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Encyclopedia > Theodore Dwight Weld


Theodore Dwight Weld (18031895), the author of American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses, was an American abolitionist. He was born in Hampton, Connecticut, where he lived until 1825 when his family moved to upstate New York. He entered Hamilton College, where he became the disciple of Charles Finney, a famous evangelist. Theodore Dwight Weld This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... Hampton is a town located in Windham County, Connecticut. ... State nickname: The Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Rodham Clinton (D) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² or 54,556 square miles (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water... Hamilton College is a private liberal arts college located in Clinton, New York. ... Charles Grandison Finney (1792-1875), often called Americas foremost revivalist, was a major leader of the Second Great Awakening in America that had a profound impact on the history of the United States. ...


While a student at Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati, Weld became a leader of the "Lane Rebels." This group of students held a series of slavery debates over 18 days in 1834 that divided the community. When the school's board of directors, including president Lyman Beecher, tried to prohibit the students from supporting abolitionism, Weld and a group of students left the seminary and were accepted by Oberlin College. Lane Theological Seminary was established in the Walnut Hills section of Cincinnati, Ohio in 1829 to educate Presbyterian ministers. ... Cincinnati is a city in southwestern Ohio, United States that lies on the Ohio River and is the county seat of Hamilton CountyGR6. ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Lyman Beecher (October 12, 1775 - January 10, 1865) was a Presbyterian clergyman, abolitionist, and father of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry Ward Beecher, and Catharine Beecher. ... Students passing through the Oberlin Memorial Arch in front of Peters Hall on the Oberlin College campus Oberlin College is a small liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio. ...


He married Angelina Emily Grimke in 1838. From 1836 to 1840, Weld worked as the editor of the Emancipator. In 1839, he co-wrote with Angelina and her sister, abolitionist Sarah Moore Grimké American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses, on which Harriet Beecher Stowe partly based Uncle Tom's Cabin. Weld used pen names for all of his writings, which many scholars believe to be the reason that he is not as well known as other abolitionists such as William Lloyd Garrison or Arthur Tappan. Angelina Emily Grimk (1805–1879) was an abolitionist and suffragette. ... Sarah Moore Grimké (November 26, 1792 - December 23, 1873) was born in South Carolina, the daughter of a plantation owner who was a firm believer in both slavery and the subordinate status of women. ... Harriet Beecher Stowe Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe, born Harriet Elizabeth Beecher (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an abolitionist, and writer of more than 10 books, the most famous being Uncle Toms Cabin which describes life in slavery, and which was first published in serial form from 1851... Uncle Toms Cabin is a novel by American abolitionist author Harriet Beecher Stowe which treats slavery as a central theme. ... William Lloyd Garrison William Lloyd Garrison (December 12, 1805, Newburyport, Massachusetts - May 24, 1879, New York City) was a United States abolitionist and reformer. ... Arthur Tappan (May 22, 1786 - July 23, 1865) was an American abolitionist. ...


See also: Grimke Sisters The Grimke Sisters, Sarah Grimke (1792 - 1873) and Angelina Grimke Weld (1805 - 1879), were 19th Century Quakers, educators and writers who were advocates of abolitionism and womens rights. ...


External sources

References

  • Letters of Theodore Dwight Weld, Angelina Grimke and Sarah Grimke, 1822-1844: Vols. 1 & 2. ISBN 0844610550.
  • Robert H. Abzug, Passionate Liberator: Theodore Dwight Weld & the Dilemma of Reform. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980. ISBN 0195030613.
  • Gilbert Hobbs Barnes. The Anti-Slavery Impulse, 1830-1844. With an Introduction by William G. McLoughlin. New York: Harcourt, 1964.
  • Robert K. Nelson, "'The forgetfulness of sex': Devotion and Desire in the Courtship Letters of Angelina Grimké and Theodore Dwight Weld," Journal of Social History 37 (Spring 2004): 663-679.

  Results from FactBites:
 
AllRefer.com - Theodore Dwight Weld (Social Reformers) - Encyclopedia (578 words)
While in college he became a disciple of the evangelist Charles G. Finney and was influenced by Charles Stuart, a retired British army officer who urged Weld to enlist in the cause of fl emancipation.
Weld chose Lane Seminary at Cincinnati, Ohio, for the ministerial training of other Finney converts and studied there until the famous antislavery debates he organized (1834) among the students led to his dismissal.
From 1836 to 1840, Weld worked at the New York office of the antislavery society, serving as an editor of the society's paper, the Emancipator, and contributing antislavery articles to newspapers and periodicals.
Theodore Dwight Weld - definition of Theodore Dwight Weld in Encyclopedia (255 words)
Theodore Dwight Weld (1803–1895), the author of American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses, was an American abolitionist.
While a student at Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati, Weld became a leader of the "Lane Rebels." This group of students held a series of slavery debates over 18 days in 1834 that divided the community.
Weld used pen names for all of his writings, which many scholars believe to be the reason that he is not as well known as other abolitionists such as William Lloyd Garrison or Arthur Tappan.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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