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Encyclopedia > Theodoric the Great

Theodoric the Great (454 - August 30, 526), known to the Romans as Flavius Theodoricus, was king of the Ostrogoths (488-526), ruler of Italy (493-526), and regent of the Visigoths (511-526). He became a hero of Germanic legend as Dietrich von Bern in German legends and as Þjóðrekr and Þiðrekr in Norse mythology. Events September 21 - Roman Emperor Valentinian III assassinates Aëtius in his own throne room. ... August 30 is the 242nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (243rd in leap years), with 123 days remaining. ... Events May 20 - Syria and Antioch. ... Map of Ostrogothic Kingdom The Ostrogoths (Greuthung, Gleaming Goths or Eastern Goths), along with the Visigoths (Noble Goths or Western Goths) were branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe that played a major role in the political events of the late Roman Empire. ... Events Theodoric the Great becomes king of the Ostrogoths. ... Events February 25 - Odoacer agrees to a mediated peace with Theodoric the Great, and is later killed by him personally. ... Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ... Migrations The Visigoths were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology comprises the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ...

Contents

Biography

The man who ruled under the name of Theodoric was born in 454 on the banks of the Neusiedler See near Carnuntum, a year after the Ostrogoths had thrown off nearly a century of domination by the Huns. The son of the King Theodemir, Theodoric went to Constantinople as a young boy, as a hostage to secure the Ostrogoths' compliance with a treaty Theodemir had concluded with the Byzantine Emperor Leo. A storks nest typical for the region The Neusiedler See (Hungarian: Fertő) is the only steppe lake in Central Europe and is located at the border between Austria and Hungary. ... // Heidentor (pagan gate). ... The Huns were a confederation of Central Asian equestrian nomads or semi-nomads. ... Theodemir was a king of the Ostrogoths. ... Map of Constantinople. ... Police often train to recover hostages taken by force, as in this exercise For the 2005 film, see Hostage (film). ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... Leo I coin. ...


He lived at the court of Constantinople for many years and learned a great deal about Roman government and military tactics, which served him well when he became the Goth ruler of a mixed but largely Romanized people. Treated with favor by the Emperors Leo I and Zeno, he became magister militum (or Master of Soldiers) in 483, and one year later he became consul. He afterwards returned to live among the Ostrogoths when he was 20 years old, and became their king in 488. Leo I coin. ... Flavius Zeno (c. ... Magister militum (Latin for Master of the Soldiers) was a top-level command used in the later Roman Empire, dating from the reign of Constantine. ... Consul (abbrev. ...


At the time, the Ostrogoths were settled in Byzantine territory as foederati (allies) of the Romans, but were becoming restless and increasingly difficult for Zeno to manage. Not long after Theodoric became king, the two men worked out an arrangement beneficial to both sides. The Ostrogoths needed a place to live, and Zeno was having serious problems with Odoacer, the King of Italy who had overthrown the western Roman Empire in 476. Ostensibly a viceroy for Zeno, Odoacer was menacing Byzantine territory and not respecting the rights of Roman citizens in Italy. At Zeno's encouragement, Theodoric invaded Odoacer's kingdom. Foederatus early in the history of the Roman Republic identified one of the tribes bound by treaty (foedus), who were neither Roman colonies nor had they been granted Roman citizenship (civitas) but were expected to provide a contingent of fighting men when trouble arose. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. ...


Theodoric came with his army to Italy in 488, where he won the Battle of Isonzo (489) and at the Battle of Verona (489) and at the Adda in 490. In 493 he took Ravenna. Odoacer surrendered and was killed by Theodoric himself. The Battle of Isonzo is the name given to the battle fought on the August 28 on the banks of the Isontius River, not far away from Aquileia. ... Adda can refer to: Adda River in Italy. ... Ravenna is a city and commune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ...


Like Odoacer, Theodoric was ostensibly only a viceroy for the emperor in Constantinople. In reality, he was able to avoid imperial supervision, and dealings between the emperor and Theodoric were as equals. However, unlike Odoacer, Theodoric respected the agreement he had made and allowed Roman citizens within his kingdom to be subject to Roman law and the Roman judicial system. The Goths, meanwhile, lived under their own laws and customs. A viceroy is a royal official who governs a country or province in the name of and as representative of the monarch. ...


Theodoric the Great was allied with the Franks by his marriage to Audofleda, sister of Clovis I, and with the Visigoths, Vandals and Burgundian kings. Clovis I's ambitions to also rule over the Goths brought on intermittent warfare between 506 and 523. For much of his reign, Theodoric was the de facto king of the Visigoths as well, becoming regent for the infant Visigothic king, his grand-son Amalric, around 505. The Franks under Clovis were able to wrest control of Aquitaine from the Visigoths in 507, defeating Alaric II, but otherwise, Theodoric was able to defeat their incursions. In 515, Theodoric married his daughter Amalasuntha to Eutharic, but Eutharic died shortly after this, so no lasting dynastic connection of Ostrogoths and Visigoths was established. For other uses, see Franks (disambiguation). ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... Migrations The Visigoths were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... Amalaric or Amalarico in Spanish (died 531), king of the Visigoths, son of Alaric II, was a child when his father fell in battle against Clovis I, king of the Franks, in (507). ... Location Administration Capital Bordeaux Regional President Alain Rousset (PS) (since 1998) Départements Dordogne Gironde Landes Lot-et-Garonne Pyrénées-Atlantiques Arrondissements 18 Cantons 235 Communes 2,296 Statistics Land area1 41,309 km² Population (Ranked 6th)  - January 1, 2005 est. ... Events Battle of Vouillé: Clovis I defeats the Visigoths near Poitiers, ends Visigothic power in Gaul. ... Alaric II, also known as Alarik, Alarich, and Alarico in Spanish or Alaricus in Latin (d. ...


Theodoric also stopped the Vandals from raiding his territories by threatening the weak Vandal king Thrasamund with invasion. In 519, when a mob had burned down the synagogues of Ravenna, Theodoric ordered the town to rebuild them at its own expense. The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century. ... Thrasamund (450-523), King of the Vandals and Alans (496-523) was the fourth king of the north African Kingdom of the Vandals, and reigned longer than any other Vandal king in Africa other than his grandfather, Geiseric. ... Telephone Area Code for much of Southwestern Ontario, Canada including cities of Windsor and Kitchener Cerdic becomes king of Wessex The synagogues of Ravenna are burnt down in a riot; Theodoric the Great orders them to be rebuilt at Ravennas expense. ... A synagogue (from Ancient Greek: , transliterated synagogē, assembly; Hebrew: ‎ beit knesset, house of assembly; Yiddish: , shul; Ladino: , esnoga) is a Jewish place of religious worship. ...


Assessment

Brick with the emblem of Theodoric, found in the temple of Vesta, Rome.
Brick with the emblem of Theodoric, found in the temple of Vesta, Rome.

Theodoric the Goth was neither Frank nor Hun.[citation needed] He had great respect for the Roman culture he saw himself as representing.[citation needed] He had an eye for outstanding talent.[citation needed] In about 520 the philosopher Boethius became his magister officiorum, (head of all the government and court services). Boethius was a man of science, a dedicated Hellenist bent on translating all the works of Aristotle into Latin and harmonizing them with the works of Plato, not an easy task. Eventually Boethius fell out of favor with Theodoric, perhaps out of a suspicion that he was in sympathy with Justinian, emperor of the East, for Arian Theodoric was always somewhat of an outsider among these Nicaean Christians. Theodoric ordered Boethius executed in 525. In the meantime Cassiodorus had succeeded Boethius as magister in 523. The pliant historian and courtier could be counted on to provide refined touches to official correspondence. "To the monarch you [Cassiodorus] were a friendly judge and an honored intimate. For when he got free of his official cares he looked to your conversation for the precepts of the sages, that he might make himself a worthy equal to the great men of old. Ever curious, he wanted to hear about the courses of the stars, the tides of the sea, and legendary fountains, that his earnest study of natural science might make him seem to be a veritable philosopher in the purple" (Cassiodorus' letterbook, Variae 9.24.8). The gulf was widening between the ancient senatorial aristocracy whose center was Rome and the adherents of Gothic rule at Ravenna: other distinguished public figures followed Boethius to the block. Theodoric in his final years was no longer the disengaged Arian patron of religious toleration that he had seemed earlier in his reign. "Indeed, his death cut short what could well have developed into a major persecution of Catholic churches in retaliation for measures taken by Justin in Constantinople against Arians there" O'Donnell 1979, ch. 1. Image File history File links Theodoric_brick. ... Image File history File links Theodoric_brick. ... Brick with the emblem of Theodoric the Great, found in the temple of Vesta. ... Boethius teaching his students (initial from a 1385 Italian manuscript of the Consolation of Philosophy) Boethius redirects here. ... Flavius Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus Senator (ca 484/490 - ca585), commonly known as Cassiodorus, was a Roman statesman and great writer, serving in the administration of Theodoric the Great, king of the Ostrogoths. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5...

The Mausoleum of Theodoric in Ravenna.
The Mausoleum of Theodoric in Ravenna.

Theodoric was of Arian faith. At the end of his reign quarrels arose with his Roman subjects and the Byzantine emperor Justin I over the Arianism issue. Relations between the two nations deteriorated, although Theodoric's ability dissuaded the Byzantines from waging war against him. After his death, that reluctance faded quickly. Theodoric the Great was interred in Ravenna. His mausoleum is one of the finest monuments in Ravenna. Theodoric Was king of all kings. Image File history File linksMetadata RavennaMausoleum. ... Image File history File linksMetadata RavennaMausoleum. ... This article is about theological views like those of Arius. ... Flavius Iustinus Augustus. ... This article is about theological views like those of Arius. ... Entrance to the Mausoleo di Teodorico. ... Ravenna is a city and commune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ...


Family

Theodoric was born in 454 as the child of king Theodemir, and Erelieva. He was married twice. It is not known who his first wife was, but he had two children with her: Arevagni and Theodegotho. His second wife was Audofleda with whom he had Amalasuntha. Events September 21 - Roman Emperor Valentinian III assassinates Aëtius in his own throne room. ... Theodemir was a king of the Ostrogoths. ... Amalasuntha (also known as Amalasuentha or Amalaswintha) (d. ...


After his death in Ravenna in 526, Theodoric was succeeded by his grandson Athalaric. Athalaric was at first represented by his mother Amalasuntha, who was a regent queen from 526 until 534. The kingdom of the Ostrogoths, however, began to wane and was conquered by Justinian I starting in 535 and finally ending in 553 with the Battle of Mons Lactarius. Athalaric (516 - 2 October 534), king of the Ostrogoths in Italy, grandson of Theodoric the Great, became king on his grand-fathers death (526). ... Justinian depicted on one of the famous mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale. ... Combatants Byzantine Empire Ostrogoths Commanders Narses Teia The Battle of Mons Lactarius (also known as Battle of the Vesuvius) took place in 553 during the Gothic War waged on behalf of East Roman Emperor Justinian I against the Ostrogoths in Italy. ...


Fictional treatments

Theodoric's afterlife was described in the epic poetry of Dietrich von Bern in the German epic Nibelungenlied, which was based on Theodoric the Great. He is also mentioned on the Rök Stone, carved in Sweden in the 800s, and in the Old English Deor and Widsith poems. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The epic is a broadly defined genre of poetry, and one of the major forms of narrative literature. ... The Nibelungenlied, translated as The Song of the Nibelungs, is an epic poem in Middle High German. ... A black-and-white rendition of the text on one side of the Rök Stone. ... Centuries: 8th century - 9th century - 10th century Decades: 750s 760s 770s 780s 790s - 800s - 810s 820s 830s 840s 850s Years: 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 Significant Events and Trends Swedish town of Birka founded as a centre of trade on the island of Björk... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Deor (or The Lament of Deor) is an Old English poem from the 10th century, preserved in the Exeter Book. ... Widsith is an Old English poem of 144 lines. ...


Dietrich von Bern is the archetype of the wise and just ruler. The Encyclopaedia Britannica (1911) noted that "the legendary history of Dietrich differs so widely from the life of Theodoric that it has been suggested that the two were originally unconnected." Anachronisms abound, for example in making Ermanaric (died 376) and Attila (died 453) contemporary with Theodoric (born 454). Bern is the Middle High German form of Verona, which was one of the historical Theodoric's residences. For other senses of this word, see archetype (disambiguation). ... The green area is the traditional extent of Götaland and the dark pink area is the island of Gotland. ... For other uses, see Attila (disambiguation). ... Middle High German (MHG, German Mittelhochdeutsch) is the term used for the period in the history of the German language between 1050 and 1350. ... Verona is a city and provincial capital in Veneto, Northern Italy. ...


The "Berner" figures in a number of surviving works, and it must be assumed that these draw on long-standing oral tradition. With the exception of the Hildebrandslied and the Nibelungenlied, in neither of which is Dietrich a central character, all the surviving Dietrich epics were composed or written down after 1250. The first page of the Hildebrandslied manuscript. ... The Nibelungenlied, translated as The Song of the Nibelungs, is an epic poem in Middle High German. ...


The earliest evidence of the legend is provided by the heroic lay, the Hildebrandslied (Lay of Hildebrand), recorded in around 820. In this, Hadubrand recounts the story of his father Hildebrand's flight eastwards in the company of Dietrich, to escape the enmity of Odoacer (this character would later become his uncle Ermanaric). Hildebrand reveals that he has lived in exile for 30 years. Hildebrand has an arm ring given to him by the (unnamed) King of the Huns, and is taken to be an "old Hun" by Hadubrand. The obliqueness of the references to the Dietrich legend, which is just the background to Hildebrand's story, indicates an audience thoroughly familiar with the material. In this work Dietrich's enemy is the historically correct Odoacer (though in fact Theodoric the Great was never exiled by Odoacer), indicating that the figure of Ermaneric belongs to a later development of the legend. This article is about the type of character. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... The first page of the Hildebrandslied manuscript. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The green area is the traditional extent of Götaland and the dark pink area is the island of Gotland. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In the heroic epic the Nibelungenlied (c. 1200), Dietrich is living in exile at the court of Etzel (Attila), the Hunnish King. He fights on Etzel's side against the Burgundians, and his whole retinue apart from Hildebrand is slain. He ends the conflict by capturing Hagen and then Günther in single combat. The epic is a broadly defined genre of poetry, and one of the major forms of narrative literature. ... The Nibelungenlied, translated as The Song of the Nibelungs, is an epic poem in Middle High German. ... For the Högni of the Heimskringla and the legends of Helge Hundingsbane, see Högne. ... ΑÖÖÖÜđiÔ:For the character of the sitcom Friends see here. ...


The Norse saga deals with Dietrich's return home. The most familiar version is that by an Icelandic or Norwegian author writing in Norway in the 13th century, who compiled a consecutive account of Dietrich, with many additional episodes. This Norse prose version, known as the Þiðrekssaga (Thidrek's saga), incorporates much extraneous matter from the Nibelungen and Wayland legends. Þiðrekssaga (also Thidreksaga, Thidrekssaga, Niflungasaga or Vilkina saga) is a saga of the adventures of the hero Dietrich von Bern, believed to be based on the historical Theodoric the Great, and written down about 1250. ... Wayland is the name of a mythical character and of some places in the United States of America: Weyland, the smith. ...


The late Heinz Ritter-Schaumburg reinspected the Old Swedish version of the Thidreks saga for the historical information it contained, and established its topographical accuracy. Further, he concluded that these oldest of the "Dietrich" sources cannot refer to Theodoric the Great of the Goths, whose movements are moderately well known, mainly because of irreconcilable topographical anomalies. Ritter-Schaumburg asserted that their narration relates instead to a contemporary of the famous Goth, who bore the same name, rendered Didrik in Old Swedish. Moreover, he identified Berne as Bonn to which was ascribed, in the medieval age, an alternative (latinized) name Verona of unknown origin. Due to his questionable argument,[1] Dietrich lived as a Frankish petty king in Bonn.[2] Bonn is the 19th largest city in Germany, located about 20 kilometres south of Cologne on the river Rhine in the Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia. ... Statue of Charlemagne (also called Karl der Große, Charles the Great) in Frankfurt, Germany. ...


Another modern author, Rolf Badenhausen, starts from Ritter-Schaumburg's approach but ends up with a different result. He claims Berne, where Thidrek/Didrik started his rise, to be identical with Varne, south of Aachen, the Roman Verona cisalpina, in the district of the northern Rhine/Eiffel lands. Thidrek/Didrik could be identified with Theuderich son of Clovis I, a royal Frank mentioned with approval by Gregory of Tours and in Fredegar's royal Frankish chronicle. Oche redirects here; in darts the oche is the line from which players must throw. ... North Rhine-Westphalia (German: , usually shortened to NRW) is - in terms of population and economic output - the largest and westernmost Federal State of Germany. ... The Eifel is a hilly region in Germany. ... Theuderic I or Theodoric I (French Thierry I, d. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... Saint Gregory of Tours (c. ... The Chronicle of Fredegar (died ca 660) is the main source for Western European events of the 7th century, a formative period whose scarcity of sources in part justifies the characterization of its silence as that of the Dark Ages. In the 7th century many institutions of the Middle Ages...


In the Book of Bern (Buch von Bern) written in the late 13th century partly by Henry the Fowler, Dietrich tries to regain his empire with the help of the Huns. In the collection of the Heldenbuch ("Book of Heroes"), Dietrich's story is related in Dietrichs Flucht ("Dietrich's Flight"), the Rabenschlacht ("The Battle of Ravenna") and Alpharts Tod ("Alphart's Death") Heinrich I depicted as The Bamberg Knight Henry I, the Fowler (German: Heinrich der Finkler or Heinrich der Vogler) (876 - July 2, 936), was Duke of Saxony from 912 and king of the Germans from 919 until his death in 936. ... The Huns were a confederation of Central Asian equestrian nomads or semi-nomads. ... Title page of the 1590 edition of the Heldenbuch. ... Ravenna is a city and commune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ...


The legendary figure of Dietrich also appears in the 13th-century Rosengarten zu Worms ("Rosegarden at Worms"), the Epos of Biterolf, of Goldemar, of Ecke, Sigenot and Laurin. Duel of Volker the minstrel and Islan the monk (hie stritet volger vnd der münch ylsan), CGM 359, fol. ... // Worms (pronounced ) is a city in the southwest of Germany. ...


A fictionalized, but impressively researched, version of Theodoric's career is presented in Raptor, a novel by Gary Jennings. Raptor is a 1993 historical novel written by Gary Jennings. ... Gary Jennings (September 20, 1928 – February 13, 1999) was a U.S. author noted for several historical fiction novels: Aztec, a story of the Aztec empire just before and during the arrival of the Spanish; Aztec Autumn, a story of the Aztecs following the Spanish conquest; and The Journeyer, an...


The German historian Felix Dahn wrote a fictional treatment on the end of the Ostrogoth kingdom that was influential in spreading a 'völkische' view on the Early Middle Ages and glorified heroism in the face of certain defeat. Felix Ludwig Julius Dahn (February 9, 1834 - January 3, 1912) was a German lawyer, author and historian. ... Justinians wife Theodora and her retinue, in a 6th century mosaic from the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna. ...


Notes

  1. ^ See, for example, the critical review by Henry Kratz, in The German Quarterly 56.4 (November 1983), pp. 636-638.
  2. ^ Heinz Ritter-Schaumburg: Dietrich von Bern. König zu Bonn. Herbig: Munich / Berlin 1982

References

  • O'Donnell, James J. 1979, Cassiodorus. (University of California Press) [1]
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica 1911: "Dietrich of Bern"
  • Rolf Badenhausen, "Merovingians by the Svava?": discussion based on the Skokloster Svava, Stockholm catalogued as Skokloster-Codex-I/115&116 quarto, E 9013.

Further reading

  • John Moorhead, 1992. Theoderic in Italy (Oxford: Oxford University Press) ISBN 0-19-814781-3

External links

Preceded by
Theodemir
King of the Ostrogoths
488526
Succeeded by
Athalaric
Preceded by
Odoacer
King of Italy
493526
Preceded by
Anicius Acilius Aginatius Faustus,
Post consulatum Trocundis (East)
Consul of the Roman Empire
484
with Decius Marius Venantius Basilius
Succeeded by
Q. Aurelius Memmius Symmachus,
Post consulatum Theoderici (East)

Coordinates: 44°25′30″N, 12°12′33″E Project Gutenberg logo Project Gutenberg (often abbreviated as PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works via book scanning. ... The Catholic Encyclopedia, also referred to today as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by The Encyclopedia Press. ... Theodemir was a king of the Ostrogoths. ... Map of Ostrogothic Kingdom The Ostrogoths (Greuthung, Gleaming Goths or Eastern Goths), along with the Visigoths (Noble Goths or Western Goths) were branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe that played a major role in the political events of the late Roman Empire. ... Events Theodoric the Great becomes king of the Ostrogoths. ... Events May 20 - Syria and Antioch. ... Athalaric (516 - 2 October 534), king of the Ostrogoths in Italy, grandson of Theodoric the Great, became king on his grand-fathers death (526). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The following is a list of barbarian kings of Italy: Maximinus Thrax (235-238) Odoacer (476-493) Ostrogothic Kings of Italy Theoderic (493-526) Athalaric (526-534) Theodahad (534-536) Witiges (536-540) Heldebadus (540-541) Totila (541-552) Teias (552) Teias was killed by the Byzantine general Narses, and... Events February 25 - Odoacer agrees to a mediated peace with Theodoric the Great, and is later killed by him personally. ... Events May 20 - Syria and Antioch. ... The List of Roman Consuls from the Death of Commodus // 193 Q. Pompeius Sosius Falco, C. Iulius Erucius Clarus Vibianus; M. Silius Messalla, L. Fabius Cilo Septiminus Catinius Acilianus Lepidus Fulcinianus 194 Imp. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... Events December 28 - Alaric II succeeds Euric as king of the Visigoths. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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Theodoric the Great (1001 words)
Theodoric's mastery of Italy being thus established, he at once showed his appreciation of the ancient culture and political organization of the Empire, claiming to be its vicegerent and restorer in Western Europe.
Among his many schemes was a great project to combine in one harmonious system, around the shores of the Mediterranean, all the conflicting barbarian nations, and for this reason he repeatedly aided the Frankish king Clovis against the Alamanni and Visigoths.
All Theodoric's decrees, including this code, were in their language very conciliatory towards the Romans: the Roman population was to consider Gothic supremacy the guarantee of its security and prosperity.
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