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Encyclopedia > Theodore Kaczynski
Police mug shot of Theodore Kaczynski
Born May 22, 1942 (1942-05-22) (age 65)
Flag of the United States Chicago, Illinois, USA
Conviction(s) Murder, transportation of explosives
Penalty life imprisonment
Status in prison
Occupation mathematician, professor
Parents Theodore Richard Kaczynski, Wanda Theresa Dombek

Theodore John Kaczynski (born May 22, 1942), also known as the Unabomber, is an American convicted murderer and radical environmentalist who carried out a campaign of mail bombings that killed three and wounded 23. He sent bombs to several universities and airlines from the late 1970s through early 1990s.[1] Unabomber may be: People: Theodore Kaczynski (born 1942), American convicted mail-bomb murderer Phil Laak (born 1972), Irish poker player Italian Unabomber (fl. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Al Capone. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country United States State Illinois Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... Life imprisonment is a sentence of imprisonment for a serious crime, nominally for the entire remaining life of the prisoner, but in fact for a period which varies between jurisdictions: many countries have a maximum possible period of time (usually 50 years) a prisoner may be incarcerated, or require the... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Some environmentalists take the position that traditional methods of social change like political lobbying, public awareness campaigns, and the like are insufficient for achieving necessary changes in the relationship between humans and the environment. ... A mailbomb (or mail bomb), also called parcel bomb or letter bomb, is an explosive device sent via the postal service, and designed to explode when opened, injuring or killing the recipient, usually someone the sender has a personal grudge against, or more indiscriminately as part of a terrorist campaign. ...


In his Industrial Society and Its Future (commonly called the "Unabomber Manifesto") he argued that his actions were a necessary (although extreme) tactic by which to attract attention to what he believed were the dangers of modern technology. The Unabomber was the target of the most expensive investigations in the FBI's history.[2] When plotted on a logarithmic graph, 15 separate lists of paradigm shifts for key events in human history show an exponential trend. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ), serving as both a federal criminal investigative body and a domestic intelligence agency. ...


For his actions, Kaczynski was charged with numerous federal offenses stemming from his mail bombing campaign. In his April 24, 1995 letter to the New York Times, he promised "to desist from terrorism." To avoid the death penalty, Kaczynski entered into a plea agreement, under which he pled guilty and was sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole. is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


Kaczynski's moniker as the Unabomber developed as a result of an FBI codename. Before his real identity was known, the FBI used the handle "UNABOM" ("university and airline bomber"), which resulted in variants such as Unabomer, Unibomber, and Unabomber when the media started using the name. A moniker (or monicker) is a pseudonym, or cognomen, which one gives to oneself. ... A code name or cryptonym is a word or name used clandestinely to refer to another name or word. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life and mathematical career

Kaczynski was born in Chicago to second-generation Polish Americans, Theodore Richard Kaczynski and Wanda Theresa Dombek. Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country United States State Illinois Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Polish-American refers to American citizens of Polish descent. ...


Kaczynski attended kindergarten and grades one through four at Sherman Elementary School in Chicago. He attended fifth through eighth grade at Evergreen Park Central school. As the result of testing conducted in the fifth grade, it was determined that he could skip the sixth grade and enroll with the seventh grade class. According to various accounts, testing showed him to have a high IQ, and by his account, his parents were told he was a genius. He says that his IQ was in the 160-to-170 range. Testing conducted at that time has not been made available for review. Kaczynski described skipping this grade as a pivotal event in his life. He remembers not fitting in with the older children and being subjected to verbal abuse and teasing from them. His mother, Wanda Kaczynski, was so worried by his poor social development that she considered entering him in a study led by Bruno Bettelheim regarding autistic children; he had a fear of people and buildings, and he played beside other children rather than interacting with them. He did however manage to form a bond with one child: a mentally handicapped boy.[3] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bruno Bettelheim (August 28, 1903 - March 13, 1990) was an Austrian-born American writer and child psychologist. ... Asperger described his patients as little professors. Aspergers syndrome (AS), is a pervasive developmental disorder commonly referred to as a form of high-functioning autism. ...


He attended high school at Evergreen Park Community High School. He did well academically, but reported some difficulty with mathematics in his sophomore year. He was subsequently placed in a more advanced math class and mastered the material, and then skipped the 11th grade. As a result, he completed his high-school education two years early, although this did necessitate a summer school course in English. He was encouraged to apply to Harvard, and was subsequently accepted as a student beginning in the fall of 1958. He was 16 years old. While at Harvard, Kaczynski was taught by the famous logician Willard Quine and participated in a several-year personality study conducted by Dr. Henry A. Murray, an expert on stress interviews.[4] Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... W. V. Quine Willard Van Orman Quine (June 25, 1908 - December 25, 2000) was one of the most influential American philosophers and logicians of the 20th century. ... Henry A. Murray (b. ...


According to an article by Alston Chase for the June 2000 Atlantic Monthly, students in Murray's study were told they would be debating personal philosophy with a fellow student.[5] Instead, they were subjected to the stress test: an extremely stressful and prolonged psychological attack by an anonymous attorney. During the test, students were strapped into a chair and connected to electrodes that monitored their physiological reactions, while facing bright lights and a one-way mirror. The "debate" was filmed, and students' expressions of impotent rage were played back to them at various times later in the study. According to Chase, Kaczynski's records from that period suggest that he was emotionally stable at the start of the study. Lawyers for Kaczynski attributed some of his emotional instability and dislike of mind control to his participation in this study.


In 1962, Kaczynski graduated from Harvard. After graduation he attended the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, earning a master's degree and a Ph.D. in mathematics. Kaczynski began a research career at Michigan but made few friends. One of his professors at Michigan, George Piranian, said: "It is not enough to say he was smart." He earned his Ph.D. by solving, in less than a year, a math problem that Piranian had been unable to solve. Kaczynski's specialty was a branch of complex analysis known as geometric function theory. "I would guess that maybe 10 or 12 people in the country understood or appreciated it", said Maxwell O. Reade, a retired math professor who served on Kaczynski's dissertation committee. In 1967 Kaczynski received a $100 prize recognizing his dissertation entitled 'Boundary Functions' as the school's best in math that year. At Michigan he held a National Science Foundation fellowship. There he taught undergraduates for three years and published two articles related to his dissertation in mathematical journals. After he left Michigan, he published four more papers. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... For the railroad company, see Ann Arbor Railroad. ... Complex analysis is the branch of mathematics investigating functions of complex numbers, and is of enormous practical use in many branches of mathematics, including applied mathematics. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... A thesis committee (or, at some universities, specifically for the doctorate, a dissertation committee) is a committee that evaluates a students thesis. ... This article is about the thesis in dialectics and academia. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... A fellow in its broadest sense is someone who is an equal or a comrade. ...


In the fall of 1967 Kaczynski was hired as an assistant professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley. Kaczynski's aloofness and reserve made students rate him poorly. Despite pleas from the department staff Kaczynski resigned without explanation in 1969. Calvin Moore, vice chairman of the department in 1968, said that given Kaczynski's 'impressive' thesis and record of publications, "he could have advanced up the ranks and been a senior member of the faculty today". Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ...


After resigning his position at Berkeley he held no permanent employment. In the summer of 1969, Kaczynski moved his place of domicile from Berkeley, California, to the small residence of his parents in Lombard, Illinois. He lived a simple life in a remote shack on very little money, occasionally worked odd jobs and received some financial support from his family. In 1978, he worked briefly with his father and brother at a foam-rubber factory. Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in northern California, in the United States. ... Incorporated Village in 1869. ...


Bombings

The forensic sketch by Jeanne Boylan
The forensic sketch by Jeanne Boylan

The first mail bomb was sent in late May 1978 to Professor Buckley Crist at Northwestern University. The package was found in a parking lot at the University of Illinois at Chicago, with Crist's return address. The package was 'returned' to Crist. However, when Crist received the package he noticed that it had not been addressed in his own handwriting. Suspicious of a package he had not sent he contacted campus policeman Terry Marker. Marker opened the package and it exploded. The injury was slight, mostly because the bomb was poorly constructed. Marker's left hand was sufficiently damaged to send him to Evanston Hospital. The bomb was made of bits and pieces of metal that could have come from a home workshop. It was based on a piece of metal pipe about an inch in diameter and nine inches long. The bomb contained smokeless explosive powders and the box and the plugs that sealed the pipe ends were hand crafted of wood. In comparison; most pipe bombs usually use threaded metal ends that can be bought in any large hardware store. Wooden ends do not have the strength to allow a large pressure to build within the pipe. This is partly why the bomb did not have the effect Kaczynski intended. The primitive trigger device the bomb employed was a nail tensioned by rubber bands designed to slam into six common match heads when the box was opened. The match heads would immediately burst into flame and ignite the explosive powders (when the trigger hit the match heads, only three ignited). A more efficient technique, later employed by Kaczynski, would be to use batteries and heat-filament wire to ignite the explosives faster and more effectively. The sketch of the Unabomber from [1]. According to Encarta, the drawing was released by the FBI in 1987. ... The sketch of the Unabomber from [1]. According to Encarta, the drawing was released by the FBI in 1987. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Northwestern University (officially abbreviated NU; sometimes abbreviated NWU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ... This article is about the University of Illinois at Chicago. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


The initial 1978 bombing was followed by bombs to airline officials, and in 1979 a bomb was placed in the cargo hold of American Airlines Flight 444, a Boeing 727 flying from Chicago to Washington, D.C. The bomb began smoking and the pilot was forced to make an emergency landing. Many of the passengers were treated for smoke inhalation. Only a faulty timing mechanism prevented the bomb from exploding. Authorities said it had enough firepower to "obliterate the plane." As bombing an airliner is a federal crime in the United States, the FBI became involved after this incident and came up with the code name UNABOM (University and Airline Bomber). They also called the suspect the Junkyard Bomber because of the material used to make the bombs. In 1980, chief agent John Douglas working with fellow agents in the FBI's Behavioral Sciences Unit (BSU) issued a psychological profile of the unidentified bomber which described the offender as a man with above-average intelligence with some connections to academics. This profile was later refined to characterize the offender as a neo-luddite holding an academic degree in the hard sciences, but this psychologically based profile was superseded by 1993 in favor of an alternative theory developed by FBI analysts concentrating on the physical evidence in recovered bomb fragments. In this rival profile the bomber suspect was characterized as a blue-collar airplane mechanic.[6] American Airlines Flight 444 was a Boeing 727 flying from Chicago to Washington DC, which on November 15, 1979 was attacked by the Unabomber. ... The Boeing 727 is a mid-size, narrow-body, three-engine commercial jet airliner. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... An emergency landing is a non-planned landing made by an aircraft in response to a crisis. ... Smoke inhalation is the primary cause of death in victims of indoor fires. ... In the United States, a federal crime or federal offence is a crime that is either made illegal by U.S. federal legislation or a crime that occurs on U.S. federal property. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... John E. Douglas (born June 18, 1945) is a former FBI agent and one of the first profilers. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The term Luddite is a political/historical term relating to a political movement during the Industrial Revolution; currently it is primarily used as a pejorative, describing those perceived as being uncompromisingly or unnecessarily opposed to technological innovations. ...


The first serious injury occurred in 1985, when John Hauser, a Berkeley graduate student and Captain in the Air Force, lost four fingers and vision in one eye.[7] The bombs were all hand-crafted and were made with some wooden parts.[8] Inside the bombs certain parts carried the inscription "FC" — at one point reported to stand for "Fuck Computers" but later found to mean "Freedom Club." A California computer-store owner, Hugh Scrutton, 38, was killed by a nail and splinter loaded bomb lying in his parking lot in 1985. A similar attack against a computer store occurred in Salt Lake City, Utah on February 20, 1987. The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ... Salt Lake City is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ...


After a six-year break, Kaczynski struck again in 1993 mailing a bomb to David Gelernter, a computer-science professor at Yale University. Another bomb in the same year was aimed at the geneticist Charles Epstein. Kaczynski wrote a letter to The New York Times claiming that his "group", called FC, was responsible for the attacks. In 1994 advertising executive Thomas J. Mosser was killed by a mail bomb sent to his North Caldwell, New Jersey home. In a letter Kaczynski attempted to justify the killing by pointing out that the public-relations field is in the business of developing techniques for manipulating people's attitudes. This was followed by the 1995 murder of California Forestry Association president Gilbert Murray in Sacramento, California. David Hillel Gelernter is a professor of computer science at Yale University. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Map of North Caldwell in Essex County North Caldwell is a borough in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... Location of Sacramento in Sacramento County, California County Sacramento Government  - Mayor Heather Fargo Area  - City  99. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


In all, 16 bombs - that injured 23 people and killed three - were attributed to Kaczynski. While the devices varied widely through the years, all but the first few contained the initials "FC". Latent fingerprints on some[citation needed] of the devices did not match the fingerprints found on letters attributed to Kaczynski. As stated in the FBI affidavit:

"203. Latent fingerprints attributable to devices mailed and/or placed by the UNABOM subject were compared to those found on the letters attributed to Theodore Kaczynski. According to the FBI Laboratory no forensic correlation exists between those samples."[9]

One of Kaczynski’s tactics was leaving false clues in every single bomb. He would make them hard to find so as to purposely mislead investigators into thinking they had a clue. First and foremost of the clues was a metal plate stamped with the initials “FC” hidden somewhere (usually in the pipe end cap) in every bomb.[10] Another clue was in a letter to the CIA 'accidentally' revealing that he lived in the Sierra Mountains. In actuality he lived near a mountain range in Montana. The police spent days scouring much of the Sierras. The next false trail he left was a note in a bomb that failed to go off saying, "Wu – It works! I told you it would – RV". A more obvious clue was the Eugene O’Neill $1 stamps used to send his boxes. One of his bombs was sent embedded in a copy of Sloan Wilson’s novel Ice Brothers. Eugene ONeill Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel and Pulitzer Prize winning American playwright. ... Sloan Wilson (8 May 1920 - 25 May 2003) was an American author. ...


Manifesto

In 1995, Kaczynski mailed several letters, some to his former victims, outlining his goals and demanding that his 35,000-word paper Industrial Society and Its Future (commonly called the "Unabomber Manifesto") be printed verbatim by a major newspaper; he stated that he would then end his bombing campaign. There was a great deal of controversy as to whether it should be done. A further letter threatening to kill more people was sent, and the US Justice Department recommended publication out of concern for public safety. The pamphlet was then published by the New York Times and the Washington Post on September 19, 1995, with the hope that someone would recognize the writing style. Bob Guccione of Penthouse volunteered to publish it as well, but he was turned down.[11] The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ... ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Bob Guccione and friend Robert Charles Joseph Edward Sabatini Guccione (b. ... Penthouse, a mens magazine founded by Bob Guccione, combines urban lifestyle articles and soft-core pornographic pictorials that, in the 1990s, evolved into hardcore. ...


Industrial Society and Its Future begins with Kaczynski's assertion that the "Industrial Revolution and its consequences have been a disaster for the human race."[12] In his opening and closing chapters, Kaczynski condemns leftism and leftists as anti-individualistic and pro-collectivist, because they cause people to spend energy trying to change things that are not important in the long term -- as opposed to radicals who attack problems at the root.[13] The "leftism" described in the document works in opposition to achieving what the document envisions as "anarchy" (individuals and small-groups having the ability to make decisions without being intimidated).[14]


Throughout the text, Kaczynski capitalizes entire words in order to show emphasis. He always refers to himself as either "we" or "FC" (Freedom Club), though he appears to have acted alone.


The Manifesto states that the only alternative to technological subjugation is the rejection of technology and return to a life close to nature in which the "power process," a psychological need he describes as the ability to solve one's own problems and have power over one's life, is fulfilled. In technological-industrial society, Kaczynski suggests, humanity has far greater power, but humans have far less power, in that as the number of cooperating humans in any given society increases, individuals inexorably constitute smaller and smaller fractions of the decision-making population. The overwhelming need for the power process causes modern society to be filled with endlessly multiplying "surrogate activities" which are essentially meaningless, including almost everything modern humans do for business or pleasure: artistic endeavor, professional advancement, the accrual of wealth, "an excessive amount of sex", all of this activity is "artificial" because is not connected to the actual process of living (getting food, water, and other necessities for yourself rather than having a factory produce them for you)[15]


These processes of technological advancement and industrialization, says Kaczynski, have been refining themselves for centuries, and may eventually culminate in the domination of the great majority of people either by "the machines" themselves or by a tiny elite using the advanced technology of the future. He posits that society will likely genetically engineer and drug people to accept more and more "empty" surrogate activities, creating a world in which "human beings may be happy... but they most certainly will not be free."[16] In this world, "[people] will have been reduced to the status of domestic animals."


Having predicted the breakdown of society due to its incompatibility with individual happiness, Kaczynski alludes to his desire to "harness the energies of the True Believer to a revolution," and concludes by observing that "the most dangerous leftists of all... avoid irritating displays of aggressiveness and refrain from advertising their leftism, but work quietly and unobtrusively to promote collectivist values..."[17]


As a critique of technological society, the Manifesto echoed contemporary critics of technology and industrialization, such as John Zerzan, Fredy Perlman, Jacques Ellul, Lewis Mumford and Derrick Jensen. Bill Joy, cofounder of Sun Microsystems, quoted Ray Kurzweil quoting Kaczynski in a Wired magazine article on the dangers of technology, agreeing that the Manifesto was a "dystopian vision" that warranted a response, even though his friend David Gelernter had been seriously injured by Kaczynski.[18] John Zerzan (born 1943) is an American anarchist and primitivist philosopher and author. ... Fredy Perlman (August 20, 1934 -- July 26, 1985) was an author, publisher and activist. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Lewis Mumford (October 19, 1895 – January 26, 1990) was an American historian of technology and science. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Bill Joy William Nelson Joy (born Nov 8, 1954), commonly known as Bill Joy, is an American computer scientist. ... Sun Microsystems, Inc. ... Dr. Raymond Kurzweil (born February 12, 1948) is a pioneer in the fields of optical character recognition (OCR), text-to-speech synthesis, speech recognition technology, and electronic musical keyboards. ... Wired is a full-color monthly magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ...


In early 1996, former FBI hostage negotiator and profiler Clinton R. Van Zandt was contacted by Washington, D.C. attorney Tony Bisceglie, working for Theodore Kaczynski's brother, David Kaczynski, who asked that he make a comparison of the Manifesto to type-written copies of hand-written letters that a client had allegedly received from his brother. Van Zandt's analysis determined that there was a conclusive match between vocabulary and style in the unauthenticated letters and the manifesto, which had been in public circulation for just under half a year. Based on this conclusion, David Kaczynski pointed the FBI to the Lincoln, Montana cabin of his older brother, Theodore.


Paragraphs 204 and 205 of the FBI search and arrest warrant for Kaczynski state that many FBI experts believed the Manifesto had been written by "another individual, not Theodore Kaczynski."[19] As stated in the affidavit, the FBI was seriously conflicted over whether Kaczynski was the unabomber or the author of the manifesto:

"204. Your affiant is aware that other individuals have conducted analyses of the UNABOM Manuscript __ determined that the Manuscript was written by another individual, not Kaczynski, who had also been a suspect in the investigation.
"205. Numerous other opinions from experts have been provided as to the identity of the unabomb subject. None of those opinions named Theodore Kaczynski as a possible author."[20]

Arrest and court proceedings

Kaczynski while being booked by the police
Kaczynski while being booked by the police

Agents arrested Kaczynski on April 3, 1996, at his remote cabin outside Lincoln, Montana. David had once admired and emulated his elder brother, but had later decided to leave the survivalist lifestyle behind.[citation needed] David had received assurances from the FBI that he would remain anonymous and that in particular his brother would not learn who had turned him in, but his identity was later leaked, prompting an unsuccessful internal leak investigation by the FBI.[citation needed] David donated the reward money, less his expenses, to families of his brother's alleged victims.[citation needed] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Lincoln is a census-designated place located in Lewis and Clark County, Montana. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked... A survivalist is a person who anticipates a potential disruption in the continuity of local, regional or worldwide society, and takes steps to survive in the resulting unpredictable situation. ...


In January 1995, a graduate student in English at Brigham Young University noticed that Joseph Conrad's 1907 novel The Secret Agent provided a rationale for the bombing of professors and scientists. After Kaczynski's arrest it was discovered that, like the character known simply as "The Professor" in the novel, Kaczynski had given up a non-professor teaching position at a university to pursue a lifestyle as a naturalist. Investigators further learned that Kaczynski grew up with a copy of the book somewhere in his home and had during interrogation admitted to have read it more than a dozen times. He also allegedly had used the pseudonyms "Conrad" or "Konrad" at times when he traveled to distribute his bomb-packages.[citation needed] Brigham Young University Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is the flagship university of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church). ... // Joseph Conrad (born Teodor Józef Konrad Nałęcz-Korzeniowski, 3 December 1857 – 3 August 1924) was a Polish-born novelist who spent most of his adult life in Britain. ... The Secret Agent is a 1907 novel by Joseph Conrad. ...


Kaczynski's lawyers, headed by Montana federal defender Anthony Gallagher, attempted to enter an insanity defense to save Kaczynski's life, which he rejected. A court-appointed psychiatrist diagnosed Kaczynski as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia,[21] and declared him competent to stand trial. Kaczynski's family said he would psychologically "shut down" when pressured[citation needed]. On January 7, 1998, Kaczynski attempted to hang himself. Initially the government prosecution team (headed by Robert Cleary of Proskauer Rose LLP, Stephen Freccero of Morrison and Forester LLP and assistant U.S. Attorney Steve Lapham) indicated that it would seek the death penalty for Kaczynski. David Kaczynski's attorney asked the former FBI agent who made the match between the Unabomber's Manifesto and Kaczynski to ask for leniency. Eventually, Kaczynski was able to avoid the death penalty by pleading guilty to all the government's charges on January 22, 1998. Later Kaczynski attempted to withdraw his guilty plea, arguing it was involuntary. Judge Garland Burrell denied his request. The U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld that decision. To date, none of the evidence compiled against Kaczynski has been cross-examined in any American court of justice. In a criminal trial, the insanity defenses are possible defenses by excuse, via which defendants may argue that they should not be held criminally liable for breaking the law, as they were mentally ill at the time of their allegedly criminal actions. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Alaska District of Arizona Central District of California Eastern District of California Northern District of California Southern District of California District of Hawaii...


The early hunt for the Unabomber in America portrayed a perpetrator far different from the eventual suspect. The Unabomber Manifesto consistently uses "we" and "our" throughout, and at one point in 1993 investigators sought an individual whose first name was "Nathan."[22] However, when the case was finally presented to the public, authorities denied that there was ever anyone other than Kaczynski involved in the crimes. No explanation was ever presented as to why Kaczynski targeted the airplane and the specific victims he selected, and why he chose to place other devices where they would randomly kill and maim.[23] Bombs sent via the U.S. Postal Service continue to this day, some exploding and many others being defused, but none are attributed to Kaczynski since it is the government's position that he acted alone.


On August 10, 2006, Judge Garland Burrell Jr. ordered that personal items seized in 1996 from Kaczynski's Montana cabin should be sold at a "reasonably advertised Internet auction."[24] Items the government considers to be bomb-making materials, such as writings that contain diagrams and "recipes" for bombs, are excluded from the sale. The auctioneer will pay the cost and will keep up to 10% of the sale price, and the rest of the proceeds must be applied to the $15 million in restitution that Burrell ordered Kaczynski to pay his victims. is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Included among Kaczynski's holdings to be auctioned were his original writings, journals, correspondences, and other documents allegedly found in Kaczynski's cabin. The judge ordered that all references in those documents which allude to any of his victims must be removed before they are sold. Kaczynski has challenged those ordered redactions in court on first amendment grounds, arguing that any alteration of his writings is an unconstitutional violation of his freedom of speech.[25] The Bill of Rights in the National Archives The First Amendment to the United States Constitution is a part of the United States Bill of Rights. ... Constitutionality is the status of a law, a procedure, or an acts accordance with the laws or guidelines set forth in the applicable constitution. ... Citizens of the United States often treat free speech as a fundamental right and often a matter of patriotism. ...


To date, no other members of Kaczynski's alleged Freedom Club have ever been publicly named.


Life in prison

Kaczynski is serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole in ADX Florence, the Federal ADX Supermax prison in Florence, Colorado. He is prisoner number 04475-046.[26] Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... It has been suggested that Medical parole be merged into this article or section. ... The ADX Florence facility from the outside The United States Penitentiary Administrative Maximum Facility (ADX) in Florence is a supermax prison in Florence, Colorado. ... Supermax is the name used to describe control-unit prisons, the most secure prisons in the prison system. ... Florence is a city in Fremont County, Colorado, USA. The population was 3,653 at the 2000 census. ...


The Labadie Collection, part of the University of Michigan's Special Collection Library, is housing Kaczynski's correspondence from over 400 people since his arrest in April 1996, some of his carbon-copied replies as well as some legal documents, publications, and clippings. The names of most correspondents will be kept sealed until 2049.[27] The Labadie Collection at the University of Michigan is recognized as one of the world’s most complete collections of materials documenting the history of anarchism and other radical movements from the 19th century to the present. ... The Hatcher Graduate Library from the North side The Shapiro Library (The UGLi) The University of Michigan University Library in Ann Arbor, is one of the largest university library systems in the United States. ...


He has been active as a writer in prison. A one-paragraph letter by Kaczynski on a book review by István Deák appeared in the New York Review of Books.[28] The New York Review of Books (or NYRB) is a biweekly magazine on literature, culture, and current affairs published in New York which takes as its point of departure that the discussion of important books is itself an indispensable literary activity. ...


In a letter dated October 7, 2005 Kaczynski offered to donate two rare books to the Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies at Northwestern University's Evanston Campus, which was the location of the first two attacks. The recipient, David Easterbrook, turned the letter over to the university's archives. Northwestern rejected the offer, noting that the library already owns the volumes in English and did not desire duplicates. is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Melville Jean Herskovits (September 10, 1895 - February 25, 1963) was a U.S. anthropologist born in Bellefontaine, Ohio who firmly established African and African American studies in American academia. ... Northwestern University (officially abbreviated NU; sometimes abbreviated NWU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ... Incorporated City in 1872. ...


Popular culture references

S.M. Stirling's second Emberverse trilogy casts the Unabomber as the leader of the Church Universal and Triumphant. In that timeline, he escaped custody during the "Change," and got as far as the Rockies. Stephen Michael Stirling is a Canadian-American science fiction and fantasy author. ... The Church Universal and Triumphant is a New Age new religious movement and organization founded by Mark L. Prophet and Elizabeth Clare Prophet. ...


Phil Laak, a professional poker player was given the nickname "The Unabomber" by fellow professional, Gus Hansen, due to the fact he often plays with his face concealed by a hooded top. Phil The Unabomber Laak (pronounced lock; born September 8, 1972 in Dublin, Ireland) is a professional poker player, now residing in San Francisco, California. ... A game of Texas hold em in progress. ... Gustav Hansen (born February 13, 1974 outside Copenhagen, Denmark) is a professional poker player who lives in Monaco. ...


In the episode of King of the Hill entitled "Full Metal Dust Jacket", Peggy is discussing the book "A Dinner of Onions" with a number of bikers and gun enthusiasts. At one point she says "The book also brings up issues of the government's invasion of people's private lives, as our friend here who won't give us his name has mentioned", she then points towards a man bearing a strong resemblance to Jeanne Boylan's forensic sketch. This article is about the television program. ... Imme R 100,Germany, 1948/1949 A 125 cc motorcycle, the Italian-manufactured Cagiva Planet. ...


Swedish rock band Mando Diao named Kaczynski in a song, "Killer Kaczynski", on their 2006 album Ode to Ochrasy. Mando Diao is a garage rock band from Borlänge, Sweden. ... Album by Mando Diao, released 2006. ...


Italian band Kirlian Camera released a song titled "Kaczynski Code" on their 2006 album Coroner's Sun with lyrics taken from paragraph 173 of the "Unabomber Manifesto". Kirlian Camera are an Italian band playing mostly electronic darkwave music. ...


In an episode of Upright Citizens Brigade, a girl-scout happens upon "The Real Unabomber" who looks identical to the Boylan sketch, down to the hooded sweatshirt. When the girl-scout mentions that Kaczynski was arrested in Montana for the Unabomber crimes, The Real Unabomber states that he would never live in a place like that as it had "no good discos". The Upright Citizens Brigade is an improvisational comedy and sketch comedy group that emerged from Chicagos ImprovOlympic in 1990. ...


Playwright Brian Polak wrote a monologue titled Bombs and Manifestos which was produced in Boston in January 2007 by Alarm Clock Theatre Company. Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area  - City  89. ... Alarm Clock Theatre Company is a theatre company based in Boston, MA. Their productions are semi-annual and performed at The Boston Center for the Arts Black Box Theater. ...


In the Criminal Minds episode called "Empty Planet", Spencer Reid mentions the Unabomber when describing the profile of a personal cause bomber. Criminal Minds is a crime drama that premiered on CBS on September 22, 2005. ...


In the Dark Angel (tv series) episode Prodigy, a terrorist group is said to take its name from his birthdate, 'The May 22nd movement takes its name from the birthday of terrorist Theodore Kaczynski known as the Unabomber'


Ted Sprague, a supporting character on the NBC drama Heroes, is very similar to Kaczynski (His name, look, and "explosive nature"). Sprague has the ability to emit radiation from his hands. However, Sprague is a good character. Theodore Ted Sprague, played by Matthew John Armstrong, was a fictional character on the television show Heroes, who had the power to manipulate radiation. ... Heroes is an American Emmy Award-nominated [1] science fiction drama television series, created by Tim Kring, which premiered on NBC on September 25, 2006. ...


In the movie Good Will Hunting, Will's therapist uses a reference to the Unabomber to make a point about Will's ability to choose what's best for him. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In The Simpsons, Groundskeeper Willie lives in a shack which he refers to as "Unabomber-style." Simpsons redirects here. ... Groundskeeper Willie (a. ...


In San Francisco songwriter Mark Eitzel's song "Windows on the World," a character accuses Eitzel of "look[ing] just like the Unabomber." Mark Eitzel in a promotional photo. ...


In the Jim Carrey movie Fun with Dick and Jane when Dick starts robbing stores for money because he gets laid off, Jane tells him he looks like the Unabomber. James Eugene Carrey (born January 17, 1962) is a two-time Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian-American A-list film actor and comedian. ... Fun with Dick and Jane is a 2005 comedy film, and remake of the 1977 film of the same name. ...


The band Sleepytime Gorilla Museum has a song entitled "FC: The Freedom Club" on the album Of Natural History which is about the Unabomber. According to the band's official website, the album itself is in part a "debate between two contradictory pillars of 20th C. Anti-Humanism: The Futurists versus the Unabomber". Sleepytime Gorilla Museum (often abbreviated to SGM) are an American avant-rock band, formed in 1999 in Oakland, California. ... Of Natural History is the second album by avant-rock group Sleepytime Gorilla Museum. ...


In VH1's I Love the 90's series, the sketch of the unabomber was shown to bear an uncanny resemblance to parody artist "Weird Al" Yankovic. VH1 (VH-1: Video Hits One until 1994) is an American cable television channel that was created in January 1985 by Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, at the time a division of Warner Communications and owners of MTV. VH1 and sister channel MTV are currently part of the MTV Networks division... This article is about the musician himself. ...


Will Ferrell portrayed Kaczynski in several sketches on Saturday Night Live. In at least one of these sketches, "the real Unabomber" is portrayed by Weird Al Yankovic, dressed in the same manner as the police-issued artist's depiction. Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 90 minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City that has been broadcast live by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ...


In the episode of Law and Order: Special Victims Unit titled "Weak," a police sketch of a rapist is said by two characters to resemble the police sketch of the Unabomber. Law & Order: Special Victims Unit - Season 5 DVD Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (also known as Law & Order: SVU) is the first of three spin-offs of Law & Order (the other two being Law & Order: Criminal Intent and Law & Order: Trial by Jury; all series are presented on the NBC...


Law & Order episode "Carrier" (1998) In Judge Barry Abram's Chambers, Jack McCoy says "Your Honor, if this Stark kid gets out, it's like giving Theodore Kaczynski a Bomb and a stamp."


A Norwegian aggrotech group Combichrist released a song that mentions Kaczynski. The song is called "God Bless" and is on the album Everybody Hates You. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Everybody Hates You is an album by the Norwegian Aggrotech band Combichrist. ...


Mention was made in the film You've Got Mail. Meg Ryan's character thought her boyfriend was the "Unabomber". Youve Got Mail is an American romantic comedy released in 1998 by Warner Brothers. ... Meg Ryan (born November 19, 1961) is a questionable American actress who specializes in romantic comedies, but has also worked in other film genres. ...


In the film America's Sweethearts an eccentric director (played by Christopher Walken) owns Kaczynski's shack and uses it to edit his films. Americas Sweethearts (2001) is a romantic comedy film, directed by Joe Roth, starring Julia Roberts, Billy Crystal, John Cusack and Catherine Zeta-Jones. ... Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ...


White Power Heavy Metal band Mudoven released a song on their album Truth and Tragedy: Life in the Occupied Zone celebrating the actions of Kaczynski. White Power is an ideology and a political slogan describing the views of white supremacists. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... In music, a band is a company of musicians, or musical ensemble, usually popular or folk, playing parts of or improvising a musical arrangement on different musical instruments. ...


There's a game called "Catch the Unabomber!" where the player must capture the Unabomber by clicking his face which hops around from state to state.


Unsolved Mysteries showed a segment that theorizes that the Zodiac Killer could have been Kaczynski. This article contains a trivia section. ... The Zodiac Killer was a serial killer who operated in Northern California for ten months in the late 1960s. ...


In the film Let's Go To Prison When Lyshitski (Played by Dax Shepard) is watching the Biederman (Played by Will Arnett) sentencing in court, he sits as a spectator from the audience and the way he is dressed is a reference to the Kaczynski common attire seen Here. Lets Go to Prison is a dark American comedy that was released in theatres November 17, 2006, starring Dax Shepard, Will Arnett and Chi McBride, and directed by Bob Odenkirk. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... William Will Emerson Arnett (born May 5, 1970) (pronounced ) is an Emmy Award-nominated Canadian-American actor known for his role as George Oscar G.O.B Bluth II (pronounced Job, like the biblical figure[1]) on the now-cancelled FOX comedy Arrested Development. ...


In his 2002 one man Broadway show, Robin Williams does an entire spiel about how Kaczynski is similar to Osama bin Laden, with one of his lines about him being "Ted's played 'A Beautiful Mind: The Home Game.'" Robin McLaurim Williams (born July 21, 1952)[1] is an Academy Award-winning American actor and comedian who has done television, stage, and film work. ... Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957[1]), most often mentioned as Osama bin Laden or Usama bin Laden, is a Saudi Arabian militant Islamist and is widely believed to be one of the founders of the organization called al-Qaeda. ... A Beautiful Mind is a book and Academy Award-winning film (starring Russell Crowe, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Christopher Plummer, and Paul Bettany) about the Nobel Prize (Economics) winning mathematician John Nash and his experiences of schizophrenia. ...


He is mentioned as a well-off child who defied the odds going for him and took a turn for the worst in the book Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner. The cover of this version of Freakonomics has a picture of what looks like an apple on the outside but is really an orange. ...


Ted Kaczynski and the Mad Bombers was the name of a band now known as At All Costs. [1]


In an episode of Adult Swim's Harvey Birdman: Attorney At Law, Harvey must defend Boo-Boo bear (Yogi the bear) who is convicted of the same crimes as Kaczynski. Bobo, called the unibear, also wrote the Unibear Manifesto, a parody of Kaczynski own manifesto. Adult Swim, sometimes rendered [adult swim] based on its logo, is the name for an adult-oriented television programming network. ... Yogi Bear Yogi Bear is a fictional anthropomorphic bear who appears in animated cartoons created by Hanna-Barbera Productions. ...


An American Death Metal band Macabre released an EP in 1999 called Unabomber, which contains songs about several serial killers, including Kaczynski. Death metal is a subgenre of heavy metal. ... Macabre are a death metal band from the USA. They were formed in 1985 in Chicago, Illinois, and ever since have never had a line-up change. ... Unabomber is an EP by the American heavy metal band Macabre released in 1999. ...


A Penny Arcade webcomic featured Tycho trying to buy an early copy of Bioshock when he learns they sold the last copy to a "Ted Kaczynski looking motherfucker". [2] ... Webcomics, also known as online comics and internet comics, are comics that are available to read on the Internet. ... Tycho may refer to: Tycho Brahe (1546–1601), Tyge Ottesen Brahe, Danish nobleman and astronomer Tycho (crater), on the Moon Tycho Brahe (crater), on Mars The Tycho-1 Catalogue of stars Tycho Celchu, a character in the fictional Star Wars Universe Brother-Captain Tycho, a character from the fictional Warhammer... BioShock is an action-adventure, survival horror first-person shooter video game by 2K Boston/2K Australia (previously Irrational Games. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


In the sit-com News Radio, the character Joe, an electrician, is sometimes jokingly said to be the Unabomber by the other characters, due to his paranoia of the goverment and modern technology, which causes him to built even the most advanced machines from scratch. For the Australian radio station, see ABC NewsRadio NewsRadio was an American sitcom, originally broadcast from 1995 to 1999 by NBC. The series is set in a New York City news radio station, WNYX, and starts with the arrival of a new news director, Dave Nelson (played by Dave Foley). ...


See also

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
  • Anarcho-primitivism, Kaczynski's political doctrine which says that technological-industrial society is inherently wasteful and suppressive of human nature, and must be brought down;
  • Hugo de Garis, an academic technologist who makes much the same predictions about the future as Kaczynski, but supports such a future nevertheless (he sees people like Kaczynski and himself possibly becoming opposing sides in a major war over such a scenario, paralleling Kaczynski's line of thought about a struggle between anarchists and technophiles for the future of human dignity);
  • John Zerzan, a major anarcho-primitivist philosopher who defended Kaczynski's writings and was a confidant to him during his trial;
  • Green Anarchy, an Anarchist magazine that has published some of Kaczynski's writings including his short story Ship of Fools;
  • Jason McQuinn, editor of Anarchy: A Journal of Desire Armed who wrote the essay One, Two, Three, Many Unabombers in which he defended Kaczynski;
  • Italian Unabomber, an unknown person or group who was conducting bombings in Italy;
  • Das Netz, a German film that explores the actions of the Unabomber in relation to art, technology, and LSD.

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Anarcho-primitivism is an anarchist critique of the origins and progress of civilization. ... Hugo de Garis (born 1947, Sydney, Australia) became an associate professor of computer science at Utah State University. ... In many countries, Technologists are synonymous with applied scientists or engineers. ... John Zerzan (born 1943) is an American anarchist and primitivist philosopher and author. ... Green Anarchy is a magazine published three times a year out of Eugene, Oregon by a collective. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... The ship of fools, depicted in a 1549 German woodcut Ship of Fools is a short story written by Ted Kaczynski in which various people, representing oppressed groups in American society, squabble aboard a ship headed for destruction in the North Pole. ... Jason McQuinn is an American anarchist, co-editor of the journal Anarchy: A Journal of Desire Armed and Alternative Press Review. ... Anarchy: A Journal of Desire Armed is a North American anarchist magazine. ... The Italian Unabomber is a name given by the international media to an unknown assaliant tied to a series of booby-trap bombings in northern Italy which began in 1994. ... Das Netz (Eng: The Net) is an independent film directed by Lutz Dammbeck. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ...

References

  1. ^ http://cbs5.com/topstories/local_story_332014518.html
  2. ^ the Unabomb case, CNN Time
  3. ^ Pysychological Evaluation of Theodore Kaczynski, Court TV News
  4. ^ CIA Shrinks & LSD, CounterPunch
  5. ^ http://www.unabombers.com/MKUltraInvoices.htm
  6. ^ Lucinda Franks, "Don't Shoot", The New Yorker July 22, 1996.
  7. ^ http://www.courttv.com/trials/unabomber/chronology/chron_8587.html
  8. ^ Unabomber CIA NSA FBI Conspiracy Echelon Terrorism VanPac. Retrieved on 2006-09-19.
  9. ^ COURT TV ONLINE - TRIALS. Retrieved on 2006-09-19.
  10. ^ Unabomber Court Documents, Court TV Library
  11. ^ MURDERER'S MANIFESTO, TIME
  12. ^ Industrial Society and Its Future Theodore Kaczynski
  13. ^ http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Industrial_Society_and_Its_Future#Feelings_of_Inferiority
  14. ^ http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Industrial_Society_and_Its_Future#The_Danger_Of_Leftism
  15. ^ http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Industrial_Society_and_Its_Future#Surrogate_Activities
  16. ^ http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Industrial_Society_and_Its_Future#The_Future
  17. ^ http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Industrial_Society_and_Its_Future#Final_Note
  18. ^ Wired 8.04: Why the future doesn't need us. Retrieved on 2006-09-19.
  19. ^ http://www.courttv.com/trials/unabomber/documents/affidavit.html#2
  20. ^ Trial affidavit CourtTV.com
  21. ^ Revolutionary suicide, Newsreal
  22. ^ ["Death in the Mail -- Tracking a Killer: A special report.; Investigators Have Many Clues and Theories, but Still No Suspect in 15 Bombings" By RALPH BLUMENTHAL AND N. R. KLEINFIELD, The New York Times, Sunday, Dec. 18, 1994, Sec 1, Page 49, 3,219 words.]
  23. ^ FBI affidavit
  24. ^ Unabomber's Belongings to Be Auctioned. Retrieved on 2006-09-19.
  25. ^ Serge F. Kovaleski, "Unabomber Wages Legal Battle To Halt the Sale of His Papers", New York Times, national edition January 22, 2007
  26. ^ New York Times; January 22, 2007; [[Also known as Inmate 04475-046 at the federal maximum-security prison in Florence, Colo., Kaczynski has asked an appeals court to assign him a new lawyer who is an expert in First Amendment litigation. Otherwise, he has told the court, he wants to represent himself in an appeal of the ruling that authorized auctioning the papers.
  27. ^ Labadie Manuscripts. Retrieved on 2006-09-19.
  28. ^ The New York Review of Books: GIANTS AT HEART. Retrieved on 2006-09-19.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

Works written by the Unabomber

Works written by Kaczynski

  • Kaczynski, T. J. (1967). Boundary Functions [doctoral dissertation]. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan.
  • Kaczynski, T. J. (1964). "Another proof of Wedderburn's theorem". American Mathematical Monthly 71: 652 – 653. 
  • Kaczynski, T. J. (1964). "Advanced problem 5210". American Mathematical Monthly 71: 689. 
  • Kaczynski, T. J. (1965). "Boundary functions for functions defined in a disk". Journal of Mathematics and Mechanics 14 (4): 589 – 612. DOI:10.1512/iumj.1965.14.14039. MR0176080. 
  • Kaczynski, T. J. (1965). "Distributivity and (-1)x = -x (solution to advanced problem 5210)". American Mathematical Monthly 72: 677 – 678. 
  • Kaczynski, T. J. (1966). "On a boundary property of continuous functions". Michigan Mathematical Journal 13: 313 – 320. MR0210900. 
  • Kaczynski, T. J. (1968). "Note on a problem of Alan Sutcliffe". Mathematics Magazine 41: 84 – 86. MR0228409. 
  • Kaczynski, T. J. (1969). "The set of curvilinear convergence of a continuous function defined in the interior of a cube". Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society 23: 323 – 327. 
  • Kaczynski, T. J. (1969). "Boundary functions for bounded harmonic functions". Transactions of the American Mathematical Society 137: 203 – 209. MR0236393. 
  • Kaczynski, T. J. (1969). "Boundary functions and sets of curvilinear convergence for continuous functions". Transactions of the American Mathematical Society 141: 107 – 125. MR0243078. 
  • Kaczynski, T. J. (1971). "Problem 787". Mathematics Magazine 44 (1): 41.  A match stick problem (solution to problem 787), Mathematics Magazine 44 (5): 286 – 299. This article was subsequently plagiarized by Dănuţ Marcu in Geombinatorics. [3]

The American Mathematical Monthly is a mathematical journal published 10 times each year by the Mathematical Association of America since 1894. ... The Indiana University Mathematics Journal (ISSN 0022-2518) is a journal of mathematics published by Indiana University. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Mathematical Reviews is a scientific journal edited by the American Mathematical Society offering reviews of recent mathematical papers. ... Mathematical Reviews is a scientific journal edited by the American Mathematical Society offering reviews of recent mathematical papers. ... Mathematics Magazine is a a bimonthly publication of the Mathematical Association of America. ... Mathematical Reviews is a scientific journal edited by the American Mathematical Society offering reviews of recent mathematical papers. ... Proceedings of the AMS, October 2005 issue. ... Transactions of the American Mathematical Society is a monthly mathematics journal published by the American Mathematical Society. ... Mathematical Reviews is a scientific journal edited by the American Mathematical Society offering reviews of recent mathematical papers. ... Mathematical Reviews is a scientific journal edited by the American Mathematical Society offering reviews of recent mathematical papers. ... Dănuţ Marcu (born January 11, 1952, Bucharest) is a Romanian mathematician and computer scientist, who received his Ph. ... Geombinatorics is a mathematical research journal (ISSN 1065-7371) published by the University of Colorado, USA, since 1991 under an international board of editors. ...

Works about Kaczynski and the Unabomber

  • Ron Arnold, Ecoterror: The Violent Agenda to Save Nature: The World of the Unabomber, 1997, ISBN 0-939571-18-8
  • Alston Chase. Harvard and the Unabomber: The Education of an American Terrorist , extended from the Atlantic article, about the Murray psychological experiment, ISBN 0-393-02002-9
  • Alston Chase, A Mind for Murder: The Education of the Unabomber and the Origins of Modern Terrorism, 2004, ISBN 0-393-32556-3
  • Douglas and Olshaker, Unabomber: On the Trail of America's Most-Wanted Serial Killer , 1996, Pocket Books, ISBN 0-671-00411-5
  • Don Foster, Author Unknown: Tales of a Literary Detective, pg. 95-142, 2000, Henry Holt & Co., ISBN 978-0805063578
  • James A. Fox, et al, Technophobe - The Unabomber Years: The Ultimate Sourcebook of Facts,...., 1997, Dove Books, ISBN 0-7871-1159-7
  • David Gelernter, Drawing Life: Surviving the Unabomber, 1997, ISBN 0-684-83912-1
  • Robert Graysmith, Unabomber : Desire to Kill, 1997, ISBN 0-89526-397-1
  • Michael Mello, The United States of America versus Theodore John Kaczynski: Ethics, Power and the Invention of the Unabomber, 1999, ISBN 1-893956-01-6
  • Jay Nash, Terrorism in the 20th Century: A Narrative Encyclopedia from the Anarchists, Through the Weathermen, to the Unabomber, 1998, ISBN 0-87131-855-5
  • Jill Smolowe, et al, Mad Genius: Odyssey, Pursuit & Capture of the Unabomber Suspect, 1996, ISBN 0-446-60459-3
  • Chris Waits, Dave Shors, Unabomber: The Secret Life of Ted Kaczynski, 1999, ISBN 1-56037-131-5
  • Steven D. Levitt, Steven J. Dubner, "Freakonomics", 2005, ISBN-13: 978-0-141-03008-1 Pg141-142, 191

David Hillel Gelernter is a professor of computer science at Yale University. ... The cover of this version of Freakonomics has a picture of what looks like an apple on the outside but is really an orange. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Theodore Kaczynski - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3550 words)
Kaczynski's specialty was a branch of complex analysis known as geometric function theory.
In the fall of 1967 Kaczynski was hired as an assistant professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley.
Kaczynski is serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole in ADX Florence, the Federal ADX Supermax prison in Florence, Colorado.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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