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Encyclopedia > Theophilus of Alexandria
Theophilus and the Serapeum
Theophilus and the Serapeum

Theophilus of Alexandria, (died 412) was the Nicene patriarch of Alexandria, Egypt (385 - 412). Download high resolution version (434x646, 53 KB)Theophilus and the Serapeum. ... Download high resolution version (434x646, 53 KB)Theophilus and the Serapeum. ... Events The Visigoths move into Gaul, led by Alarics brother Ataulf. ... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... Antiquity and modernity stand cheek-by-jowl in Egypts chief Mediterranean seaport Located on the Mediterranean Sea coast, Alexandria Αλεξάνδρεια (in Arabic, الإسكندرية, transliterated al-ʼIskandariyyah) is the chief seaport in Egypt, and that countrys second largest city, and the capital of the Al Iskandariyah governate. ... Events February 11 - Oldest Pope elected: Siricius, bishop of Tarragona. ... Events The Visigoths move into Gaul, led by Alarics brother Ataulf. ...


He was patriarch at a time of conflict between the newly dominant Christians and the pagan establishment in Alexandria, each supported by a segment of the Alexandrian populace. In 391, Theophilus (according to Rufinus and Sozomen) discovered a hidden pagan temple. He and his followers displayed the pagan artifacts to the public which offended the pagans enough to provoke an attack on the Christians. The Christian faction counter-attacked, forcing the pagans to retreat to the Serapeum. A letter was sent by the emperor that Theophilus should grant the offending pagans pardon, but destroy the temple. Antiquity and modernity stand cheek-by-jowl in Egypts chief Mediterranean seaport Located on the Mediterranean Sea coast, Alexandria Αλεξάνδρεια (in Arabic, الإسكندرية, transliterated al-ʼIskandariyyah) is the chief seaport in Egypt, and that countrys second largest city, and the capital of the Al Iskandariyah governate. ... Events All non-Christian temples in the Roman Empire are closed Quintus Aurelius Symmachus is urban prefect in Rome, and petitions Theodosius I to re-open the pagan temples. ... Tyrannius Rufinus or Rufinus of Aquileia (between 340 and 345–410 CE) was a monk, historian, and theologian. ... Salminius Hermias Sozomen (c. ... Paganism (from Latin paganus) and Heathenry are catch-all terms which have come to connote a broad set of spiritual/religious beliefs and practices of a natural religion, as opposed to the Abrahamic religions. ... The Serapeum of Alexandria in Ptolemaic Egypt was a temple built by Ptolemy III (reigned 246 BC–222 BC) and dedicated to Serapis, the syncretic Hellenistic-Egyptian god who was made the protector of Alexandria. ...


The destruction of the Serapeum was seen by many ancient and modern authors as representative of the triumph of Christianity over other religions; when Christians lynched Hypatia, they acclaimed Theophilus's successor Cyril as "the new Theophilus, for he had destroyed the last remains of idolatry in the city" (Chronicle of John of Nikiu). Hypatia could refer to: Hypatia of Alexandria (?370–415), a neo-Platonic philosopher, mathematician, and teacher. ... Cyril I (376 – June 27, 444), surnamed The Pillar of Faith, was Pope of Alexandria. ... John of Nikiû was a Coptic bishop of Nikiû/Pashati in the Egyptian Delta and appointed general adminstrator of the monsteries of Upper Egypt in 696. ...


Theophilus turned on the followers of Origen after having supported them for a time. He was apparently also an opponent of the Nestorians. He was accompanied by his nephew Cyril to Constantinople in 403 and was present at the "Synod of the Oak" that deposed John Chrysostom. Origen (ca. ... The term Nestorianism is eponymous, even though the person who lent his name to it always denied the associated belief. ... Events Alaric the Visigoth leaves Italy after his first unsuccessful invasion. ... Saint John Chrysostom John Chrysostom (347 - 407) was a notable Christian bishop and preacher from the 4th and 5th centuries in Syria and Constantinople. ...


Surviving works

For other uses see: Jerome (disambiguation) Jerome (about 340 - September 30, 420), (full name Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus) is best known as the translator of the Bible from Greek and Hebrew into Latin. ... Anastasius I was pope from November 27, 399-401. ... Saint Innocent I, pope (402 - 417), was, according to his biographer in the Liber Pontificalis, the son of a man called Innocent of Albano; but according to his contemporary Jerome, his father was Pope Anastasius I, whom he was called by the unanimous voice of the clergy and laity to... Jacques Paul Migne (25 October 1800 - 25 October 1875) was a French priest who published inexpensive and widely-distributed editions of theological works, encyclopedias and the texts of the Church Fathers. ... The Coptic language is the last phase of the Egyptian languages, and is the direct descendant of the ancient Egyptian language written in the hieroglyphic, hieratic, and demotic scripts. ... The Geez language (or Giiz language) is an ancient language that developed in the Ethiopian Highlands of the Horn of Africa as the language of the peasantry. ...

External links

Preceded by:
Timothy I
Patriarch of Alexandria
385412
Succeeded by:
Cyril I

  Results from FactBites:
 
Theophilus of Alexandria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (287 words)
Theophilus of Alexandria, (died 412) was the Nicene patriarch of Alexandria, Egypt (385 - 412).
He was patriarch at a time of conflict between the newly dominant Christians and the pagan establishment in Alexandria, each supported by a segment of the Alexandrian populace.
Theophilus turned on the followers of Origen after having supported them for a time.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Theophilus (865 words)
With Theophilus at their head, the Christians retaliated by destroying the celebrated temple of Serapis, on the ruins of which the patriarch erected a church.
Theophilus was summoned to Constantinople to answer their charges, and thus begins his connection with the tragedy of Chrysostom, which soon took the first place in his and the public interest (see ST.
The Canons ascribed to Theophilus are in Pitra, "Juris eccles.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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