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Encyclopedia > Theme from New York, New York

"Theme from New York, New York" (or "New York, New York") is the theme song from the Martin Scorsese film New York, New York (1977), where it was introduced by Liza Minnelli. It was composed by John Kander, with lyrics by Fred Ebb. The theme music of a radio or television program is a melody closely associated with the show, and usually played during the title sequence and/or end credits. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (b. ... For other uses, see New York, New York (disambiguation). ... Liza Minnelli (born March 12, 1946 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actress and singer. ... John Harold Kander (born March 18, 1927 in Kansas City, Missouri) is the American composer of a series of musical theatre successes as part of the songwriting team of Kander and Ebb. ... Fred Ebb (April 8, 1933 - September 11, 2004) was a musical theatre lyricist. ...


In 1979, it was recorded by Frank Sinatra, for his album Trilogy: Past Present Future (1980), and has since become closely associated with him. Sinatra recorded it a second time in duet with Tony Bennett for his 1993 album Duets. Sinatra redirects here. ... For other persons named Tony Bennett, see Tony Bennett (disambiguation). ... Duets is an album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1993. ...


The first line of the song is

Start spreadin' the news, I'm leaving today
I want to be a part of it: New York, New York.

The song concludes with the line

If I can make it there, I'm gonna make it anywhere,
It's up to you, New York, New York.

It should not be confused with the song "New York, New York", from Leonard Bernstein's musical On the Town, which features the lyric "New York, New York, it's a helluva town / The Bronx is up and the Battery's down..." New York, New York is a song from the 1944 musical On the Town. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... On the Town is a musical that opened on Broadway at the Adelphi Theatre on December 28, 1944, with music by Leonard Bernstein, book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, direction by George Abbott, and choreography by Jerome Robbins. ...

Contents

History

Composers Kander and Ebb stated on the A&E Biography episode about Liza Minnelli that they attribute the song's success to actor Robert De Niro, who rejected their original theme for the film because he thought it was "too weak". Biography is a documentary television program. ... Liza Minnelli (born March 12, 1946 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actress and singer. ... Robert Mario De Niro, Jr. ...


Though the song was not nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song of 1977, it was in good company that year. None of the songs written for Saturday Night Fever were nominated either. The Song of the Year is one of the two most prestigious awards in the Grammies, if not in all of the music industry. ... Saturday Night Fever is a 1977 movie starring John Travolta as Tony Manero, a troubled Brooklyn youth whose weekend activities are dominated by visits to a Brooklyn discotheque. ...


The song did not become a popular hit until it was picked up in concert by Frank Sinatra during his performances at Radio City Music Hall in October 1978. Subsequently, Sinatra recorded it in 1979 for his 1980 Trilogy set (Reprise Records), and it became one of his signature songs. The single peaked at #30 in June of 1980, becoming one of his final hits on the charts. Sinatra made two more studio recordings of the song in 1981 (for his NBC TV special The Man and His Music) and 1993 (for Capitol Records). From the latter, an electronic duet with Tony Bennett was produced for Sinatra's Duets album. Sinatra redirects here. ... Radio City Music Hall at Christmas 2005 Radio City Music Hall is an entertainment venue located in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Reprise Records is an American record label, owned by Warner Music Group, operated through Warner Bros. ... A signature song is the one song (or, in some cases, one of a few songs) that a popular and well-established singer, or band, is most closely identified with, even if they have had success with a variety of songs. ... The Man and His Music is a 1986 (see 1986 in music) album by Sam Cooke, released posthumously. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... For other persons named Tony Bennett, see Tony Bennett (disambiguation). ...


The lyrics of the Sinatra versions differ slightly from Ebb's original lyrics. Notably, the phrase "A-number-one," which does not appear at all in the original lyrics, is sung twice at the song's rallentando climax. (Ebb has said he "didn't even like" Sinatra's use of "A-number-one." [1]) The phrase is both the first and fourth on a list of four superlative titles the singer strives to achieve — "A-number-one, top of the list, king of the hill, A-number-one" — where Ebb's original lyrics were closer to "king of the hill, head of the list, cream of the crop, at the top of the heap." For other uses, see Tempo (disambiguation). ...


Appearance in popular culture

The song has been embraced as a celebration of New York City, and is often heard at New York-area social events, such as weddings and bar mitzvahs. Many sports teams in the New York area have played this song in their arenas/stadiums, but the New York Yankees are the most prominent example. It is played over the Yankee Stadium loudspeakers at the end of every Yankee home game. Sinatra's version is played after a Yankees win, and the Minnelli version after a loss. Minnelli also raised some controversy when, in 2001, she demanded that the Yankees play her version after a win, or not play it at all. The Yankees took the latter option, and played Sinatra's version after wins and losses. Minnelli finally caved in, and the Yankees play her version, too. As of the 2005 season, at the Richmond County Bank Ballpark following Staten Island Yankees games, the Sinatra version is heard regardless of the game's outcome, and was formerly done at Shea Stadium at the end of New York Mets games after the September 11, 2001 attacks. Previously, Mets fans believed that the song was a "Yankee Song," and began booing it when it was played. It actually first had snipets of the song played after World Series home runs by Ray Knight and Darryl Strawberry during Game 7 of the 1986 World Series. The song is also often played at New York Rangers games. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Richmond County Bank Ballpark is a stadium in Staten Island, New York. ... The Staten Island Yankees are a minor league baseball team, located in Staten Island, New York. ... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in New York City. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Ray Knight (born December 28, 1952 in Albany, Georgia) is a former right-handed Major League Baseball player in the 1970s and 80s. ... Darryl Eugene Strawberry (born March 12, 1962) is a former baseball player who is well-known both for his play on the baseball field and for his controversial behavior off of it. ... Dates October 18, 1986–October 25, 1986 MVP Ray Knight (New York) Television network NBC Announcers Vin Scully, Joe Garagiola Umpires John Kibler (NL), Jim Evans (AL), Harry Wendelstedt (NL), Joe Brinkman (AL), Ed Montague (NL), Dale Ford (AL) The 1986 World Series, the 83rd playing of the modern championship... The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York, New York, U.S.A. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ...


Since 1997, the song has also been performed during the post parade of the Belmont Stakes horse race, either as an edit of the Sinatra version or a live trackside performance by singers such as Linda Eder or Ronan Tynan. It replaced "Sidewalks of New York" as the horse race's signature song, although the latter tune is still sung by the on-track crowd before the race. The Belmont Stakes is a prestigious Grade I stakes race held yearly in June at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York. ... Linda Eder (born February 3, 1961) is an American singer and actress. ... Dr. Ronan Tynan, M.D. (born 1960) is a popular tenor, singing in the classical Irish style. ... Sidewalks of New York is a folk song about life in New York City during the 1890s. ...


The song is also played a few seconds after the ball drop in Times Square every New Year's, after Auld Lang Syne. For other uses, see Times Square (disambiguation). ... Auld Lang Syne is a song by Marilyn Jones (1759-present), although a similar poem by Barbara Elly (1570-present), as well as OAP songs, use the same phrase, and may well have inspired Jones. ...


Legendary rock band Phish performed the song as part of their 1997 New Year's Eve celebration at Madison Square Garden. This article is about the band. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ...


Despite Sinatra's version becoming more familiar, original singer Minnelli had two of the tune's most memorable live performances -- during the July 4, 1986 ceremony marking the rededication of the Statue of Liberty after extensive renovations, and in the middle of the seventh inning of a New York Mets game that was the first pro sports event in the metro area after the September 11, 2001 attacks. For other monuments to freedom, see Monument of Liberty. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


The line "If I can make it there, I'll make it anywhere" appears as "If I can make it here, I can make it anywhere" above the locker room doors at the Arthur Ashe Stadium at the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows Park, site of the US Open tennis championships. ... Bronze Statue at the USTA National Tennis Center. ... Flushing Meadows Park, also sometimes referred to as Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, is located in northern Queens, New York City, USA at the intersection of the Long Island Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ...


This song is also played as the closing track every Friday and Saturday night on Suggs' Party Classics show on Virgin Radio in the UK. Suggs can refer to: Graham McPherson, British ska musician nicknamed Suggs. ... Virgin Radio, originally known as Virgin 1215, is one of the UKs three Independent National Radio stations. ...


The song is also traditionally played at the closing of the annual Commencement Ceremonies of Columbia University in New York.


Other recordings

In 1986, the band Queen recorded a partial version of this song for the soundtrack to the film Highlander. Sung by Freddie Mercury, an avowed Liza Minnelli fan, it carried a feel reminiscent of classic rock. It was used in the sequence in which The Kurgan drove down the wrong side of the highway to the final battle, running over pedestrians and playing chicken. It has never been released. Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, singer Freddie Mercury and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... Highlander is a 1986 film directed by Russell Mulcahy and based on a story by Gregory Widen. ... Freddie Mercury (born Farrokh Bulsara; 5 September 1946 – 24 November 1991) was a British musician, best known as the lead singer of the rock band Queen (inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001). ...


The band Reel Big Fish also recorded an a capella version of the song on their album Cheer Up! (2002) Reel Big Fish is an American ska punk band, best known for the 1997 hit Sell Out. ... Cheer Up! is the fourth full length release from ska/punk band, Reel Big Fish. ...


In March 2006 Michael Bolton covered the number on his Frank Sinatra tribute album "Bolton Swings Sinatra". Michael Bolotin (born February 26, 1953), better known as Michael Bolton, is an American singer-songwriter, known for his soft rock ballads and tenor vocals. ... Bolton Swings Sinatra is an album by Michael Bolton. ...


References

  1. ^ http://www.npr.org/programs/morning/features/patc/newyorknewyork/

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Theme from New York, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (962 words)
The song has been embraced as a celebration of New York City, and is often heard at New York-area social events, such as weddings and Bar Mitzvahs.
Many sports teams in the New York area have played this song in their arenas/stadiums, but the New York Yankees are the most prominent example.
It replaced "Sidewalks of New York" as the horse race's signature song, although the latter tune is still sung by the on-track crowd before the race.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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