Catholic Monarchs (Spanish: los Reyes Católicos) is the collective title used in history for Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon. ...


The city remained the largest Jewish city in the world for at least two centuries, often called "Mother of Israel". Of its 130,000 inhabitants at the start of the 20th century, around 60,000 were Sephardic Jews.[6] Some Romaniote Jews were also present.[7] The Romaniotes are a Jewish population who have lived in the territory of todays Greece for more than 2000 years. ...


Thessaloníki, called Selânik in Turkish, became one of the most important cities in the Empire, being the foremost trade and commercial center in the Balkans. The railway reached the city in 1888 and new modern port facilities were built in 1896-1904. The founder of modern Turkey, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, was born here in 1881, and the Young Turk movement was headquartered here in the early twentieth century. “Mustafa Kemal” redirects here. ... The Young Turks were a Turkish nationalist reform party, officially known as the Committee of Union and Progress (CUP) — in Turkish the Ittihad ve Terakki Cemiyeti — whose leaders led a rebellion against Sultan Abdul Hamid II (who was officially deposed and exiled in 1909). ...


Selânik was a sanjak center in the Rumeli eyalet from 1393 to 1402 and again from 1430 to 1864, when it became a vilayet (province). The Ottoman vilayet of Selânik province included the sanjaks of Selânik (Thessaloniki), Drama, and Serres (Siroz or Serez). Sanjak and Sandjak (other variants: sinjaq, sanjaq) are the most common English transliterations of the Turkish word Sancak, which literally means banner. In Arabic the sanjaks were also called liwas. ... Map of Rumelia as of 1801 Rumelia (or Roumelia) (in Turkish Rumeli, the East Roman or Byzantine Empire), a name commonly used, from the 15th century onwards, to denote the part of the Balkan Peninsula subject to the Ottoman Empire. ... Vilâyet (also eyalet or pashaluk) was the Turkish name for the provinces of the Ottoman Empire. ... Vilâyet (also eyalet or pashaluk) was the Turkish name for the provinces of the Ottoman Empire. ... The vilayet of Salonika was an Ottoman province from 1864 to 1912. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Serres (Greek: Σέρρες, older form: Σέρραι, Turkish: Serez or Siroz, Slavic: Серез/Serez, Сяр/Syar or Сер/Ser) is a city in the Greek region of Macedonia. ...


Architectural remains from the Ottoman period can be found mainly in the Ano Poli (Upper Town) which has the only traditional wooden houses and fountains that survived the great fire. In the city center, a number of the stone mosques survived, notably the "Hamza-Bey Camii" on Egnatia (under restoration), the "Alatza Imaret Camii" on Kassandrou Street, "Bezesteni" on Venizelou Street, and "Yahoudi Hamam" on Frangon Street. Almost all of the more than 40 minarets collapsed in the fire, or were demolished after 1912; the only surviving one is at the Rotonda (Arch and Tomb of Galerius). There are also a few remaining Ottoman hammams (bathhouses), particularly the "Hamam Bey" on Egnatia Avenue. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Arch of Galerius (Greek: τόξο του Γαλερίου or Aψίδα του Γαλερίου) and the Tomb of Galerius (Τάφος το&#965... A hammam in Chefchaouen, Morocco The Turkish hammam (also Turkish bath or hamam) is the Middle Eastern variant of a steam bath, which can be categorized as a wet relative of the sauna. ... Floorplan of Bey Hamam Bey Hamam seen from the outside Bey Hamam, alternatively known as the Baths of Paradise, is a Turkish bath house located along the street Egnatia in Thessalonica, west of Panagia Chalkéôn. ...


During 19th century Thessaloníki became one of the cultural and political centres of the Bulgarian revival movement in Macedonia. According to Bulgarian ethnographer Vasil Kanchov around the beginning of the 20th century there were approximately 10,000 Bulgarians, a substantial minority in the city.[8] In 1880 a Bulgarian Men's High School was founded, followed later by other educational institutions of the Bulgarian Exarchate. In 1893 a group of Bulgarian intelligentsia created a revolutionary organization, which spread its influence among Bulgarians throughout Ottoman Balkans and became the strongest Bulgarian paramilitary movement, best known under its latest name Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization. In 1903 a group of Bulgarian leftists and anarchists, tied to IMRO, organized series of terrorist acts. After the Young Turk Revolution of 1908 Thessaloniki became major centre of Bulgarian political activity in the Ottoman Empire and seat of the two largest legal Bulgarian parties, the rightist Union of the Bulgarian Constitutional Clubs, and the leftist People's Federative Party (Bulgarian Section).[9] Vasil Kanchov (Bulgarian: ) (26 July 1862 – 6 February 1904) was a Bulgarian geographer, ethnographer and politician. ... The Sts. ... An early 20th century postcard depicting the Bulgarian St Stephen Church in Istanbul The Bulgarian Exarchate (Bulgarian: ) was the official name of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church before its autocephaly was recognized by the other Orthodox churches in the 1950s. ... For a novel by a similar name, see Imaro (novel). ... The Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization (in Macedonian: Vnatrešna Makedonska Revolucionerna Organizacija, Внатрешна Македонска Револуционерна Орг&#1072... In late April 1903, a group by young anarhysts from the Gemidzhii Circle - graduates from the Bulgarian secondary school in Thessaloniki launched a campaign of terror bombing. ... Public demonstration in the Sultanahmet district of Istanbul, 1908 The Young Turk Revolution of 1908 reversed the suspension of the Ottoman parliament by Sultan Abdul Hamid II, marking the onset of the Second Constitutional Era. ...


Balkan Wars and World War I

Further information: Great Thessaloniki Fire of 1917
The Institute of Macedonian Studies building.
The Institute of Macedonian Studies building.

During the First Balkan War, the Ottoman garrison surrendered Salonika to the Greek Army on November 9 November [O.S. 27 October] 1912. This was a day after the feast of the city's patron saint, Saint Demetrios, which has become the date customarily celebrated as the anniversary of the city's liberation. The next day, a Bulgarian division arrived, and Bulgarian troops were allowed to enter the city in limited numbers. Although officially governed by the Greeks, the final fate of the city hung in the balance. The Austrian government proposed to make Salonika into a neutral, internationalized city similar to what Danzig later became; it would have had a territory of 400-460 km² and a population of 260,000. It would be "neither Greek, Bulgarian nor Turkish, but Jewish".[10] The Great Thessaloniki Fire of 1917 was one of the most important incidents that marked the history of the city. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 477 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 611 pixel, file size: 170 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 477 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 611 pixel, file size: 170 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Combatants Ottoman Empire Balkan League: Bulgaria Greece Montenegro Serbia Commanders Nazim Pasha, Zekki Pasha, Esat Pasha, Abdullah Pasha, Ali Rizah Pasha Vladimir Vazov, Vasil Kutinchev, Nikola Ivanov, Radko Dimitriev Crown Prince Constantine, Panagiotis Danglis, Pavlos Kountouriotis King Nicholas I, Prince Danilo Petrović, Mitar Martinović, Janko Vukotić Radomir Putnik, Petar Bojovi... This article is about the land force of the modern nation of Greece. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style or O.S. is a designation indicating that a date conforms to the Julian calendar, formerly in use in many countries, rather than the Gregorian calendar, currently in use in most countries. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For alternative meanings of Gdańsk and Danzig, see Gdansk (disambiguation) and Danzig (disambiguation) The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ...


The Greeks' emotional attachment to the city was increased when King George I of Greece, who had settled there to emphasize Greece's possession of it, was assassinated on 18 March 1913 by Alexandros Schinas. After the Greek and Serbian victory in the Second Balkan War, which broke out among the former allies over the final territorial dispositions,[11] the city's status was finally settled by the Treaty of Bucharest on August 10, 1913, becoming an integral part of Greece. In 1915, during World War I, a large Allied expeditionary force landed at Thessaloniki to use the city as the base for a massive offensive against pro-German Bulgaria. This precipitated the political conflict between the pro-Allied Prime Minister, Eleftherios Venizelos, and the the pro-neutral King Constantine. In 1916, pro-Venizelist army officers, with the support of the Allies, launched the Movement of National Defence, which resulted in the establishment of a pro-Allied temporary government, headed by Venizelos, that controlled northern Greece and the Aegean, against the official government of the King in Athens. Ever since, Thessaloniki has been dubbed as symprotévousa ("co-capital"). George I, King of the Hellenes (Greek: ; December 24, 1845 – March 18, 1913) was King of Greece from 1863 to 1913. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Alexandros Schinas Alexandros (Alekos) Schinas (1870s, Volos - May 6, 1913), was a Greek[1] anarchist who assassinated King George I of Greece in Thessaloniki in 1913. ... Combatants Bulgaria Greece Serbia Montenegro Romania Ottoman Empire Commanders Mihail Savov Nikola Ivanov, Vasil Kutinchev, Radko Dimitriev Serbia: Radomir Putnik, Greece:King Constantine, Romania: Crown Prince Ferdinand, Alexandru Averescu Strength 500,000 men Serbia 220,000 men, Romania 200,000 men, Greece 150,000 men, Montenegro 12,000 men The... The Treaty of Bucharest was concluded on August 10, 1913, by the delegates of Bulgaria, Romania, Serbia, Montenegro, and Greece. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Look up ally in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Expeditionary Force is a generic name sometimes applied to a military force dispatched to fight in a foreign country. ... Eleftherios Venizelos (1864-1936), Greek statesman and diplomat. ... This is a list of the Kings of Greece, formally known by the title of King of The Hellenes. ... Constantine I, King of the Hellenes (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος A, Βασιλεύς των Ελλήνων) (2 August 1868 - 11 January 1923) ruled Greece from 1913-1917 and from 1920-1922. ... Venizelism was one of the major political movements in Greece from the 1900s until the mid 1970s. ... The Movement of National Defence (Greek: Κίνημα της Εθνικής Αμύνης) was a revolution by Venizelist officers in Thessaloniki in 1916 against the royal government in Athens. ... A provisional government is an emergency or interim government set up when a political void has been created by the collapse of a previous administration or regime. ...


Most of the old town was destroyed by a single fire on 18 August [O.S. 5 August] 1917 which was accidentally caused by some French soldiers that were camping there. The fire made some 72,000 people homeless (most of them were Turkish) out of a population of approximately 271,157 at the time. Venizelos forbade the reconstruction of the town center until a full modern city plan was prepared. This was accomplished a few years later by the French architect and archeologist Ernest Hebrard. The Hebrard plan, although in the event never fully carried out, swept away the Oriental features of Thessaloníki and transformed it to the modern, European style metropolis that it is today. One consequence of the great fire was the fact that nearly half of the city's Jewish homes and livelihoods were destroyed leading to a massive Jewish emigration. Many went to Palestine, others stepped onto the Orient Express to Paris and still others found their way to America. Their numbers, however, were quickly replaced by a considerable number of refugees from Asia Minor following the population exchange between Greece and Turkey, after the defeat of the Greek forces in Anatolia during the Greco-Turkish War. With these new refugees, the city expanded enormously and haphazardly, and was nicknamed "The Refugee Capital" (I Protévoussa ton Prosfýgon) and "Mother of the Poor" (Ftohomána). The Great Thessaloniki Fire of 1917 was one of the most important incidents that marked the history of the city. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style or O.S. is a designation indicating that a date conforms to the Julian calendar, formerly in use in many countries, rather than the Gregorian calendar, currently in use in most countries. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Ernest Hébrard (1875-1933) was a French architect, archeologist and urban planner. ... This article is about the geographical area known as Palestine. ... Poster advertising the Orient Express Orient Express is the name of a long-distance passenger train originally operated by the Compagnie Internationale des Wagons-Lits. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Anatolia and Europe Anatolia (Turkish: from Greek: Ανατολία - Anatolia) is a peninsula of Western Asia which forms the greater part of the Asian portion of Turkey, as opposed to the European portion (Thrace, or traditionally Rumelia). ... Cartoon depicting a Turk and a Greek arguing over the exchange. ... Combatants Greece Turkish Revolutionaries Commanders Gen Leonidas Paraskevopoulos, Gen Anastasios Papoulas, Gen Georgios Hatzianestis Ali Fethi Okyar, Ä°smet Ä°nönü, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, Fevzi Çakmak Strength 200,000 men 120,000 men (plus village protectors) Casualties 23,500 dead; 20,820 captured 20,540 dead; 10,000 wounded The...


World War II Era

Further information: Axis occupation of Greece during World War II

Thessaloniki fell to the forces of Nazi Germany on April 9 1941 and remained under German occupation until 30 October 1944. The city suffered considerable damage from Allied bombing, and almost its entire Jewish population was exterminated by the Nazis. Barely a thousand Jews survived. However, Thessaloniki was rebuilt and recovered fairly quickly after the war. This recovery included both a rapid growth in its population, as well as an impressive development of new, modern infrastructure and industrial enterprizes throughout the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. Most of the urban development of that period was, however, without a proper plan, causing traffic and zoning problems that remain to this day. German soldiers raising the Reich War Flag over the Acropolis. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... It has been suggested that Jewish population by cities and cityareas be merged into this article or section. ... Urban planning is concerned with the ordering and design of settlements, from the smallest towns to the worlds largest cities. ...


Modern Era

The OTE Tower in the International Trade Exhibition is one of the city's modern landmarks.
The OTE Tower in the International Trade Exhibition is one of the city's modern landmarks.
Nikis Avenue on Thessaloniki's central seafront.
Nikis Avenue on Thessaloniki's central seafront.

At 23:04 (local time) on 20 June, 1978, the city was hit by a powerful earthquake registering a moment magnitude of 6.5. The tremor caused considerable damage to several buildings and even to some of the city's Byzantine monuments. Forty people were crushed to death when an entire apartment block collapsed in the central Hippodromio district. Nonetheless, the city quickly recovered from this natural disaster. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1125 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1125 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... An earthquake is the result of a sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... Mount Pinatubo eruption, 1991 A natural disaster is the consequence of a natural hazard (e. ...


Early Christian and Byzantine monuments of Thessaloniki were inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1988. Thessaloniki became the European City of Culture for 1997. UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... The European Capital of Culture is a city designated by the European Union for a period of one year during which it is given a chance to showcase its cultural life and cultural development. ...


Thessaloniki is one of the most important university centers in Southeastern Europe and it hosts a student population coming from all over the country. The city features two state universities — the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, the largest university in Greece (founded 1926) and the University of Macedonia, as well as the Technological Education Institute of Thessaloniki. In addition, there are several private institutions that are either affiliated with universities in other nations, or accredited abroad. The Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (often referred to in English as Aristotelian University), named after the philosopher Aristotle, is the largest university of Greece. ... The University of Macedonia is located in Thessaloniki, Greece. ...


In June 2003, the Summit meeting of European leaders, at the end of the Greek Presidency of the EU, was hosted at the Porto Carras resort in Chalkidiki, instead of within Thessaloniki itself (as originally planned) due to some security concerns. In 2004, the city hosted some of the football events of the 2004 Summer Olympics. Thessaloniki unsuccessfully bid for the 2008 World EXPO, won by Zaragoza, Spain. However, another planned bid for 2017 was announced in September 2006 away from the previous bid that has been made and was clarified as unsatisfactory. Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Porto Carras (Greek:Πόρτο Καρράς) is one of Greeces biggest and most famous holiday resorts and tourist places. ... Categories: Greece geography stubs ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... For other uses, see Zaragoza (disambiguation). ...


Government

Main article: List of mayors of Thessaloniki

Since Thessaloniki is the second largest city in Greece, and an influential city in Northern Greece, it is the capital of the Central Macedonia Periphery, Thessaloniki Prefecture, and Thessaloniki Municipality. The Mayor of Thessaloniki is the head of the Municipality of Thessaloniki, the largest district of the City of Thessaloniki. ... Central Macedonia is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, being the central part of Greek Macedonia. ... Thessaloniki (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη) is a nomos (prefecture) in Greece, containing Thessaloniki, Lagana and the northern portion of the Chalcidicean peninsula. ...

Aerial photo of Eastern Thessaloniki. Kalamaria is its easternmost suburb.

Many countries have consulates in Thessaloniki as all major embassies are located in the capital of Greece, in Athens except the Culture office of the Italian Embassy located in Thessaloniki: Image File history File links Kalamaria_from_Air. ... Image File history File links Kalamaria_from_Air. ... Kalamaria (Greek: Καλαμαριά) is a suburban city in the Thessaloniki Prefecture located about 5 km southeast of downtown Thessaloniki. ... For the uses of Consul as Chief Magistrate of a (city) state, see Consul. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... A diplomatic mission is a group of people from one nation state present in another nation state to represent the sending state in the receiving State. ...


Albania, Australia, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, Chile, Republic of Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France, Federal Republic of Germany, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM), Hungary, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxemburg, Mexico, The Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, Serbia, Sweden, Switzerland, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America (consulate general). Luxembourg - a small country in west Europe Luxembourg (city) - the capital city of the country Luxembourg (district) - a district in the country Luxembourg, province of Belgium Luxemburg, Iowa - a city in the USA Luxemburg, Wisconsin - a village in the USA Luxembourg Garden, Paris, France Luxemburg Township, Minnesota - a township in... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ...


Urban Landscape

The Ano Poli district as seen from the eastern seafront.
The Ano Poli district as seen from the eastern seafront.
Panoramic View of parts of central and eastern Thessaloniki from the byzantine walls.
Panoramic View of parts of central and eastern Thessaloniki from the byzantine walls.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (947x228, 300 KB) Summary Ian 20:31, 12 September 2006 (UTC) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (947x228, 300 KB) Summary Ian 20:31, 12 September 2006 (UTC) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 291 pixelsFull resolution (5487 × 1999 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 291 pixelsFull resolution (5487 × 1999 pixel, file size: 3. ...

Architecture

Part of the Aghia Sophia Square.
Part of the Aghia Sophia Square.

The architectural face of Thessaloniki was always an interesting and special case because it was in constant flux due to the city's position at the center of all historical developments in the Balkans. Besides its commercial importance, Thessaloniki was, for many centuries, the military and administrative hub of the region, and also the transportation link between Europe and the Levante. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


The city layout changed after 1870, when the seaside fortifications gave way to extensive piers. During the following 47 years, a period of great economic growth, the city's population exploded by 70%, reaching 135 thousand in 1917. The city became a commercial attraction for economic refugees, businessmen and traders from across Europe, including many Jews. The authorities tore down part of the city's Byzantine fortifications to allow it to expand, which it did, to the east and the west, along the coast. World GDP/capita changed very little for most of human history before the industrial revolution. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ...


The need for commercial and public buildings in that new era of prosperity led to a marked shift in architectural direction and led to the construction of large edifices in the city center in lots formerly occupied by small, shabby one-family homes. During this time, Thessaloniki saw the building of banks, large hotels, theaters, warehouses, and factories.


The expansion of Eleftherias Square (today's Venizelou Square) to the sea completed the new commercial center of the city. The rest of the city's neighborhoods, within the old fortifications, remained unchanged. The western districts were the working class section, near the factories, and Thessalonikis' new industrial activity. The middle and upper classes moved east of the city and built a new suburb, then known as "Exohes", or "country retreats". The new district soon acquired schools, public buildings and also some manufacturing plants. Today, the city's most important public buildings are to be found between the historic center and those eastern suburbs, next to the White Tower. The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... Social class refers to the hierarchical distinctions between individuals or groups in societies or cultures. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The White Tower is a 1945 novel by James Ramsey Ullman. ...

The building of the Bank of Greece in central Thessaloniki.
The building of the Bank of Greece in central Thessaloniki.

The most important year in the city's history was 1917, a landmark year that shaped Thessaloniki into its present form. The devastating fire that swept through the city that year and burned uncontrollably for 32 hours, destroyed the city's historic center and a large part of its architectural heritage. Many buildings of rare beauty were completely demolished. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 1,008 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 1,008 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Not to be confused with the National Bank of Greece. ... Heritage can refer to: Cultural heritage Cultural traditions Heritage tourism Inheritance Kinship and descent Natural heritage A novel in the BBC Books series See also English Heritage UNESCO World Heritage Site This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


The city that was designed between 1917 and 1950 was a modern and functional urban center whose layout and feel had little in common with what preceded it. The team of architects and urban planners that designed the new Thessaloniki was led by Ernesr Hebrard, a french architect. The team chose the Byzantine era as the basis for their designs of the buildings that would adorn the new city. The new city plan included axes, diagonal streets and monumental squares, with a street grid that would channel traffic smoothly. The Urban Center is a gallery on Madison Avenue in New York City (USA), which is run by the Municipal Art Society (MAS). ... A simple grid plan road map (Windermere, Florida). ...


The plan of 1917 included provisions for the future population explosion and an adequate street and road network that would have been sufficient even today. It contained sites for public and important buildings, the restoration of important Byzantine churches and landmarks and Ottoman mosques, whereas the whole of the Upper City, near the fortifications, was declared a heritage site. The plan also included a site for the campus of the future University of Thessaloniki, which was never realized, although today's University campus incorporates some of Hebrard's ideas. A heritage site is a location where a landmark of natural or cultural importance is legally protected. ... The Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, named after the philosopher Aristotle, is the largest university of Greece. ...

The Ministry of Macedonia and Thrace in central Thessaloniki.
The Ministry of Macedonia and Thrace in central Thessaloniki.

An important element of the plan was to achieve a fine balance between contemporary urban planning and architectural ideas and the city's rich tradition and history. The main feature of all proposed buildings was the perfect symmetry of all sides and the emphasis on the center of each. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 729 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1124 × 924 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 729 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1124 × 924 pixel, file size: 1. ...


The plan also included provisions for the building of an administrative center with the city hall, the courts building and a series of secondary buildings to house all other civic functions. Unfortunately, those plans were never implemented and the city lacks an administrative district to this day. Nevertheless, this part of the plan influenced a lot of building and planning decisions throughout the 20th century, with the inevitable adaptations to service the population explosion of the last 50 years. It has been suggested that Town Hall be merged into this article or section. ...


Although Thessaloniki is one of the most attractive cities in Greece and quite interesting for the student of architecture, today it bursts at the seams and presents its residents with a full menu of modern urban inconveniences. Traffic is the most important problem, with new car registrations increasing by about 20 thousand annually, and the volume of cars quintupling in the last 15 years. Thessaloniki is the only major European urban center that is served by only one mode of public transportation; buses. In addition, the city center has limited public parking spaces. A subway line and an underwater tunnel are currently under construction in an effort to decongest the city center.


Landmarks

Part of Aristotelous Square in central Thessaloniki.
Part of Aristotelous Square in central Thessaloniki.
The Arch of Galerius (Kamara) stands on Egnatia Avenue.
The Arch of Galerius (Kamara) stands on Egnatia Avenue.
The Rotunda of St. George in central Thessaloniki.
The Rotunda of St. George in central Thessaloniki.
  • The White Tower of Thessaloniki (Greek: Λευκός Πύργος Lefkos Pyrgos), widely regarded as the symbol of the city. It has been known by many names and is now home to the Museum of Byzantine Cultures. The top of the tower offers excellent views of the downtown area.
  • The Arch and Tomb of Galerius is more commonly known as the "Kamara", is ornately decorated and made with a reddish coloured stone.
  • The Upper Town or 'Ano Poli' is what remains of Ottoman Thessaloniki, beautiful wooden houses overhang the winding streets all the way up to the Eptapyrgio at the top of the city. The Ano Poli also contains some of the city's oldest and most important churches, particularly Osios David, St. Nicolaos Orphanos and Vlatades Monastery.
  • The Church of Aghios Demetrios is the most important church in the entire city. Lying above the remains of the agora and the Roman Forum, the church has three side-chapels, a museum, and underground catacombs that also include Saint Demetrios' imprisonment chamber. He is the patron saint of the city.
  • OTE Tower, a TV tower is the center of the Thessaloniki Expo Center. A revolving restaurant offers great views of the city.
  • The waterfront is Thessaloniki's major drawcard. The promenade of Nikis Avenue runs from the White Tower of Thessaloniki to the giant palace that is now a ferry terminal. Numerous shops and cafés line the waterfront.
  • The Arch and Tomb of Galerius or the Church of Aghios Georgios, which is a circular church lacking the classic Orthodox iconostasis. The church is built upon former Roman and Greek pagan ruins.
  • Aristotelous Square, extending all the way from Nikis Avenue on the waterfront to the Church of Panayia Halkeion. The square, shaped like a bottle, is lined with tall archondika, or mansions of the rich, that have now been converted to shops and hotels. A large park lies at the north end of the square, and Thessaloniki's thriving old market is just one block away to the east and west.
  • The area surrounding the Church of Aghia Sofia, also located in the city center, includes the large church and paved alleyways that make the few blocks around it famous.
  • The extensive Byzantine walls of the Upper City (Ano Poli) and kastro.
  • The Kyvernion (little Palace); former residence of the King and Queen of Greece; in the Karabournaki area, in Eastern Thessaloniki
  • The modern Concert Hall of Thessaloniki in the East side of the city, near the Posidonion sports center.
  • Thessaloniki Intemational Trade Fair held every September, organised by Helexpo.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1143x857, 294 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Greece Aristotelous Square ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1143x857, 294 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Greece Aristotelous Square ... Aristotelous Square (Greek Οδος Αριστοτελους) is one of the main squares of Thessaloniki, Greece. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 751 KB) The Arch of Galerius in Thessaloniki, Greece, seen from the east. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 751 KB) The Arch of Galerius in Thessaloniki, Greece, seen from the east. ... The Arch of Galerius (Greek: τόξο του Γαλερίου or Aψίδα του Γαλερίου) and the Tomb of Galerius (Τάφος του Γαλερίου) are neighbouring monuments in the city of Thessaloniki, in the province of Central Macedonia in northern Greece. ... Image File history File links The Saint George Rotunda (4th cent. ... Image File history File links The Saint George Rotunda (4th cent. ... The Arch of Galerius and the Rotunda with its minaret The Arch of Galerius (Modern Greek: τόξο του Γαλερίου or Aψίδα του Γαλερίου) and the Tomb of Galerius (Τάφος του Γαλερίου) are neighboring monuments in the city of Thessaloniki, in the province of Central Macedonia in northern Greece. ... The White Tower of Thessaloniki The White Tower of Thessaloniki (in Greek, Λευκός Πύργος, Lefkos Pyrgos, Macedonian: Бела Кула, Bela Kula) is a monument and museum on the waterfront of the city of Thessaloniki, capital of the region of Macedonia in northern Greece. ... The Arch of Galerius (Greek: τόξο του Γαλερίου or Aψίδα του Γαλερίου) and the Tomb of Galerius (Τάφος το&#965... St Demetrios with children: one of several Byzantine mosaics that escaped destruction from the hands of the Iconoclasts. ... The OTE tower in modern Thessaloniki OTE tower OTE Tower is a TV tower at Thessaloniki, Greece. ... Masts of the Rugby VLF transmitter in England Radio masts and towers are, typically, tall structures designed to support antennas (also known as aerials in the UK) for telecommunications and broadcasting, including television. ... A revolving restaurant is a restaurant on a revolving floorplate. ... The Arch of Galerius (Greek: τόξο του Γαλερίου or Aψίδα του Γαλερίου) and the Tomb of Galerius (Τάφος το&#965... Aristotelous Square (Greek Οδος Αριστοτελους) is one of the main squares of Thessaloniki, Greece. ... The Church of Panayia Halkeon is a church in the Greek city of Thessaloniki. ... The Hagia Sophia (Greek: ; Holy Wisdom) in Thessaloniki, Greece, is one of the oldest churches in that city still standing today. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Karabournaki, also Karampournaki (Greek: Καραμπουρνάκι), Mikro Karabourou or -Karampourou (Μικρό Καραμπουρνού) or Mikro Emvolo (Μικρό Έμβολο). is the cape founded in Kalamaria south of Thessaloniki. ... The 2006 LinuxWorld trade show at the Boston Convention and Exposition Center. ...

Museums

The State Museum of Contemporary Arts (Κρατικό Μουσείο Σύγχρονης Τέχνης) is a state museum based in Thessaloniki, Greece. ... Beat the white with the Red wedge, a 1919 lithograph by Lissitzky The Russian avant garde is an umbrella term used to define the large, influential wave of modernist art that flourished in Russia from approximately 1890 to 1930 - although some place its beginning as early as 1850 and its... Georgy Costakis by Anatoly Zverev, end of 50ies In the years around the 1917 Revolution, Russia produced the first non-figurative art movement which was to be the defining art of the 20th century. ... The Greek Struggle for Macedonia 1904-1908 (in Greek language: Μακεδονικός Αγῶν, Macedonian Struggle) is how the Greeks describe their military conflicts against the Bulgarians (VMRO) and the Turkish forces in Ottoman occupied Macedonia during the first decade of the 20th century. ... Thessaloniki Science Center & Technology Museum - NOESIS, aerial view Thessaloniki Science Center and Technology Museum - NOESIS is located at the outscirts of Thessaloniki, Greece, in a new complex that occupies a surface area of 14. ...

Archaeological sites

  • Agia Paraskevi, Thessaloniki, archaic cemetery
  • The Ancient Agora of Thessaloniki
  • Monastery of Latomos at Thessaloniki
  • The Roman Palace and Hippodrome
  • The extensive city walls
  • Trigonian Tower and the Castra area

Demographics

Although the population of the Municipality of Thessaloniki has declined in the last two censuses, the metropolitan area's population is still growing, as people are moving to the suburbs. Today approximate 1 million people live in the metropolitan area, making it the second largest metropolitan area in Greece after Athens. The Thessaloniki metropolitan area, has traditionally consisted of the municipality of Thessaloniki and its immediate surroundings. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ...

Year City population Change Metro population
1981 406,413 - -
1991 383,967[12] -22,446/-5.52% -
2001 363,987[12] -19,980/-5.20% 1,057,825[12]

The Jews of Thessaloniki

The colourful shopfronts of the central district of Ladadika which used to be the Jewish quarter
The colourful shopfronts of the central district of Ladadika which used to be the Jewish quarter
The Jewish Cemetery of Thessaloniki in the late 19th century.
The Jewish Cemetery of Thessaloniki in the late 19th century.

Thessaloniki's Jewish community, was largely of Sephardic background, but also included the historically significant and ancient Romaniote community. During the Ottoman era, Thessaloniki's Jewish community comprised more than half the city's population and Jews were dominant in commerce until Greece took over the city in 1912. Within the Greek state the Jews enjoyed the same civil rights as all other Greeks.[13] As a result of the Jewish influence on the city, many non-Jewish inhabitants of Thessaloniki also spoke Ladino, the Romance language of the Sephardic Jews, and the city virtually shut down on Saturday, the Jewish Sabbath.[14] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (847x621, 621 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Thessaloniki Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (847x621, 621 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Thessaloniki Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the... The Romaniotes are a Jewish population who have lived in the territory of todays Greece for more than 2000 years. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Not to be confused with Ladin. ... The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family, comprising all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ...


A great blow to the Jewish community of Thessaloniki came with the great fire of 1917, which left 50,000 Jews homeless.[15] Many Jews emigrated to Turkey,[16] United States, other parts of Europe and Alexandria, Egypt. In 1920, the government created special electoral colleges for Salonica's Jews, so that they could not compete with Christian candidates.[17] In 1922, a blue law preventing trading on Sunday caused further financial stress on the Jewish merchants, already suffering the loss of markets after the collapse of the Ottoman empire, and yet further Jews emigrated.[18] The Great Thessaloniki Fire of 1917 was one of the most important incidents that marked the history of the city. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... This article is about laws created to enforce moral standards. ...


The arrival of the 100,000 Greek refugees that settled in Thessaloniki after the Asia Minor catastrophe of 1923, reduced the importance of the community and during the interwar period its members represented only 20% of the city’s population. Thessaloniki's Jewish community, nonetheless, continued to play an important role in the city up until Thessaloniki was occupied by the Nazis in World War II. The Nazis murdered approximately 96% of Thessaloniki's Jews in the Holocaust, effectively ending the Jewish community of Thessaloniki. National Socialism redirects here. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ...


Today, fewer than 1,000 Jews remain in Thessaloniki, although there are communities of Thessaloniki Jews -- both Sephardic and Romaniote -- in the United States and Israel.


Jewish Population of Thessaloniki[19]

Year Total Population Jewish Population Jewish Percentage Source
1842 70,000 36,000 51% Jakob Philipp Fallmerayer
1870 90,000 50,000 56% Greek schoolbook (G.K. Moraitopoulos, 1882)
1882/84 85,000 48,000 56% Ottoman government census
1902 126,000 62,000 49% Ottoman government census
1913 157,889 61,439 39% Greek government census
1917 52,000
1943 50,000
2000 363,987[12] 1,000 0.27%

Ethnic statistics in the end of 19th and the beginning of 20th century

Year Total Population Jewish Population Turkish Population Greek Population Bulgarian Population Roma Population Other groups
1890 118,000[20] 55,000[20] 26,000[20] 16,000[20] 10,000[20] 2,500[20] 8,500[20]
around 1913 157,889[21] 61,439[21] 45,889[21] 39,956[21] 6,263[21] 2,721[21] 1,621[21]

Economy

Thessaloníki is a major port city and an industrial and commercial center. The city's industries mainly produce refined oil, steel, petrochemicals, textiles, machinery, flour, cement, pharmaceuticals, and liquor. The city is also a major transportation hub for the whole of southeastern Europe, carrying, among other things, trade to and from the newly capitalist countries of the region. A considerable percentage of the city's working people are employed in small and medium sized businesses and in the service sector. Official unemployment rates for 2002 were 10%. Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Lubbock, Texas Ignacy Łukasiewicz - inventor of the refining of kerosene from crude oil. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... A petrochemical is any chemical derived from fossil fuel. ... This article is about the type of fabric. ... For other uses, see Flour (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cement (disambiguation). ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon is drug, and logos is science) is the study of how chemical substances interfere with living systems. ... A distilled beverage is a consumable liquid containing ethyl alcohol (ethanol) purified by distillation from a fermented substance such as fruit, vegetables, or grain. ...


Culture

Festivals

International Trade Fair

The Thessaloniki International Trade Fair has a long history that dates back to 1926. It is hosted every September for 10 days at the 180,000 m² Thessaloniki International Exhibition Center, in the heart of the city. It's organised by HELEXPO, which also organises themed exhibitions and congresses throughout the year. The International Trade Fair is inaugurated by the Prime Minister and attended by more than 300,000 visitors every year.


International Film Festival

The Thessaloniki International Film Festival has become the Balkans' primary showcase for the work of new and emerging filmmakers, as well as the leading film festival in the region. The event features the International Section, the panorama of Greek films, the New Horizons program, the Balkan Survey, and numerous retrospectives and tributes to leading figures in the world of film. Since 1993, several international celebrities of cinema like Francis Ford Coppola, Faye Dunaway, Catherine Deneuve and Irene Papas, have visited Thessaloniki's Film Festival. A film festival is the presentation or showcasing of films in one or more movie theaters or screening venues. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Faye Dunaway (born January 14, 1941, in Bascom, Florida) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Catherine Deneuve (born Catherine Fabienne Dorléac) (French IPA: ), (October 22, 1943, in Paris, France), is an award winning French actress. ... Irene Papas (Greek Ειρήνη Παππά, born September 3, 1926 in Corinth) is a Greek-born actress who has starred in over seventy films in a career spanning more than fifty years. ...


Documentary Festival

The Thessaloniki Concert Hall.
The Thessaloniki Concert Hall.

The Thessaloniki Documentary Festival, launched in March 1999, was inspired by Dimitri Eipides. It has benefited from the local public's enthusiastic response and from the extensive coverage in the local and international press. In 2005, 22,000 plus admissions were registered. The main programme is focusing on documentaries that explore the social and cultural developments in the world, introducing at the same time a number of new side sections and events based on important works by new documentarists. Films of the main programme will be candidates for the FIPRESCI and also the Audience Awards. Image File history File links Thessaloniki_music_Hall4. ... Image File history File links Thessaloniki_music_Hall4. ... FIPRESCI (short for Fédération Internationale de la Presse Cinématographique), in English known as International Federation of Film Critics, comprised of the national organizations of professional film critics and film journalists from around the world for the promotion and development of film culture and for the safeguarding of...


The festival attracts a film-going public which discovers, year after year, images of the new century, new film ecritures, new directors, new technologies, but also representatives of the film world who find here a reliable organisation, appropriate for promoting their work. The event revolves around the standard sections: stories to tell, views of the world the recording of memory, and portraits but every year's programme is being enriched by several other sections.


The images of 21st century make a date every March in Thessaloniki with a film-going public that seeks an in-depth reading of the human landscape through a journey into the art of documentary.


International Festival of Photography

The Thessaloniki International Festival of Photography (Photosynkyria) takes place in Thessaloniki from February to mid-April of every year, attracting the interest both of the photographic world and of the wider public while at the same time functioning as a meeting place for the Greek and the international photographic scene. Photosynkyria exhibitions and events are hosted in a variety of venues around Thessaloniki, such as museums, heritage landmarks, galleries, bookshops and cafes.


Photosynkyria was launched in 1988 by photographer Aris Georgiou and has been organized in the last 5 years by the Thessaloniki Museum of Photography, which annually appoints the artistic director of the festival. The artistic director of a theatre is responsible for choosing the material staged in a season, and the hiring of creative/production personnel (such as directors), as well as other theatre management tasks. ...


Dimitria

The 3 month long festival of cultural events is held every September-December since 1966. It's named after Aghios Dimitrios (St. Demetrius), that patron Saint of the city, and it has become an institution for the city and very popular with the local population. It includes musical, theatrical, dance events, street happenings and exhibitions. It is organised and overlooked by the Municipality of Thessaloniki and last year it celebrated 40 years of history [2]. 12th-century mosaic depicting St Demetrios, from the Golden-Roofed Monastery in Kiev. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ...


Video Dance Festival

The Video Dance Festival started in 2000 at Thessaloniki as an international dance film festival, but soon it widened up to include more kinds of experiment on movement and the moving image. The Video Dance Festival started in 2000 at Thessaloniki as an international dance film festival, but soon it widened up to include more kinds of experiment on movement and the moving image. ... Dance film is the cinematic interpretation of existing dance works, originally created for live performance. ...


DMC DJ Championship

The Greek DMC DJ Championship is hosted in Thessaloniki in the International Trade Fair Of Thessaloniki.


DMC’s World DJ Championships, sponsored internationally by Technics and Ortofon, has grown through the years and the formats of the competitions have developed along with the demands. Originally meant to be a DJ mixing battle, DJ Cheese in 1986, introduced scratching in his routine, changing the course of the DMC battles. Since that time, the Technics DMC World Champion title has become the most sought after by aspiring DJs and turntablists worldwide. DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ... Technics is a brand name of the Japanese company Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. ... Ortofon is a Danish manufacturer of electronic audio equipment. ... DJ Cheese (Plainfield, New Jersey) was one of the first DMC mixing championship DJs and appeared in the UK tour with Run-DMC. Dj Cheese is usually considered as an important character in the world of turntablism. ...


The only equipment permitted in Technics DJ Championships worldwide are Technics SL1200 turntables and the Technics EX-DJ1200 mixer. The DJs are allowed a period of exactly six minutes to impress the judges. Technics SL-1200MK2 The Technics SL-1200 is a series of turntables manufactured since October 1972 by Matsushita under the brand name of Technics. ...


Sports

Basketball game in Alexandreio Melathron.
Basketball game in Alexandreio Melathron.

The first football team that was established officially was Iraklis in 1908. Aris was established in 1914. PAOK and Apollon Kalamarias were established in 1926 by Greek refugees from Constantinople ,Pontus and Asia Minor in the aftermath of the Greco-Turkish War. Today there are many more football teams in Thessaloniki, while the four major teams participate in the Super League Greece and on many occasions in the UEFA Cup. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x683, 365 KB) Basketball game in Alexandreio Melathro, Thessaloniki, Greece. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x683, 365 KB) Basketball game in Alexandreio Melathro, Thessaloniki, Greece. ... Alexandreio Melathron is a indoor arena in Thessalonika, Greece. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Toumba Stadium is a stadium in Thessalonika, Greece. ... PAOK FC (Greek: ΠΑΟΚ - Πανθεσσαλονίκειος Αθλητικός Όμιλος Κωνσταντινουπολιτών - Panthessalonikeios Athlitikos Omilos Konstantinoupoliton), the Pan-Thessalonikan Athletic Club of Constantinopolitans, is a Greek association football club based in Thessaloniki, Greece. ... Iraklis FC is a soccer club based in Thessaloniki, Greece. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Main article: Aris Thessaloniki Aris Thessaloniki Football Club is a Greek football club that premiered on the 25th of March 1914 in Thessaloniki. ... PAOK FC (Greek: ΠΑΟΚ - Πανθεσσαλονίκειος Αθλητικός Όμιλος Κωνσταντινουπολιτών - Panthessalonikeios Athlitikos Omilos Konstantinoupoliton), the Pan-Thessalonikan Athletic Club of Constantinopolitans, is a Greek association football club based in Thessaloniki, Greece. ... Apollon Kalamarias is a soccer team of the Greek National Division. ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see List of professional sports leagues. ... The UEFA Cup (also known as European Cup 3, CE3 or C3) is a football competition for European club teams, organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). ...


The current stands of the major teams are:

PAOK is the most successful team in football , Aris the most successful in basketball and Iraklis the most successful in Volleyball and track and field. The main football stadiums in Thessaloníki are the state-owned Kaftanzoglio Stadium (Iraklis' home stadium) which was heavily renovated in the wake of 2004 Summer Olympics, the Toumba Stadium (PAOK's home stadium), the Kleanthis Vikelides Stadium (Harilaou) (Aris' home stadium). The major indoor arenas are the state-owned Alexandreio Melathron which is the home arena of Aris Thessaloniki and is used for many cultural events too, and the PAOK Sports Arena which is the arena used by PAOK's basketball and volleyball sections. Main article: Aris Thessaloniki Aris Thessaloniki Football Club is a Greek football club that premiered on the 25th of March 1914 in Thessaloniki. ... PAOK FC (Greek: ΠΑΟΚ - Πανθεσσαλονίκειος Αθλητικός Όμιλος Κωνσταντινουπολιτών - Panthessalonikeios Athlitikos Omilos Konstantinoupoliton), the Pan-Thessalonikan Athletic Club of Constantinopolitans, is a Greek association football club based in Thessaloniki, Greece. ... Apollon Kalamarias is a soccer team of the Greek National Division. ... Iraklis FC is a soccer club based in Thessaloniki, Greece. ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see List of professional sports leagues. ... This article is about state ownership. ... Kaftanzoglio is a football stadium located in Thessaloniki. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... Toumba Stadium is a stadium in Thessalonika, Greece. ... Kleanthis Vikelides Stadium (previously known as Charilaou Stadium) is a stadium in Thessalonika, Greece. ... Alexandreio Melathron is a indoor arena in Thessalonika, Greece. ... Aris Basketball Club (Greek name, transliterated into English: K.A.E. Aris) is the basketball team of the Thessaloniki-based Greek sport club Aris Thessaloniki. ... PAOK Sports Arena is located in Thessaloniki, Greece and it hosts PAOK BC and PAOK VC departments. ... PAOK Basketball Club (BC) is one of the top professional basketball teams in Greeces First Division league AND IN EUROPEAN BASKETBALL AS WELL.ESPECIALLY AT THE LATE 80S AND THE FIRST HALF OF 90S. REACHED THE SEMI FINALS OF EUROPEAN CUPWINNERS CUP AT 89-90(DISQUALLIFIED BY... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


1st South Eastern European Games

In October 2007, it organised the 1st South Eastern European Games [3]. The participating countries were, The Republic of Albania , Republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina , Republic of Bulgaria, Romania, Republic of Croatia, Helllenic Republic, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Republic of Serbia, Republic of Montenegro, Republic of Slovenia, and Republic of Turkey.


Climate

The city experiences a Mediterranean climate with mild rainy winters and hot summers  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is a climate that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin. ...

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Maximum. [°C] 12 13 16 18 23 28 31 30 26 21 15 13
Minimum temperature [°C] 5 6 6 9 12 16 18 18 15 11 6 7
Rainfall (mm) 40 38 43 35 43 30 22 20 27 45 58 50
Record temperatures [°C] 20 22 25 31 36 39 42 39 36 32 27 26

Look up Month in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Transportation

The exterior view of the Makedonia International Airport.
The exterior view of the Makedonia International Airport.

Public transport in Thessaloniki is currently served only by buses. The bus company operating in the city is called Organismos Astikon Sygkoinonion Thessalonikis (OASTH) Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1330 pixel, file size: 340 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1330 pixel, file size: 340 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Thessaloniki International Airport, Makedonia /(Macedonia) (Greek: Κρατικός Αερολιμένας Θεσσαλονίκης Μακεδονία) or Makedonia /(Macedonia) International Airport (IATA: SKG, ICAO: LGTS) is about 15 km SE of the city centre of Thessaloniki; close to the busy suburb of Kalamaria. ... “Autobus” redirects here. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Thessaloniki Metro

Further information: Thessaloniki Metro

The construction of the Thessaloniki Metropolitan Railway has been discussed for more than 15 years,[22] but construction has now begun and is scheduled to last around 6.5 years, being completed in late 2012.[22] The single line will extend for 9.5km and contain 13 stations,[23] and it is estimated that the subway will eventually serve 250,000 passengers daily.[22] Like the Athens Metro, the Thessaloniki Metro will also house archaeological finds.[24] Thessaloniki Metro is a planned underground public transport system for Thessaloniki, Greece. ... The Athens Metro is the underground public transport system of Athens, Greece, constructed by the Attiko Metro company (Αττικό Μετρό, literally Attican metro) and the ISAP (Ilektrikoi Sidirodromoi Athinon-Pireos) company (Ηλεκτρικοί Σιδηρόδρομοι Αθηνών-Πειραιώς Athens - Piraeus Electric Railways). The Athens Metro is one of the most impressive underground Mass Transit systems in the world because... Thessaloniki Metro is a planned underground public transport system for Thessaloniki, Greece. ...


Discussions are under way on the future expansion to the west, in order to connect the underground with the major transport hubs in the city, the Makedonia Central Bus Station, the Central Railway Station and Makedonia International Airport. Possible future expansions include the districts of Eleftherio-Kordelio in the west side, Stavroupoli in the upper west side, Kalamaria in the east side, and the northern districts, like Toumba. ... Thessaloniki International Airport, Makedonia /(Macedonia) (Greek: Κρατικός Αερολιμένας Θεσσαλονίκης Μακεδονία) or Makedonia /(Macedonia) International Airport (IATA: SKG, ICAO: LGTS) is about 15 km SE of the city centre of Thessaloniki; close to the busy suburb of Kalamaria. ... Eleftherio-Kordelio is a municipal suburb on the western edge of the Thessaloniki metropolitan area in Greece. ... For Stavroupoli in Xanthi prefecture see Stavroupoli, Xanthi. ... Kalamaria (Greek: Καλαμαριά) is a suburban city in the Thessaloniki Prefecture located about 5 km southeast of downtown Thessaloniki. ... Toumba is a neighborhood on the eastern side of Thessaloniki, Greece. ...


Motorways

Further information: Egnatia Odos

Thessaloniki did not have a motorway link until the 1970s. Thessaloniki is accessed with GR-1/E75 from Athens, GR-4, GR-2, (Via Egnatia) /E90 and GR-12/E85 from Serres and Sofia. In the early 1970s, the motorway reached Thessaloniki and was the last section of the GR-1 to be completed. In the 1980s construction begun on the 4-lane bypass of Thessaloniki, which was finally opened to traffic in 1988, running from the west industrial side of the city up to the other side of Thessaloniki to its southeast approaching Thermi and Halkidiki. It has recently been upgraded with new junctions and improved motorway features. The latest motorway expansion was Via Egnatia northwest of Thessaloniki. Ancient Via Egnatia route Via Egnatia (Greek: Εγνατία Οδός) was a road constructed by the Romans around 146 BC. It was named after Gnaeus Egnatius, proconsul of Macedonia, who ordered its construction. ... Greece Interstate 1 is one of the longest highways in Greece. ... Via Egnatia (Greek: Εγνατία Οδός) was a road constructed by the Romans around 146 BC. It was named after Gaius Ignatius, proconsul of Macedonia, who ordered its construction. ... National Theatre, Sofia Alexander Nevski Cathedral The city of Sofia (Bulgarian: София), at the foot of the Vitosha mountain, has a population of 1,208,930 (2003), and is the capital of the Republic of Bulgaria. ...


Railways

The train station. Thessaloniki is linked with a number of cities throughout South-Eastern Europe.

The city is a major railway hub for the Balkans, with direct connections to Sofia, Skopje, Belgrade, Moscow, Vienna, Budapest, Bucharest, Istanbul as well as Athens and other major destinations in Greece. Recently, daily railway services were established between Thessaloniki and Litochoro, Pieria, covering the distance in approximately 45 to 50 minutes. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Balkans is the historic and geographic name used to describe southeastern Europe (see the Definitions and boundaries section below). ... This article is about the capital of Bulgaria. ... Location of the city of Skopje (green) in the Republic of Macedonia Government  - Mayor Trifun Kostovski Area  - City 701. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Patria si Dreptul Meu (My Country and My Right) Location of Bucharest within Romania (in red) Coordinates: , Country County Founded 1459 (first official record) Government  - Mayor Adriean Videanu Area  - City 228 km²  (88 sq mi)  - Metro 238 km² (91. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Litochoro (Greek, Modern: Λιτόχωρο, Ancient/Katharevousa Λιτόχωρον, older form: Litochoron) is a town and municipality located in the southern part of the prefecture of Pieria, famous for beeing on the roots of Mount Olympus. ... Pieria (Πιερία) is one of the fifty-one prefectures of Greece. ...


Airport

Air traffic of the city is served by Makedonia International Airport for both international and domestic flights. The short length of the airport's two runways means that it cannot support long-haul flights, although there are plans for major expansion. The expansion of one of the runways into the Thermaic Gulf is being undertaken, so as to enable the servicing of trans-oceanic flights, despite the considerable opposition to this by environmentalist groups. Air Traffic are an English indie rock band from Bournemouth. ... Thessaloniki International Airport, Makedonia /(Macedonia) (Greek: Κρατικός Αερολιμένας Θεσσαλονίκης Μακεδονία) or Makedonia /(Macedonia) International Airport (IATA: SKG, ICAO: LGTS) is about 15 km SE of the city centre of Thessaloniki; close to the busy suburb of Kalamaria. ...


Hospitals and medical centers

  • Interbalkan Medical Center [4]
  • AHEPA University Hospital [5]
  • Papageorgiou Hospital
  • Papanicolaou Hospital
  • Hipokration Hospital of Thessaloniki
  • George Gennimatas Hospital
  • St. Demetrius Hospital
  • Saint Lucas Clinic
  • Kyanous Stavros (Blue Cross)
  • Two soon to be built Hospitals

Interbalkan Medical Center (Greek: Ιατρικό Διαβαλκανικό Κέντρο), known in Greek as Iatriko Diavalkaniko Kentro, is a private General Hospital based in Thessaloniki, Greece. ... AHEPA University Hospital (Greek: Πανεπιστημιακό Νοσοκομείο ΑΧΕΠΑ), also known as AHEPA Hospital, is one of the biggest hospitals in northern Greece, famous in the whole of Greece and based in Thessaloniki. ...

Communications

Newspapers

Television

  • ERT3 [7] - division of Elliniki Radiophoniki Tileorasi (ERT)
  • TV Macedonia [8]
  • TV100
  • Apollon TV
  • Best TV (local)
  • TV Balkania
  • Europe One
  • Omega TV
  • Orion TV
  • Panorama TV
  • Gnomi TV
  • TV Thessaloniki
  • Vergina TV
  • 4E, Church TV Station

Radio

  • Star FM - 97.1 FM
  • Laikos FM - 87.6 FM
  • Mylos FM - 88.5 FM
  • Thessaloniki Radio Deejay - 89.0 FM
  • Zoo Radio - 90.8 FM
  • RSO - 91.7 FM
  • Ellinikos FM - 92.8 FM
  • Heart FM - 93.1 FM
  • Radio Thessaloniki - 94.5 FM
  • Eroticos FM - 94.8 FM
  • Cosmoradio - 95.1 FM
  • Athlitiko Metropolis - 95.5 FM
  • ERT 3 95.8 FM - public - 95.8 FM
  • Republic 100.3 - Official Site
  • ERT 3 102 FM - public - 102.0 FM
  • Extra Sport - 103.0 FM
  • Banana FM - 104.0 FM
  • Rock Radio 104.7 - 104.7 FM
  • 1055 Rock - 105.5 FM
  • City International - 106.1 FM
  • Safari FM - 107.1 FM
  • Libero FM - 107.4 FM

Makedonias front page, March 1940 Makedonia (Macedonia, Greek: Μακεδονία) is a Greek daily newspaper, first published in 1911 by Ioannis Vellidis in Thessaloniki, capital of the Greek region of Macedonia and Greeces second largest city. ... // Greece Television broadcasting in Greece began in 1966, with the first network, EPT (Elliniki Radiophonia Tileorassi) broadcasting out of Athens, as a state-owned monopoly. ... ET-3 or ERT 3 is the third channel from ERT, the Hellenic Broadcasting Corporation. ... The only national network based in Thessaloniki. ... Greece has well over 1,000 radio stations, most of them on the FM band, the AM band being almost entirely abandoned by everyone but the State-run media. ... Republic 100. ...

List of famous Thessalonikians

Image File history File links Flag_of_Palaeologus_Emperor. ... 12th-century mosaic depicting St Demetrios, from the Golden-Roofed Monastery in Kiev. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palaeologus_Emperor. ... Saint Cyril (Greek: Κύριλλος , Church Slavonic: Кирилъ) (827 - February 14, 869) was a Byzantine Greek monk, scholar, theologian, and linguist. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palaeologus_Emperor. ... Saint Methodius (Greek: Μεθόδιος; Church Slavonic Мефодии) (b. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Christos Antoniou Sartzetakis (born 6 April 1929 - Thessaloniki) is a Greek jurist and an elder statesman. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Manolis Anagnostakis (b. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Isaac Carasso was an olive oil merchant of Jewish Greek origin. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Cahit Arf, probably in front of METU Department of Mathematics. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Stavros Koujioumtzis (Greek:Σταύρος Κουγιουμτζής) is one of the most significant greek music composers of the 20th century. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Zoe Laskari on the cover of the album featuring music from her hit movie Koritsia ya filima Zoe Laskari (Greek: Ζωή Λάσκαρη, born 1942) is a Greek actress, one of the most famous film and theatre of Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... “Mustafa Kemal” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... // [edit] Biography Marinella (born May 20, 1938 - ) is a popular Greek singer whose career has spanned several decades. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Marsheaux are a female Synthpop duo from Thessaloniki, Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Dionysis Savvopoulos (Greek: Διονύσης Σαββόπουλος) is a Greek music composer, lyricist and singer. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Nazım Hikmet Ran Nazım Hikmet Ran (November 20, 1901 – June 3, 1963), commonly known as Nazım Hikmet (IPA: ), was a Turkish poet, playwright, novelist and memoirist who is acclaimed in Turkey as the first and foremost modern Turkish poet, is known around the world as one of... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Country: Greece Residence: Thessaloniki, GRE Height: 511 1/2 (182 cm) Weight: 158 1/2 lbs. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Traianos Dellas (Τραϊανός Δέλλας) (born January 31, 1976 in Greece, is a Greek football player. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Evangelos Venizelos (Greek: ) (born January 1, 1957) is a former Greek Minister for Culture. ...

Twinnings

(in chronological order)

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location in Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates: , Country State NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Named 1637 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1896 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Eddie Perez Area  - City  18. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... Plovdiv (Bulgarian: ) is the second-largest city in Bulgaria after Sofia, with a population of 341,873([1]). It is the administrative centre of Plovdiv Province in southern Bulgaria, as well as the largest and most important city of the historical region of Upper (or Northern) Thrace, famous for its... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... “VIC” redirects here. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cyprus. ... District Limassol Government  - Mayor Andreas Christou Population (2004)  - City 201. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Leipzig ( ; Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk from the Sorbian word for Tilia) is, with a population of over 506,000, the largest city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DED Capital Dresden Minister-President Georg Milbradt (CDU) Governing parties CDU / SPD Votes in Bundesrat 4 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  18,416 km² (7,110 sq mi) Population 4,252,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density 231 /km... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... For the food product, see Bologna sausage. ... Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovakia. ... Nickname: Location of Bratislava within Slovakia Coordinates: , Country Region Districts Bratislava I-V City subdivisions 17 city boroughs Cadastral areas 20 cadastral areas First mentioned 907 Government  - Type City council  - Mayor (Primátor) Andrej ÄŽurkovský  - Headquarters Primates Palace Area [1]  - City 367. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Akhisar (pronounced: ah-kee-sahr; or Tepe Mezarligi) is a district and a town center of Manisa Province in the Aegean region of Turkey. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... For other uses, see Cologne (disambiguation). ... Coat of arms Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DEA Capital Düsseldorf Prime Minister Jürgen Rüttgers (CDU) Governing parties CDU / FDP Votes in Bundesrat 6 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  34,084 km² (13,160 sq mi) Population 18,033,000... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... County ConstanÅ£a Mayor Radu Åžtefan Mazăre Area 124. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Alpes-Maritimes (06) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration Nice Côte dAzur Mayor Jacques Peyrat (UMP) (since 1995) Statistics Land area¹ 71. ... (Région flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Alpes-de-Haute-Provence Alpes-Maritimes Bouches-du-Rhône Hautes-Alpes Var Vaucluse Arrondissements 18 Cantons 237 Communes 963 Statistics Land area1 31,400 km² Population (Ranked 3rd)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Egypt. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ...   (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Postal map spelling: Tientsin) is one of the four municipalities of China. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Syracuse (Italian Siracusa, Sicilian Sarausa, Greek , Latin Syracusae) is an Italian city on the eastern coast of Sicily and the capital of the province of Syracuse. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Photo gallery

See also

“Mustafa Kemal” redirects here. ... This article covers the Greek civilization. ... There have been organized Jewish communities in Greece for more than two thousand years. ... The Great Thessaloniki Fire of 1917 was one of the most important incidents that marked the history of the city. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

Further reading

  • Apostolos Papagiannopoulos,Monuments of Thessaloniki, Rekos Ltd, date unknown.
  • Apostolos P. Vacalopoulos, A History of Thessaloniki, Institute for Balkan Studies,1972.
  • John R. Melville-Jones, 'Venice and Thessalonica 1423-1430 Vol I, The Venetian Accounts, Vol. II, the Greek Accounts, Unipress, Padova, 2002 and 2006.
  • Thessaloniki: Tourist guide and street map, A. Kessopoulos, MalliareÌ„s-Paideia, 1988.
  • Mark Mazower, Salonica, City of Ghosts: Christians, Muslims and Jews, 1430-1950, 2004, ISBN 0-375-41298-0.
  • Thessaloniki City Guide, Axon Publications, 2002.
  • James C. Skedros, Saint Demetrios of Thessaloniki: Civic Patron and Divine Protector, 4th-7Th Centuries (Harvard Theological Studies), Trinity Press International (1999).
  • Vilma Hastaoglou-Martinidis (ed.), Restructuring the City: International Urban Design Competitions for Thessaloniki, Andreas Papadakis, 1999.

Mark Mazower is a notable British historian. ...

References

  1. ^ Ανδριώτης (Andriotis), Νικόλαος Π. (Nikolaos P.) (1995). Ιστορία της ελληνικής γλώσσας: (τέσσερις μελέτες) (History of the Greek language: four studies). Θεσσαλονίκη (Thessaloniki): Ίδρυμα Τριανταφυλλίδη. ISBN 960-231-058-8. 
  2. ^ Vitti, Mario (2001). Storia della letteratura neogreca. Roma: Carocci. ISBN 88-430-1680-6. 
  3. ^ Gibbon, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, ch.27 2:56
  4. ^ Thomas Magististos, Dimitrios Triklinios, Nikiforos Choumnos, Kostantinos Armenopoulos, and Neilos Kavassilas
  5. ^ a b The New Cambridge Medieval History p.779 - Rosamond McKitterick, Christopher Allmand
  6. ^ Mark Mazower, Salonica, City of Ghosts: Christians, Muslims and Jews, 1430-1950, London: HarperCollins, 2004. ISBN 0-00-712023-0
  7. ^ for a review of recent work on the Jewish community of Thessaloniki, see Andrew Apostolou, "Mother of Israel, Orphan of History: Writing on Jewish Salonika", Israel Affairs 13:1:193-204 doi:10.1080/13537120601063499
  8. ^ Васил Кънчов (1970). "Избрани произведения", Том II, "Македония. Етнография и статистика" (in Bulgarian). София: Издателство "Наука и изкуство", pg. 440. 
  9. ^ Mercia MacDermott (1988). "For Freedom and Perfection. The Life of Yané Sandansky". London: Journeyman, chapters "Plus ça change, plus c'est le même" and "Uneasy peace". Retrieved on 2007-10-19. 
  10. ^ Rena Molho, "The Jewish community of Salonika and its incorporation into the Greek state 1912-19", Middle Eastern Studies 24:4:391-403 doi:10.1080/00263208808700753; see also N. M. Gelber, "An Attempt to Internationalize Salonika, 1912–1913", Jewish Social Studies 17:105–120, Indiana University Press, 1955 (not seen)
  11. ^ Encyclopedia Britannica, 12th edition, 1922, vol. 30, p. 376
  12. ^ a b c d Population of Greece. General Secretariat Of National Statistical Service Of Greece. www.statistics.gr (2001). Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  13. ^ http://www.jmth.gr/web/thejews/pages/pages/history/pages/his.htm
  14. ^ http://www.ce-review.org/00/4/daskalovski4.html
  15. ^ http://www.jmth.gr/web/thejews/pages/pages/history/pages/his1.htm
  16. ^ Stanford J. Shaw, Turkey and the Jews of Europe during World War II, http://www.sefarad.org/publication/lm/043/6.html , 2001.
  17. ^ Mazower, pg. 381
  18. ^ ibid
  19. ^ http://www.jmth.gr/web/thejews/pages/pages/history/pages/his.htm
  20. ^ a b c d e f g Васил Кънчов (1970). "Избрани произведения", Том II, "Македония. Етнография и статистика" (in Bulgarian). София: Издателство "Наука и изкуство", pg. 440. Retrieved on 2007-10-19. 
  21. ^ a b c d e f g Συλλογικο εργο (1973). "Ιστορια του Ελληνικου Εθνους",History of Greek Nation Том ΙΔ, (in Greek and English). ATHENS: "ΕΚΔΟΤΙΚΗ ΑΘΗΝΩΝ", pg. 340. 
  22. ^ a b c CONCLUSION OF CONTRACT FOR THE THESSALONIKI METRO. Attiko Metro S.A.. www.ametro.gr (2006-04-07). Retrieved on 2007-08-13.
  23. ^ Thessaloniki metro "top priority", Public Works minister says. Athens News Agency. www.ana.gr (2007-02-12). Retrieved on 2007-08-13.
  24. ^ CONCLUSION THESSALONIKI METRO & ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXCAVATION. Attiko Metro S.A.. www.ametro.gr (2007-04-12). Retrieved on 2007-08-13.
  25. ^ Basic Characteristics. Ministry of the Interior. www.ypes.gr. Retrieved on 2007-08-07.

Mark Mazower is a notable British historian. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Government

  • Municipality of Thessaloniki
  • Thessaloniki Port Authority
  • ΟΑΣΘ - Organisation of Urban Transport of Thessaloniki (Greek & English)
  • Thessaloniki - Photo Archive Documents 1900-1980

Cultural

  • Thessaloniki Film Festival
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Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Greece consists of 13 administrative regions known as Peripheries of Greece, which are further subdivided into 51 prefectures (nomoi, singular - nomos, Greek: νομοί, νομός)): See also List of the prefectures of Greece by area List of the prefectures of Greece by population density List of the prefectures of Greece by population External... Agios Nikolaos (or Aghios Nikolaos, Greek: Άγιος Νικόλαος) is a coastal town on the Greek island of Crete. ... Alexandroupoli (also Alexandroupolis, Greek: Αλεξανδρούπολη, Turkish: DedeaÄŸaç) is a city of Greece and the capital of the Evros Prefecture in Thrace. ... Amphissa redirects here, for the ancient town near todays Roccella Ionica, see Amphissa, Italy Amfissa (Greek: Άμφισσα), other form: Amfissa, Latin: Amphissa is a town and the capital of the Phokida prefecture and the Parnassida province with the population around 10,000. ... Argostoli (Greek: Modern: Αργοστόλι, Ancient/Katharevousa: -ον, -on) has been the capital and administrative centre of Kefalonia, Greece, since 1757, following a population shift down from the old capital of Agios Georgios (also known as Kastro) to take advantage of the trading opportunities provided by the sheltered bay upon which Argostoli sits. ... Arta (Greek: Άρτα) is a city in north-western Greece, capital of the Arta Prefecture. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Coordinates 38°28′ N 23°36′ E Country Greece Periphery Central Greece Prefecture Euboea Population 53,584 source (2001) Area 30. ... Chania (IPA , Greek: Χανιά, also transliterated as Hania, older form Chanea and Venetian: Canea, Ottoman Turkish: خانيه Hanya) is the second largest city of Crete and the capital of the Chania Prefecture. ... Chios (in Greek, Χίος – Chíos) is a town in eastern Greece. ... Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a city in north-western Greece. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... Drama (Greek: Δράμα) is a town in northeastern Greece. ... Localization of Edessa Edessa (Greek: ) is an ancient town of 25,000 inhabitants in Central part of Macedonia, in Greece, and the capital of the Pella prefecture and is also the provincial capital of the province of the same name. ... Eleusis redirects here. ... Ermoupoli (Greek: Ερμούπολη - Ermoúpoli), also known as Syros is a town in eastern Greece. ... Flórina (Greek: Macedonian: ), is a town in West Macedonia, Greece. ... Grevena (Greek: Γρεβενά) is a town in Greece, capital of the Grevena prefecture, one of the fifty-one prefectures of Greece. ... For other uses, see Heraklion (disambiguation). ... Igoumenitsa (Greek: Ηγουμενίτσα) (Albanian: Gumenicë) is a coastal city in northwestern Greece. ... This article is about the Greek city. ... Kalamata (Greek, Modern: Καλαμάτα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -ai), older forms: Kalamai is a city in southern Greece, on the Peloponnesos, by the Mediterranean. ... Karditsa (Greek: Καρδίτσα) is a city in western Thessaly in mainland Greece. ... Karpenisi (Greek: Καρπενήσι - Karpenísi), also Karpenissi, older forms: Karpenisio, Karpenissio, Karpenision and Karpenission is a town in central Greece. ... Kastoria (Greek: Καστοριά) is a city in northern Greece. ... Katerini (Greek: Κατερίνη) is a town in Northern Greece, the capital of Pieria prefecture. ... Kavala (also seen as Kavála, Kavalla, (Greek) (2001 pop. ... Coordinates 40°59′ N 22°52′ E Country Greece Periphery Central Macedonia Prefecture Kilkis Province Kilkis Population 24,812 source (2001) Area 306. ... Komotini or Komotene (Greek: Κομοτηνή, Turkish: Gümülcine) is a city in north-eastern Greece. ... Kozani (Greek: ), is a city in northern Greece, capital of Kozani Prefecture and of West Macedonia periphery. ... Lamia (Greek: Λαμία) is a city in central Greece (population 75,000). ... Larissa (Greek: Λάρισα, Lárisa) is the capital city of the Thessaly periphery of Greece, and capital of the Larissa Prefecture. ... Lefkada (Greek: Λευκάδα - Lefkáda) is a city in western Greece. ... Livadeia (Greek: Λιβαδειά - Livadeiá or Λεβάδεια - Levádeia) is a city in central Greece. ... Messolonghi is a town of about 12,000 people (as of 1991 census) in central Greece. ... Mytilene (Greek: Μυτιλήνη - Mytilíni, Turkish: Midilli), also Mytilini, is the capital city of Lesbos (formerly known as Lesbos but the modern name is Mytilene), a Greek island in the Aegean Sea, and the Lesbos Prefecture as well. ... Nafplion (Ναύπλιο; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a town on the Peloponnese in Greece. ... Pallini or Palini (Greek: Παλλήνη), ancient form and Latin: Pallene, is a suburb in the northeastern part of Athens, Greece. ... Patras (Demotic Greek: Πάτρα, Pátra, Classical Greek: Πάτραι, Pátrai, Latin: , Ottoman Turkish: Ballıbadra) is the third-largest city of Greece and the capital of the prefecture of Achaea, located in northern Peloponnese, 215 kilometers to the west of Athens. ... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... Polygyros ( South Slavic: Деригово, Derigovo) is a town in northern Greece, the capital of the Prefecture of Chalcidice. ... Preveza is a town in north-western Greece. ... Pyrgos (Greek: Πύργος) is the capital of the Prefecture of Elis in Greece. ... Rethymno (IPA ), also Rethimno, Rethymnon, Réthymnon, and Rhíthymnos) (Greek: Ρέθυμνο, in Turkish Resmo), a city of approximately 40,000 people, is the capital of Rethymno Prefecture in the island of Crete. ... This article is about the Greek city of Rhodes. ... External links Information about Serres (Greek and English) Serres is the name of several communes in France: Serres in the Aude département Serres in the Hautes-Alpes département Serres in the Meurthe-et-Moselle département Categories: Greece geography stubs | Cities and towns in Greece ... For other uses see Sparta (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Trikala (disambiguation). ... Tripoli (Greek, Modern: Τρίπολη, Katharevousa: -s; older form and Latin: Tripolis,rarely Tripolitsa, Tripolitza and Tripolizza) is a city in the central part of the Peloponnesos, Greece, and the capital of the prefecture of Arcadia. ... Vathy (Greek: Βαθύ - Vathý), also known as Samos is a town in eastern Greece. ... Veria is also a settlement in the prefecture of Laconia, see Veria, Laconia, and a commune in France, see Véria, Jura. ... Volos (Greek: Βόλος, Ottoman Turkish: Golos) is a city situated at the center of the Greek mainland, about 326 km north from Athens and 215 km south from Thessaloniki. ... Xanthi (Greek: Ξάνθη) is a city in northern Greece, in the East Macedonia and Thrace periphery. ... Zakynthos (Greek: Ζάκυνθος - Zákynthos, also named Zante) is a city in western Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... The peripheries (περιφέρειες) are the subnational divisions of Greece. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a city in north-western Greece. ... The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek: , Ionioi NÄ“soi) are a group of islands in Greece. ... For other uses, see Heraklion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek city. ... The name Epirus, from the Greek Ήπειρος meaning continent may refer to: // Epirus (region) - a historical and geographical region of the southwestern Balkans, straddling modern Greece and Albania Epirus (periphery) - one of the thirteen peripheries (administrative divisions) of Greece. ... Komotini or Komotene (Greek: Κομοτηνή, Turkish: Gümülcine) is a city in north-eastern Greece. ... East Macedonia and Thrace is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, being the eastern part of Greek Macedonia along with Thrace. ... Kozani (Greek: ), is a city in northern Greece, capital of Kozani Prefecture and of West Macedonia periphery. ... West Macedonia is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, consisting of the western part of Greek Macedonia. ... Lamia (Greek: Λαμία) is a city in central Greece (population 75,000). ... The periphery of Continental Greece (Greek: - Stereá Elláda) or Central Greece (Greek: ) is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece. ... Larissa (Greek: Λάρισα, Lárisa) is the capital city of the Thessaly periphery of Greece, and capital of the Larissa Prefecture. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... Mytilene (Greek: Μυτιλήνη - Mytilíni, Turkish: Midilli), also Mytilini, is the capital city of Lesbos (formerly known as Lesbos but the modern name is Mytilene), a Greek island in the Aegean Sea, and the Lesbos Prefecture as well. ... Categories: Greece geography stubs ... Patras (Demotic Greek: Πάτρα, Pátra, Classical Greek: Πάτραι, Pátrai, Latin: , Ottoman Turkish: Ballıbadra) is the third-largest city of Greece and the capital of the prefecture of Achaea, located in northern Peloponnese, 215 kilometers to the west of Athens. ... Categories: Greece geography stubs ... Ermoupoli (Greek: Ερμούπολη - Ermoúpoli), also known as Syros is a town in eastern Greece. ... Categories: Greece geography stubs ... Central Macedonia is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, being the central part of Greek Macedonia. ... Tripoli (Greek, Modern: Τρίπολη, Katharevousa: -s; older form and Latin: Tripolis,rarely Tripolitsa, Tripolitza and Tripolizza) is a city in the central part of the Peloponnesos, Greece, and the capital of the prefecture of Arcadia. ... Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... Cilicia as Roman province, 120 AD In Antiquity, Cilicia (Κιλικία) was the name of a region, now known as Çukurova, and often a political unit, on the southeastern coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey), north of Cyprus. ... Derbe is an ancient city in todays Turkey. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In antiquity, Phrygia (Greek: ) was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolia. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mysia. ... Coordinates 40°29′ N 25°31′ E Country Greece Periphery East Macedonia and Thrace Prefecture Evros Population 2,723 source (2001) Area 178. ... Neapoli (Greek: Νεάπολη) is a suburban city in the Thessaloniki Prefecture. ... Map of Greece showing Philippi Philippi (in Ancient Greek / Philippoi) was a city in eastern Macedonia, founded by Philip II in 356 BC and abandoned in the 14th century after the Ottoman conquest. ... Localization of Amphipolis Amphipolis (Greek, Ἀμφίπολις – Amphípolis) was an ancient Greek city in the region once inhabited by the Edoni people in the present-day periphery of East Macedonia and Thrace. ... Apollonia is an ancient town (former Apollonia in Mygdonia) in Greek Macedonia along the Via Egnatia, about midway between Thessalonica and Amphipolis. ... The White Tower The Arch of Galerius Map showing the Thessaloníki prefecture Thessaloníki (Θεσσαλονίκη) is the second-largest city of Greece and is the principal city and the capital of the Greek region of Macedonia. ... Berea is mentioned in the book of Acts in the Bible, for the ancient city of Beroea, now know as Veria. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... There is another Kechries, see Kechries Kechries (Greek Modern: Κεχριές, rarely Κεχρεές, Ancient/Katharevousa: Kechreai), older form: Cenchreae, Kechriai, Kekhries, Kekhriai, Kekhriais is a community in the municipality of Corinth in Corinthia. ... Map of Lydia in ancient times showing location of Ephesus and other ancient cities in western Anatolia Ephesus (Greek: , Turkish: ) was an Ionian Greek city in ancient Anatolia, founded by colonists from Athens in the 10th century BC[1]. The city was located in Ionia, where the Cayster River (K... Caesarea Palaestina, also called Caesarea Maritima, a town built by Herod the Great about 25 - 13 BC, lies on the sea-coast of Israel about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa, on the site of a place previously called Pyrgos Stratonos (Strato or Stratons Tower, in Latin Turris Stratonis). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Greece Travel: Thessaloniki Guide (1284 words)
Thessaloniki was the second most important city of the Byzantine Empire, next to Constantinople, and is full of beautiful examples of Byzantine art and architecture.
In the 15th Century Thessaloniki became a haven for Jews exiled from Spain, who became an important part of the culture, until they were sent to the concentration camps during the Nazi occupation, thus ending a period of four hundred years of Jewish influence both socially and economically.
Thessaloniki may be one of the most unique and interesting cities in the world and Mazower has captured it.
Thessaloniki - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4506 words)
Thessaloniki is a thriving, vibrant city and it is Greece's second major economic, industrial, commercial and cultural center as well as a transportation hub in southeastern Europe.
Thessaloniki's acropolis, located in the northern hills, was built in 55 BC after Thracian raids in the city's outskirts, for security reasons.
Thessaloniki was the main prize of the First Balkan War of 1912, during which it was captured by Greece on 26 October 1912, which is now a local holiday.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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BowenShirley33
6th October 2010
I opine that to receive the mortgage loans from banks you should have a great reason. However, once I have got a financial loan, just because I wanted to buy a building.

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