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Encyclopedia > There Will Be Blood
There Will Be Blood

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson
Produced by Paul Thomas Anderson
Daniel Lupi
Joanne Sellar
Scott Rudin (Executive Producer)
Written by Screenplay:
Paul Thomas Anderson
Novel:
Upton Sinclair
Starring Daniel Day-Lewis
Paul Dano
Dillon Freasier
Music by Jonny Greenwood
Cinematography Robert Elswit
Editing by Dylan Tichenor
Distributed by United States:
Paramount Vantage
International:
Miramax Films
Release date(s) December 26, 2007
Running time 158 min.
Country United States
Language English
Budget $25 million
Gross revenue $72,907,541
Official website
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

There Will Be Blood is a 2007 film directed, written and produced by Paul Thomas Anderson. The film is loosely based on an Upton Sinclair novel, Oil! (1927), and tells the story of a silver miner turned oil man on a ruthless quest for power during Southern California's oil boom of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It stars Daniel Day-Lewis and Paul Dano. Shooting began in mid-May 2006 in New Mexico and Marfa, Texas, with principal photography wrapping August 24, 2006. The first public screening was on September 29, 2007, at Fantastic Fest in Austin, Texas. The film was released on December 26, 2007, in New York and Los Angeles, and then opened in a limited number of theaters in selected markets. It opened in wide release January 25, 2008. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 404 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (509 × 755 pixel, file size: 74 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher or the creator of the work depicted. ... Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ... Scott Rudin (born July 14, 1958) is an American motion picture producer and theatre producer known for his award-winning films and Broadway plays and also for his legendary temper. ... Upton Sinclair Jr. ... Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957) is an Academy-Award winning and Golden Globe-award nominated actor. ... Paul Franklin Dano (born June 19, 1984) is a BAFTA Award-nominated American actor and producer. ... Jonathan Jonny Richard Guy Greenwood (born November 5, 1971 in Oxford, England) is a musician and a member of Radiohead. ... Robert Elswit is an American cinematographer. ... Paramount Classics logo Paramount Vantage (originally Paramount Classics) is the specialty film division of Paramount Pictures (which in turn is owned by Viacom), charged with producing, purchasing, distributing and marketing films, generally those with a more art house feel than films made and distributed by its parent company. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Miramax Films is a film production and distribution brand that was a Big Ten film motion picture distribution and production company headquartered in New York City before being bought out by The Walt Disney Company. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... USD redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ... 2007 has been referred to, by film and media critics, as the year of the threequels, a nickname referring to both the 2004 summer movie season and several film franchises which premiered or had installments released in 2004, which appear again this year: Spider-Man 3, Shrek the Third, Ocean... Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ... Upton Sinclair Jr. ... Oil! is a novel by Upton Sinclair published in 1927. ... This article is about the region of Southern California. ... Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957) is an Academy-Award winning and Golden Globe-award nominated actor. ... Paul Franklin Dano (born June 19, 1984) is a BAFTA Award-nominated American actor and producer. ... May 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → May 1, 2006 (Monday) Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association outraged Vatican by planning to ordain another bishop, Liu Xinhong in Anhui Province. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... Hotel Paisano and the Presidio County courthouse View south from the county courthouse Marfa is a city located in the high desert of far West Texas. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Fantastic Fest is an annual film festival in Austin, Texas, sponsored by the Alamo Drafthouse and Aint It Cool News. ... Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the state. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


The film received significant critical praise and numerous award nominations and victories. It appeared on many critics' "top ten" lists for the year, namely the National Society of Film Critics and the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. Day-Lewis won Oscar, BAFTA, Golden Globe, Screen Actors' Guild, NYFCC, and IFTA Best Actor awards for his performance. The film was nominated for eight Academy Awards, winning Best Actor for Day-Lewis, and Best Cinematography for Robert Elswit. The National Society of Film Critics or NSFC is an American film critic organization. ... The Los Angeles Film Critics Association (LAFCA) was founded in 1975. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... New York Film Critics Circle Awards are given annually to honor excellence in cinema worldwide by an organization of film reviewers from New York City-based publications. ... The IFTA Award (Irish Film & Television Award) first appeared in 1999. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actor who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Charles Rosher the first recipient in 1928 The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... Robert Elswit is an American cinematographer. ...

Contents

Plot

The story opens in 1898 with prospector Daniel Plainview (Daniel Day-Lewis) discovering crude oil deposits in one of his silver mines. Plainview begins extraction operations, eventually refining his extraction techniques with self-designed drilling and rigging equipment. He soon earns enough money to build a small drilling company. One of his workers is killed in a work accident, and Plainview takes the man's orphaned child as his own. He begins a much larger enterprise with the boy, whom he names H.W. (Dillon Freasier), as his partner. By 1911, he has become one of the most successful oil men in California. Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Prospecting is the physical search for minerals, fossils, precious metals or mineral specimens, and is also known as fossicking. ... Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957) is an Academy-Award winning and Golden Globe-award nominated actor. ... Petro redirects here. ... A nugget of silver Silver Mining refers to the resource extraction of the precious metal element silver, mostly through mines. ... For other uses, see Orphan (disambiguation). ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Plainview is approached by young Paul Sunday (Paul Dano) who sells him an oil lead located on his family's property in Little Boston, California. Plainview and H.W. travel there under the guise of hunting quail and discover oil seeping to the surface. Plainview then attempts to buy the property without telling Paul's father, Abel (David Willis), of the oil, but Paul's twin brother, Eli (also Paul Dano), knows of the oil and raises the price to $10,000, which he intends to put into the founding of his own church. Plainview pays him $5,000 up front and promises $5,000 as a donation to the church. Paul Franklin Dano (born June 19, 1984) is a BAFTA Award-nominated American actor and producer. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the bird. ...


Plainview leases the surrounding ranches, with the exception of one, owned by Mr. Bandy (Hans Howes), whom Plainview brushes off when Bandy demands that Plainview see him personally. With the money from his land, Eli founds his own church, the Church of the Third Revelation, and styles himself as a faith healer. Faith healing is the use of solely spiritual means in treating disease, which, in some cases, is accompanied with the refusal of modern medical techniques. ...


H.W. loses his hearing in the blast from an explosion. When Eli comes to the derrick to request the money Plainview owes him, Plainview violently attacks him, berating him for being unable to heal his son. Humiliated, Eli returns home, where he beats his father for selling the family's land at a greatly undervalued price.

Daniel Day-Lewis earned his second Academy Award for Best Actor in his role as Daniel Plainview.
Daniel Day-Lewis earned his second Academy Award for Best Actor in his role as Daniel Plainview.

A man approaches Plainview claiming to be his half-brother Henry Brands (Kevin J. O'Connor). Plainview takes Henry into his confidence, confessing his need to win out over all other competition. That night H.W. attempts to burn the bed in which Henry is sleeping. Plainview sends him away to a school for the deaf. Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actor who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ...


Henry and Plainview make a deal with Union Oil. Plainview becomes suspicious that Henry is not who he says he is, and eventually Henry admits being an impostor: Plainview's real brother was Henry's friend, who died of tuberculosis. Plainview then shoots and buries Henry. The Unocal Corporation (NYSE: UCL), based in El Segundo, California, was founded in 1890 as the Union Oil Company of California. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ...


The next morning Plainview is awakened by Bandy, who agrees to lease his property for the pipeline on the condition that Plainview be baptized into the Church of the Third Revelation. In addition to his property being vital to Plainview's oil pipeline, Bandy's leverage is his knowledge of Plainview's murder of Henry. Plainview, who has no interest in religion, agrees, and suffers a humiliating initiation at the hands of Eli. Plainview sends for H.W., but is still unable to communicate with the boy, who is now learning sign language. Eli leaves Little Boston on missionary work. Two sign language Intepreters working as a team for a school. ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ...


The story jumps to 1927. H.W. (now played by Russell Harvard) asks his father (through an interpreter) to be released from their partnership so he can take his wife Mary, Eli's sister, to Mexico in order to form his own oil company. Upset, Plainview tells H.W. that he was adopted, repeatedly calling him a "bastard from a basket."


Later, Eli visits Plainview in his mansion, to beg for money after losing investments in the depression. He attempts to sell Plainview the rights to drill the Bandy Ranch, now in Eli's possession. Before agreeing, Plainview forces Eli to claim that he is false prophet, and to denounce God as a superstition. Plainview then informs Eli that he has already drained the oil from Bandy's land with his surrounding wells. He taunts Eli, and eventually attacks him. He then beats him to death with a bowling pin, before the butler enters. Plainview calls out "I'm finished!" and the film ends. The Great Depression was a global economic slump that began in 1929 and bottomed in 1933. ... False prophet is a label given to a person who is viewed as illegitimately claiming charismatic authority within a religious group. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


Cast

  • Daniel Day-Lewis as Daniel Plainview
  • Paul Dano as Paul Sunday / Eli Sunday
  • Dillon Freasier as H.W. Plainview
  • Ciarán Hinds as Fletcher Hamilton
  • Kevin J. O'Connor as Henry Brands
  • David Willis as Abel Sunday
  • Russell Harvard as H.W. Plainview (older)

Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957) is an Academy-Award winning and Golden Globe-award nominated actor. ... Paul Franklin Dano (born June 19, 1984) is a BAFTA Award-nominated American actor and producer. ... Hinds in HBOs TV Series Rome Ciarán Hinds (born February 9, 1953) is a well-respected Belfast-born actor whose work spans theatre, radio, television, and film. ...

Production

Originally, Paul Thomas Anderson had been working on a screenplay about two fighting families. He struggled with the script and soon realized it just was not working.[1] Homesick, he purchased a copy of Upton Sinclair's Oil! in London and was immediately drawn to the cover illustration of a California oilfield.[2] As he read, Anderson became even more fascinated with the novel and adapted the first 150 pages to a screenplay. He began to get a real sense of where his script was going after making many trips to museums dedicated to early oilmen in Bakersfield.[3] He changed the title from Oil! to There Will Be Blood because, "at the end of the day, there [was] not enough of the book to feel like it [was] a proper adaptation."[1] He didn't want to impose any kind of accent on whoever was going to play Plainview as he wanted to keep things simple.[1] He wrote the original screenplay with Daniel Day-Lewis in mind and approached the actor when the script was nearly complete. He had heard that Daniel Day-Lewis liked Punch-Drunk Love, which gave him the confidence to hand him a copy of the incomplete script.[4] According to Day-Lewis, simply being asked to do the film was enough to convince him.[5] In an interview with the The New York Observer, the actor elaborated on what drew him to the project. It was "the understanding that [he] had already entered into that world. [He] wasn't observing it - [he'd] entered into it - and indeed [he'd] populated it with characters who [he] felt had lives of their own."[6] The line in the final scene, "I drink your milkshake!", is paraphrased from a quote by New Mexico Senator Albert Fall speaking before a Congressional investigation into the 1920s oil-related Teapot Dome scandal. Anderson was enamored of the use of the term "milkshake" to explain the complicated technical process of oil drainage to senators.[7] Upton Sinclair Jr. ... Oil! is a novel by Upton Sinclair published in 1927. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... Bakersfield redirects here. ... Punch-Drunk Love is a 2002 film written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. ... The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ... A strawberry milkshake topped with whipped cream and strawberry syrup A milkshake is a sweet, cold beverage which is made from milk, ice cream, and sweet flavourings such as fruit syrup or chocolate sauce (in Canada and most regions of the United States, and the United Kingdom. ... The New Mexico State Senate is the upper house of the New Mexico State Legislature. ... Albert Bacon Fall (November 26, 1861 - November 30, 1944) Senator from New Mexico and the Secretary of the Interior under President Warren G. Harding, notorious for his involvement in the Teapot Dome scandal. ... The location of Teapot Dome in the US state of Wyoming. ...


According to JoAnne Sellar, one of the film's producers, it was a hard film to finance because, "the studios didn't think it had the scope of a major picture."[2] It took two years to acquire financing for the film.[3]


For the role of Plainview's son, Anderson looked at people in Los Angeles and New York City, but he realized that they needed someone from Texas who knew how to shoot shotguns and "live in that world."[1] The filmmakers asked around at a school and the principal recommended Dillon Freasier. They did not have him read any scenes and instead talked to him, realizing that he was the perfect person for the role.[1] Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


To start building his character, Day-Lewis started with the voice. Anderson sent him recordings from the late 19th century to 1927 and a copy of 1948 film, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, including documentaries on its director, John Huston, an important influence on Anderson's film.[2] According to Anderson, he was inspired by the fact that Sierra Madre is "about greed and ambition and paranoia and looking at the worst parts of yourself."[3] While writing the script, he would put the film on before he went to bed at night. To research for the role, Day-Lewis read letters from laborers and studied photographs from the time period. He also read up on oil tycoon Edward Doheny upon whom Sinclair's book is loosely based.[8] The Treasure of the Sierra Madre is John Hustons 1948 black and white adaptation of B. Travens eponymous 1927 novel The Treasure of the Sierra Madre , in which two American down-and-outers (Humphrey Bogart and Tim Holt) in 1920s Mexico hook up with an old-timer (Walter... John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director and actor. ... Edward Laurence Doheny (August 10, 1856 - September 8, 1935) was an American oil tycoon. ...


Filming started in June 2006 on a ranch in Marfa, Texas[3] and took three months to shoot.[2] Other location shooting took place in Los Angeles. Anderson tried to shoot the script in sequence with most of the sets on the ranch.[3] Two weeks into the 60-day shoot, Anderson replaced the actor playing Eli Sunday with Paul Dano. A profile of Day-Lewis in The New York Times Magazine suggested that the original actor (Kel O'Neill) had been intimidated by Day-Lewis's intensity and habit of staying in character on and off the set.[8][3] Both Anderson and Day-Lewis deny this claim,[8][3] and Day-Lewis stated, "I absolutely don't believe that it was because he was intimidated by me. I happen to believe that — and I hope I'm right."[9] Anderson first saw Dano in The Ballad of Jack and Rose and thought that he would be perfect to play Paul Sunday, a role he originally envisioned to be a 12 or 13-year-old boy. Dano only had four days to prepare for the much larger role of Eli Sunday,[10] but he researched the time period that the film is set in as well as evangelical preachers.[1] Three weeks of scenes with Sunday and Plainview had to be re-shot with Dano instead of Kel O'Neill.[3] The interior mansion scenes were filmed at the Greystone Mansion in Beverley Hills, the former real-life home of Edward Doheny Jr., a gift from his father Edward Doheny. Scenes filmed at Greystone involved the careful renovation of the basement's two lane bowling alley.[11] The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Ballad of Jack and Rose is a 2005 film written and directed by Rebecca Miller. ... Look up evangelist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Greystone Mansion was the home built by Edward L. Doheny for his son. ... Beverly Hills redirects here. ... Edward Laurence Doheny (August 10, 1856 - September 8, 1935) was an American oil tycoon. ...


Anderson dedicated the film to Robert Altman, who died while Anderson was editing it.[1] For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ...


This film was the second co-production of Paramount Vantage and Miramax Films to be released in as many months, after No Country for Old Men (which won the Academy Award for Best Picture). Paramount Classics logo Paramount Vantage (originally Paramount Classics) is the specialty film division of Paramount Pictures (which in turn is owned by Viacom), charged with producing, purchasing, distributing and marketing films, generally those with a more art house feel than films made and distributed by its parent company. ... Miramax Films is a film production and distribution brand that was a Big Ten film motion picture distribution and production company headquartered in New York City before being bought out by The Walt Disney Company. ... No Country for Old Men is a 2007 crime thriller film written and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, starring Tommy Lee Jones, Josh Brolin, and Javier Bardem. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ...


The film is known in some circles for the infamous "Milkshake" scene, which features Day-Lewis' character proclaiming "I drink your milkshake! I drink it up!"


There Will Be Blood was shot using Panavision XL 35 mm cameras outfitted primarily with Panavision C series and high-speed anamorphic lenses.[12] Panavision is a motion picture equipment company specializing in cameras and lenses, based in Woodland Hills, California. ... Simulated 35 mm film with soundtracks _ The outermost strips (on either side) contain the SDDS soundtrack as an image of a digital signal. ... Anamorphic widescreen is a cinematography and photography technique for capturing a widescreen picture on standard 35mm film. ...


Critical reception

The first public screening of There Will Be Blood was on September 29, 2007, at Fantastic Fest in Austin, Texas. The film was released on December 26, 2007, in New York and Los Angeles where it grossed US$190,739 on its opening weekend. The film then opened in 885 theaters in selected markets on January 25, 2008, grossing $4.8 million on its opening weekend. The film went on to make $40.1 million in North America and $32.7 million in the rest of the world, with a worldwide total of $72.9 million, well above its $25 million budget.[13] is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Fantastic Fest is an annual film festival in Austin, Texas, sponsored by the Alamo Drafthouse and Aint It Cool News. ... Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the state. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... USD redirects here. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


The film received very positive reviews from critics. As of March 29, 2008, on the review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, 91% of critics gave the film positive reviews, based on 178 reviews.[14] On Metacritic, the film has an average score of 92 out of 100, based on 39 reviews.[15] is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ...


Andrew Sarris called the film "an impressive achievement in its confident expertness in rendering the simulated realities of a bygone time and place, largely with an inspired use of regional amateur actors and extras with all the right moves and sounds."[16] In Premiere magazine, Glenn Kenny praised Day-Lewis's performance: "Once his Plainview takes wing, the relentless focus of the performance makes the character unique."[17] Manohla Dargis wrote, in her review for the New York Times, "the film is above all a consummate work of art, one that transcends the historically fraught context of its making, and its pleasures are unapologetically aesthetic."[18] Esquire magazine also praised Day-Lewis's performance: "what’s most fun, albeit in a frightening way, is watching this greedmeister become more and more unhinged as he locks horns with Eli Sunday...both Anderson and Day-Lewis go for broke. But it’s a pleasure to be reminded, if only once every four years, that subtlety can be overrated."[19] Richard Schickel in Time magazine praised There Will Be Blood as "one of the most wholly original American movies ever made."[20] Critic Tom Charity, writing about CNN's ten-best films list, calls the film the only "flat-out masterpiece" of 2007.[21] Andrew Sarris is a film critic and a leading proponent of the Auteur theory of criticism. ... Premiere is an American and New York City-based film magazine published by Hachette Filipacchi Médias, beginning publication in 1987. ... Manohla Dargis is one of the chief film critics for The New York Times. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... August 2005 issue of Esquire Esquire is a mens magazine by the Hearst Corporation. ... Richard Warren Schickel (b. ... TIME redirects here. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ...


Schickel also named the film one of the Top 10 Movies of 2007, ranking it at #9, calling Daniel Day Lewis’ performance “astonishing”, and calling the film “a mesmerizing meditation on the American spirit in all its maddening ambiguities: mean and noble, angry and secretive, hypocritical and more than a little insane in its aspirations.”[22]


The Times chief film critic, James Christopher, in a list of the Top 100 films of all time released in April 2008, listed the film #2, behind Casablanca. [23] The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... This article is about the 1942 film. ...


However some critics were more negative. Armond White of the New York Press expressed that the "musical wit disguises the story’s incoherence—its meaningless siblings, silences and opportunistic sadism", feeling that the film's finale was "confusing and slapdash" and "comes across as just secular-progressive prejudice and loopy, unconvincing drama".[24] Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle shot out at the films praises by saying "there should be no need to pretend 'There Will Be Blood' is a masterpiece just because Anderson sincerely tried to make it one."[25] Armond White (born in Detroit, Michigan) is one of Americas leading film critics and has been the chairman of the New York Film Critics Circle since the mid-1990s. ... New York Press is a free alternative weekly in New York City. ... Mick LaSalle (born May 7, 1959) is the film critic for the San Francisco Chronicle and the author of two books on pre-code Hollywood. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ...


Top ten lists

The film appeared on many critics' top ten lists of the best films of 2007.[26][27]

Dec. ... The Austin Chronicle is an alternative weekly newspaper published every Thursday in Austin, Texas, United States. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The distinctive Time Out logo, seen on all its publications Time Out is a publishing company based in London, England. ... L.A. Weekly is a free weekly tabloid-sized newspaper (a so-called alternative weekly) in Los Angeles, California. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Staten Island Advance is a daily newspaper published in the borough of Staten Island in New York City. ... Premiere is an American and New York City-based film magazine published by Hachette Filipacchi Médias, beginning publication in 1987. ... The Orange County Register is a daily newspaper published in Santa Ana, California. ... The A.V. Club is an entertainment newspaper and website published by The Onion. ... Salon. ... October 2, 2004 edition. ... The Chicago Reader is an alternative newsweekly in Chicago, Illinois, USA. It was founded in 1971[2] by a group of friends who attended Carleton College. ... The Austin Chronicle is an alternative weekly newspaper published every Thursday in Austin, Texas, United States. ... The Montreal Mirror is an English language alternative newsweekly based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Since its inception in 2001, Slant Magazine has grown exponentially in content, exposure, and readership. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... L.A. Weekly is a free weekly tabloid-sized newspaper (a so-called alternative weekly) in Los Angeles, California. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The A.V. Club is an entertainment newspaper and website published by The Onion. ... The Miami Herald is a daily newspaper owned by The McClatchy Company. ... The A.V. Club is an entertainment newspaper and website published by The Onion. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... This article is about a New York newspaper. ... October 2, 2004 edition. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette is a daily newspaper published in Little Rock, Arkansas. ... This article is about the magazine. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... TIME redirects here. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... Slate is an online news and culture magazine created in 1996 by former New Republic editor Michael Kinsley and owned by Microsoft (as part of MSN). ...

Score and soundtrack

Further information: There Will Be Blood (album)

Anderson had been a fan of Radiohead's music and was impressed with Jonny Greenwood's scoring of the film Bodysong. While writing the script for There Will Be Blood, Anderson heard Greenwood's orchestral piece Popcorn Superhet Receiver, which prompted him to ask Greenwood to work with him. After initially agreeing to score the film, Greenwood had doubts and thought about backing out, but Anderson's reassurance and enthusiasm for the film convinced the musician to stick with the project.[30][31] Anderson gave Greenwood a copy of the film and three weeks later he came back with two hours of music recorded at Abbey Road Studios in London.[1] Concerning his approach to soundtracking the movie, Greenwood said to Entertainment Weekly: Radiohead are an English alternative rock band from Oxfordshire. ... Jonathan Jonny Richard Guy Greenwood (born November 5, 1971 in Oxford, England) is a musician and a member of Radiohead. ... Bodysong is Jonny Greenwoods first solo LP Tracklisting: 1. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ...

I think it was about not necessarily just making period music, which very traditionally you would do. But because they were traditional orchestral sounds, I suppose that's what we hoped was a little unsettling, even though you know all the sounds you're hearing are coming from very old technology. You can just do things with the classical orchestra that do unsettle you, that are sort of slightly wrong, that have some kind of undercurrent that's slightly sinister. [32]

The film also contains the cello and piano transcription of Fratres by Arvo Pärt, and the third movement from Brahms's Violin Concerto. The recording is by violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter with the Berlin Philharmonic directed by Herbert von Karajan. Fratres is a composition by the Estonian composer Arvo Pärt, existing in versions for a wide variety of instrumentations and exemplifying Pärts Tintinnabuli style of composition. ... Arvo Pärt (born September 11, 1935 in Paide), (IPA: ˈɑr̺vÉ” ˈpær̺t) is an Estonian composer, often identified with the school of minimalism and more specifically, that of mystic minimalism or sacred minimalism. He is considered a pioneer of this style, along with contemporaries Henryk Górecki... Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D major, Op. ... Anne-Sophie Mutter (born June 29, 1963 in Rheinfelden, Germany) is a German violinist. ... The Berliner Philharmoniker (Berlin Philharmonic), is one of the worlds leading orchestras. ... Herbert von Karajan (April 5, 1908 – July 16, 1989) was an Austrian conductor. ...

Home video release

The movie was released on DVD on April 8, 2008. It was released in a single disc as well as a two disc edition. It has been said that Anderson has refused to record a commentary for the film.[33] The discs were packaged in cardboard, something uncommon for DVDs, which are generally packaged in plastic. April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


Awards and nominations

80th Academy Awards

8 nominations[34] including: The 80th Academy Awards ceremony, honoring the best in film for 2007, was broadcast from the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, California on ABC beginning at 5:30 p. ...

61st British Academy Film Awards

9 nominations[35] including: Paul Thomas Anderson at the Toronto Film Festival 9/12/2002 Paul Thomas Anderson (born January 1, 1970 in Studio City, California,USA) is an American filmmaker. ... Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ... Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957) is an Academy-Award winning and Golden Globe-award nominated actor. ... Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ... Jack Fisk (19 December 1945 Canton, IL) married actress Sissy Spacek on April 12, 1974. ... Robert Elswit is an American cinematographer. ... For the English cricketers named Matthew Wood, see Matthew Wood (Yorkshire cricketer) and Matthew Wood (Somerset cricketer). ...

65th Golden Globe Awards

2 nominations[36] including: Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957) is an Academy-Award winning and Golden Globe-award nominated actor. ... Paul Thomas Anderson at the Toronto Film Festival 9/12/2002 Paul Thomas Anderson (born January 1, 1970 in Studio City, California,USA) is an American filmmaker. ... Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ... Paul Franklin Dano (born June 19, 1984) is a BAFTA Award-nominated American actor and producer. ... Jonathan Jonny Richard Guy Greenwood (born November 5, 1971 in Oxford, England) is a musician and a member of Radiohead. ... Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ... Jack Fisk (19 December 1945 Canton, IL) married actress Sissy Spacek on April 12, 1974. ... Robert Elswit is an American cinematographer. ... For the English cricketers named Matthew Wood, see Matthew Wood (Yorkshire cricketer) and Matthew Wood (Somerset cricketer). ... 65th Golden Globe Awards January 13, 2008 Picture - Drama: Picture - Musical or Comedy: TV Series - Drama: TV Series - Musical or Comedy: Miniseries or TV Movie: The 65th Golden Globe Awards, honouring the best in film and television of 2007, will be given by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association on 13...

  • Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama (Daniel Day-Lewis) - winner
  • Best Motion Picture - Drama (Daniel Lupi, JoAnne Sellar, & P.T. Anderson)

Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957) is an Academy-Award winning and Golden Globe-award nominated actor. ... Paul Thomas Anderson at the Toronto Film Festival 9/12/2002 Paul Thomas Anderson (born January 1, 1970 in Studio City, California,USA) is an American filmmaker. ...

Critics associations

Austin Film Critics Association

5 wins including:[37]

  • Best Picture
  • Best Actor
  • Best Director
  • Best Cinematography
  • Best Original Score
National Society of Film Critics

4 wins including:[38]

  • Best Picture
  • Best Director
  • Best Actor
  • Best Cinematography
Los Angeles Film Critics Association

4 wins including:[39]

  • Best Picture
  • Best Director
  • Best Actor
  • Best Production Design
Broadcast Film Critics Association

2 wins including:[40]

  • Best Actor
  • Best Composer

Guild awards

Directors Guild of America

The Directors Guild of America nominated PT Anderson for the DGA Award.[41] Director Guild of America building on Sunset Boulevard. ...

Screen Actors Guild

Daniel Day-Lewis won Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role at the 14th Screen Actors Guild Awards held in 2008.[42]

Writers Guild of America

Anderson was also nominated by the Writer's Guild of America for "Best Adapted Screenplay". The Writers Guild of America (WGA) is the collective bargaining representative, or labor union, for writers in the motion picture and television industries. ...

Producers Guild of America

The film also garnered a "Producer of the Year Award" nomination from the Producers Guild of America. Producers Guild of America (PGA) is a trade organization representing the television and film producers in the United States. ...

American Society of Cinematographers

Director of photography Robert Elswit won the American Society of Cinematographers' award for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) is not a labor union or guild, but rather an educational, cultural and professional organization. ...

The American Film Institute's Top 10

The American Film Institute listed it as an AFI Movie of the Year for 2007.[43] This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Stern, Marlow. "There Will Be Blood Press Conference", Manhattan Movie Magazine, December 10, 2007. 
  2. ^ a b c d Goodwin, Christopher. "Daniel Day-Lewis Gives Blood, Sweat and Tears", The Sunday Times, November 25, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-12-21. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Hirschberg, Lynn. "The New Frontier's Man", New York Times, December 11, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. 
  4. ^ "Prospectors Anderson and Day-Lewis Strike Black Gold", Los Angeles Times, December 19, 2007, <http://www.calendarlive.com/movies/cl-en-coverstory19dec19,0,5752296.story?coll=cl-movies>. Retrieved on 31 December 2007 
  5. ^ Freydkin, Donna. "Daniel Day-Lewis has recognition in his Blood", USA Today, December 10, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-12-21. 
  6. ^ Vilkomerson, Sarah. "P.S. I Love You Daniel Day-Lewis", New York Observer, December 18, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. 
  7. ^ Foundas, Scott (January 16, 2008). Paul Thomas Anderson: Blood, Sweat and Tears. LA Weekly. Retrieved on 2008-02-10.
  8. ^ a b c Lewis, Judith. "Daniel Day-Lewis: The Way He Lives Now", L.A. Weekly, December 19, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. 
  9. ^ Longsdorf, Amy (2008-01-03), "In 'Blood,' Day-Lewis unearths an oil tycoon's complexities", The Morning Call, <http://www.mcall.com/entertainment/movies/all-go_movies.6208480jan03,0,5814474.story>. Retrieved on 31 December 2007 
  10. ^ "National Public Radio Audio Interview", NPR. 
  11. ^ Hobart, Christy (2007-12-27), "At Greystone, there will be Blood -- and bowling", Los Angeles Times: F1, F4, <http://www.latimes.com/features/home/la-hm-blood27dec27,1,6977925.story?ctrack=2&cset=true>. Retrieved on 31 December 2007 
  12. ^ Goldman, Michael (2007-11-01), Old-Fashioned Filmmaking, <http://digitalcontentproducer.com/mil/features/video_oldfashioned_filmmaking/index2.html>. Retrieved on 24 February 2008 
  13. ^ There Will Be Blood - Box Office Mojo. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2008-04-08.
  14. ^ There Will Be Blood - Rotten Tomatoes. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved on 2008-04-19.
  15. ^ There Will Be Blood (2007): Reviews. Metacritic. Retrieved on 2008-03-05.
  16. ^ Sarris, Andrew. "Oil, Oil Everywhere!", New York Observer, December 17, 2007. 
  17. ^ Kenny, Glenn. "There Will Be Blood", Premiere, December 13, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. 
  18. ^ Dargis, Manohla. "An American Primitive, Forged in a Crucible of Blood and Oil", New York Times, December 26, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. 
  19. ^ D'Angelo, Mike. "One Fine Ham", Esquire, December 26, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. 
  20. ^ Schickel, Richard. "There Will Be Blood: An American Tragedy", Time, December 24, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-12-31. 
  21. ^ a b Tom Charity. "Review: The best (and worst) films of 2007", CNN, December 29, 2007. Retrieved on 2008-01-06. 
  22. ^ Schickel, Richard; “The 10 Best Movies”; time.com
  23. ^ Christopher, James. "Top 100 Films", The Times, April 27, 2008. 
  24. ^ Armond White. "A Guilt-Soaked Epic", New York Press. Retrieved on 2008-04-19. 
  25. ^ Mick LaSalle. "Conquering the West, and getting his hands dirty in the process", San Francisco Chronicle, January 4, 2008. Retrieved on 2008-04-19. 
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Metacritic: 2007 Film Critic Top Ten Lists. Metacritic. Retrieved on 2008-01-05.
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Movie City News: 2007 Film Critic Top Ten Lists. Movie City News. Retrieved on 2008-01-08.
  28. ^ 2007 Year in Review - MSN. MSN. Retrieved on 2008-01-09.
  29. ^ David Germain; Christy Lemire (2007-12-27). 'No Country for Old Men' earns nod from AP critics. Associated Press, via Columbia Daily Tribune. Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  30. ^ Willman, Chris. "There Will Be Music", Entertainment Weekly, December 2007. Retrieved on 2007-12-21. 
  31. ^ Ponto, Arya. "Jonny Greenwood scoring PTA's new film", Just Press Play, 2007-09-07. Retrieved on 2007-12-21. 
  32. ^ Martens, Todd. Radiohead's Greenwood goes sinister for 'There Will Be Blood'. Los Angeles Times.
  33. ^ There Will Be No Commentary. Awards Daily. Retrieved on 2008-03-11.
  34. ^ Nominees - 80th Annual Academy Awards. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
  35. ^ BAFTA Film Award Winners in 2008. British Academy of Film and Television Arts. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  36. ^ 2007 Golden Globe Nominations and Winners. Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  37. ^ Austin Film Critics draw 'Blood'. Variety. Retrieved on 2008-01-19.
  38. ^ Hernandez, Eugene (2008-01-05). "There Will Be Blood" Leads National Society of Film Critics Awards: Best Picture, Director, Actor, Cinematography. indieWIRE. Retrieved on 2008-01-05.
  39. ^ Giles, Jeff (2007-12-10). There Will Be Blood, No Country For Old Men Top Critics' Awards: New York, LA, Boston and D.C. scribes honor the best of 2007. Rotten Tomatoes / IGN Entertainment, Inc.. Retrieved on 2007-12-22.
  40. ^ Coens land Critics' Choice Awards. BBC News (2008-01-08). Retrieved on 2008-01-08.
  41. ^ Directors Guild announces nominations. Rope of Silicon (2007-12-20). Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  42. ^ Final 14th Annual SAG Awards Recipient Press Release. Screen Actors Guild (2008-01-27). Retrieved on 2008-01-27.
  43. ^ No Country for Old Men, Juno named to AFI's Top 10 of year. CBC (2007-12-17). Retrieved on 2007-12-31.

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The L.A. Weekly is a weekly free paper in Los Angeles. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Premiere is an American and New York City-based film magazine published by Hachette Filipacchi Médias, beginning publication in 1987. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... August 2005 issue of Esquire Esquire is a mens magazine by the Hearst Corporation. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TIME redirects here. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see MSN (disambiguation). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... The Columbia Daily Tribune, commonly referred to as the Columbia Tribune or the Tribune is one of two city-wide newspapers in Columbia, Missouri. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Screen Actors Guild (S.A.G.) is the labor union representing over 120,000 film actors in the United States. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... CBC redirects here, as this is the most common use of the abbreviation. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ... Hard Eight is a 1996 film written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, starring Philip Baker Hall, John C. Reilly, Gwyneth Paltrow and Samuel L. Jackson. ... This article is about the 1997 film. ... Magnolia is a 1999 American drama film, written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. ... Punch-Drunk Love is a 2002 film written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. ...

 
 

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