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Encyclopedia > Theodor Mommsen
Christian Matthias Theodor Mommsen

Born: November 30, 1817(1817-11-30)
Garding, Schleswig
Died: November 1, 1903 (aged 85) (age 85)
Occupation: Classical Scholar, Jurist and Historian
Nationality: German

Christian Matthias Theodor Mommsen (November 30, 1817November 1, 1903) was a Danish/German classical scholar, historian, jurist, journalist, politician, archaeologist[1] and writer[2], generally regarded as the greatest classicist of the 19th century[citation needed]. His work regarding Roman history is still of fundamental importance for contemporary research. He received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1902, and was also a prominent German politician, as a member of the Prussian and German parliaments. His works on Roman law and on the law of obligations had a significant impact on the German civil code (BGB). Image File history File links Nobel_prize_medal. ... Image File history File links T-mommsen-2. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Garding is a town in the district of Nordfriesland, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ... The region of Schleswig (former English name: Sleswick, Danish: Sønderjylland or Slesvig, Low German: Sleswig, North Frisian: Slaswik or Sleesweg) covers the area about 60 km north and 70 km south of the border between Germany and Denmark. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Classics (disambiguation). ... A jurist is a professional who studies, develops, applies or otherwise deals with the law. ... A historian is an individual who studies history and who writes on history. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Classics (disambiguation). ... A historian is an individual who studies history and who writes on history. ... A jurist is a professional who studies, develops, applies or otherwise deals with the law. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Classicism, in the arts, refers generally to a high regard for classical antiquity as setting standards for taste which the classicist seeks to emulate. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... History - Ancient history - Ancient Rome This is a List of Ancient Rome-related topics, that aims to include aspects of both the Ancient Roman Republic and Roman Empire. ... Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Using the term Roman law in a broader sense, one may say that Roman law is not only the legal system of ancient Rome but the law that was applied throughout most of Europe until the end of the 18th century. ... The Law of Obligations is one of the component private law elements of the civil law system of law (as well as of mixed legal systems, such as Scotland, South Africa, and Louisiana) and encompasses contractual obligations, quasi-contractual obligations such as enrichment without cause and extra-contractual obligations. ... A civil code is a systematic compilation of laws designed to comprehensively deal with the core areas of private law. ... Publication in the Reich Law Gazette on August 24, 1896 The Bürgerliches Gesetzbuch (or BGB) is the civil code of Germany. ...

Contents

Life

Mommsen was born in Garding in Schleswig as a son of a poor minister. He grew up in Oldesloe and studied at home, thought he attended gymnasium in Altona for four years. He studied Greek and Latin and received his diploma in 1837, graduating as a doctor of Roman law. As he could not afford to study at one of the more prestigious German universities, he enrolled at the university of Kiel. Garding is a town in the district of Nordfriesland, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ... The region of Schleswig (former English name: Sleswick, Danish: Sønderjylland or Slesvig, Low German: Sleswig, North Frisian: Slaswik or Sleesweg) covers the area about 60 km north and 70 km south of the border between Germany and Denmark. ... Map of Germany showing Bad Oldesloe Bad Oldesloe is a town located in the northern German state of Schleswig-Holstein. ... Altona may refer to various places: Altona, Victoria, a seaside suburb in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Altona, Illinois, a village located in Knox County, Illinois Altona, Indiana, a town located in DeKalb County, Indiana Altona, Hamburg, the westmost district in the city of Hamburg, Germany Altona, Manitoba, a town located in...


Mommsen studied jurisprudence at the University of Kiel (Holstein) from 1838 to 1843. Thanks to a Danish grant, he was able to visit France and Italy to study preserved classical Roman inscriptions. During the revolution of 1848 he suported monarchists and worked as a war correspondent (journalist) in Danish at that time Rendsburg, supporting the annexation of Schleswig-Holstein by his country and constitutional reform. He became a professor of law in the same year at the University of Leipzig. When Mommsen protested the new constitution of Saxony in 1851, he had to resign. However, the next year he obtained a professorship in Roman law at the University of Zurich and spent a couple of years in exile. In 1854 he became a profesor of law at the University of Breslau where he met Jakob Bernays. Mommsen became a research professor at the Berlin Academy of Sciences in 1857. He later helped to create and manage the German Archaeological Institute in Rome. For the jurisprudence of courts, see Case law. ... The University of Kiel, in full the Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (in short: CAU), is a university in the city of Kiel, Germany. ... Holstein (Hol-shtayn) (Low German: Holsteen, Danish: Holsten, Latin and historical English: Holsatia) is the southern part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, between the rivers Elbe and Eider. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... —Alexis de Tocqueville, Recollections The European Revolutions of 1848, in some countries known as the Spring of Nations, were the bloody consequences of a variety of changes that had been taking place in Europe in the first half of the 19th century. ... Rendsburg (Danish: Rendsborg) is a town at the Kiel Canal in the northeastern part of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ... Schleswig-Holstein is the northernmost of the 16 Bundesländer in Germany. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... The University of Leipzig (German Universität Leipzig), located in Leipzig in the Free State of Saxony (former Kingdom of Saxony), Germany, is one of the oldest universities in Europe. ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DED Capital Dresden Minister-President Georg Milbradt (CDU) Governing parties CDU / SPD Votes in Bundesrat 4 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  18,416 km² (7,110 sq mi) Population 4,252,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density 231 /km... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Wrocław. ... Jakob Bernays (September 11, 1824 - May 26, 1881), German philologist and philosophical writer, was born at Hamburg of Jewish parents. ... The Prussian Academy of Sciences (German: ) was an academy established in Berlin on July 11, 1700. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1858 Mommsen was appointed a member of the Academy of Sciences in Berlin, and he also became professor of Roman History at the University of Berlin in 1861, where he held lectures up to 1887. Mommsen received high recognition for his scientific achievements: the medal Pour le Mérite in 1868, honorary citizenship of Rome, and the Nobel prize for literature in 1902 for his main work Römische Geschichte (Roman History). He is one of the very few non-fiction writers to receive the Nobel prize in literature. Mommsen had sixteen children with his wife Marie (daughter of the editor Karl Reimer from Leipzig), some of whom died in childhood. Two of his great-grandsons, Hans and Wolfgang, are prominent German historians. Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... There is no institution called the University of Berlin, but there are four universities in Berlin, Germany: Humboldt University of Berlin (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) Technical University of Berlin (Technische Universität Berlin) Free University of Berlin (Freie Universität Berlin) Berlin University of the Arts (Universität der... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... The Order Pour le Mérite, known informally as the Blue Max (German: Blauer Max), was Prussias highest military order until the end of World War I. The award was a blue-enameled Maltese Cross with eagles between the arms, the Prussian royal cypher, and the French legend Pour... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For the book by Chuck Palahniuk titled Non-fiction, see Stranger Than Fiction: True Stories. ... Hans Mommsen (November 5, 1930-) is a left-wing German historian and twin brother of Wolfgang Mommsen. ... Wolfgang Justin Mommsen (November 5, 1930-August 11, 2004) was an left-wing German historian and the twin brother of Hans Mommsen. ...


Mommsen worked hard. He rose at five and began to work in his library. Whenever he went out, he took one of his books along to read, and contemporaries often found him reading whilst walking in the streets.


1880 Fire

Not all of Mommsen's library was completely destroyed by the fire; the Roman History v4 was damaged but preserved
Not all of Mommsen's library was completely destroyed by the fire; the Roman History v4 was damaged but preserved[3]

On 2 am July 7, 1880 a fire occurred in the upper floor workroom-library of Mommsen's house at Marchstraße 6 in Berlin.[4][5][6]. Several old manuscripts were burnt to ashes, including Manuscript 0.4.36 which was on loan from the library of Trinity College, Cambridge;[7] There is information that the Manuscript of Jordanes from Heidelberg University library was burnt.[8] Two other important manuscripts, from Brussels and Halle, were also destroyed.[9] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus, written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... The Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg (German Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; also known as simply University of Heidelberg) was established in the town of Heidelberg, then the seat of the Counts Palatine, Prince-Electors of the Holy Roman Empire, in 1386. ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ... Halle is the name of two cities in Germany, and both a municipality and a town in Belgium. ...


Scholarly works

Theodor Mommsen in 1881
Theodor Mommsen in 1881

Mommsen published over 1,500 works, and effectively established a new framework for the systematic study of Roman history. He pioneered epigraphy, the study of inscriptions in material artifacts. Although the unfinished History of Rome has been widely considered as his main work, the work most relevant today is perhaps the Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum, a collection of Roman inscriptions he contributed to the Berlin Academy. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 417 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (531 × 764 pixel, file size: 96 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ludwig Knaus: Portrait Theodor Mommsen, 1881 Nationalgalerie Berlin, A I 315 العربية | ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 417 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (531 × 764 pixel, file size: 96 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ludwig Knaus: Portrait Theodor Mommsen, 1881 Nationalgalerie Berlin, A I 315 العربية | ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... The Rosetta Stone in the British Museum. ... Inscriptions are words or letters written, engraved, painted, or otherwise traced on a surface and can appear in contexts both small and monumental. ... History of Rome (Ger. ... The Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum (CIL) is a comprehensive collection of ancient Latin inscriptions. ... The Prussian Academy of Sciences (German: ) was an academy established in Berlin on July 11, 1700. ...

  • Roman Provinces under the Empire, 1884
  • History of Rome: Mommsen's most famous work appeared in three volumes between 1854 and 1856, and exposed Roman history up to the end of the Roman republic and the rule of Julius Caesar, whom Mommsen portrayed as a gifted statesman. He closely compared political issues and terminology, especially of the late Republic, to political developments in the 19th century (nation-state, democracy). It is counted among the great classics of historical works. Mommsen never wrote a continuation of his Roman history to incorporate the imperial period. Notes taken during his lectures on the Roman Empire between 1863 and 1886 were published (in 1992) under the title A History of Rome Under the Emperors. In 1885 a presentation of the Roman provinces in the imperial period appeared as volume 5 of Roman History (The Provinces of the Roman Empire from Caesar to Diocletian). There was no volume 4. The work has also received some criticism, accusing him of "journalism", and in 1931 Egon Friedell argued that in his hands "Crassus becomes a speculator in the manner of Louis Philippe, the brothers Gracchus are Socialist leaders, and the Gallians are Indians, etc."[10]
  • Roman Chronology to the Time of Caesar (1858) written with his brother August Mommsen.
  • Roman Constitutional Law (1871-1888). This systematic treatment of Roman constitutional law in three volumes has been of importance for research on ancient history.
  • Roman Criminal Law (1899)
  • Monumentum Ancyranum
  • Iordanis Romana et Getica (1882) was Mommsen's critical edition of Jordanes' The Origin and Deeds of the Goths and has subsequently come to be generally known simply as Getica.
  • More than 1,500 further studies and treatises on single issues.

A bibliography of over 1,000 of his works is given by Zangemeister in Mommsen als Schriftsteller (1887; continued by Jacobs, 1905). Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... History of Rome (Ger. ... This article refers to the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For alternate meanings, see Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... This article refers to the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For alternate meanings, see Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... The term nation-state, while often used interchangeably with the terms unitary state and independent state, refers properly to the parallel occurence of a state and a nation. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Egon Friedell born Egon Friedmann 21 January 1878 in Vienna, died 16 March 1938 in Vienna, was a prominent Austrian philosopher, historian, journalist, actor, cabaret performer and theatre critic. ... Marcus Licinius Crassus Dives (c. ... Speculation is the buying, holding, and selling of stocks, commodities, futures, currencies, collectibles, real estate, or any valuable thing to profit from fluctuations in its price as opposed to buying it for use or for income - dividends, rent etc. ... Louis-Philippe of France (October 6, 1773–August 26, 1850), served as the Orleanist king of the French from 1830 to 1848. ... The Gracchi were a noble plebeian family of ancient Rome. ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Gallia may mean several things: Gallia was the Latin name for Gaul. ... The Mommsen family is a German family of influential historians, most notably Theodor Mommsen, 1902 Nobel Laureate in Literature. ... Using the term Roman law in a broader sense, one may say that Roman law is not only the legal system of ancient Rome but the law that was applied throughout most of Europe until the end of the 18th century. ... Mediterranean world when Jordanes wrote Getica. ... Modern Istanbul, site of ancient Constantinople, capital of the eastern Roman Empire, where Jordanes was being detained when he wrote Getica. ...


Mommsen as editor and organiser

While he was secretary of the Historical-Philological Class at the Berlin Academy (1874-1895), Mommsen organised countless scientific projects, mostly editions of original sources. The Prussian Academy of Sciences (German: ) was an academy established in Berlin on July 11, 1700. ...


Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum

At the beginning of his scientific career, Mommsen already envisioned a collection of all known ancient Latin inscriptions when he published the inscriptions of the Neapolitan Kingdom (1852). He received additional impetus and training from Bartolomeo Borghesi of San Marino. The complete Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum would consist of sixteen volumes. Fifteen of them appeared in Mommsen's lifetime and he wrote five of them himself. The basic principle of the edition (contrary to previous collections) was the method of autopsy (which in Greek means literally "to see for oneself"), according to which all copies (i.e., modern transcriptions) of inscriptions were to be checked and compared to the original. For other uses, see Naples (disambiguation). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Bartolomeo Borghesi (11 July 1781 - 16 April 1860) was an Italian antiquarian who was a key figure in establishing the science of numismatics. ... The Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum (CIL) is a comprehensive collection of ancient Latin inscriptions. ...


Further editions and research projects

Mommsen also published the fundamental collections in Roman law: the Corpus Iuris Civilis and the Codex Theodosianus. Furthermore, he played an important role in the publication of the Monumenta Germaniae Historica, the edition of the texts of the Church Fathers, the Limes research and countless other projects. The Corpus Juris Civilis (Body of Civil Law) is a fundamental work in jurisprudence issued from 529 to 534 by order of Justinian I, Byzantine Emperor. ... The Codex Theodosianus (Book of Theodosius) was a compilation of the laws of the Roman Empire under the Christian emperors since 312. ... The Monumenta Germaniae Historica (frequently abbreviated MGH in bibliographies and lists of sources) is a comprehensive series of carefully edited and published sources for the study of German history (broadly conceived) from the end of the Roman Empire to 1500. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers... The limes Germanicus, 2nd century. ...


Mommsen as politician

Mommsen was a delegate to the Prussian Landtag in 1863-1866 and again in 1873-1879, and delegate to the Reichstag in 1881-1884, at first for the liberal German Progress Party (Deutsche Fortschrittspartei), later for the National Liberal Party, and finally for the Secessionists. He was very concerned with questions about scientific and educational policies and held national positions. Disappointed with the politics of the empire, regarding whose future he was quite pessimistic, in the end he advised collaboration between Liberals and Social Democrats. For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... A Landtag (Diet) is a representative assembly or parliament in German speaking countries with some legislative authority. ... The Reichstag (German for Imperial Diet) was the parliament of the Holy Roman Empire, the North German Confederation, and of Germany until 1945. ... The German Progress Party (Deutsche Fortschrittspartei or DFP) was the first modern political party with a programm in Germany, founded by the liberal members of the Prussian Lower House in 6 June 1861. ... The National Liberal Party (Nationalliberale Partei) was a German political party which flourished between 1867 and 1918. ...


In 1881 Mommsen strongly disagreed with Bismarck about social policies in 1881. He used strong words and narrowly avoided prosecution. In 1879 his colleague Heinrich von Treitschke (the so-called 'Berliner Antisemitismusstreit') begun a political campaign against Jews and Mommsen criticized him sharply in public. On the other hand, he insisted on assimilation of them, as he disagreed with their cultural or religious independence. “Bismarck” redirects here. ... Heinrich von Treitschke (September 15, 1834 - April 28, 1896), German historian and political writer, was born at Dresden. ... This box:      Antisemitism (alternatively spelled anti-semitism or anti-Semitism) is discrimination, hostility or prejudice directed at Jews. ... Cultural assimilation (often called merely assimilation) is an intense process of consistent integration whereby members of an ethno-cultural group, typically immigrants, or other minority groups, are absorbed into an established, generally larger community. ...


Mommsen was violent supporter of German nationalism, maintaining a militant attitude towards the Slavic nations. He appealed to German speaking inhabitants of Austria-Hungary to "Be hard. The Czech skull cannot absorb knowledge, but even it is accessible to blows."[11] Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... For other uses of Skull, see Skull (disambiguation). ... Marines practicing striking A strike is an attack with an inanimate object, such as a weapon, or with a part of the human body intended to cause an effect upon an opponent or to simply cause harm to an opponent. ...


Trivia

  • Mommsen was both the oldest person to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature and the first-born laureate; born in 1817, he won the second Nobel ever awarded at the age of eighty-five. The next oldest laureate in Literature is Paul Heyse, born in 1830, who won the Nobel in 1910.
  • Fellow Nobel Laureate (1925) Bernard Shaw cited Mommsen's interpretation of the last First Consul of the Republic, Julius Caesar, as one of the inspirations for his 1898 (1905 on Broadway) play, Caesar and Cleopatra.
  • The playwright Heiner Müller wrote a 'performance text' entitled Mommsen's Block (1993), inspired by the publication of Mommsen's fragmentary notes on the later Roman empire and by the East German government's decision to replace a statue of Karl Marx outside the Humboldt University of Berlin with one of Mommsen.[12]
  • There is a Gymnasium (academic high school) named for Mommsen in his hometown of Bad Odesloe, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.

Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ... Paul Johann Ludwig von Heyse (March 15, 1830 - April 2, 1914) was a German author. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Multiple people share the name Bernard Shaw: George Bernard Shaw, the celebrated Irish playwright (1856 - 1950) Bernard Shaw, a journalist and longtime CNN anchorman (1940 - ) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Caesar and Cleopatra is a 1901 play by George Bernard Shaw. ... Heiner Müller (January 9, 1929 – December 30, 1995) was an East German dramatist and writer. ... For the historical eastern German provinces, see Historical Eastern Germany East Germany, officially the German Democratic Republic (GDR), German Deutsche Demokratische Republik (DDR), was a Communist Party-led state that existed from 1949 to 1990 in the former Soviet occupation zone of Germany. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin The Humboldt University of Berlin (German Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) is Berlins oldest university, founded in 1810 as the University of Berlin (Universität zu Berlin) by the liberal Prussian educational reformer and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt whose university model has strongly influenced... A gymnasium (pronounced with or, in Swedish, as opposed to ) is a type of school providing secondary education in some parts of Europe, comparable to English Grammar Schools and U.S. High Schools. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.nndb.com/people/618/000107297/
  2. ^ Nobel Prize in Literature#List of Nobel Laureates in Literature
  3. ^ Archiv der BBAW, 47/1 fol. 6; in "Phönix aus der Asche" http://www.mgh-bibliothek.de/etc/dokumente/a130801.pdf; page 57
  4. ^ Title: Phönix aus der Asche : Theodor Mommsen und die Monumenta Germaniae Historica; Authors: Arno Mentzel-Reuters Mark Mersiowsky Peter Orth Olaf B. Rader; Published: München und Berlin 2005; URL: http://www.mgh-bibliothek.de/etc/dokumente/a130801.pdf; page 53
  5. ^ Vossische Zeitung 12/7/1880 (Nr. 192) in column "Lokales"
  6. ^ Contemporery Map
  7. ^ quote: Another manuscript is beyond recall; namely, 0.4.36, which was borrowed by Professor Theodor Mommsen and perished in the lamentable fire at his house in 1880. It was not, apparently, an indispensable or even a very important authority for the texts (Jordanes, the Antonine Itinerary, etc.) which it contained, and other copies of its archetype are yet in being: still, the loss of it is very regrettable ; M R James' The Western Manuscripts in the Library of Trinity College, Cambridge: a Descriptive Catalogue; http://rabbit.trin.cam.ac.uk/James/Jamespref.html
  8. ^ Quote: Der größte Verlust war eine frühmittelalterliche Jordanes-Handschrift aus der Heidelberger Univer-sitätsbibliothek. Url:http://www.mgh-bibliothek.de/etc/dokumente/a130801.pdf; page 53
  9. ^ vor allem zwei aus Brüssel und Halle entlehnte Handschriften
  10. ^ Kuusankosken kaupunginkirjasto, Finland.
  11. ^ http://media.hoover.org/documents/0817944915_146.pdf
  12. ^ Heiner Müller, Mommsen's Block. In A Heiner Müller Reader: Plays | Poetry | Prose. Ed. and trans. Carl Weber. PAJ Books Ser. Baltimore and London: The John Hopkins University Press, 2001. ISBN 0801865786. p.122-129.

Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ... The Monumenta Germaniae Historica (frequently abbreviated MGH in bibliographies and lists of sources) is a comprehensive series of carefully edited and published sources for the study of German history (broadly conceived) from the end of the Roman Empire to 1500. ... The Vossische Zeitung (more precisely: (Königlich Privilegierte) Berlinische Zeitung von Staats- und Gelehrten Sachen) was the well known liberal German newspaper that was published in Berlin (1721-1934). ... Carl Weber is a theatre director and has been Professor of drama at Stanford University since 1984. ...

Literature

  • Wilhelm Weber, Theodor Mommsen (1929)
  • W. Warde Fowler, Theodor Mommsen: His Life and Work (1909)
  • Mommsen, Theodor: Römische Geschichte. 8 Volumes. dtv, München 2001. ISBN 3-423-59055-6
  • Heuß, Alfred: Theodor Mommsen und das 19. Jahrhundert. Kiel 1956; reprinted Stuttgart 1996. ISBN 3-515-06966-6
  • Wickert, Lothar: Theodor Mommsen. 4 volumes. Frankfurt/Main, 1959?1980.
  • Rebenich, Stefan: Theodor Mommsen: eine Biographie. Beck, München 2002. ISBN 3-406-49295-9
  • Josef Wiesehöfer (ed.), Theodor Mommsen: Gelehrter, Politiker und Literat, unter Mitarbeit von Henning Börm. Stuttgart, 2005. (see review)
  • Anthony Grafton - Roman Monument (History Today September 2006)

Wilhelm Eduard Weber (October 24, 1804 - June 23, 1891) was a noted physicist. ... William Warde Fowler (May 16 1847–June 15 1921) was an English historian and ornithologist, and tutor at Lincoln College, Oxford. ...

External links

5 & 8 (vol. 6 & 7 do not exist) in German]. Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

  • http://www.mgh-bibliothek.de/etc/dokumente/a130801.pdf. Phönix aus der Asche Theodor Mommsen und die Monumenta Germaniae Historica
Persondata
NAME Mommsen, Christian Matthias Theodor
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Mommsen, Theodor
SHORT DESCRIPTION German Classical Scholar, Jurist and Historian
DATE OF BIRTH November 30, 1817
PLACE OF BIRTH Garding, Schleswig
DATE OF DEATH November 1, 1903
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Theodor Mommsen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (916 words)
Christian Matthias Theodor Mommsen (30 November 1817–1 November 1903) was a German classical scholar and historian, generally regarded as the greatest classicist of the 19th century.
Mommsen studied jurisprudence at the University of Kiel (Holstein) from 1838 to 1843.
Mommsen was a delegate to the Prussian Landtag in 1863-1866 and again in 1873-1879, and delegate to the Reichstag in 1881-1884, at first for the liberal (German Progress Party (Deutsche Fortschrittspartei), later for the National Liberal Party (Nationalliberalen), and finally for the Secessionists.
Theodor Mommsen - definition of Theodor Mommsen in Encyclopedia (855 words)
Christian Matthias Theodor Mommsen (30 November 1817 - 1 November, 1903) was a German classical scholar and historian, generally regarded as the greatest classicist of the 19th century.
Mommsen studied jurisprudence in Kiel from 1838 to 1843.
Mommsen was a delegate to the Prussian Landtag in 1863 - 1866 and again in 1873 - 1879, and delegate to the Reichstag in 1881 - 1884, at first for the liberal 'Deutsche Fortschrittspartei' (German Progressive Party), later for the 'Nationalliberalen' (National Liberals), and finally for the Secessionists.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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