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Encyclopedia > Therianthropy

Therianthropy (from n. therianthrope and adj. therianthropic, part man and part beast, from the Greek therion, Θηριον, meaning "wild animal" or "beast", and anthrōpos, ανθρωπος, meaning "man") refers to the metamorphosis of humans into animals.[1] Therianthropes have long existed in mythology, appearing in ancient cave drawings[2] such as the Sorcerer at Les Trois Frères. A cicada in the process of shedding. ... Trinomial name Homo sapiens sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 Humans, or human beings, are bipedal primates belonging to the mammalian species Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man or knowing man) in the family Hominidae (the great apes). ... The word mythology (from the Greek μυολογία mythología, from mythologein to relate myths, from mythos, meaning a narrative, and logos, meaning speech or argument) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use the supernatural to interpret natural events and... The Sorcerer is one name for an enigmatic cave painting found in a cavern known as The Sanctuary at Trois-Frères, France. ... The Cave of the Trois-Frères, named for the three sons of comte Bégouen who discovered it in 1910 is one of the famous caves in southwestern France famous for its cave paintings, one of which, called The Sorcerer is as familiar as any art in the more...


The term therianthropy was used to refer to animal transformation folklore of Asia and Europe as early as 1901.[3] Therianthropy was also used to describe spiritual belief in animal transformation in 1915[4] and one source[5] raises the possibility the term may have been used in the 16th century in criminal trials of suspected werewolves.


The "new-age" notion of "spiritual theriantropy" developed among the Usenet group alt.horror.werewolves (ca. 1992).[6] Some Usenet users began publicly asserting that they were part animal. It turned out that some were only joking, but others were apparently serious about the assertions, which were subject to ongoing discussion.[7] Such people initially called themselves lycanthropes, but since the word more accurately describes wolf-people, the word therianthropes became more popular. New Age is the term commonly used to designate the broad movement of late 20th century and contemporary Western culture, characterised by an eclectic and individual approach to spiritual exploration. ... Usenet (USEr NETwork) is a global, decentralized, distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP architecture of the same name. ...

Horus is an ancient Egyptian deity, many of which were portrayed with human body and animal head
Horus is an ancient Egyptian deity, many of which were portrayed with human body and animal head

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (504x800, 109 KB) French: Horus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (504x800, 109 KB) French: Horus. ... This page is about the Egyptian deity. ...

Examples

Ethnologist Ivar Lissner theorized that cave paintings of beings with human and nonhuman animal features were not physical representations of mythical shapeshifters, but were instead attempts to depict shamans in the process of acquiring the mental and spiritual attributes of various beasts.[8] Religious historian Mircea Eliade has observed that beliefs regarding animal identity and transformation into animals are widespread[9]. This article is becoming very long. ...


Therianthropy can also refer to artistic descriptions of characters that simultaneously share human and animal traits, for example the animal-headed humanoid forms of gods depicted in Egyptian mythology (such as Ra, Sobek and others) as well as creatures like centaurs and mermaids. Egyptian mythology or Egyptian religion is the succession of tentative beliefs held by the people of Egypt for over three thousand years, prior to major exposure to Christianity and Islam. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sobek (from the Temple of Kom Ombo) or In Egyptian mythology, Sobek (also spelt Sebek, Sochet, Sobk, Sobki, Soknopais, and in Greek, Suchos) was the deification of crocodiles, and was originally a demon, as crocodiles were deeply feared in the nation so dependent on the Nile River. ... In Greek mythology, the Centaurs (Greek: Κένταυροι) are a race of creatures composed of part human and part horse. ... A mermaid (from the Middle English mere in the obsolete sense sea (as in maritime, the Latin mare, sea) + maid(en)) is a legendary aquatic creature with the head and torso of human female and the tail of a fish. ...


Some common forms of therianthropy have their own terminologies. Of these, lycanthropy, cynanthropy and ailuranthropy are the best known.[10] The term "cynanthropy" was applied in 1901 to Chinese myths about humans turning into dogs, dogs becoming people, and sexual relations between humans and canines.[11] Cynanthropy (sometimes spelled kynanthropy) is a mental delusion in which one imagines oneself as a dog, frequently barking and growling. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ...


Lycanthropy

Main article: Lycanthropy

In folklore, mythology and anthropology, the most commonly known form of therianthropy is lycanthropy (from the Greek words lycos ("wolf") and anthropos ("man")), the technical term for the transformation from human to animal form. Although the precise definition of lycanthropy specifically refers only to the change into lupine form (as with a werewolf), the term is often used to refer to morphing into any non-human animal form. In folklore, lycanthropy is the ability or power of a human being to undergo transformation into a wolf. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ... In folklore, lycanthropy is the ability or power of a human being to undergo transformation into a wolf. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... A German woodcut from 1722 A werewolf (also lycanthrope or wolfman) in folklore is a person who shapeshifts into a wolf or wolflike creature, either purposely, by using magic, or after being placed under a curse. ...


Psychiatry

Among a sampled set of psychiatric patients the belief of being part animal, or Clinical lycanthropy, was generally associated with severe psychosis, but not always with any specific psychiatric diagnosis or neurological findings.[12] Others regard it as a delusion in the sense of the self-identity disorder found in affective and schizophrenic disorders or as a symptom of other psychiatric disorders.[13]. Clinical lycanthropy is a psychiatric syndrome that involves a delusional belief that the affected person is, or has, transformed into an animal. ...


See also

Clinical lycanthropy is a psychiatric syndrome that involves a delusional belief that the affected person is, or has, transformed into an animal. ... This is a list of shapeshifters from mythology and modern fiction. ... WERE is an AM radio station in Cleveland, Ohio operating on 1300 kHz with studios in downtown Cleveland. ... Barbara Minerva as the form-changing supervillain Cheetah, by Justiniano Werecats (also written in a hyphenated form as were-cats) are creatures of folklore, fantasy fiction, horror fiction and occultism that are generally described as shapeshifters who are similar to werewolves, except that they turn into creatures that are based... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A totem is any entity which watches over or assists a group of people, such as a family, clan or tribe (Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary [1] and Websters New World College Dictionary, Fourth Edition). ... Nagual or Nahual (both pronounced [nawal]) is a word used in the study of the religion, mythology, folklore and anthropology of Mesoamerican peoples and which is used with different definitions. ... Theriocephaly (from the Greek, therion, meaning beast or animal) is used to refer to humans depicted with animal heads. ... Morphological freedom is, according to neuroscientist Anders Sandberg, an extension of one’s right to one’s body, not just self-ownership but also the right to modify oneself according to one’s desires. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Edward Podolsky (1953). Encyclopedia of Aberrations: A Psychiatric Handbook. Philosophical Library. 
  2. ^ Trois Freres. Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved on 2006-12-06.
  3. ^ De Groot, J.J.M. (1901). The Religious System of China: Volume IV. Leiden: Brill, 171. 
  4. ^ Brinkley, Frank; Dairoku Kikuchi (1915). A History of the Japanese People from the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era. The Encyclopædia Britannica Co. 
  5. ^ Ramsland, Katherine (2005). The Human Predator: A Historical Chronicle of Serial Murder and Forensic Investigation. Berkley Hardcover. ISBN 042520765X. 
  6. ^ Chantal Bourgault Du Coudray (2006). The Curse of the Werewolf: Fantasy, Horror and the Beast Within. I. B. Tauris. ISBN 1845111583. 
  7. ^ Cohen, D. (1996). Werewolves. New York: Penguin, 104. ISBN 0-525-65207-8. 
  8. ^ Steiger, B. (1999). The Werewolf Book: The Encyclopedia of Shape-Shifting Beings. Farmington Hills, MI: Visible Ink. ISBN 1-57859-078-7. 
  9. ^ Eliade, Mircea (1965). Rites and Symbols of Initiation: the mysteries of birth and rebirth. Harper & Row. 
  10. ^ Greene, R. (2000). The Magic of Shapeshifting. York Beach, ME: Weiser, 229. ISBN 1-57863-171-8. 
  11. ^ De Groot, J.J.M. (1901). The Religious System of China: Volume IV. Leiden: Brill, 184. 
  12. ^ Keck PE, Pope HG, Hudson JI, McElroy SL, Kulick AR. (1988) Lycanthropy: alive and well in the twentieth century. Psychological Medicine, 18(1), 113-20.
  13. ^ Garlipp, P; Godecke-Koch T, Dietrich DE, Haltenhof H. (Jan 2004). "Lycanthropy--psychopathological and psychodynamical aspects". Acta Psychiatr Scand 109 (1): 19-22. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Therianthropy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (557 words)
Therianthropy is a generic term for any transformation of a human into another animal form, or for a being which displays both human and animal characteristics, either as a part of mythology or as a spiritual concept.
Therianthropy can also refer to characters that share man and animal traits at the same time, for example with the animal-headed human forms of gods in Egyptian mythology (such as Ra, Sobek and others) as well as creatures like centaurs and mermaids.
A nearly endless number of types of therianthropy could thus be referred to by their own individual terms, though most of these would be neologisms.
therianthropy - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com (1034 words)
Therianthropy is a generic term for any transformation of a human into an animal form, either as a part of mythology or as a spiritual concept.
Spiritual therianthropy is not the same as clinical lycanthropy, a mental illness in which an individual believes they are physically of another species.
Therianthropy should not be confused with the furry fandom, though some intermixing of the groups does occur.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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