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Encyclopedia > Themis
Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Olympians
Aquatic deities
Chthonic deities
Other deities
Titans
The Twelve Titans:
Oceanus and Tethys,
Hyperion and Theia,
Coeus and Phoebe,
Cronus and Rhea,
Mnemosyne, Themis,
Crius, Iapetus
Sons of Iapetus:
Atlas, Prometheus,
Epimetheus, Menoetius
Personified concepts

In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. Among these Titans of primordial myth, few were venerated at specific sanctuaries in classical times, and Themis was so ancient that the followers of Zeus claimed that it was with him she produced the Three Fates themselves (Hesiod, Theogony, 904). A fragment of Pindar, however, tells that the Moerae were already present at the nuptials of Zeus and Themis, that in fact the Moerae rose with Themis from the springs of Okeanos the encircling World-Ocean and accompanied her up the bright sun-path to meet Zeus at Olympus. With Zeus she more certainly bore the Horae, those embodiments of the right moment— the rightness of Order unfolding in Time— and Astraea. Themis was there at Delos to witness the birth of Apollo. Greek mythology consists of an extensive collection of narratives detailing the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, which were first envisioned and disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a large number of sea gods. ... In mythology chthonic (from Greek χθονιος-pertaining to the earth; earthy) designates, or pertains to, gods or spirits of the underworld, especially in Greek mythology. ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... For the moon of Saturn, see Titan (moon). ... Oceanus or Okeanos refers to the ocean, which the Greeks and Romans regarded as a river circling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... In the Homers Iliad and Odyssey the sun god is called Helios Hyperion, Sun High-one. But in the Odyssey, Hesiods Theogony and the Homeric Hymn to Demeter the sun is once in each work called Hyperonides son of Hyperion and Hesiod certainly imagines Hyperion as a separate... In Greek mythology, Theia (also written Thea or Thia), also called Euryphaessa (wide-shining), was a Titan. ... In Greek mythology, Coeus (also Koios) was the Titan of intelligence. ... Phoebe (pronunced fee-bee) was one of the original Titans, one set of sons and daughters of Uranus and Gaia. ... Cronus receives the Omphalos Stone from his wife Rhea and devours it unaware that Zeus was safe; painting was made between 475 B.C. and 425 B.C. Cronus (of obscure etymology, perhaps related to horned), pronounced: kroh-nuhs , also spelled Cronos or Kronos, is often confused with Chronos/Khronos. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... Mnemosyne (Greek , IPA in RP and in General American) (sometimes shortened to Mneme) was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Crius was one of the Titans, a son of Uranus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology Iapetus, or Iapetos, was a Titan, the son of Uranus and Gaia, and father (by an Oceanid named Clymene or Asia) of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Menoetius and through Prometheus and Epimetheus and Atlas an ancestor of the human race. ... In Greek mythology, Atlas was a member of a race of giant gods known as Titans. ... This article is about the mythological figure; for other uses, see Prometheus (disambiguation). ... Epimetheus, a Titan known for his hindsight, with Pandora and Eros. ... In Greek mythology, Menoetius referred to several different people. ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek Μουσαι, Mousai) are nine archaic goddesses who embody the right evocation of myth, inspired through remembered and improvised song and traditional music and dances. ... Nemesis (Νέμεσις, as well called Rhamnousia, the goddess of Rhamnous, at her sanctuary at Rhamnous, north of Marathon), in Greek mythology, is the spirit of divine retribution against those who succumb to hubris, vengeful fate personified as a remorseless goddess. ... In Greek mythology, the white-robed Moirae or Moerae (Greek Μοίραι — the Apportioners, often called the Fates) were the personifications of destiny (Roman equivalent: Parcae, sparing ones, or Fatae; also equivalent to the Germanic Norns). ... In Greek mythology, Cratos (strength) was a son of Styx and Pallas, brother of Nike, Bia and Zelus. ... This Zelos is the Greek personification. ... In Greek mythology, Nike (Greek Νίκη, pronounced /nike/ NEE-keh, meaning Victory) (Roman equivalent: Victoria), was a goddess who personified triumph and victory. ... In Greek mythology, Metis (wisdom or wise counsel) was a Titaness who was the first great spouse of Zeus, indeed his equal (Hesiod, Theogony 896) and the mother of Athena. ... The Three Graces, from Sandro Botticellis painting Primavera Uffizi Gallery In Greek mythology, the Charites were the graces. ... A goddess in Greek mythology and a daughter of Zeus, Adrasteia (inescapable) was also an epithet applied to Rhea, Cybele, Nemesis and Ananke. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (Latin) or Horai (Greek; both words mean the hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, Bia (force) was the personification of force, daughter of Pallas and Styx. ... In Greek mythology, Eros was the god responsible for lust, love, and sex; he was also worshipped as a fertility deity. ... Daughter of Nyx in Greek mythology, Apate was the personification of deceit. ... Eris is also a genus of jumping spiders. ... Greek mythology consists of an extensive collection of narratives detailing the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, which were first envisioned and disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition. ... This article discusses the ancient Greek poet Hesiod. ... Rhea tricking Cronus with a wrapped stone. ... Gaia (World Book «JEE uh») (land or earth, from the Greek ; variant spelling Gaea—see also also Ge from ) is a Greek goddess personifying the Earth. ... For the moon of Saturn, see Titan (moon). ... In Greek mythology, the white-robed Moirae or Moerae (Greek Μοίραι — the Apportioners, often called the Fates) were the personifications of destiny (Roman equivalent: Parcae, sparing ones, or Fatae; also equivalent to the Germanic Norns). ... Pindar Pindar (or Pindarus / Pindaros) (522 BC – 443 BC), considered the greatest of the nine lyric poets of ancient Greece, was born at Cynoscephalae, a village in Thebes. ... Oceanus or Okeanos refers to the ocean, which the Greeks and Romans regarded as a river circling the world. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (Latin) or Horai (Greek; both words mean the hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, Astraea (star-maiden) was a daughter of Zeus and Themis or of Eos and Astraeus. ... The island of Delos (Greek: Δήλος, Dhilos), isolated in the centre of the roughly circular ring of islands called the Cyclades, near Mykonos, had a position as a holy sanctuary for a millennium before Olympian Greek mythology made it the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis. ... In Greek mythology LÄ“tō (Greek: Λητώ, Lato in Dorian Greek, the hidden one) is a daughter of the Titans Coeus and Phoebe, and in the Olympian scheme of things, Zeus is the father of her twins, Apollo and Artemis. ...


Themis (meaning "law of nature" rather than "human ordinance"), she "of good counsel," was the embodiment of divine order, law and custom. When Themis is disregarded, Nemesis brings just and wrathful retribution. Themis is not wrathful: she, "of the lovely cheeks" was the first to offer Hera a cup when she returned to Olympus distraught over threats from Zeus (Iliad xv.88). Themis presided over the proper relation between man and woman, the basis of the rightly ordered family, and the family the pillar of the deme, and judges were often referred to as "themistopoloi" (the servants of Themis). Such was the basis for order upon Olympus too. Hera addressed her as "Lady Themis." Nemesis (Νέμεσις, as well called Rhamnousia, the goddess of Rhamnous, at her sanctuary at Rhamnous, north of Marathon), in Greek mythology, is the spirit of divine retribution against those who succumb to hubris, vengeful fate personified as a remorseless goddess. ... The Iliad (Greek Ιλιάς, Ilias) tells part of the story of the siege of the city of Ilium, i. ... In biology, a deme (rhymes with team) is another word for a local population of organisms of one species that actively interbreed with one another and share a distinct gene pool. ...


The name of Themis might be substituted for Adrasteia in the birth of Zeus on Crete. She built the Oracle at Delphi and was herself oracular. According to another legend, Themis received the Oracle at Delphi from Gaia and later gave it to Phoebe. A goddess in Greek mythology and a daughter of Zeus, Adrasteia (inescapable) was also an epithet applied to Rhea, Cybele, Nemesis and Ananke. ... Michelangelos rendering of the Delphic Sibyl The Delphic Sibyl was the priestess presiding over the Apollonian Oracle at Delphi, a Greek colony, located in a plateau on the side of Mount Parnassus. ... Michelangelos rendering of the Delphic Sibyl The Delphic Sibyl was the priestess presiding over the Apollonian Oracle at Delphi, a Greek colony, located in a plateau on the side of Mount Parnassus. ... Gaia (World Book «JEE uh») (land or earth, from the Greek ; variant spelling Gaea—see also also Ge from ) is a Greek goddess personifying the Earth. ... Phoebe (pronunced fee-bee) was one of the original Titans, one set of sons and daughters of Uranus and Gaia. ...


Themis in Neopaganism

Many modern Neopagans, particularly Hellenistic Neopagans, believe that Themis is the goddess of virtue and justice. In many modern sects Themis is thought to take part in deciding the afterlife of one's mortal spirit. She carries a set of scales which weigh a persons virtuous deeds against a persons ill deeds. Themis is also thought to give the final input before the fate of a mortal is decided by Hades (The Judge). Themis is often considered compassionate and virtuous towards mortals, and concerned with mortal wellbeing as well as mortal plights. Worship of Themis is not uncommon among many pagan sects in the United States. According to some pagan websites Themis may have as many worshippers as Artemis or Hera (two of the most popular pagan goddesses). Worshippers of Themis often attempt to lead virtuous and charitable lives. Neopaganism (sometimes Neo-Paganism) describes a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, mainly pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions. ... Neopaganism (sometimes Neo-Paganism) describes a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, mainly pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions. ... A sect is a small religious or political group that has branched off from a larger established group. ... Hades (Greek: - Hadēs or - Háidēs) (unseen) means both the ancient Greek abode of the dead and the god of that underworld. ... The Artemis of Versailles, a Roman copy of a Hellenistic marble sculpture, now at the Louvre Museum. ... In the Olympian pantheon of classical Greek Mythology, Hêra (Greek or ) was the wife and sister of Zeus. ...


Worship of Themis may take the form of chants, prayer, the burning of oils and incense, and the burning of food or spilling of drinks as offerings. Acts of Charity are also considered to be an active form of worship. Some sects that include worship of Themis encourage tithing, and many encourage proselytizing to non-believers. Proselytizing is typically rare among sects that do not include the worship of Themis. Followers of Themis often discourage hedonism, persecution, grudges, malice, spite, mockery, and revenge. Themis is thought to grant boons of good health, euphoria, virility, and charisma to her followers. Some pagan websites suggest that Themis is most commonly worshipped by males. A tithe (from Old English teogotha tenth) is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a voluntary contribution or as a tax or levy, usually to support a Jewish or Christian religious organization. ... Religious conversion is the adoption of new religious beliefs that differ from the converts previous beliefs; in some cultures (e. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Persecution is persistent mistreatment of an individual or group by another group. ... Malice is a legal term referring to a partys intention to do injury to another party. ... Revenge or vengeance consists of retaliation against a person or group in response to perceived wrongdoing. ...


Consorts/Children

  1. With Zeus
    1. Horae: the Hours
      1. First Generation (other names are also known)
        1. Auxo (the Grower)
        2. Carpo (the Fruit-bringer)
        3. Thallo (the Plant-raiser)
      2. Second Generation
        1. Dike (Trial), known as Astraea in Roman mythology, the constellation Virgo
        2. Eirene (Peace)
        3. Eunomia (Rule of Law)
    2. Moirae: the Fates
      1. Atropos (the Inevitable)
      2. Clotho (the Weaver)
      3. Lachesis (the Lot-caster)

A Roman equivalent of one aspect of Hellenic Themis, as the personification of the divine rightness of law, was Iustitia (Anglicized as Justitia). Her origins are in civic abstractions of a Roman mindset, rather than archaic mythology, so drawing comparisons is not fruitful. Portrayed as an impassive woman, blindfolded and holding scales and a cornucopia, the sculpted figure outside a county courthouse is Iustitia, not Themis (illustration, above right). Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th-century engraving. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (Latin) or Horai (Greek; both words mean the hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, Astraea (star-maiden) was a daughter of Zeus and Themis or of Eos and Astraeus. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, the white-robed Moirae or Moerae (Greek Μοίραι — the Apportioners, often called the Fates) were the personifications of destiny (Roman equivalent: Parcae, sparing ones, or Fatae; also equivalent to the Germanic Norns). ... In Greek mythology, Atropos was the third of the Moirae. ... In Greek mythology, Clotho, the Greek word Κλωθώ for spinner, was the youngest of the Moirae. ... Lachesis can be: One of the Three Fates or Moirae, the personifications of destiny in Greek mythology. ... Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Lady Justice Lady Justice (or the Goddess of Justice) is a personification of the legal system. ... The cornucopia (Latin Cornu Copiae), also known as the Horn of Plenty, is a symbol of food dating back to the 5th century BC. In Greek mythology, Amalthea raised Zeus on the milk of a goat. ...

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Themis delivered oracles at Delphi until Apollo, the lovely son of Leto, came to the city, killed the serpent Python which guarded the oracle, and sitting in the tripod, took over it.
Themis told the Titan Prometheus 1 (who called her "mother", but so he called Gaia too, as some will have it that Gaia and Themis were one and the same) not to join the TITANS in their war against the OLYMPIANS, because in that war, the clever not the brute, would prevail.
Themis was deemed guardian of men's oaths, and for that reason she is also called goddess of oaths.
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