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Encyclopedia > Thermoplastics

A thermoplastic is a plastic that softens when heated and hardens again when cooled. Thermoplastics can generally go through many melt/freeze cycles with no appreciable chemical change, making them suitable for recycling. These characteristics also lend thermoplastics to various manufacturing techniques; injection molding, thermoforming and welding.


Many thermoplastic materials are addition polymers (chain growth polymers), such as polythene and polypropylene.


Thermoplastic Polymers are contrasted with thermosetting polymers, which cannot go through melt/freeze cycles.


A partial list of thermoplastics:

  • Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)
  • Polyvinyl chloride (PVC)
  • Polypropylene
  • Polyethylene
  • Acrylic
  • Celluloid
  • Polystyrene
  • Cellulose acetate
  • Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene, (ABS).
  • Cellulosic.
  • Ethylene vinyl alcohol, (E/VAL).
  • Fluoroplastics, (PTFE), (FEP, PFA, CTFE, ECTFE, ETFE).
  • Ionomer.
  • Liquid Crystal Polymer, (LCP).
  • Polyacetal, (Acetal).
  • Polyacrylates, (Acrylic).
  • Polyacrylonitrile, (PAN), (Acrylonitrile).
  • Polyamide, (PA), (Nylon).
  • Polyamide-imide, (PAI).
  • Polyaryletherketone, (PAEK), (Ketone).
  • Polybutadiene, (PBD).
  • Polybutylene, (PB).
  • Polybutylene teraphthalate, (PBT).
  • Polycarbonate, (PC).
  • Polyektone, (PK).
  • Polyester.
  • Polyetheretherketone, (PEEK).
  • Polyetherimide, (PEI).
  • Polyethersulfone, (PES).
  • Polyethylene, (PE).
  • Polyethylenechlorinates, (PEC).
  • Polyimide, (PI).
  • Polymethylpentene, (PMP).
  • Polyphenylene Oxide, (PPO).
  • Polyphenylene Sulfide, (PPS).
  • Polyphthalamide, (PTA).
  • Polypropylene, (PP).
  • Polystyrene, (PS).
  • Polysulfone, (PSU).
  • Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene, (ABS).
  • Cellulosic.
  • Ethylene vinyl alcohol, (E/VAL).
  • Fluoroplastics, (PTFE), (FEP, PFA, CTFE, ECTFE, ETFE).
  • Ionomer.
  • Liquid Crystal Polymer, (LCP).
  • Polyacetal, (Acetal).
  • Polyacrylates, (Acrylic).
  • Polyacrylonitrile, (PAN), (Acrylonitrile).
  • Polyamide, (PA), (Nylon).
  • Polyamide-imide, (PAI).
  • Polyaryletherketone, (PAEK), (Ketone).
  • Polybutadiene, (PBD).
  • Polybutylene, (PB).
  • Polycarbonate, (PC).
  • Polyektone, (PK).
  • Polyester.
  • Polyetheretherketone, (PEEK).
  • Polyetherimide, (PEI).
  • Polyethersulfone, (PES).
  • Polyethylene, (PE).
  • Polyethylenechlorinates, (PEC).
  • Polyimide, (PI).
  • Polymethylpentene, (PMP).
  • Polyphenylene Oxide, (PPO).
  • Polyphenylene Sulfide, (PPS).
  • Polyphthalamide, (PTA).
  • Polypropylene, (PP).
  • Polystyrene, (PS).
  • Polysulfone, (PSU).
  • Polyurethane, (PU).
  • Polyvinylchloride, (PVC).
  • Polyvinylidene Chloride, (PVDC).
  • Thermoplastic elastomers, (TPE).
  • Polyurethane, (PU).
  • Polyvinylchloride, (PVC).
  • Polyvinylidene Chloride, (PVDC).
  • Thermoplastic elastomers, (TPE).

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Heat seamable flame retardant roof sheeting with highly crystalline thermoplasticity promoters and method for covering ... (5739 words)
It is another object of the present invention to provide compositions which have sufficient crystallinity to show thermoplastic behavior during the formation of a seam using both heat and pressure, but which will continue to maintain its flame resistance.
The highly crystalline thermoplasticity promoters listed in Table I are necessary, when the polymer blend comprises increasing amounts of the halogenated olefin type elastomer having less than 2 weight percent crystallinity.
It is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the specific types of halogenated olefinic elastomers or thermoplasticity promoters exemplified herein or by the disclosure of other typical halogenated olefinic elastomers provided herein, the examples having been provided merely to demonstrate the practice of the subject invention.
Thermoplastic at AllExperts (495 words)
A thermoplastic is a material that is plastic or deformable, melts to a liquid when heated and freezes to a brittle, glassy state when cooled sufficiently.
Most thermoplastics are high molecular weight polymers whose chains associate through weak van der Waals forces (polyethylene); stronger dipole-dipole interactions and hydrogen bonding (nylon); or even stacking of aromatic rings (polystyrene).
Thermoplastic polymers differ from thermosetting polymers (Bakelite; vulcanized rubber) which once formed and cured, can never be remelted and remolded.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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